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My Dad died about 18 months ago; he had been a lifelong sailor, and so we decided that the best thing to do with his ashes was to put them into the sea. I'm posting this to note what we did, to maybe help anybody out in a similar position in the future, and also for others to post about the laws and requirement in their location.  

Legal position. - IANAL. However, the advice we received is that scattering ashes at sea requires no specific license. I don't know about the position wrt privately owned rivers and harbours (Beaulieu river, Bembridge harbour etc).  (Burials at sea are possible in the UK in certain specific locations (off the Needles amongst others), but there are particular requirements for coffins and licenses.)

AIUI, the Environment Agency require that everything put into the water is biodegradable. So no wreaths or flower arrangements using plastic or metal parts. 

The choices we had were to scatter the ashes themselves into the sea, or to use a biodegradable urn. Googling for "water urn ashes" found a number of options. There seem to be two broad types - lightweight, paper type envelopes which float for a bit and then sink. Or heavier urns that sink more quickly, and then dissolve. (The pink one below is carved rock salt). 

Journey-Earthurn-Navy-w-Mini-Web-Sq-Main.jpg?size=425x421&lossy=1&strip=1&webp=1Rock-salt-water-urn-group.jpg.86047b54002e2e2170c35ecb98578adf.jpg

We went with one of the faster sinking options, as we didn't like the idea of just watching it bob away. Ordered it online and had it sent to the undertakers, who dealt with the ashes. We put into the sea uptide of a navigation mark, so that fishing trawlers wouldn't pick it up as it dissolves - I checked with the harbourmaster for a good place. Said a word or two, and then back to shore for a drink to his memory. A good Dad, and a sailor who didn't believe in shouting. 

If you really want to go for it, you can get a viking longboat to set on fire. Seriously. 

Viking-Longboat-Urn.jpg?size=500x500&lossy=1&strip=1&webp=1

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Presuming Ed said:

If you really want to go for it, you can get a viking longboat to set on fire. Seriously. 

Viking-Longboat-Urn.jpg?size=500x500&lossy=1&strip=1&webp=1

 

 

 

I wish I'd known when I had the need a few years ago.

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Our club has a large anchor out on a plinth on the lawn with a ring of bricks as edging.  Club members whose ashes have been scattered at sea can have a brick with their name added to the group.  

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In my neck of the woods, across the atlantic, scattering ashes is sort of regulated, meaning that you can do that but from designated ships and in presence of an official from the city where you depart, he/she/it will note the time and exact location and give you a certificate.

However.... grin.... being the unruly lot we are, several years ago my brother in law calls me saying that his father just died and one of his last wishes was that his ashes should be scattered over the sea while (believe it or not) playing Barry White's "the one and only" ... so he asks me if I'm willing to take him and his missus (my sister) and his sister and her husband out to do that. So I took them out on a calm sunny day, motored to a red buoy about a mile from the river entrance and while Barry White's song was  wafting over the waves my brother in law scattered the ashes around the buoy while his sister was scattering rose petals.

The man's name was Gaston, since that day the buoy is Gaston's buoy and each time I pass there I simply say something like "hi Gaston, how's things going ?" sometimes to the utter surprise of guest on board who of course think the skipper has gone bonkers, grin.

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we did it from my boat, I am sure you would need some kind kind of permit, etc to do it but fuck them! there is a some kind of permit or cost for everything you do in life from when you are born to when you die. Being a sailor we did it classy with a toast and some words said then done in a way to not harm anything.

 

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We did it maybe 6-8 weeks ago for a friend of a friend. The funeral home took care of the permitting for SF Bay.

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1 hour ago, Albatros said:

In my neck of the woods, across the atlantic, scattering ashes is sort of regulated, meaning that you can do that but from designated ships and in presence of an official from the city where you depart, he/she/it will note the time and exact location and give you a certificate.

However.... grin.... being the unruly lot we are, several years ago my brother in law calls me saying that his father just died and one of his last wishes was that his ashes should be scattered over the sea while (believe it or not) playing Barry White's "the one and only" ... so he asks me if I'm willing to take him and his missus (my sister) and his sister and her husband out to do that. So I took them out on a calm sunny day, motored to a red buoy about a mile from the river entrance and while Barry White's song was  wafting over the waves my brother in law scattered the ashes around the buoy while his sister was scattering rose petals.

