Cashelmore

Amateur couple rebuilds salvage cruiser

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We looked at a new model mid 30 foot Benne some years ago being commissioned in Charleston SC. The broker/yard had everything out of the boat that would come out without cutting. The glass work below the floor scared me away. 

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Seems amazing to me that the grid broke loose, but the boat barely had any leaks.  Seems like the grid was so poorly attached it allowed the bottom of the boat to flex a few inches without breaking the hull.  I am about 6 videos in and its getting better.  I could do without her taking selfie videos nearly the entire time. 

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Bene’s have a terrible grid pan layout that is not attached through tabbing to the inner hull surface and the spooge layer is all (except the keelbolts) that holds the keel to the outer hull. I’ve passed on about every Bene I looked at. Bolts torn out, keels swiped clean off the bottom...
 

I did buy a 35RFirst and it was a good boat. Tall carbon rig, deep draft and crazy sharp handling. Too much fun so I downgraded to a Catalina.

 

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I am no engineer but might it be a good idea to float the boat without the keel before glueing the grid back in?? 

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Playing devils advocate:  Isn't it better that the grid gave way in the grounding, and the boat basically stayed floating, rather than it being so bonded that it rips a gaping hole in the bottom on a grounding?  Is the grid purposefully sacrificial?

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Not sure about the sacrificial part, but I have seen the keels ripped right out by the bolts with the grid still mostly there. That was in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, which was a pretty extreme way to test a lot of boats to their limits.

I have seen multiple Beneteau’s listed as salvage after a moderate grounding and the damage is always similar to this boat. It steered me away from buying one, even though they looked nearly new and in otherwise fine condition.

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59 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

Playing devils advocate:  Isn't it better that the grid gave way in the grounding, and the boat basically stayed floating, rather than it being so bonded that it rips a gaping hole in the bottom on a grounding?  Is the grid purposefully sacrificial?

I would say the issue isn't so much that an extreme grounding causes structural damage, that could happen to any boat.
Its just very hard to assess the damage, and even harder to repair it.

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7 hours ago, GH41 said:

I am no engineer but might it be a good idea to float the boat without the keel before glueing the grid back in?? 

I think you lost everyone at the words "good idea." Nah, just keep grinding. 

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6 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Playing devils advocate:  Isn't it better that the grid gave way in the grounding, and the boat basically stayed floating, rather than it being so bonded that it rips a gaping hole in the bottom on a grounding?  Is the grid purposefully sacrificial?

This is the bottom of Cheeki Rafiki. I'd prefer a stronger floor system entirely so you can inspect the tabbing and see that the keel isn't suddenly going to tear itself out of the bottom of the boat.

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8 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Playing devils advocate:  Isn't it better that the grid gave way in the grounding, and the boat basically stayed floating, rather than it being so bonded that it rips a gaping hole in the bottom on a grounding?  Is the grid purposefully sacrificial?

It that was the intent, great - but that isn't the goal. It's to make a structure strong enough to hold the keel on, and cheap to make and install.

If a moderately hard grounding makes your boat a write off, it's not a great design philosophy. It is not that hard to make a internal hull structure strong enough that it won't be damaged. Just costs a bit more $$ and time. Beneteau is not in that game.

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2 hours ago, Zonker said:

It that was the intent, great - but that isn't the goal. It's to make a structure strong enough to hold the keel on, and cheap to make and install.

If a moderately hard grounding makes your boat a write off, it's not a great design philosophy. It is not that hard to make a internal hull structure strong enough that it won't be damaged. Just costs a bit more $$ and time. Beneteau is not in that game.

I was racing on a Dubois 43 that hit a reef off the east coast of Oz BITD.  We hit it and stopped dead, then got picked up by several waves and slammed back down on the reef,  each time the boat moved forward a bit until we were off the reef.  

Boat was hauled in Southport, no damage save for a bit of lead missing from the front of the keel.  The boat had an internal metal tube grid that tied the keel support to the hull in three dimensions.  Yes, you can design a boat to withstand a severe grounding.  

