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dylan winter

best mag for sailing binos

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My experience with my 300 mile solo jaunt down the north sea made me realise that the current binos are no longer fit for purpose

dropped once too often so I have to close one eye to see anything

I intend to buy a pair for les than £35 on ebay - only because I know that they life expectancy will be around a year before  meeting  their fate by being dropped into the briny 9 feet to concrete

what magnificqtion works best for short sighted shallow water sailors

D

 

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You know, if you just put a strap on them and are disciplined about using it, you won't have that problem. 

Binocs are one thing where you definitely get what you pay for up to a point and that point is in excess of £300. If you can bring yourself to pay £200 for a pair of Fujinon, Steiner, or Nikon 7x50's you will get 6X the binocular compared to your £35 ebay cheapies.

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18 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

My experience with my 300 mile solo jaunt down the north sea made me realise that the current binos are no longer fit for purpose

dropped once too often so I have to close one eye to see anything

I intend to buy a pair for les than £35 on ebay - only because I know that they life expectancy will be around a year before  meeting  their fate by being dropped into the briny 9 feet to concrete

what magnificqtion works best for short sighted shallow water sailors

D

 

I like 7X50's.

Mine are not eBay cheapies but were pretty cheap - Whitworths $250 AUD. I'm happy with them - autofocus, light weight, waterproof, supposedly float. Got some sort of grad in one lens that in theory allows you to work out ranges. Beyond my competence so I use a cheap Eyoyo laser rangefinder instead to settle arguments on the line if 'you're too close to the shore'...

I haven't tested the last waterproof & float features and hope not to for a while.

I've had an outstanding pair of Zeiss rubber armoured binocs for over 2 decades. They're heavy as hell with utterly superb optics. They don't go on the boat - they used to be my hunting binocs, these days they're the birdwatching ones.

So, 7X50's in whatever price bracket you think appropriate.

FKT

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7X. More magnification just makes it harder to get a sharp, stable image. Field of view is almost as important. Wider FOV is better but requires better, more expensive glass.

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3 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

7 x 50 it is then

D

Here I don't need much tiny puddles or mountain lakes, just the cheapies, but on the other boat, OMG the expensive good optics ones make one hell of a difference in the 1000 islands.  Splurge a bit w the new boat Dillon.  It will be 100X worth it

Think of it this way, if you pay $100 for decent shades, Why in the hell would you not pay 2-3x that for a pair of decent binos..  

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3 minutes ago, shaggy said:

Here I don't need much tiny puddles or mountain lakes, just the cheapies, but on the other boat, OMG the expensive good optics ones make one hell of a difference in the 1000 islands.  Splurge a bit w the new boat Dillon.  It will be 100X worth it

Think of it this way, if you pay $100 for decent shades, Why in the hell would you not pay 2-3x that for a pair of decent binos..  

never owned a pair of shades that cost more than £5

D

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I'd agree with 7x50... Active stabilisation would offer higher stable magnification but at cost of duller image, since the technology relies on being able to shift the viewpoint around a larger field of view instead of using that to maximise the brightness of the image... and the price hike is hefty!

 The popularity of this spec helps keep the pricing competitive, too.

 I was given a pair like these as a present: https://www.force4.co.uk/item/Force-4/Floating-Waterproof-Compass-Binoculars/B9V

 Think they are available with varying branding and with or without the compass, so worth shopping around... when I compared them to the cheaper alternatives they seemed significantly better,  without the really scary price tags of the top end ones...

 

 One other thing: you say shortsighted. If you wear glasses, you want good "eye relief", so you can see through them properly. Definitely worth testing this,  if you can,  it makes a big difference that the non-myopic do not understand!!!!

Cheers, 

              W.

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Both eye relief and field of view cost money and won't be found in £35 ebay specials.