The man's name was Gaston, since that day the buoy is Gaston's buoy and each time I pass there I simply say something like "hi Gaston, how's things going ?" sometimes to the utter surprise of guest on board who of course think the skipper has gone bonkers, grin.

Yes, please be careful as you don't want to make it a worse situation.

I like to be scattered out at Santa Cruz Island but because it is a Marine Sanctuary it may be frowned upon.

Rest in Peace.

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2 hours ago, PaulK said:

Our club has a large anchor out on a plinth on the lawn with a ring of bricks as edging.  Club members whose ashes have been scattered at sea can have a brick with their name added to the group.  

Do they have to keep paying dues? 

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Having scattered for friends gone too soon, one unpleasant lesson learned is that scattering on windy days can have the unintended consequence of ash blowing back on board and on celebrants.  Be careful with your "tossing to the winds" technique.  

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18 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Be careful with your "tossing to the winds" technique.  

You mean like this?

 

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One thing I learned at a ceremony at sea recently: consider the sea state, especially if you make fancy arrangements. A puking funeral party is not ceremonial.

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My oldest grandson knows my wishes..... In the water and no bagpipes  

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Some friends asked if I could take them out on the bay to scatter the ashes of their mother.  Of course.

So we motored out, 15knot breeze, all good.  The guy doing the deed took the lid off and sprinkled it into the piss.

The wind shadow swirled the ashes all over the boat and those in it.  Grit between the teeth stuff. 

Took me ages to clean it up.

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We splashed my Dad in LI Sound seven years ago. 40’ sailboat with 8 friends and family. Very special memories. We did a big ceremony in the cemetery with a headstone for show. 
 

It never occurred to me to ask permission to throw a few handfuls in the ocean. Do any of those fuckers ask to throw sewage, plastic, or apple cores in the drink? What about pissing off the back of the boat?

This is definitely one of those fuck you moments in one’s life. 

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at least in the US, burial at sea of cremains must take place outside the 3 mile line and only on "ocean waters" at least 600 feet deep. It must then be reported to the EPA within 30 days of burial.

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Guy I knew had a cabin cruiser, and he - and his friends - had reached an age where parents were passing away en masse. Poor chap was besieged by almost weekly requests for funerals at sea, even by simple acquaintances once the word got around - it seems this is considered very romantic, even for land lubbers

And needless to say, the wind has a way of playing tricks ...

 

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17 minutes ago, bloodshot said:

at least in the US, burial at sea of cremains must take place outside the 3 mile line and only on "ocean waters" at least 600 feet deep. It must then be reported to the EPA within 30 days of burial.

not true. Maybe true of non-permitted disposal, but you can get a permit to dispose within the confines of SF Bay.

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7 hours ago, Presuming Ed said:

My Dad died about 18 months ago; he had been a lifelong sailor, and so we decided that the best thing to do with his ashes was to put them into the sea.

Sorrey foire youre losse, you our a thouhtfulle son.                       

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Many years ago I got a call to help some friends who had a very new-to-them boat, and had gotten a request to take a family out to scatter the ashes of a young woman who had been murdered. They wanted some help considering the group that would be on board.

When we went out, the family had just learned that the killer was in fact the woman’s husband, who stabbed her while their young son watched.

I will never forget that experience.

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3 hours ago, Cristoforo said:

Do they have to keep paying dues? 

The really good members set up foundations to provide for launches, instructors, RC boats, and landscape maintenance.

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16 minutes ago, PaulK said:

The really good members set up foundations to provide for launches, instructors, RC boats, and landscape maintenance.

You mean the ‘very rich members’. 
that’s nice 

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2 hours ago, CaptainAhab said:

We splashed my Dad in LI Sound seven years ago. 40’ sailboat with 8 friends and family. Very special memories. We did a big ceremony in the cemetery with a headstone for show. 
 