And let's not forget the famous Hobie 33 video....

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43 minutes ago, Rain Man said:

Yes, you can design a boat to withstand a severe grounding.  

Absolutely.

5_1f7319a379.jpeg

It's rather a question of how often dows that happen and esp. for charter companies: remains undetected? 

Does anyone know if charter companies use some sort of indicators / devices such as strain gauges to detect suspected groundings?

And: wouldn't charter companies prefer to have, say, laminated keels like in the old days (see HR 29) where the lead is put into the keel from atop? This in a keel + centreboard configuration could make for a durable combination that you wouldn't need to worry about. 

Performance might be a bit lower, then again less draft could make that an even better proposition for guests from a marketing perspective.

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12 minutes ago, Matagi said:

Absolutely.

5_1f7319a379.jpeg

It's rather a question of how often dows that happen and esp. for charter companies: remains undetected? 

Does anyone know if charter companies use some sort of indicators / devices such as strain gauges to detect suspected groundings?

And: wouldn't charter companies prefer to have, say, laminated keels like in the old days (see HR 29) where the lead is put into the keel from atop? This in a keel + centreboard configuration could make for a durable combination that you wouldn't need to worry about. 

Performance might be a bit lower, then again less draft could make that an even better proposition for guests from a marketing perspective.

Well this one didn’t remain undetected, diddit? 
Many charter companies in the Med send a diver down for a quick look at the front of the keel on returning. 

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28 minutes ago, 10thTonner said:

Well this one didn’t remain undetected, diddit? 
Many charter companies in the Med send a diver down for a quick look at the front of the keel on returning. 

Not all of them, apparently:  https://www.yachtingmonthly.com/specials/sailing-100-miles-without-a-keel-30486

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Pasted from the wiki Cheeki Rafiki page. Sounds familiar. 

 "The connection between hull, matrix and keel had been repaired several times already. Even experts are not normally capable of telling how such a repair would be properly done and how to tell that it was acceptably fixed. The recommendation from the manufacturer to remove the keel completely was considered best practice, its cost-effectiveness was questioned though"

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They really are using the wrong tools still.  They needed to spend about $500+ to get a really good self cleaning vacuum and set it outside the boat while grinding.  Then use a proper dust hood on the grinder.  It could have captured a significant amount of the dust.  They are going to be cleaning all the dust out of the boat for life.  But hey, at least its getting done.  

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17 minutes ago, SeattleB said:

They really are using the wrong tools still.  They needed to spend about $500+ to get a really good self cleaning vacuum and set it outside the boat while grinding.  Then use a proper dust hood on the grinder.  It could have captured a significant amount of the dust.  They are going to be cleaning all the dust out of the boat for life.  But hey, at least its getting done.  

This.
I made the same mistake they did, albeit on a smaller project.
Despite sheeting off, dust literally fucking everywhere. I'll get the proper kit next time.

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2 hours ago, MiddayGun said:

I'll get the proper kit next time.

Next time?

You are a slow learner. ;)

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10 hours ago, Matagi said:

Does anyone know if charter companies use some sort of indicators / devices such as strain gauges to detect suspected groundings?

divers in the caribbean

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So, let's say they finish this repair by adding a shit load of fiberglass to attach the bottom to the grid. What would happen if they hit a rock at some point? Ideally it is built strong enough to withstand the impact (while ideally you don't hit a rock in the first place, but shit happens), but would it then rip out the grid at the front or back that has not been reinforced? 

The dust is absolutely horrifying. She said at some point her mask now catches "most" of the dust. She also said she has an auto-immune disease. Regardless, be a bit careful with your lungs! It is now everywhere in the boat and in their bodies. What a trainwreck.

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Having been involved in a very dusty glass project once (removed a thruster tube) - you need to create positive pressure behind your curtains (the stuff you want to protect) and negative pressure around your work area. They could have had a box fan (or two) taped to deck over hatches and done a lot better.