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was carrying my binos in the backpack on the motorbike, while cornering at about 120km/h the backpack zipper broke, bino flew out and got projected against protecting rail at the side, result : no bino anymore but 2 mono's. compass24 online chandlery, costs less than 100 eurodollars, waterproof and built-in compass, certainly not the best of the best of the best but worth the price and seems rather unbreakable for the "dropping challenged" among old to near-derelict salts

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One advantage of the more expensive ones is they have good warrantees and will repair them if you do drop them.  And you can see so much better with them.  But I also pay good money for my glasses so I can see well with them.  It depends what is important to you.

 

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I got the Celestron 7x50 with the compass for $135. They are good. Initially I did not think 7x was enough and I used other binoculars I had with more mag in the boat. But given I really use them for sighting markers and taking bearings it is enough, and more mag makes this more difficult for me. It’s not bird watching. For the same reason, I need very good optical quality but I don’t need to see the pimples on the ass of of something a mile away. I just need to be able to sight it and take a bearing. I have been pleased though with the functional durability of these binoculars.

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The west Marine 7x50 are ok, rebranded but not sure by who.  I actually don't like stabilized ones.  Too many years of looking through regular ones, my brain won't process it. We had a crazy spendy pair of cannon stabilized and night vision on the boat I delivered, I kept using the WM ones and the captain gave me crap as those were for the children...

I have the same pair of fujion 7x50 I bought in 1996. Not perfect definitely a little corrosion but still great optics.  Have a pair of stieners too.  Way more compact and equal optics but they stay in the locker for the most part.

 

I would try a hunting place in your area, something like Cabela's in the states. You should be able to pick up something decent without the marine sticker shock. 

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5 hours ago, dylan winter said:

the current binos are no longer fit for purpose

 

Dylan

- You can get 7x50s.  They are fantastic optically but are big, heavy, and expensive

- You can get a monocular.  You will still have to close one eye, but they are cheaper, more rugged, and weigh 1/3 as much (only one tube and no pieces to connect the two tubes together).  8x

- During the daytime a cheap pair of 8x32 are great.  You can get pretty good new ones for around US$ 100.  Or any other smaller 8x.  My children took my venerable 8x28s for a swim a few months ago so they're done.  Modern ones are waterproof.

Anything is better than nothing.  Let price be your guide

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1 hour ago, 2airishuman said:

Dylan

- You can get 7x50s.  They are fantastic optically but are big, heavy, and expensive

- You can get a monocular.  You will still have to close one eye, but they are cheaper, more rugged, and weigh 1/3 as much (only one tube and no pieces to connect the two tubes together).  8x

- During the daytime a cheap pair of 8x32 are great.  You can get pretty good new ones for around US$ 100.  Or any other smaller 8x.  My children took my venerable 8x28s for a swim a few months ago so they're done.  Modern ones are waterproof.

Anything is better than nothing.  Let price be your guide

Respectfully disagree. 8X is too high, 32 is too dim.

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54 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Respectfully disagree. 8X is too high, 32 is too dim.

Yep agree. 7X50's are the sweet spot for magnification and light gathering. You really, really notice the difference around dusk.

I used to have a quite expensive telescopic sight on one of my hunting rifles. Used to piss me off that I could see a feral animal quite clearly in the binocs, put them down, lift the rifle and not be able to pick out the animal from the background even though I knew exactly where it was. 

That low light gathering ability is important IMO. As for weight, my boat binocs are lightweight and supposedly waterproof. My Zeiss birdwatching binocs are bloody heavy but have wonderful optics. But they were serious money 20 years ago.

FKT

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Just another tack, have you thought about a spotting scope?

We have one at home on a tripod, it’s amazing for wildlife and checking boats on the Channel.

I have heard some of them have attachments for cameras,  would make a good cheap telephoto for bird watching..

Boat binocs are 7x50, if you get one with a compass make sure it is on the side of your best eye if you have any visual discrepancies...

Most have the compass on the left, which I cant see well. Eventually found a Russian one with the compass on the right.

