jdege

So, I bought a boat

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So, I bought a boat.

IMG_0463_copy_756x1008.thumb.jpg.1cc5c30b4d9d6be71fff9725ee8963a2.jpg

 

It's Alan Vaitses' take on the classic L.F. Herreshoff Meadowlark.

37 foot length, 8 foot beam, draws 20 inches with the leeboards up.

 

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2 minutes ago, ROADKILL666 said:

Good for you.Now here’s your cookie.

That sondes licke somthinge Crap Game woude saye.......

d5d7b277f355900d3fd414a764967b6a.jpg

:)

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tough crowd, tough crowd, but how about a hearty fuck off, and a well deserved show us some tits ?

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3 minutes ago, Albatros said:

tough crowd, tough crowd, but how about a hearty fuck off, and a well deserved show us some tits ?

tackes oune to no oune Albey............                    :)

Plusse on the tittes...........    :)

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Forward swept spreaders.

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39 minutes ago, Albatros said:

tough crowd, tough crowd, but how about a hearty fuck off, and a well deserved show us some tits ?

Yes, let's see those forward swept spreaders.

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Just now, Varan said:

Yes, let's see those forward swept spreaders.

as long as the companionway is not offset, the horror !!

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Lose the rig and take the inland route 

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3 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

              :)

Plusse on the tittes...........    :)

limmie helps a bro out

 

 

Minka.jpg

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4 hours ago, jdege said:

So, I bought a boat.

IMG_0463_copy_756x1008.thumb.jpg.1cc5c30b4d9d6be71fff9725ee8963a2.jpg

 

It's Alan Vaitses' take on the classic L.F. Herreshoff Meadowlark.

37 foot length, 8 foot beam, draws 20 inches with the leeboards up.

 

Those are weird fenders. You should get some normal ones.

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48 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Lose the rig and take the inland route 

No need. The masts are on tabernacles. One person can raise and lower them unassisted with nothing but the windlass and winches onboard.

She should work well on the ICW. One of her sisters made the loop a couple of years ago.

SV SkinnyDipper Powerboaters become Loopers on a Meadowlark 37

Personally, I want to get her to the Bahamas.

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3 hours ago, FixinGit said:

Forward swept spreaders.

May look like it, from the angle of the photo, but there's no sweep either forward or back.IMG_0464_copy_812x878.thumb.jpg.277194dd357e13575e02fac58bff539e.jpg

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21 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Those are weird fenders. You should get some normal ones.

If I had normal "fenders" I'd need either a keel or a centerboard.

With a keel I'd not be able to run her up on a beach. And she's too narrow to cut her cabin in half with a centerboard trunk.

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Have fun with it, I’ve seen a few sail by dragging their Leeboards and enjoying gunkholes

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17 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

You're not helping.

Juste smaille and waive.......

maxresdefault.jpg

(gettes wourse if you complaine)                            :)

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15 hours ago, jdege said:

So, I bought a boat.

IMG_0463_copy_756x1008.thumb.jpg.1cc5c30b4d9d6be71fff9725ee8963a2.jpg

 

It's Alan Vaitses' take on the classic L.F. Herreshoff Meadowlark.

37 foot length, 8 foot beam, draws 20 inches with the leeboards up.

 

Congratulations! looks like you have some work ahead of you but you bought a boat so you must like work! 

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16 hours ago, jdege said:

So, I bought a boat.

IMG_0463_copy_756x1008.thumb.jpg.1cc5c30b4d9d6be71fff9725ee8963a2.jpg

 

It's Alan Vaitses' take on the classic L.F. Herreshoff Meadowlark.

37 foot length, 8 foot beam, draws 20 inches with the leeboards up.

 

Congrads! Once you get it squared away - That would be a very good ICW boat. 

Some guys do not understand why you might have the best of both worlds. There is no teaching them what they can not understand. Let me help with your submitted photo.

Screen Shot 2020-10-15 at 9.21.52 AM.jpg

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Please someone press 'autodestruct' before things get even worse.

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Ummmm  What's it rate??

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23 minutes ago, shaggy said:

Ummmm  What's it rate??

Finally! A Sailing Anarchy post with some goddam common sense!

But seriously congrats on the Meadowlark. Potential great boat. There's one near us, smallish diesel inboard, see them out motor-sailing around some times. It does look a bit rough, was it ever fully finished and in commission?