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25 minutes ago, AnotherSailor said:

What would happen if they hit a rock at some point? Ideally it is built strong enough to withstand the impact (while ideally you don't hit a rock in the first place, but shit happens), 

That’s why the boat was totaled and declared salvage in the first place...;)

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new video,  now they are talking about making a new grid...and cutting everything down to the original chopstrand...

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They've progressed from questionable to ill-advised to WTF to crazy talk. Do they have any experienced loved ones who could stage an intervention?

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Sounds like they've fallen into the "in for a penny, in for a pound" trap.

or the similar "while I'm doing this, I may as well do that", which Lord knows I've fallen victim to more times than I'd like to admit.

Hopefully one day I will learn.  But then again, you can't teach an old dog new tricks.

I'm now left wondering just how many cliches I can spew in this post. :blink:

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OK, I fast forwarded thru the video to get the relevant truth. They found areas where the surface matt layers in the mold de-lammed from the structural glass. So they are going to peel all the matt layers off the grid in the middle third of the boat, then re-glass/tab over that structure. 

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27 minutes ago, longy said:

OK, I fast forwarded thru the video to get the relevant truth. They found areas where the surface matt layers in the mold de-lammed from the structural glass. So they are going to peel all the matt layers off the grid in the middle third of the boat, then re-glass/tab over that structure. 

It's ok to admit you watched the video.  :P

 

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27 minutes ago, longy said:

OK, I fast forwarded thru the video to get the relevant truth. They found areas where the surface matt layers in the mold de-lammed from the structural glass. So they are going to peel all the matt layers off the grid in the middle third of the boat, then re-glass/tab over that structure. 

 

Been decades since I did this kind of work, but wouldn't it be better and stronger to include some carbon fiber, and-or kevlar in this glass repair in the keel hull joint area?

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Walk away now and learn a valuable lesson...no survey, no buy

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37 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

Been decades since I did this kind of work, but wouldn't it be better and stronger to include some carbon fiber, and-or kevlar in this glass repair in the keel hull joint area?

You have to be careful when contemplating using carbon.

The load path ALWAYS follows the stiffest member so whatever carbon is added will quite possibly be taking almost all the load.

Now if you start from scratch using carbon only, then it is a different story.

You can always get the equivalent strength and stiffness using standard E-Glass, but you add extra weight and bulk when doing so.

Truth be told though, carbons chief advantage is stiffness.  And specific strength I suppose.  But for a given layup thickness carbon isn't significantly stronger than E-Glass and E-Glass in tension is actually slightly stronger than kevlar 49

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1 hour ago, longy said:

OK, I fast forwarded thru the video to get the relevant truth. They found areas where the surface matt layers in the mold de-lammed from the structural glass. So they are going to peel all the matt layers off the grid in the middle third of the boat, then re-glass/tab over that structure. 

Spoiler alert. Fuck. 

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1 hour ago, eastern motors said:

This is never going to work.  They should just ditch the mast and keel.  Add 1000 gallons diesel tank in the bilge.  Circumnavigate.  

This may be the best idea yet. They could sell the keel lead, mast, sails, winches, hardware, cut 3 feet off the rudder, break even and have a nice trawler for almost free. 

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1 hour ago, eastern motors said:

This is never going to work.  They should just ditch the mast and keel.  Add 1000 gallons diesel tank in the bilge.  Circumnavigate.  

I would think they likely want to add some sort of stabilizers or retain some sort of s keel stub. To minimize roll and to provide some protection for the rudder and prop.

 With no keel, I’ll bet it would roll like a sonuva bitch.

personally. After about hour 48 with the engine running the entire time. Getting keel hauled sounds like fun. 

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1 hour ago, 12 metre said:

You have to be careful when contemplating using carbon.

The load path ALWAYS follows the stiffest member so whatever carbon is added will quite possibly be taking almost all the load.

Now if you start from scratch using carbon only, then it is a different story.

You can always get the equivalent strength and stiffness using standard E-Glass, but you add extra weight and bulk when doing so.