It never occurred to me to ask permission to throw a few handfuls in the ocean. Do any of those fuckers ask to throw sewage, plastic, or apple cores in the drink? What about pissing off the back of the boat?

This is definitely one of those fuck you moments in one’s life. 

Thank you and dad  for improving the water quality of LIS! 

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1 minute ago, Cristoforo said:
18 minutes ago, PaulK said:

The really good members set up foundations to provide for launches, instructors, RC boats, and landscape maintenance.

You mean the ‘very rich members’. 
that’s nice 

You maye allso mentione "withe no familey thay licke", Ime am thickeng theire is allotte angere theire.                           :)

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There is a buoy 3/4 of the way up the course in the Chicago Mackinac Race where many a sailor's ashes have been disbursed off race boats. Our departed friends are having a massive party there we all believe.  Some pour alcohol in the water as they pass the buoy each year as an homage to their family or friends who have departed.

At some point in the future, it'll be a reef.  I know of 3 others who plan to go there.

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We told the junior sailors the bodies were buried under the bricks. Gives us a  kid free area to relax in. 

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I once scattered ashes of an old sailor on Tampa Bay, Florida within sight of his brother in the nearby rest home from my International 10 Square Meter Canoe, Tardis. Really careful not to capsize.

 

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Once, while on the Washington State Ferry from Mukilteo to Clinton (Whidbey Island), the ferry stopped and the captain announced that there would be a brief pause× for a funeral service. A previously roped off deck was full of people, while flowers (and I did not see whatelse) were tossed into the sea. A few minutes later it was full speed+ with us arriving on schedule. I thought that was pretty cool.

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20 minutes ago, sailwriter said:

I once scattered ashes of an old sailor on Tampa Bay, Florida within sight of his brother in the nearby rest home from my International 10 Square Meter Canoe, Tardis. Really careful not to capsize.

 

:lol: my brother, his wife, and I went out on windsurfers to scatter dad’s ashes- off of Boston Harbor Washington - not much wind, and my brother insisted on going out on his new f2 Lightening, and kept on falling in while going out to the official scattering spot, so he was soaked by the time we got there, and of course he insisted on being the one to scatter the ashes, and just as he scattered them, a gentle gust came up (Doing a 180), and he was coated with ash.  Head to toe.  And it stuck.  I was trying not to laugh.  His soon to be ex wife was not even trying.  He dove in 3 times, to try to wash the ash off,  and still was coated.  So we went back in to the beach we launched from which belonged to a buddy of my dad, and he hosed off the ash.  My brother left soon after that, but I hung around, and a couple of other sailors showed up who hung with my dad, and we had a nice wake.  That and the tide came in and took the remaining ashes away.  We all agreed that Dad was having a good laugh, wherever he might be.

So yes, don’t capsize.
 

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6 hours ago, bloodshot said:

at least in the US, burial at sea of cremains must take place outside the 3 mile line and only on "ocean waters" at least 600 feet deep. It must then be reported to the EPA within 30 days of burial.

i would think that would pertain to burying a body at sea,  scattering ashes probably doesn't have such restrictions..

Sorry for your loss PE..

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One shite, dead lobster or fish , a handful of dirt would effect the ocean environment than 1 dead guy’s ashes. 
 

Based on this scientific thread roughly 50% of the time you carry some of him back to land on your clothes. 
 

To quote my Dad in response to some yahoo complaining about burying his ashes at sea: “Fuck them and the horse they road in on” as well Hawkeye Pearce “Finest kind” and Doc Holiday “I’m your Huckleberry”
 

 

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The square rigger that I crewed on offered this service. Not only did I crew for a few ceremonies, but when my father passed away a few years ago, we scattered his ashes from on board. Each party could organise their own ceremony, supported by full catering on board and even specific music to be played.

My farther's trip was just with the immediate family, we had a short ceremony with just a few words spoken, followed by an Indonesian 'rijsttafel' meal (my father was born there) and ended the day with a magnificent sail. Memorable day...

Can't recall ever hearing any type of regulations being mentioned...