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not sure I would bother with a compass

not on binocs

I am also considering committing the heresy of removing the one in the motor sailor

It is a great big thing, ugly, black and in the way. 

I am often up estuaries so a compass means nothing. The only installed nav aid I really need is an echo-sounder

Most of the time I navigate by  eye or  memory - the remaining 5 per cent is by tablet  or phablet

when out at sea and attempting to sail or motor to a compass bearing then I  hand over to the auto-helm which is far, far better at holding a  course than I ever could be.

If  I need a compass I have a small marine hand bearing one I can fish out of a plastic food box where I keep the flares, weird collection of wooden bungs and the yellow quarantine flag.

 

I can blue tack the blue hand bearing compass  in the pilot house somewhere.

D

 

 

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The best optics have a much better depth of field than the cheapies. I have a pair of Steiner 6x30s which are in sharp focus from about 50 yds to infinity. I also have a pair from West Marine with which you have to refocus for small differences in distance between 10 yds to 500 yds. If you're trying to read the number on a buoy in difficult conditions,  it's much harder if you have to refocus. 

The Steiners have soft rubber eye cups that you are supposed to fold back if you are wearing glasses, but the rubber leaves huge smudges on the lenses making that impractical.  I've had other optics that did the same thing. I focus for my naked eyes and remove my glasses, which is a pain. Also leaves the binoculars  focused for me and no one else.

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When I was in the US Navy, 7 X 50s were used on the bridge.

If you didn't use the strap, the Quartermaster of the Watch would request you to please do so.

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3 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

The Steiners have soft rubber eye cups that you are supposed to fold back if you are wearing glasses, but the rubber leaves huge smudges on the lenses making that impractical.  I've had other optics that did the same thing. I focus for my naked eyes and remove my glasses, which is a pain. Also leaves the binoculars  focused for me and no one else.

This. Sweaty eye-brow crud on the rubber eye cups makes me crazy bc it gets transferred to my eyeglasses. If someone sails with me, the rule is they must be wearing glasses or sunglasses before they use the binocs. I sail solo almost always. The curmudgeon with his silly rules about binocular usage has probably alienated potential sailing companions, but his eyeglasses are smudge-free. 

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

When I was in the US Navy, 7 X 50s were used on the bridge.

If you didn't use the strap, the Quartermaster of the Watch would request you to please do so.

Good enough for the navy then

Weight is not important

It is really to help me see which way the triangles are pointing

D

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20 hours ago, dylan winter said:

never owned a pair of shades that cost more than £5

D

Ok, if you pay more than $100 for a decent camera, etc etc etc...

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1 hour ago, shaggy said:

Ok, if you pay more than $100 for a decent camera, etc etc etc...

you would not beleive how much I have spent on cameras, microphones, cables, tripods, batteries and chargers  over the years

I used to specialise in taking tv cameras to difficult places

loggers, truckers, cowboys, soldiers, sailors

if they were there then so was I

I have destroyed a lot gear over the years

One got stomped on by a horse - too many to count have succembed to horrible, all encompassing dampness

D

 

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7X for straight optical, 10X for image stabilized. 

I have a set of cheapo West Marines for kids and the clumsy. 

A set of Fujinon 7x50 with compass and ranging reticle that are fine but heavy.

A set of Canon IS 10x that are astonishing in their clarity. 