Truth be told though, carbons chief advantage is stiffness.  And specific strength I suppose.  But for a given layup thickness carbon isn't significantly stronger than E-Glass and E-Glass in tension is actually slightly stronger than kevlar 49

Kevlar seems to suck in laminates - apparently if "floats" in the resin. I've seen & heard of more problems with Kevlar laminates than any other fabric.

Modern uncrimped glass fabrics in epoxy are stronger than any normal production boat laminate so why try to get fancy?

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I watched the newest video and doubt the delamination between grid layers has anything to do with the grounding. I suspect almost all Bene grids could be dissected the same way. I have never heard of a grid falling apart on it's own, and indeed it looks to have remained mostly intact as it popped loose from the hull. As such it does seem they are now overdoing it.

I guess their concern is the original structure had the structural glass bonded to the hull, but if they glass the grid back to the hull by overlapping the the grid with new tabbing the repair could fail if the layers sheer. If you consider the large surface area of the new tabbing, and the huge surface area between the layers of glass in the existing grid, failure seems unlikely. 

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Serious overkill.  Just tab the grid back in with epoxy and a couple layers of 1808 or such and call it good- maybe add some bigger stainless or aluminum plates to help spread the loads of the keel bolts so they don't pull through.  It will be stronger than when it left the factory.  It's a Bene- not a serious offshore boat, why try to make it one?  It'll be fine for sailing around the world with some careful planning and up to date electronics.  If they want to go to the poles its the wrong boat...and will never be right.  Get it back in the water and go sailing.  Spend some of the time/money you save on a new life raft, EPIRB, and some satellite communication.

  

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At what point in the keel grid structural repair would they need to put the hull in a cradle to keep the boat from becoming banana shaped?

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2 hours ago, airacer said:

This may be the best idea yet. They could sell the keel lead, mast, sails, winches, hardware, cut 3 feet off the rudder, break even and have a nice trawler for almost free. 

Keel is iron, rusty iron.  If I was them I would consider filling in the gaps between the grid and the hull with epoxy, creating a large epoxy fillet over the gaps, then glassing the grid down to the hull with about 6" of overlap.  

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Basically it sounds like they’re going to do the same thing Mads  of Sail Life did: add enough laminate over the existing structure to replace all the strength required.

Like Mads though, they may want to get a structural engineer involved sooner rather than later.

Up till now they’re doing all the right things, grinding down to a form of structure that can be trusted. Nothing yet indicates they are in over their head - they went into this with eyes wide open, fully prepared (mentally) to deal with whatever they encounter.

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1 hour ago, SomethingElse said:

At what point in the keel grid structural repair would they need to put the hull in a cradle to keep the boat from becoming banana shaped?

I don’t think they’re removing that much of the grid that the hull will fold - as I understand it large parts of the grid are still firmly attached to the hull, particularly in the ends.

I would recommend supporting the hull from underneath to eliminate any existing deformation and ensure the the shape reverts to as designed.

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5 hours ago, alphafb552 said:

I don’t think they’re removing that much of the grid that the hull will fold - as I understand it large parts of the grid are still firmly attached to the hull, particularly in the ends.

I would recommend supporting the hull from underneath to eliminate any existing deformation and ensure the the shape reverts to as designed.

It looks like the hull is already sagging away from the grid in areas, either that or the grid itself has 'sprung' in after becoming detached.

Maybe they can use a sister ship to make a cradle that will hold the hull as it should be, its a load of work but at this point they're committed.
If the grid itself is still rigid enough then maybe just putting the boat in the slings will pull the hull back to the correct shape.

Its entertaining at least.

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On 11/7/2020 at 3:55 AM, AnotherSailor said:

So, let's say they finish this repair by adding a shit load of fiberglass to attach the bottom to the grid. What would happen if they hit a rock at some point? Ideally it is built strong enough to withstand the impact (while ideally you don't hit a rock in the first place, but shit happens), but would it then rip out the grid at the front or back that has not been reinforced? 