My sister's ashes were scattered in her favorite place in Scotland - I recall her family being guite relieved once they were through customs into the UK without having to explain the presence of an urn in the car...

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@Presuming Ed

Good onya mate. My condolences for your loss.

Valhalla bound sounds good to me.

GBNF.

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Put a number over the side in Hobart races over the years.

The trick seems to be to pour from below the gunwale line & to leeward of course.

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Permits are strange.

With all the bushfires one wonders about the damage all those ashes are doing to the ocean quality.

My Mum died this afternoon. Sister want's a country burial so that's what it will be. My dads ashes go with her in the coffin.

I wanted an ashes scattering over the water where they had planned to retire, though dad's little boat has long gone.

So it goes.

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4 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

Permits are strange.

With all the bushfires one wonders about the damage all those ashes are doing to the ocean quality.

My Mum died this afternoon. Sister want's a country burial so that's what it will be. My dads ashes go with her in the coffin.

I wanted an ashes scattering over the water where they had planned to retire, though dad's little boat has long gone.

So it goes.

Sorry for your loss

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10 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

Permits are strange.

With all the bushfires one wonders about the damage all those ashes are doing to the ocean quality.

My Mum died this afternoon. Sister want's a country burial so that's what it will be. My dads ashes go with her in the coffin.

I wanted an ashes scattering over the water where they had planned to retire, though dad's little boat has long gone.

So it goes.

Thinking of you Meli.

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Permits?

My dad wanted his ashes spread in Lake Erie.  My brother kept some, the next two Macs my dad ended in both Michigan and Huron.  Some on the boat took it more seriously than my brother and me.  I later put some in the Pacific and Atlantic.  My dad was loved and would have loved what we did.  

My favorite story was a friend, fellow pilot who had a Cherokee 6, overhears some people at church talking about spreading some ashes in Lake Michigan and trying to figure out who they knew who had a boat.  He tells them, we can do this.  They get to altitude over the lake and he opens what we call the storm window, maybe 4 x 6 inches near the pilot.  He starts shoveling the cremains out this little window and what didn't blow back into the cabin, the bigger pieces, were banging off the stabilizer.  So, he lands with the parents looking for an eyewash, two kids crying, and he's looking at his stabilizer wondering who was going to pay for it.  I nearly shit myself when he told that story.  

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21 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

Permits are strange.

With all the bushfires one wonders about the damage all those ashes are doing to the ocean quality.

My Mum died this afternoon. Sister want's a country burial so that's what it will be. My dads ashes go with her in the coffin.

I wanted an ashes scattering over the water where they had planned to retire, though dad's little boat has long gone.

So it goes.

Very sorry.  Be prepared that the worse is yet to come.  I was cool when I had to actively deal with stuff like arrangements, memorials, etc.  Once that was over, my roller coaster hit the valley and it was dark.  And then, it gets better.

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My second favorite story was spreading Dick Rodseth's ashes in Lake Michigan.  Some folks from Lake Michigan might remember Dick.  So we take Vagary(Peterson 43) out and a good friend took his 44' out with the overflow.  A few words were said and we dumped ashes along with a lot of flowers and wreaths.  So we're done, right?  No, this little 4ktsb starts scooping up the flowers.  We double back and tell them it's a memorial.  The horror on their faces was terrible.  They docked in the same marina and to say the owner, who is a great guy, profusely apologized would be a vast understatement.  My favorite moment was that a long time crew member threw a Kit Kat into the memorial.  I remember a Mac race where I woke up for my watch and Dick was working his way through a Halloween sized bag of candy, I went on deck and told Mike, your father in law is below committing suicide.  

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44 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

Permits are strange.

With all the bushfires one wonders about the damage all those ashes are doing to the ocean quality.

My Mum died this afternoon. Sister want's a country burial so that's what it will be. My dads ashes go with her in the coffin.

I wanted an ashes scattering over the water where they had planned to retire, though dad's little boat has long gone.

So it goes.

Sorry to hear it. I still pick up the phone and start to dial my dad. But not too often anymore.

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So far, my younger brother and my mother.  Probably soon my elder brother.  Lessons learned - stern to the wind, ashes off the bow.  Otherwise, transom eddies result in ashes coming back aboard!  Double-enders may be different!