 

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10 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

you would not beleive how much I have spent on cameras, microphones, cables, tripods, batteries and chargers  over the years

I used to specialise in taking tv cameras to difficult places

loggers, truckers, cowboys, soldiers, sailors

if they were there then so was I

I have destroyed a lot gear over the years

One got stomped on by a horse - too many to count have succembed to horrible, all encompassing dampness

D

 

I want to know the horse story...  ;)

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7 x 50 for sure. Had these for 5 years now and have found them to be great. I find the compass interesting even when not needed.
Dedicated Marine with night light. Waterproof 7x50 Binoculars-Nitrogen filled, rubber armoured  and bright.

https://www.force4.co.uk/item/Force-4/Waterproof-7x50-Binoculars-with-Compass/BA5

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4 hours ago, snubber said:

This. Sweaty eye-brow crud on the rubber eye cups makes me crazy bc it gets transferred to my eyeglasses. If someone sails with me, the rule is they must be wearing glasses or sunglasses before they use the binocs. I sail solo almost always. The curmudgeon with his silly rules about binocular usage has probably alienated potential sailing companions, but his eyeglasses are smudge-free. 

Do we know each other? :P

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4 hours ago, snubber said:

This. Sweaty eye-brow crud on the rubber eye cups makes me crazy bc it gets transferred to my eyeglasses. If someone sails with me, the rule is they must be wearing glasses or sunglasses before they use the binocs. I sail solo almost always. The curmudgeon with his silly rules about binocular usage has probably alienated potential sailing companions, but his eyeglasses are smudge-free. 

I take off my glasses and adjust the Binocs to my myopia. 

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1 minute ago, Raz'r said:

I take off my glasses and adjust the Binocs to my myopia. 

I would drop my eyeglasses in the cockpit and not be able to find them again without my eyeglasses, and would probably step on them or kick them down the cockpit drain. I live in a very, very dangerous world inside my head. Rest assured, I will not borrow your binocs because I know they are protected with eyeglass smearing goo. Well played Raz'r.

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7 minutes ago, snubber said:

I would drop my eyeglasses in the cockpit and not be able to find them again without my eyeglasses, and would probably step on them or kick them down the cockpit drain. I live in a very, very dangerous world inside my head. Rest assured, I will not borrow your binocs because I know they are protected with eyeglass smearing goo. Well played Raz'r.

https://www.croakies.com/product/croakies

 

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For starters I would not bother with a compass... most aren't illuminated and simply add bulk.

I would agree about 7x50... but don't think you get much for £35..... 

Some manufacturers make excellent 'high end' binos but their lower priced offerings are a bit indifferent.. Fujinon comes to mind.

You want to find something with 'fold down' eye cups....  although these can fail over time... stow them unfolded.. 

The Nikon hard 'click stop' eyecups are excellent and better than the rubber ones.

If I was looking for a budget pair with good glass  I would go for these

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/319410-USA/Nikon_7239_7x50_Action_EX_Extreme.html

I don't have a pair but do have a pair of their "Action Extreme" 12 x 50's ashore and have had their Action Extreme 8x 42s.... the latter were replaced with a pair of 10x42 Monarch 7s which I use afloat and ashore. ( I also have Fujinon FMTRs on the boat and a nice pair of Zeiss ashore .... I like good glass )

Moving right along... binocular straps are the work of the devil. Fine if you are standing a four hour watch with your Barr and Stroud 12x 50s on a nice stable platform such as the bridge of HMS Repulse ..... but on a yacht?  Some prick will - sooner rather than later  - pick the bins up... but the strap will hook around some bit of furniture and snatch them from their hands and that will be the end of that.....

Likewise... wandering around on a yacht with your bins swinging around like an elephant's dong will soon lead to tears...

If you must wander around with them hanging from your neck buy something like this...

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1549712-REG/riton_optics_xbh_binocular_harness.html

 

Sweaty crew using the captain's binoculars? Stuff em.... don't let them near them....simple fix...

 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

I take off my glasses and adjust the Binocs to my myopia. 

You are lucky... I'm cross-eyed....

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2 hours ago, OPAL said:

7 x 50 for sure. Had these for 5 years now and have found them to be great. I find the compass interesting even when not needed.
Dedicated Marine with night light. Waterproof 7x50 Binoculars-Nitrogen filled, rubber armoured  and bright.

https://www.force4.co.uk/item/Force-4/Waterproof-7x50-Binoculars-with-Compass/BA5

It's been a while but I think I found those didn't work well with my glasses (see eye relief comment above). Happy to be corrected if I'm wrong about that!