FB- Doug

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I love it.  Learn to sail it well and know all the positive aspects and the negative aspects.  

A serious gunkholing champion is in the making.  Applause! 

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46 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Finally! A Sailing Anarchy post with some goddam common sense!

But seriously congrats on the Meadowlark. Potential great boat. There's one near us, smallish diesel inboard, see them out motor-sailing around some times. It does look a bit rough, was it ever fully finished and in commission?

FB- Doug

Meadowlarks were traditionally very simply-fitted boats. Curlew is no different. She spent many years sailing the US east coast, making annual trips from Maine to the Bahamas and back.

The guy I bought her from bought her 20 years ago, had the trailer build, and trucked her to Minnesota. (She's trailerable without permits, which is nice.) He's sailed her on the Lakes Michigan and Superior, but for the last five years or so she's been sitting in his back yard as a bit of a project boat.

There's work to do, but not that much. She has a Yanmar 3GM30 that needs a new impeller, and the running rigging needs to be removed, cleaned, and inspected. And all her nav lights have been pulled and tossed and the replacements are sitting in boxes in the cabin. Fortunately, working on the masts is simple, compared to most, since I can bring them up and down by myself.

Aside from that she should sail.

Well, there's a marine head and no holding tank, and I'm going to have to do something with that. Perhaps just remove it, so long as I'm just day sailing on a local lake. Having it in place, even unused, could cause problems if I'm ever inspected.

Though there's a lot I'm thinking I might want to do. I want, eventually, to be able to live aboard her. For multi-week trips, at least. But I'm doing nothing beyond getting her fit for the water of it until I've sailed her for a season.

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2 hours ago, Black Jack said:

Congrads! Once you get it squared away - That would be a very good ICW boat. 

Some guys do not understand why you might have the best of both worlds. There is no teaching them what they can not understand. Let me help with your submitted photo.

Screen Shot 2020-10-15 at 9.21.52 AM.jpg

 

71725E6B-0A09-44CF-9828-8870E55AB4B0.gif

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Have fun!

Being out on the water is step #1

All the rest are just refinements to the fun, safety and expenses.

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1 hour ago, jdege said:

Well, there's a marine head and no holding tank, and I'm going to have to do something with that. Perhaps just remove it, so long as I'm just day sailing on a local lake. Having it in place, even unused, could cause problems if I'm ever inspected.

Great candidate for a composting head!  Get rid of those through-hulls and simplify your life!

I just got a second airhead delivered (yesterday) to replace the one remaining marine head in our trawler.  Love 'em!

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4 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

 

Is that what you use to masturbate?  :P

 

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13 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

Is that what you use to masturbate?  :P

  

Never owned a sock puppet. Perhaps it's yours "jd"? :lol:

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2 hours ago, Windward said:

Have fun!

Being out on the water is step #1

All the rest are just refinements to the fun, safety and expenses.

I've always figured that the first rule of boating was to stay in the boat.

And the second is to keep the water out of the boat.

And that all else was optional.

But I suppose there is a zeroth rule - have a boat.

 

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Steel multifolds are relatively easy to produce but very very slow.
A 4 knot shit box.
 

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When you cruise, 4 knots is a lot 

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53 minutes ago, Schakel said:

Steel multifolds are relatively easy to produce but very very slow.
A 4 knot shit box.
 

It will not exceed the hull speed, but a long water line combined with a flat bottom certainly does not mean that it will not exceed 4knots just because it is built out of steel. Yes some chined steel multihulls are absolute shit. The Herreshoff design does not fall in that category.

This boat is not exactly my cup of tea either, but for certain purposes it is perfect.

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23 hours ago, Albatros said:

tough crowd, tough crowd, but how about a hearty fuck off, and a well deserved show us some tits ?

Gosh mate. I hope he has thicker skin than lord Ian the Dubinator. And for those of you who missed it Albatros's traditional greeting began one of the great SA threads. Can't find it using the search function but it is a piece of shit after all.

 

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50 minutes ago, AnotherSailor said:

It will not exceed the hull speed, but a long water line combined with a flat bottom certainly does not mean that it will not exceed 4knots just because it is built out of steel. Yes some chined steel multihulls are absolute shit. The Herreshoff design does not fall in that category.