 

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not totally same but related, no thread hijack in mind ...

way back mid-80's while on apprentice run on a general cargo going from europe to south africa and back, when coming back from  south africa east coast to capetown and then back to europe, the captain diverted the ship more than 100 miles seaward, at a certain point we stopped, crew gathered on deck, several wreaths came out of the cooling room and were lowered gently into the sea.

so what was this all about ? I was wondering.... couple of years before a ship under same flag but from another company had perished at that spot, all gone down, or at least that was last known position, and is it was (or is) tradition, the next ship under same flag passing nearby would salute them properly

can tell you, most of those hardened tough sea dwelling people that we were had a tear somewhere in the corner of an eye, to this young one (at the time) it gave a lesson that to be buried at sea is where I want to end up with ... big grin ... food for fish, so for once I've been of use, yeah !! grin

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12 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Sorry to hear it. I still pick up the phone and start to dial my dad. But not too often anymore.

My best sailing buddy pasted away a little over a year ago...... For some reason,.....  I just can't delete his # from my phone.

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We delivered old Flos (104) back to the waters she swam during her good life in the river here. Laws against it but we let her go in a calm sea with light winds and no one ate ashes. 
 



 

 

DCE16CB1-543B-481F-B4FA-4F2B96BF79E1.jpeg

79FB6E69-ED61-4D63-8210-ABE74F760372.jpeg

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Perhaps it’s best to test the wind by pissing into it before coating the boat and oneself with cremated ashes. It kinda ruins what can be a special memorable event in ones life that is rare for most people to experience. 
 

I’ll put it in my will that ashes at sea is my final resting place. We got married at sea, so my wife won’t fight it. My kids would enjoy it, like I did with my Dad. 

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On 10/16/2020 at 12:43 PM, Raz'r said:

The funeral home took care of the permitting for SF Bay.

That's the way my family went, too.  We used the Neptune Society for 3 of our 4 family funerals: Dad, Mom, and older brother (who all died long before they should have).  My older sister (who also died prematurely) was the only one who didn't want to be 'buried at sea" and chose to have her ashes scattered in the Marin Headlands where she lived and hiked.  

The others are just outside the Golden Gate.  

 

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Lost my main grinder at 55 to serious drinking that ended up killing him (dissolved his organs into jelly).

Took the crew and his family out for burial about 4 miles east of Half Way Rock off Marblehead.

With a storm raging, it was a snotty ride out.  As we got set up for the burial, the water calmed, the wind let up, and it was like we were in the eye of the storm.

Everyone had their say before we put the ashes in the water.

As we headed in the storm started up again.

Spooky..

 

2 years later I had donated a sunset cruise on the boat as a prize for a charity auction.

As I was handing them a bottle of wine and asking if they would like tunes, the winner asked me to head for a specific spot just outside Salem Sound. No sails required.

Seas were up until we got to the spot the lady requested when again the water calmed.  The little old lady explained this is where her husband's ashes had been spread overboard several years earlier.  Her son who was a commercial sea captain had been at sea for dad's burial, but was with us for this trip.  After 15 minutes we headed back.  No sooner had i got them to the club dock when then storm returned with a vengeance.   they laughed saying dad was watching over them.   again Spooky

 

epa rules for burial at sea.   May also have local laws you need to follow

https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/burial-sea

 

 

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Back in 2010 we scattered my dad over his favorite sailing spot in the Upper Chesapeake. Too many people for our 32' Islander, so a friend volunteered his Sabre 426.  Beautiful but breezy day. Bald eagles circling overhead.  Will never forget. He taught me sailing as a kid and we sailed together for 50 years.  Gave me a gift I will always treasure. Think of him every time we round that point. 

dad.JPG

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On 10/17/2020 at 7:07 AM, astro said:

Some friends asked if I could take them out on the bay to scatter the ashes of their mother.  Of course.

So we motored out, 15knot breeze, all good.  The guy doing the deed took the lid off and sprinkled it into the piss.

