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I have a 38' sailboat that is 15 years old.  A couple of years ago I started  to annually replace a couple of lines on the boat, as we race pretty extensively.  Consequently, I have a box full of old dock lines, jib sheets, tack lines etc.  None are perfect, but not so bad you would just throw away.  What do I do with these?

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Strip the covers and keep using the cores. You can slide good parts of the cover to high wear areas where they contact winches, stoppers, etc. and bury or stitch and whip the cover ends to keep them in place. I've successfully doubled and tripled the life of "worn out" halyards, sheets, and preventers.

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Donate to a sailing school or sea scouts or sea cadets. They are always looking for line for tieing up dingys, towing  boats on no wind days, knot practice. Our sail school has gone through hundreds of miles of line in 50yrs, we have no idea where it all goes. 

 

or google dominatrix in your area, they may have a use.....

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Maybe find a boat in your club who is just starting out and/or running a lower budget program and see if they could use them. 

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Cardboard box and a sign with four letters has always worked for me. 

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6 minutes ago, mgs said:

Cardboard box and a sign with four letters has always worked for me. 

Ditto. Back when we had a creek load of liveaboards, disposal of  stuff was easy.

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^^^^ We were tied up at the Harbor Patrol docks, where you can get 14 days for really cheap (by Ca standards) temporary dockage. Sorted thru all the string, came up with three milk crates worth of stuff the boat would never use. Broken, covers worn thru, too short, duplicate, whatever. Put it out on the dock & the denizens went wild.

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Not 100% but oxiclean does a great job cleaning up old lines without damaging the material. Soak in a tote or bucket for a bit.  Pretty much any dot org sailing or boating organization loves this stuff, line is super spendy so it's a big help.

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Yep, recycle it into other projects.  

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Thanks guys for the suggestions.  I put the old lines in a box with the FREE sign on it and took it down to the slips where the local watermen dock their boats.  All of the lines were taken by the end of the day.  

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I have rounded am enough marks way ahead only to bust a line or fitting snd sit as the fleet has sailed by. 
If I know a line is good, I keep using it. If it is about to fail, I sure as hell don’t pass that booby trap to a fellow sailor. 
 

There are lots of uses for crappy strings  but few of those have to do with sailboats. 

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Do what the thrifty racers do around my club and use them as dock lines. Just make sure to put the money saved on docklines into fiberglass repair supplies.

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Dock lines meant to be stretchy, not a good home for old sheets and halyards. Same goes for recycling into dog leashes.

Oops just saw that about fibreglass....

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If the cover is in decent shape.  Pull the core.  Tuck the cover inside at one end to make an eye and then stitch lock the eye.  End up using for sail ties and general use non-critical tie downs.

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On 11/3/2020 at 7:36 PM, Essex said:

Dock lines meant to be stretchy, not a good home for old sheets and halyards. Same goes for recycling into dog leashes.

Oops just saw that about fibreglass....

Yes but if you tie your boat up correctly no line should impart shock loads.

If that's unavoidable, you should put a snubber in the line, and not rely on stretchy line. I like the ones that the line wraps around in a spiral.

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