Astigmatism means I need the glasses on to help distinguish shapes accurately... which way are those triangles pointing?

Cheers,

             W.

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42 minutes ago, Cisco said:

binocular straps are the work of the devil.

I disagree. The neck strap is not an excuse for letting the  binocs swing about; you have to use your hands too sometimes. In your car, you would not dispense with your seat belt because you have an air bag, would you?

The "Binocular Harness" you point us to would be great, but no neck strap is just silly IMHO.

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

I disagree. The neck strap is not an excuse for letting the  binocs swing about; you have to use your hands too sometimes. In your car, you would not dispense with your seat belt because you have an air bag, would you?

The "Binocular Harness" you point us to would be great, but no neck strap is just silly IMHO.

I guess I am just silly then.... I don't even have a strap on either my Fujis or my Nikons for the very reason mentioned above....

If they may be needed they live in their comfy little nest under the dodger..

Want to look at something.... remove from nest.... take a look... return to nest...

I'm not in the habit of dropping things whether they be  my binos or a beer...

Mind you I have been known to  drop the occasional hint and the odd clanger...

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6 minutes ago, SASSAFRASS said:

https://www.ebay.com/p/2255623979

 

These look like a good deal, not sure on shipping, but we'll under most marine ones.

A friend who is an experienced sailor, and who did yacht deliveries,  used Bushnells as illustrated here.

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10 hours ago, Cisco said:

I guess I am just silly then.... I don't even have a strap on either my Fujis or my Nikons for the very reason mentioned above....

If they may be needed they live in their comfy little nest under the dodger..

Want to look at something.... remove from nest.... take a look... return to nest...

I'm not in the habit of dropping things whether they be  my binos or a beer...

Mind you I have been known to  drop the occasional hint and the odd clanger...

Each to his own, but you would have been the quartermaster's scourge.:o

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I bought my wife new binoculars for her birthday - she loves to use them when we are out sailing - looking at wildlife, other boats, and the next bouy.   The binoculars can float - if you use the supplied strap that looks like the offspring of a bino strap and a life vest.   One look at it and my wife grabbed the strap off of her old binoculars.

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21 hours ago, WGWarburton said:

It's been a while but I think I found those didn't work well with my glasses (see eye relief comment above). Happy to be corrected if I'm wrong about that!

Astigmatism means I need the glasses on to help distinguish shapes accurately... which way are those triangles pointing?

Cheers,

             W.

I find the focus on them works for my eyes without having to use glasses.

Apparently Individual Focus on both lenses is stronger at taking knocks than the center-wheel design.

Focus.jpg

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13 hours ago, Bull City said:

Each to his own, but you would have been the quartermaster's scourge.:o

I honestly don't remember a quartermaster ever telling me what to do... in fact quite the opposite.

A warship's  bridge - with a cast of thousands milling around - is quite different to being by yourself in the cockpit of a yacht in a seaway.

That is quite different again to a merchantman's bridge where the norm was two bino boxes on the bridge front.... one box for the master's bins.... the other for the watchkeepers.... and in my first company a long skinny box  for the ship's telescope.... which would have been handed down from ship to ship since the mid 1800's.... and had optics that showed it...

 

Back on track....in my last day job the lookout's binoculars would last about a year...... I would wander up to the local camera shop and buy a new pair out of petty cash. I used to buy Tasco 7x50s... good quality for the price.

I thought they went bust some years ago but they seem to have been reborn....

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Tasco-Essentials-7x50mm-Porro-Black-Standard-Binoculars/202834016418?epid=28027034952&hash=item2f39d978a2:g:3DgAAOSwLG9fA24L

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As everyone says 7X50 is the standard for watchkeepers glasses. Wide field of view and good light gathering.