The wind shadow swirled the ashes all over the boat and those in it.  Grit between the teeth stuff. 

Took me ages to clean it up.

I have done many scatterings - no charge to the families when any of our (ex) students turn their toes up.

You do need to wait until they have gone before you start hosing Uncle Harry's remains off the transom. The worst part if when they get to the end of the 'pour' and the teeth start rattling in the box.

I still have my parents in the pool shed 2 and 1 years respectively after they passed. Mum loved the beach but hated boats but Dad loved them both so we might chuck them in the surf one day. They seem quite happy there in the meantime.

A4957B55-FB6D-46BA-A301-28335004BEBA.jpeg

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On 10/17/2020 at 8:01 PM, Shortforbob said:

Permits are strange.

With all the bushfires one wonders about the damage all those ashes are doing to the ocean quality.

My Mum died this afternoon. Sister want's a country burial so that's what it will be. My dads ashes go with her in the coffin.

I wanted an ashes scattering over the water where they had planned to retire, though dad's little boat has long gone.

So it goes.

Only just saw this Meli. All the best. 

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1 hour ago, LB 15 said:

 

You do need to wait until they have gone before you start hosing Uncle Harry's remains off the transom.  The worst part if when they get to the end of the 'pour' and the teeth start rattling in the box.

 

 

Don't even ask about Buddhist cremations. 

You get the whole box rattling well  before the pour. DAMHIKT 

It's a story not fit for even me to post :D

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2 hours ago, LB 15 said:

I have done many scatterings - no charge to the families when any of our (ex) students turn their toes up.

You do need to wait until they have gone before you start hosing Uncle Harry's remains off the transom. The worst part if when they get to the end of the 'pour' and the teeth start rattling in the box.

I still have my parents in the pool shed 2 and 1 years respectively after they passed. Mum loved the beach but hated boats but Dad loved them both so we might chuck them in the surf one day. They seem quite happy there in the meantime.

A4957B55-FB6D-46BA-A301-28335004BEBA.jpeg

I surfed with Ma and Pa a couple of times, I was just a grommet though.

Legends they were/are.

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My dad said where he wanted to rest, in the water near their place.

But when mum went a few years later she ended up staying with my brother for a few years, waiting till we were all together.  Then we made the time.  It was a good day, real closure, a day on he water with the remains of that family generation.

I will end up in the same place.

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I had often thought that being tossed over somewhere off Tasman Is would be my choice.

But then UTS in Sydney opened a body farm & I couldn't pass that up,  so now I am among their early donators.  They just can't have it until I'm finished with it!

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My father was born and worked in Alaska in the shipping business, and wanted his ashes buried at sea there.  My sister and I took a cruise on a small ship (75 passengers) to SE Alaska.  We talked with the cruise line about how to deal with his ashes and they offered to do a small ceremony.  He had shared a office with the owner of the cruise line many years before.  I asked the captain to find an appropriate time and place.  He selected Frederick Sound and wanted to do it as the sun was setting. . . he would do it with the 3rd mate (who we knew from Anacortes).

The crew found out about it and wanted to be a part of it, as did most of the passengers.  They stopped the ship, rang 8 bells, and provided a wreath.  Unfortunately the ship was sideways to the wind and created a bit of an unplanned dispersal.  As the ceremony was over the crew lined up to hug us, one crew member asked me if I saw the humpback whale spouting.  Unfortunately. . . NO.

I went up to see the captain the next morning and wanted him to mark on a chart where his ashes were and he pointed to the chart.  I looked at the chart, up at him, back at the chart, and again up at him.  I said really?  And he said yes. . . where else?  It was Deadman's Bay, and a great location.

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16 hours ago, astro said:

I surfed with Ma and Pa a couple of times, I was just a grommet though.

Legends they were/are.

They were indeed.

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16 hours ago, astro said:

My dad said where he wanted to rest, in the water near their place.

But when mum went a few years later she ended up staying with my brother for a few years, waiting till we were all together.  Then we made the time.  It was a good day, real closure, a day on he water with the remains of that family generation.

I will end up in the same place.

