Alan H

When is it time to transition?

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After many years of racing shorthanded, I'm finally at the point where I'm feeling ready to let that go and cruise/daysail.  I'm not "done", yet...I have a few more races in me and one more big crossing but the clock is ticking.   I'm 63.  Now, lots of people do both at the same time. And sure, "age is just a number"...which to a point is true.

So when did / does  the "time come" to kick back and ease off the racing pedal, for you?

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I was going to suggest before completing puberty?  But I might be confused. 
 

:)

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For my Dad, it was after he turned 80. He won 2 National Championships when he was 70 and 77 respectively, so yeah, bag it and get a daysailor. Oh wait, you already have one...

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Transition -- yet another term that has made a transition.

Like sailboat racing -- it happens on AC75s @ 40kts, not 4-7kt SBs on Wednesday nights. Things change.

 

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I find that letting our two sons plus a couple friends race FRANCIS LEE with me aboard as just a passenger is a good transition. No more stress on my 72 year old body, just the delight in seeing our kids and a couple friends having fun.

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I will be 72 next month. I was never a very successful racer, never a one-design racer, just handicap racing on Biscayne Bay and a lake. Like some of you, whenever there is another boat in sight, I am secretly racing. I still enjoy PHRF racing, but spinnakers are a drawback. I am glad of the racing I did, because it made me a better sailor.

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For me it happened when I first got interested in sailing.

I never had much or any interest in racing sailboats. If I'm going to race something I want it to be fast, not just relatively fast.

Having said that, I do like sailing old race boats - the same way I'd like a GT40 or Lola T70 on the street. :D

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For a good part of my life the only reason to get on a boat was to race it. Then I married and discovered cruising.

I'm really lucky in that my wife LOVES cruising, because I love her and love being with her. Being on the boat together is our favorite place in the world, and we are comfortable with overnight sails and offshore. She's done 2 Bermuda returns, but has no interest in racing. 

Nowadays, I do occasional classic yacht regattas because, well, we have a wooden Spirit of Tradition boat, and some of the races are very beautiful. It's still not as fun as just cruising with the two of us.

I'm 66, but "transitioned" to cruising years ago.  

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For me it was in my mid-30's. I was always crew, and never on hotshot boats, but racing made me a much better sailor.

But I also learned that I was unlikely to want financial responsibility for a boat used for racing- at least one with a keel. I like old racing boats themselves, so I'd definitely be in the "classic" mode now, modern racing tech has left me far astern. 

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A couple of years ago at our club's annual single handed race, the most senior guy in the club signs up.  He's 90-ish, and his health is spotty, but it was a beautiful day, and he was feeling good.  He retired from the race when he began to feel tired, and from what I gather, had a great day on the water. 

Point being: don't worry about switching from one type of sailing to another - just go out and enjoy it.

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Do it for as long as you can - people who I've seen "stop" abruptly seem to accelerate their own decline remarkably quickly. Better to be busy, racing and losing than not do it at all.

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Use it or lose it...  after a major health issue one of the team commented to me that "maybe soon I could try sailing again"...  followed by "that's an interesting facial expression".  I said "that's the physical manifestation of 'you can pry the wheel out of my cold dead hands...'".  I will keep sailing, and sail solo, so long as I'm comfortable doing it, not stopping based on an arbitrary judgement.

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The most important thing on a boat above all especially for a couple is being honest about what you expect to get out of it from day one.

We have met lots of racer cruisers in various configurations.  Some are both racers on a racing Cruising boat and the Cruising part is more or less filler.  Some have a great boat that sails well is comfortable and one of them gets several races fixes per season.  My guess is if you race that will always be there. You buy a Nordhaven and do a rally and you will be trying to get wherever first.

Racers above all are so far ahead of the game in a ironic way.  The average cruises are probably not the best sailors as it is only one component, but they really know how to do the Cruising life style part and have fun. Racers going in are more than likely going to be pretty good sailers but the pulling the plug part and slowing down might be hard.

 

Absolutely no reason to not get plenty of both, no time like the present.

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I sail on other people's boats sometime, and when the boat isn't sailing at its best, or reasonably close to it, because the sails aren't set up right, or trimmed properly, I get a little antsy. Not that I'm a master racer, but I really love it when a boat is doing its best. You can feel it and its a wonderful feeling. Its what make sailing a joy.

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@Blue Crab I am intrigued by your signature quote: "Tall Timbers Marina: "ALMOST 60 YEARS OF THE SAME MISMANAGEMENT!”"

Can you tell us more, or did you have to sign a Non-Disclosure Agreement?

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13 minutes ago, Bull City said:

@Blue Crab I am intrigued by your signature quote: "Tall Timbers Marina: "ALMOST 60 YEARS OF THE SAME MISMANAGEMENT!”"

Can you tell us more, or did you have to sign a Non-Disclosure Agreement?