But I find 8X fine to use at sea as far as motion goes. My best optic glasses with a crystal image are US made 8X40 with a wide field of view.  I also have small quality set of 8.5X32 , Often I can make out a ships name or see a distant kayaker or make out a navigation marker with the 8.5x32 that I can't make out with the 7x50s. So it depends what you want to do.

 

 

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12 hours ago, Cisco said:

Back on track....in my last day job the lookout's binoculars would last about a year...... I would wander up to the local camera shop and buy a new pair out of petty cash. I used to buy Tasco 7x50s... good quality for the price.

 

I still use some Tasco binocs that I bought around 1975. I don't think they're 7 X 50 though.

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4 hours ago, MikeJohns said:

As everyone says 7X50 is the standard for watchkeepers glasses. Wide field of view and good light gathering.

But I find 8X fine to use at sea as far as motion goes. My best optic glasses with a crystal image are US made 8X40 with a wide field of view.  I also have small quality set of 8.5X32 , Often I can make out a ships name or see a distant kayaker or make out a navigation marker with the 8.5x32 that I can't make out with the 7x50s. So it depends what you want to do.

 

 

Same experience here. I've got a mid-range pair of West Marine 7x50's which came with my boat that are probably equivalent to Bushnell or another not-quite-bottom-of-the-barrel Chinese binocs. West charges under $100 for them new. If you view a brick wall or do some other ad hoc test, the edges of the field look like rainbows and anything off the dead center of the field of view suffers from noticeable spherical aberration.

I've also got a pair of nice Pentax 8x32's which are crystal clear from edge to edge, have excellent coatings, etc. They cost $500 in 2011. With their superior design and build, the 8x32s are better than the 7x50's under pretty much every circumstance, even late twilight, despite their smaller objective lenses and higher mag. But they cost 5X as much. 

These days, you can probably get equivalent performance to the Pentax in a $300 binoc and if you go up to $500, the optics aren't much better but they're lighter.

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On 10/20/2020 at 4:47 PM, IStream said:

Both eye relief and field of view cost money and won't be found in £35 ebay specials.

 Nor will good light gathering capability. 

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2 hours ago, IStream said:

Same experience here. I've got a mid-range pair of West Marine 7x50's which came with my boat that are probably equivalent to Bushnell or another not-quite-bottom-of-the-barrel Chinese binocs. West charges under $100 for them new. If you view a brick wall or do some other ad hoc test, the edges of the field look like rainbows and anything off the dead center of the field of view suffers from noticeable spherical aberration.

I've also got a pair of nice Pentax 8x32's which are crystal clear from edge to edge, have excellent coatings, etc. They cost $500 in 2011. With their superior design and build, the 8x32s are better than the 7x50's under pretty much every circumstance, even late twilight, despite their smaller objective lenses and higher mag. But they cost 5X as much. 

These days, you can probably get equivalent performance to the Pentax in a $300 binoc and if you go up to $500, the optics aren't much better but they're lighter.

I used to work for West Marine. I would never buy a pair of their binoculars, I had to destroy a lot of returns. Including 2 of my own...

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Funny, West had a satisfaction guarantee on their binocs so I brought back the ones I got with the boat when they started rattling. They gave me a replacement pair of the same model that went out of alignment within a few months, so I took those back too. The same guy grabbed the next more expensive model and handed them to me with the comment that they might last a year or two and bring them back when I need to. Almost a year later I noticed that the black cement holding the lenses in place had started wicking into the field of view. Just garbage.

I can appreciate the justification for cheap tools and I own a number of them but life's too short for shitty binocs when not-shitty ones aren't that much more expensive.

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The binoculars I got for my wife were the Nikon 7x50 OceanPro - 22.7mm eye relief, field of view of 378 feet, waterproof, and has a center focus.  The center focus is nice because she uses them for looking at boats, bouys, birds, and stargazing.    So far they have worked well......