I asked Dad plenty of times what he wanted done with them. Typically he said ‘I don’t give a fuck  - I won’t be around to care.’  We are planning to scatter them at my mothers Fav fishing spot when my sister is allowed back up here in North Koreasland by Jannette Jong-un.

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1 hour ago, LB 15 said:

They were indeed.

odd Question here, they weren't the Ma and Pa from round caloundra way late 70's early 80's were they?

   . Remember from that time a really wirely old surfer who always spoke of pisscutters... known to one and all as "Pa"

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On 10/16/2020 at 6:07 PM, Raz'r said:

not true. Maybe true of non-permitted disposal, but you can get a permit to dispose within the confines of SF Bay.

 

On 10/24/2020 at 7:42 PM, Foreverslow said:

...

Everyone had their say before we put the ashes in the water.

...

 

epa rules for burial at sea.   May also have local laws you need to follow

https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/burial-sea

 

 

Just FYI - There seems to be some confusion/overlap here about "burial at sea" and "scattering cremains at sea" at least here in the USA those are two distinct thing. The EPA link is for actual disposing of a body. scattering cremains is much less regulated. Here are the rules in WA state (from a WA Law firm website)
------

Scattering ashes at sea. The federal Clean Water Act requires that cremated remains be scattered at least three nautical miles from land. The EPA does not permit scattering at beaches or in wading pools by the sea. Finally, you must notify the EPA within 30 days of scattering ashes at sea.

For more information, including the EPA contact person for Washington state, see Burial of Human Remains at Sea on the EPA website.

Scattering ashes on state-controlled waterways. The Washington State Department of Licensing states that ashes may be scattered over “public navigable waters under state control, including Puget Sound . . . rivers, streams, and lakes.”

 

Note--- In case anybody is wondering if I just randomly lookup burial laws - Subject came up in a FB mushroom group I am in. Discussing someone that has made a coffin of mycelium so it recycles you into mushrooms in short order. Which here in Washing you can only do if it is allowed by the permitted, corporately owned (yes in the RCW's) graveyard you choose.

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I spread my Dad in the water as well (Waikiki (with Polynesian priest officiating which was great - had me take a rock from shore to drop in the water marking the spot where my Dad would come back to visit), Santa Cruz Island and S.F. Bay) and just wanted to note that when I was done (took a couple years or so) I truly felt like a weight was lifted and that my Dad and I both had found peace. He had a pretty rough end and ultimately I felt I'd done right by him.

Based on this my recommendation is to do, as best you can, what you know your loved one would want.

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Here we are saying farewell to Floss and Carl. He went at 70 in the 80’s and had to wait for Floss to shake the mortal coil at 107 a few years back. Finally got their family together from around the world. The lucky ones crammed aboard my sailboat

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14EC569F-55E2-4C85-8784-F9EC9C246281.jpeg

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I remember once in a race on San Francisco bay sailing downwind with the chute up from the weather mark at sea, we came upon a sort fishing boat idling in our path, they were not fishing but standing around with drinks in hand. as we passed them we saw a fog of what was ashes coming towards us as they dumped into the water. we almost had to jybe to get away from it. 

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My buddy’s surfer brother in law OD’d a few years back on fentanyl. He was a well liked young man with long black, curly hair.  As Italian Americans, they didn’t want to cremate him, but they cut a lock of hair to release on the best surfing spot In Hawaii, which he surged on their large family vacation every year. 
 

The family got to the beach near sunset to ask a surfer if they would take the hair out, tied to a rock and toss it beyond the break for them. Friend’s wife went up to a surfer among a group of people and made the request. It turns out the surfer was Laird Hamilton and he’d just finished a photo shoot for a magazine- she was oblivious to this as she was desperate to have the hair delivered to the sea. He said he’d do it and that he had just recently lost a very good friend the same way.

He took the rock out, surfed a couple of waves with it before launching it over the top of a big barrel he was surfing down and came back in and gave her a big hug. She didn’t know who he was until later when my buddy asked if she knew who he was...made her happy!

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On 10/17/2020 at 7:04 AM, Cristoforo said:

Do they have to keep paying dues? 

Possibly not but they can still vote

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