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Dart96

Hornet spreaders

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I'm renovating a 1974 Hornet, 16ft. Spreaders are limited swing ones. The adjuster screws have corroded solid, so despite weeks in coke, heat and swearing they are not going to move.

I can make new inner ends and restore it to previous glory or do something else. I can get a set with small bottle screws behind the spreader or lock them.

Any suggestions?

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Buy new adjustable spreaders and go sailing. Enjoy!

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Lock them in place. Limited swing spreaders make the mast flexible at first, stiffer after it ends, which is basically the opposite of what you want. 

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Yes, gives length and deflection but not advice on style of spreader,

I'll hapily go for the locked version if that works best. Saves a lot of time.

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Anybody know of a good text on spreader set up?

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As a rule of thumb, set the mast straight with the amount of rake you want (check with a leading Hornet sailmaker ?Exe Sails? or Mike Mac) spreader tips inline with an 1” of deflection could be a good starting point, with enough rig tension to keep the leeward shroud tight when sailing to windward.

Allspars in Plymouth may be able to sort out the spreader bracket and spreaders ... top people

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Superspars and Selden spars are the two largest suppliers of dinghy spar related products, both in Hampshire, have you got a photo of your spreaders?

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This is going to be on a 1974 Rigden hull. Pre epoxy, been instore for 15yrs or more. I don't think it will take much rig tension.

Hornet tuning guide says 350-400lbs on the genoa. I can't imagine I'll get that.

So I'm begining thinking that as spreaders need this sort of rig tension to work and I'm not prepared to do it up that tight (rightly or wrongly) then should I look at a different system.

Could go for diamonds like the Laser 2?

I have dealt with Selden dealer in Plymouth before, nice people. However the prices were well over what I was prepared to pay. I can make any fitting  I need.

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I thought epoxy glues were around by then.

Still, accepting the limit on rig tension on an old wooden hull, would not more spreader deflection off the same bend resistance for a less tension?

Mind you, how far above the hounds is the spinnaker halyard block? You don't want to have the mast reverse on you under kite.

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Just put additional bolts through the spreader and bracket, once you have swung them to as close to where the tuning guide says.

Wooden Hornets always died when they cracked along the join between the plywood and the hog.

Rig tension is more about supporting the genoa luff for slot control,  than mast bend, don't re-invent the wheel, if you think you can't get enough rig tension, just live with a little more luff sag than optimal.  We used to have 24:1 on the stuff luff jib, and used it all.

It is not a precious thing, do the minimum required to sail it, sail it properly, and when it finally breaks, it will have died a good death with its boots on.

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Could you advertise on Dinghies and Bits for Sale to see if someone has the spreader parts that you need in their spares box?

Could you find the way to insert some bracing tubes or wires to relieve the loads from the hull?

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22 hours ago, maxstaylock said:

Rig tension is more about supporting the genoa luff for slot control,  than mast bend, don't re-invent the wheel, if you think you can't get enough rig tension, just live with a little more luff sag than optimal.

Bit more complicated than that because of the trapeze. As the weight comes on the trapeze wire it comes off the shroud, and the spreaders are less effective. In extreme cases gust hits, crew gets on wire, spreader stops working, mast bends, power dumped, crew has to get off wire again, cycle repeats. Not fast and not fun. The obvious cure was so much rig tension the reduction caused by trapeze wires was barely significant, but without excellent structural integrity there are problems. 

If the boat has a sliding seat, then this problem doesn't exist. On the other hand the plank sets up big torsional loads in the hull. 

As noted rigging diamonds solves this problem, but adds others, including few references for rig tuning, and complications around fore and aft bend control. 

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It has a seat, which was one reason for taking it. (It was a free boat and I always liked Hornets)

Boat has two winches at the mast foot, one was for the pole uphaul, I'm going to repurpose it for Lowers, would they provide enough fore and aft bend control?

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Do you know the sail number of the boat?  Lower mast bend would be changed with mast chocks in the gate, before struts became stylish must haves, but your rig may not support the higher kicker loads of later boats, think the mains may have had a smaller head to start with.    

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Boat never measured. So no sail number

It's a crew deck one like an FD so the Vertical distance  between the mast step and the foredeck is about 250mm. So I don't think the mast chocks will do much.

I'm going to run the lowers from the shroud adjustment racks below the gunwale upto the spinnaker pole eye and down to one of the winches.

Spinnaker pole eye is 1430mm above the foot.

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Hope you have a lot of fun, they are lovely boats, especially upwind.  If you are replacing your buoyancy bags, crewsaver are good, avoid holt.  Make sure your slot gasket is good, or it pumps water in.  Only the brave go without transom flaps.  

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Lowers are always a better choice than deck chocks. 

Think about loads though, the forces on lowers are far greater than logic would suggest. I would always want them fastened to the outside skin with a compression beam taking the boat crushing loads. 

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Dyneema led around the front of the mast and looped over the gooseneck is a tidy solution for attaching lowers.  However you need a lot of tension and purchases to control mast bend, and the compression may be an issue for a boat that was never intended to have them.  

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