This boat is not exactly my cup of tea either, but for certain purposes it is perfect.

Herreshoff's original design was 33' in wood.

Allan Vaitses' is 37' in fiberglass.

I talked to a number of owners and former owners, before I pulled the trigger, and they all said they sail well. (Through they're a bit of a pig, at slow speeds under power - The offset prop is alongside the keel, not behind it.)

One said he was routinely winning club races, after he put a 125% genoa on her.

We'll see in the spring.

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Meadow Larks are one of the great sleeper designs.  The uneducated respond as the first dozen or so responses you received on this thread.  You should read “Sensible Cruising Designs” by the man himself.  LFH designed boats for very specific reasons, and you have to respect the limits to get them to perform as well as they should.  Keep her simple and clean, use the diesel to go upwind, and always have a place to anchor.   

The only area where you can probably do much better is in the cross section shaping of the leeboards.  Something which is true of almost every centerboard and rudder of all traditional boats.

SHC

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I support most boat purchase decisions, but my, what a terrible looking shitbox that is.   GETEMOUT

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10 hours ago, Black Jack said:

Congrads! Once you get it squared away - That would be a very good ICW boat. 

Some guys do not understand why you might have the best of both worlds. There is no teaching them what they can not understand. Let me help with your submitted photo.

Screen Shot 2020-10-15 at 9.21.52 AM.jpg

Lifting those pounders with the right arm does wonders elsewhere. Perhaps she needs a more balanced diet. 

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18 hours ago, jdege said:

Meadowlarks were traditionally very simply-fitted boats. Curlew is no different. She spent many years sailing the US east coast, making annual trips from Maine to the Bahamas and back.

The guy I bought her from bought her 20 years ago, had the trailer build, and trucked her to Minnesota. (She's trailerable without permits, which is nice.) He's sailed her on the Lakes Michigan and Superior, but for the last five years or so she's been sitting in his back yard as a bit of a project boat.

There's work to do, but not that much. She has a Yanmar 3GM30 that needs a new impeller, and the running rigging needs to be removed, cleaned, and inspected. And all her nav lights have been pulled and tossed and the replacements are sitting in boxes in the cabin. Fortunately, working on the masts is simple, compared to most, since I can bring them up and down by myself.

Aside from that she should sail.

Well, there's a marine head and no holding tank, and I'm going to have to do something with that. Perhaps just remove it, so long as I'm just day sailing on a local lake. Having it in place, even unused, could cause problems if I'm ever inspected.

Though there's a lot I'm thinking I might want to do. I want, eventually, to be able to live aboard her. For multi-week trips, at least. But I'm doing nothing beyond getting her fit for the water of it until I've sailed her for a season.

Don't take this wrong, but "simple" is not the same as "raggedy-ass." Taping clear plastic over the ports is only a good move for a temp repair, leaving it there for years so the tape residue has to be scraped or sanded off is a step or two below raggedy-ass. Not a judgement, I got a boat in my back yard right now that I let go and is now in rough shape.

I think this would be a really fun boat. You almost wouldn't even need a dinghy, just pull it right up to the beach. Simple can be great, my wife and I did long weekends and some longer cruises on a small boat with mostly battery powered lights, a camp stove, and a porta-potty (get a good one, the cheap ones are awful). Check out Dylan Winter's videos, he does some awesome creek crawling and camp cruising.

And a mizzen staysail, you need a mizzen staysail! That's the whole point of having two masts, yes?

FB- Doug

 

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@jdege  Congratulations on your new boat.  

After reading the comments here and your stated future plans on the ICW, I think you made the wrong choice.  

What you really need is one of these.  Easily trailerable, quite stylish and comfortable, plenty of horsepower for those calm days, and it can handle anything the ICW will throw your way.  As a bonus you will have a lot less work and more time to sail by not having to restore the boat that you bought.  

Give it some serious thought, eh?  You can thank me later.

MacGregor 26 - Wikipedia

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16 hours ago, jdege said:

Herreshoff's original design was 33' in wood.

Allan Vaitses' is 37' in fiberglass.

I talked to a number of owners and former owners, before I pulled the trigger, and they all said they sail well. (Through they're a bit of a pig, at slow speeds under power - The offset prop is alongside the keel, not behind it.)