The dust is absolutely horrifying. She said at some point her mask now catches "most" of the dust. She also said she has an auto-immune disease. Regardless, be a bit careful with your lungs! It is now everywhere in the boat and in their bodies. What a trainwreck.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/New-Plastic-Cyclone-Powder-Dust-Collector-Filter-For-Vacuums-Cleaner-Separator-/264548023812

A good start would be one of these.

 

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Still don't understand why they ground the gelcoat off all those flat surfaces as they were investigating the joins. Easy for me to say but they might have discovered the delam that way and been able to peel it off...

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3 hours ago, alphafb552 said:

They got one of those quite early in the grinding saga...

Actually, a little late in the saga...

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On 11/6/2020 at 5:52 PM, boatcat65 said:

Serious overkill.  Just tab the grid back in with epoxy and a couple layers of 1808 or such and call it good- maybe add some bigger stainless or aluminum plates to help spread the loads of the keel bolts so they don't pull through.  It will be stronger than when it left the factory.  It's a Bene- not a serious offshore boat, why try to make it one?  It'll be fine for sailing around the world with some careful planning and up to date electronics.  If they want to go to the poles its the wrong boat...and will never be right.  Get it back in the water and go sailing.  Spend some of the time/money you save on a new life raft, EPIRB, and some satellite communication.

  

 

8 hours ago, lukepiewalker said:

Still don't understand why they ground the gelcoat off all those flat surfaces as they were investigating the joins. Easy for me to say but they might have discovered the delam that way and been able to peel it off...

Both suggestions would make sense in a world that makes sense, but this is a YouTube/Patreon and whatever world. If you fix the boat and go sail: Boring, no hits. You need a lot of drama and reflections on why you are going on with the drama. Making sense of the senseless, that is what these channels are all about. Think about it: episode after episode of grinding the structure of the boat away! It is absolutely ridiculous and absolutely entertaining! 

I have been watching more of these videos than I dare to admit. Some of them are sailing but if there is ever an episode of a perfect sail, it is followed by a ton of repairs and maintenance issues. That is what everyone likes to see. And it makes sense. If you follow Facebook and other social media platforms you pretty much only see great things happen to people: a perfect sunset, a great meal, a glass of wine, a new haircut, etc. It is depressing, because our own lives suck. These youtube channels full of misfortunes are a great antidote to that. Yeah, I am stuck at home, looking at a wall that needs fresh paint and a window that needs replacement, but hell, that is nothing compared to the shit these two are in!

 

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On 11/7/2020 at 2:12 AM, MiddayGun said:

will pull the hull back to the correct shape.

Nah. Why not just push the grid back and the hull shape is what it is :)

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32 minutes ago, AnotherSailor said:

You need a lot of drama and reflections on why you are going on with the drama.

So can we get to the real drama now? What will happen?

1) They "finish" the boat and sink on the first offshore passage.

2) Crazy eyes kills manbun.

3) Manbun kills crazy eyes.

4) Cancer.

5) Nothing major at all.

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6) Dog runs away and starts a new life scratching fleas instead of ‘glass dust..

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I say #1 but I don't wish it on them. I just don't see how the grid could be damaged and separated from the hull without the hull being damaged. Why did the foot square piece of hull come out with the keel? If it was part of the original laminate 5200 wouldn't have pulled it out. 

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2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

6) Dog runs away and starts a new life scratching fleas instead of ‘glass dust..

7) gomer gets wind of what they are doing and puts a stop to it...... or joins in as second mate

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1 hour ago, GH41 said:

Why did the foot square piece of hull come out with the keel?

It's a separate moulding (a glass bilge sump) that is affixed to the hull after de-moulding. It fits into a recess in the top of the keel.

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2 hours ago, Zonker said:

It's a separate moulding (a glass bilge sump) that is affixed to the hull after de-moulding. It fits into a recess in the top of the keel.

So it is sort of like a booby trap. Just a little something between you and the bottom of the ocean. I guess Bene just bolted the keel on and gave the sump a shot of with the chopper gun.. They should have made it big enough to function as a escape hatch so when the keel falls off and the boat goes tits down you have a way out. 