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2 minutes ago, slap said:

The binoculars I got for my wife were the Nikon 7x50 OceanPro - 22.7mm eye relief, field of view of 378 feet, waterproof, and has a center focus.  The center focus is nice because she uses them for looking at boats, bouys, birds, and stargazing.    So far they have worked well......

My second pair of those failed after a couple of years, and Nikon Canada is giving me grief on service because I bought them from West in Canada...and they aren't an authorized Canadian dealer. They have a 25-year warranty, so I'm hanging on to them until I can trade them for a new pair from West USA if I ever go to the USA again. First pair an element came adrift and clattered around in the body and I had them replaced, second pair fogged up both sides of the binos but by that time West was out of Canada.

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Thought the west ones were ok but only advocate as a cheep pair. In general I can't stand the store, grossly overpriced and poor quality all around, but they seem to be everywhere and always open so I ha e definitely shopped there.

 

For the money I would only go with Fujion, one of the best purchases I have made, the same pair have been in every wheelhouse of every ship I've sailed on so probably not a coincidence.

I do like the Steiners for a lighter pair.

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On 10/22/2020 at 10:22 AM, WGWarburton said:

It's been a while but I think I found those didn't work well with my glasses (see eye relief comment above). Happy to be corrected if I'm wrong about that!

Astigmatism means I need the glasses on to help distinguish shapes accurately... which way are those triangles pointing?

Cheers,

             W.

I have astigmatism too.  Ever thought of getting laser eye surgery to fix?
I've mulled it over, but have not done so as yet....

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1 hour ago, JRC026 said:

I have astigmatism too.  Ever thought of getting laser eye surgery to fix?
I've mulled it over, but have not done so as yet....

Be very careful. As you get older, nearsightedness goes away. I have a friend who was really fucked up by lasik surgery.

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4 hours ago, IStream said:

Funny, West had a satisfaction guarantee on their binocs so I brought back the ones I got with the boat when they started rattling. They gave me a replacement pair of the same model that went out of alignment within a few months, so I took those back too. The same guy grabbed the next more expensive model and handed them to me with the comment that they might last a year or two and bring them back when I need to. Almost a year later I noticed that the black cement holding the lenses in place had started wicking into the field of view. Just garbage.

I can appreciate the justification for cheap tools and I own a number of them but life's too short for shitty binocs when not-shitty ones aren't that much more expensive.

When I was a kid (1958), my dad lost his mind and took us all to Europe. In Germany, he bought a pair of Zeiss binocs. My no-good older brother still uses them. They're perfect. Of course he doesn't sail.

I think it's also nice to have a pair that's good enought to will make observation of the moon and planets a little interesting - like craters on the moon and the rings of Saturn.

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2 hours ago, JRC026 said:

I have astigmatism too.  Ever thought of getting laser eye surgery to fix?
I've mulled it over, but have not done so as yet....

Yes, I can live with glasses; in fact I feel safer with a barrier in front of my eyes...  I don't want laser surgery.

 My biggest concern at the moment is relatively rapid age related short distance vision. Having to take them off to see detail is far more hassle than wearing them had ever been! Need new varifocals again :-(

Cheers, 

               W.

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6 minutes ago, MikeJohns said:

I wanted to understand why there are 2 distinctly different styles of binocs, this sums it up:

https://binocularsguides.com/porro-prism-vs-roof-prism-binoculars/

Basically if you want cheap but good optics get Porro Prisms. They also have a better 3d perspective. 

The best binoculars I have are Porno Prisms, but it's hard to navigate with them.

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11 hours ago, Ishmael said:

The best binoculars I have are Porno Prisms, ........

Reminds me of a case in Auckland when I lived there. A woman complained to the Police that she could see a couple regularly shagging on their bed through her binocs at night, she took some pictures with a high power telephoto lense to prove it. She wanted them charged for indecency, not drawing the curtains. Instead she was charged and prosecuted on a couple of charges!  