One said he was routinely winning club races, after he put a 125% genoa on her.

We'll see in the spring.

I would not call it a pig. Pigs just lay in the mud. This boat will not track at slow speeds under power, unless the wind is dead ahead or astern. You will need those leeboards when you go slow under power. Don't be afraid to open the throttle during a turn in tight quarters with the wind blowing you sideways. 

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So how do you deal with the triatic stay when doing this easy mast lowering ??

 

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8 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

And a mizzen staysail, you need a mizzen staysail! That's the whole point of having two masts, yes?

Two masts gives me all sorts of fun possibilities.

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4 hours ago, AnotherSailor said:

I would not call it a pig. Pigs just lay in the mud. This boat will not track at slow speeds under power, unless the wind is dead ahead or astern. You will need those leeboards when you go slow under power. Don't be afraid to open the throttle during a turn in tight quarters with the wind blowing you sideways. 

One of the owners said he used a special bow thruster - a 16-foot oak pole he'd hang from the spreaders.

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2 hours ago, Essex said:

So how do you deal with the triatic stay when doing this easy mast lowering ??

 

It's the traitic that lifts the mizzen.

It runs from the peak of the main, through a pulley at the peak of the mizzen, then down to the deck.

When lifting the mizzen, you tie a block to the base of the mainmast, and run the triatic stay through it and back to the main winch.

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6 hours ago, AnotherSailor said:
22 hours ago, jdege said:

Herreshoff's original design was 33' in wood.

Allan Vaitses' is 37' in fiberglass.

I talked to a number of

owners and former owners, before I pulled the trigger, and they all said they sail well. (Through they're a bit of a pig, at slow speeds under power - The offset prop is alongside the keel, not behind it.)

One said he was routinely winning club races, after he put a 125% genoa on her.

We'll see in the spring.

I would not call it a pig. Pigs just lay in the mud. This boat will not track at slow speeds under power, unless the wind is dead ahead or astern. You will need those leeboards when you go slow under power. Don't be afraid to open the throttle during a turn in tight quarters with the wind blowing you sideways. 

PHRF in New England is 216, that's not a pig for a 1930s design, in it's SA/d range, with leeboards.

Will it pace a 12-Meter close hauled? Of course not. Skid downwind like a beachball, or sideways in turns? Hell yes and twice on Sunday.

Nice looking boat, LFH had a great eye IMHO.

I've always liked this design, would be a great east coast cruiser, or any place with beaches and/or shallow creeks. Never been motivated to actually own one because I tend to go for the two other ends of the spectrum, racers or gaff schooners. I can't decide if I want a FT10 (or a Hendo) next or a gaff topsail schooner.

FB- Doug

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how much would a new suite of sails for her cost?

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15 minutes ago, MikeR80 said:

how much would a new suite of sails for her cost?

Definitely should get some black 3Di sails.  That boat will scream.

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15 minutes ago, MikeR80 said:

how much would a new suite of sails for her cost?

Don't really know.

She came with two sets, one twenty years old and the other brand new.

So I'm not going to need to worry for a few years.

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Nice! not so fast rides are far more tolerable w a set of crispy sails, imo

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On 10/17/2020 at 9:34 AM, Steam Flyer said:

PHRF in New England is 216, that's not a pig for a 1930s design, in it's SA/d range, with leeboards.

Will it pace a 12-Meter close hauled? Of course not. Skid downwind like a beachball, or sideways in turns? Hell yes and twice on Sunday.

Nice looking boat, LFH had a great eye IMHO.

I've always liked this design, would be a great east coast cruiser, or any place with beaches and/or shallow creeks. Never been motivated to actually own one because I tend to go for the two other ends of the spectrum, racers or gaff schooners. I can't decide if I want a FT10 (or a Hendo) next or a gaff topsail schooner.

FB- Doug

Get the topsail schooner. It was a toss-up whether I built one or my current boat.

FKT

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On 10/16/2020 at 2:02 PM, jdege said:

One of the owners said he used a special bow thruster - a 16-foot oak pole he'd hang from the spreaders.

Very familiar with these, as I grew up in the Netherlands and sailed on "platbodems" (flatbottoms). Pushing a bow around solo might not always be an option, so sometimes you just use it to hold the bow where it is (judging the right angle is an acquired skill) and let the stern turn around on the wind or current. 