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3 hours ago, basketcase said:

7) gomer gets wind of what they are doing and puts a stop to it...... or joins in as second mate

8) They keep grinding until all of the boat has turned into dust. 

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1 hour ago, AnotherSailor said:
4 hours ago, basketcase said:

7) gomer gets wind of what they are doing and puts a stop to it...... or joins in as second mate

8) They keep grinding until all of the boat has turned into dust. 

9) They say fuckit and quit because their sex life is like a Norton Abrasives ad.

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9 hours ago, AnotherSailor said:

Some of them are sailing but if there is ever an episode of a perfect sail, it is followed by a ton of repairs and maintenance issues. 

Sounds like my sailing life minus Youtube and Patreon account :/

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1 hour ago, Ishmael said:

9) They say fuckit and quit because their sex life is like a Norton Abrasives ad.

It's just training for their dream of screwing on a south seas beach.

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Since everyone is in the mood to watch renovations:
 

 

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3 hours ago, Ishmael said:

9) They say fuckit and quit because their sex life is like a Norton Abrasives ad.

And the YouTube channel is renamed ‘True Grit’.

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6 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Since everyone is in the mood to watch renovations:
 

 

Why didn’t they replace the v berth cushion material?

Spend all that time and money and still sleep on sweaty vinyl?!

Don’t get me started on how much paint they used to cover the beautiful interior woodwork!

 

1A84003B-C3CF-4F57-8D8E-8EDE17E6F473.jpeg

1203EB64-A698-4617-8BC0-0429564CAE35.jpeg

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If you thought buying this Beneteau was a bad idea you are going to LOVE this... (I've only watched about 20 seconds into the video, but that's enough)

 

 

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27 minutes ago, chuso007 said:

If you thought buying this Beneteau was a bad idea you are going to LOVE this... (I've only watched about 20 seconds into the video, but that's enough)

 

 

Ho lee shit.

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Many years ago some sailing friends (seller) owned a wooden sailboat. It was in bad shape. 

When they went to sell it, the buyer's surveyor "condemmed it" and walked off the job; finding rot everywhere.

Seller and buyer look at each other.

Buyer "Now what?"

Seller "Well I'll give you a $4000 discount - if you're really scared of the boat you can buy a good liferaft for that"

Buyer "Sold"

A few weeks later they heard that yes indeed, their rotten wooden boat had sunk with the new sellers aboard :)

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1 hour ago, chuso007 said:

If you thought buying this Beneteau was a bad idea you are going to LOVE this... (I've only watched about 20 seconds into the video, but that's enough)

 

 

They need to call Leo 

 

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1 minute ago, Cristoforo said:

They need to call Leo 

That boat's in worse condition than Tally Ho...

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5 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Why didn’t they replace the v berth cushion material?

Spend all that time and money and still sleep on sweaty vinyl?!

Don’t get me started on how much paint they used to cover the beautiful interior woodwork!

 

1A84003B-C3CF-4F57-8D8E-8EDE17E6F473.jpeg

1203EB64-A698-4617-8BC0-0429564CAE35.jpeg

That right there is a tragedy.  What could have been a cosy wood interior is now an IKEA condo.  At least now the feature wall has a TV and monitor to remind everyone that this has little to do with sailing.

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Is every anchorage and marina now full of narcissistic shallow people with cameras and their hand out for internet donations?    

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2 minutes ago, solosailor said:

Is every anchorage and marina now full of narcissistic shallow people with cameras and their hand out for internet donations?    

only in warm places it seems

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5 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Don’t get me started on how much paint they used to cover the beautiful interior woodwork!

as someone who is going through a similar rebuild and facing a similar amount of wood.  painting over it has been worthy of a consideration given the condition of the wood/veneer, knowing that I can probably sand and salvage some,  but i may not be able to salvage all.   Personally I like the wood as I like the warmth,  but the light colored paints really do "open up" the space.

what i don't like about the paint, is that it will invariably will show its age as it gets nicked and chipped and you start seeing the darker wood under the paint.  which means a never ending maintenance of touching up.  not that bare wood or oiled wood is much better

 

I hope that I don't end up having to paint my wood...