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On 10/23/2020 at 7:34 PM, Bull City said:

I think it's also nice to have a pair that's good enought to will make observation of the moon and planets a little interesting - like craters on the moon and the rings of Saturn.

I think it's also nice to have a pair that's good enough to make observation of the moon and planets a little interesting - like craters on the moon and the rings of Saturn.

(Sorry, I must be getting old.)

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

I think it's also nice to have a pair that's good enough to make observation of the moon and planets a little interesting - like craters on the moon and the rings of Saturn.

(Sorry, I must be getting old.)

Don't worry, I have been living with incoherence for years now.

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On 10/20/2020 at 6:44 PM, SASSAFRASS said:

The west Marine 7x50 are ok, rebranded but not sure by who.  I actually don't like stabilized ones.  Too many years of looking through regular ones, my brain won't process it. We had a crazy spendy pair of cannon stabilized and night vision on the boat I delivered, I kept using the WM ones and the captain gave me crap as those were for the children...

I have the same pair of fujion 7x50 I bought in 1996. Not perfect definitely a little corrosion but still great optics.  Have a pair of stieners too.  Way more compact and equal optics but they stay in the locker for the most part.

 

I would try a hunting place in your area, something like Cabela's in the states. You should be able to pick up something decent without the marine sticker shock. 

Yup, have the Fujinon 7x50's on the boat and Steiner 7x50's at home so we can gaze out to sea.  Took them both on the boat for a test run and did side by side comparisons in light and dark conditions, I still like my old Fujinon binos better.  They have a comfortable feel but maybe that is just habit.

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On 10/23/2020 at 4:44 PM, WGWarburton said:

Yes, I can live with glasses; in fact I feel safer with a barrier in front of my eyes...  I don't want laser surgery.

 My biggest concern at the moment is relatively rapid age related short distance vision. Having to take them off to see detail is far more hassle than wearing them had ever been! Need new varifocals again :-(

Cheers, 

               W.

Roger that on the eye surgery, don't fucking go near my eyes!  I can live with my glasses and have since a I was wee snapper.

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23 hours ago, Bull City said:

I think it's also nice to have a pair that's good enough to make observation of the moon and planets a little interesting - like craters on the moon and the rings of Saturn.

(Sorry, I must be getting old.)

No way! 
willbell_9780943396880.jpg

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On 10/24/2020 at 1:30 AM, Bull City said:

Be very careful. As you get older, nearsightedness goes away. I have a friend who was really fucked up by lasik surgery.

I had it done about 10 years ago. That was the old technique, BTW, where you had dry eyes for the next six weeks or so. Very painful but I still would do it again without a second thought. The improvement in long-range sight is dramatic.

You must know that you might need reading glasses afterwards. I have no problem with them. (Ok, I was lucky -didn’t need them until recently.)

Before surgery, I very well had problems with my long-range astigmatism glasses when running, skiing, swimming, sailing, wakeboarding, kiteboarding, cycling, playing pingpong, moving my lawn, or just coming in from the cold. 

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On 10/29/2020 at 8:58 AM, 10thTonner said:

I had it done about 10 years ago. That was the old technique, BTW, where you had dry eyes for the next six weeks or so. Very painful but I still would do it again without a second thought. The improvement in long-range sight is dramatic.

You must know that you might need reading glasses afterwards. I have no problem with them. (Ok, I was lucky -didn’t need them until recently.)

Before surgery, I very well had problems with my long-range astigmatism glasses when running, skiing, swimming, sailing, wakeboarding, kiteboarding, cycling, playing pingpong, moving my lawn, or just coming in from the cold. 

Where did you move your lawn? From one house to another, or just from the front yard to the back yard?

Sorry.

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14 hours ago, Shu said:

Sorry.

It’s ok. No, really! 
 


 

 

(Is your second name “Tup” BTW?) 

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