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On 10/19/2020 at 11:18 AM, AnotherSailor said:

Very familiar with these, as I grew up in the Netherlands and sailed on "platbodems" (flatbottoms). Pushing a bow around solo might not always be an option, so sometimes you just use it to hold the bow where it is (judging the right angle is an acquired skill) and let the stern turn around on the wind or current. 

Are you aware of any information on what techniques to use, when poling a boat around the slips?

Anyone have a YouTube video?

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Practice, practice, practice. I don't know of any instructional videos or other instructions. This is one of those things you just need to do over and over again to get a hang of it.

You need to be able to make judgements about the speed of your boat, the depth of the water, and length of the pole. If you get it wrong the first time (for example because the water is much deeper than you thought) you should be able to correct your mistake on the second try. 45 degree angle is optimal for pushing. If your boat is for example moving sideways and you want to stop that movement plant the pole further away, so that by the time you make contact with the bottom the angle is close to 45 degrees. Plant it too far and you will not hit the bottom, plant it too close and it will be under the boat. Where you stand on the deck is also important. at the front you have more leverage, but this can be tricky, especially if the boat is going backwards. Closer to the mast is often preferred. Using a dock or wall to push off on is attractive, because it is firm, as opposed to most surfaces under water. However, if the pole slips you will fall on the deck or in the water (in a potentially precarious spot between the boat and dock). 

They can be super handy though. Just practice on a day without wind, then with a light breeze, etc. Sooner or later you will need it when you are stuck in a difficult spot with wind blowing you to the dock. Push off the bow and go!

 

 

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I don't doubt that I'll be able to figure it out, given time and a safe place to practice.

But come spring I'm going to be launching a boat I've never sailed, off of a trailer I've never launched from, with an engine I've never run, and a prop design i know doesn't handle well in tight quarters.

 

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25 minutes ago, jdege said:

I don't doubt that I'll be able to figure it out, given time and a safe place to practice.

But come spring I'm going to be launching a boat I've never sailed, off of a trailer I've never launched from, with an engine I've never run, and a prop design i know doesn't handle well in tight quarters.

 

May as well go for the full deal and wear a blindfold the whole time.

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5 hours ago, Ishmael said:

May as well go for the full deal and wear a blindfold the whole time.

Anytime you do anything, there's always a first time.

The secret is to do we much as you can to learn and prepare, first.

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Henry Ford said "if there is a thing a man believes he cannot do he is probably right".

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20 hours ago, jdege said:

Anytime you do anything, there's always a first time.

The secret is to do we much as you can to learn and prepare, first.

My memory is so bad it's always the first time. After I have thoroughly fucked it up, I remember how I fucked it up the same way last time.

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Our family had an original Meadowlark built to design specs back in the '70s out in Seattle.  Port Offord cedar on oak with ply decks and coach roof.  It was a fun boat, simple and easy to sail.  Used to race against a neighbor's Cal 39- we could beat him on a reach and downwind as long as he didn't fly the chute.  Upwind was close but he could point higher.  We'd modified the leeboards making them asymmetrical which helped.  Wooden masts were a bit boxy but it had decent sails with the short gaffs, maybe 30"- you could crank on the peak halyards and get a decent shape in the sail.  The hull shape on those isn't that far off what we see today- arc bottom and slab sides, fine entry and a flat run aft.  We never had it out in a real blow but I can easily see it surfing once some waves built.  It was a bear to steer with a large unbalanced rudder and about 6+' of tiller but when trimmed properly would self steer/track like a freight train anywhere from 60-120 degrees for hours.  Had an outboard in a well, 15 hp, would power at about 7 knots.  I hated that motor.  Yes, pulling up the weighted lee boards kept you in shape and while you could leave them both down when short tacking it struck my dad as the equivalent of leaving your bumpers out, a definite no-no.  A fun boat with lots of good memories.  No winches, 2:1 on the jib sheets and special bronze snatch blocks on the halyards that came into play for the final tensioning.  But Florida is the place to have it.  How one made it to the deep waters of the PNW I'll never know, it certainly wasn't the place to show off its most positive attributes.  My dad always dreamed of getting one of the Vaistses glass boats but he eventually moved on to a bigger power boat. 

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