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1 hour ago, chuso007 said:

If you thought buying this Beneteau was a bad idea you are going to LOVE this... (I've only watched about 20 seconds into the video, but that's enough)

 

 

Excellent. They both have voices that sound stupid as well as words that are stupid. I watched about 11 seconds and wanted to strangle them both. 

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the life will teach them for suddenly turning the decision to opt 70 ft.. not 24ft . Greed and foolishness.  :lol:

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On 10/31/2020 at 6:23 AM, Cashelmore said:

Wonder how this will turn out....

what a shitboat.. so they fell for a beautiful interior. Some people never learn.

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4 hours ago, chuso007 said:

That boat's in worse condition than Tally Ho...

I don't think it would survive being lifted in the slings

Notice many of the first mates in these Youtubers are Brazilian chicks?  
Good for them for fucking their way out of Amazonian poverty!
(Or the  Virginia Tidewater)  

 

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4 hours ago, Cristoforo said:

I don't think it would survive being lifted in the slings

Notice many of the first mates in these Youtubers are Brazilian chicks?  
Good for them for fucking their way out of Amazonian poverty!
(Or the  Virginia Tidewater)  

 

There are worse plans....   Plucky picked himself up a hottie.  Not sure she is Brazilian though.  Maybe from central america?

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I have watched some of the Odd Life Crafting Brazilian couple, mostly because I am so fascinated by the meticulous restoration they are involved in (I myself am often cutting some corners unless it is a safety issue, these two do not cut corners. For example, they must have spent hundreds of hours on cleaning the diesel tanks alone. Those tanks are so fucking clean you can use them for potable water. If I remember correctly, the spent about 50K on purchasing the boat (which seems a lot of money, but apparently the market in Brazil is a different one). The rest of it is financed through their youtube channel. Sometimes I think they are just going really slow because they don't want this revenue to stop (and for sure they are milking some extra episodes out of it at this point). They are a nice couple although a bit anal at times. They are not crazy like the sinking boat people, I thought, until today I saw their latest episode, and guess what... they are in the same harbor and they encouraged the sinking boat folks to start their own channel. Maybe it is a marketing strategy. I don't know.

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10 hours ago, Marcjsmith said:

as someone who is going through a similar rebuild and facing a similar amount of wood.  painting over it has been worthy of a consideration given the condition of the wood/veneer, knowing that I can probably sand and salvage some,  but i may not be able to salvage all.   Personally I like the wood as I like the warmth,  but the light colored paints really do "open up" the space.

what i don't like about the paint, is that it will invariably will show its age as it gets nicked and chipped and you start seeing the darker wood under the paint.  which means a never ending maintenance of touching up.  not that bare wood or oiled wood is much better

 

I hope that I don't end up having to paint my wood...

Oiled wood is much better. If it starts to look shoddy a scrub with a 3M pad, a quick applicaton of Watco or similar and a wipe down with a clean cloth will do wonders. It blends easy so you do not need to do the whole area to match, and unless the grain is raised no sanding is needed.

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4 hours ago, steele said:

Oiled wood is much better. If it starts to look shoddy a scrub with a 3M pad, a quick applicaton of Watco or similar and a wipe down with a clean cloth will do wonders. It blends easy so you do not need to do the whole area to match, and unless the grain is raised no sanding is needed.

I had to fill some cutouts in my main bulkhead from an stereo someone had installed & some speakers. I painted a satin white but with varnished teak trim.
IMO it looks far better now, the whole boat feels brighter and more airy down below.
 

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5 hours ago, steele said:

Oiled wood is much better. If it starts to look shoddy a scrub with a 3M pad, a quick applicaton of Watco or similar and a wipe down with a clean cloth will do wonders. It blends easy so you do not need to do the whole area to match, and unless the grain is raised no sanding is needed.

https://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/watco/furniture-refinisher. Is this what you’d start with?

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