That is cool. I'm still boat shopping and ran across this in MD, as I'm looking to move out of this really really red area. Place looks friendly and bills itself as a backwater marina. I'd fit right in.

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12 hours ago, SASSAFRASS said:

You buy a Nordhaven and do a rally and you will be trying to get wherever first.

This summer we met a couple living/working aboard a big Nordhavn, very nice, New Yorkers fleeing Covid. Each, it seems, has their own office aboard. 

i told them that as much as I like those boats, when I get a motorboat it won't be to do 9 knots. They corrected me.

"We cruise at 8"

48 minutes ago, Blue Crab said:

That is cool. I'm still boat shopping and ran across this in MD, as I'm looking to move out of this really really red area. Place looks friendly and bills itself as a backwater marina. I'd fit right in.

I find this saddening. I neither know nor care about the politics of most of our neighbors, although in Texas we sort of assume most are conservative, in Taos most are liberal, in New England it's a mix.

Politics should be about 10th on the list of important things in our lives, behind family, friends, work, community, faith (if applicable, it is with me), hobbies. Politicians live to divide us for their own purposes. If we let them succeed they win, and we are the poorer for it. 

Just my opinion, not worth the pixels it occupies. 

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I'm looking forward to doing a couple of races next year, maybe doing the local winter race, the Three Bridge Fiasco on a Hobie Miracle 20. That will be my first time on a multihull. I could get hooked!  Then the SHTP...sell the boat in the Islands...

Come back and sail the Piper.  I might build a two sheet...it's really a three-sheet...very cool double-ended rowboat. Free plans are available over on the Wooden Boat Forum. Or I might build that Caragnone and try dinghy cruising in the Delta. I don't think the Mrs. is going to go for having TWO boats in the front yard!  Here's Flo-Mo's free two-sheet plans page.

http://flo-mo.weebly.com/two-sheet-boats.html

I might do some racing on the Capo 30 that the Hobie owner has.  I expect I'll take the Piper across the Bay and do the Plastic Classic "race".  I'm tempted to build the Caragnone and then haul it up to WA and dinghy-cruise the Puget Sound water trail. All this is really sounding good to me now. I doubt that I will miss the racing I've done.  We'll see!

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If Vendee Globe skipper Jean le Cam, 61, can endure 114db at 27 knots (what Alex Thompson on Huge Boss reported shortly after the VG start this afternoon in France), then 61 is too early to transition.  Let’s hope he (and the other skippers) brought lots of noise-cancelling earphones...(sound effects between 1:20-1:50): 

 

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22 hours ago, Oceanconcepts said:

For me it was in my mid-30's. I was always crew, and never on hotshot boats, but racing made me a much better sailor.

But I also learned that I was unlikely to want financial responsibility for a boat used for racing- at least one with a keel. I like old racing boats themselves, so I'd definitely be in the "classic" mode now, modern racing tech has left me far astern. 

I, for one, would like to see more photos of your boat.

i don't know if you are familiar with The Hawk, a cold molded Bill Tripp one tonner that recently got an un-frickin-believable restoration at BBY, and has since done extremely well in wooden boat races. She seems more flush-decked than yours, and was built in Germany as a pretty much flat out race version. Beautiful, and boy does she sail. 

http://brooklinboatyard.com/the-hawk/

 

 

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38 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

If Vendee Globe skipper Jean le Cam, 61, can endure 114db at 27 knots (what Alex Thompson on Huge Boss reported shortly after the VG start this afternoon in France), then 61 is too early to transition.  Let’s hope he (and the other skippers) brought lots of noise-cancelling earphones...(sound effects between 1:20-1:50): 

 

What is the proper term for the big ass struts the originate from the mast base and extend outward and slightly aft?

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2 minutes ago, bmiller said:

What is the proper term for the big ass struts the originate from the mast base and extend outward and slightly aft?

Foils?  Dunno if there’s a more specific term for those fools in particular you mention.

(Forgot to add to my earlier post above - it’s time to transition out to racing when you’re losing your hearing: 114dB is about the loudness of a gas-powered leaf blower or a live rock concert, says Google :-) )

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7 minutes ago, bmiller said:

What is the proper term for the big ass struts the originate from the mast base and extend outward and slightly aft?

Outriggers .

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1 minute ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Foils?  Dunno if there’s a more specific term for those fools in particular you mention.

(Forgot to add to my earlier post above - it’s time to transition out to racing when you’re losing your hearing: 114dB is about the loudness of a gas-powered leaf blower or a live rock concert, says Google :-) )

Not the foils, the rigging parts. Like giant spreaders at the base.

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Just now, Mid said:

Outriggers .

Got it, thanks. Gives a stouter angle on the shrouds?

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1 minute ago, bmiller said:

Gives a stouter angle on the shrouds?

yep , needed to handle the loads generated .

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34 minutes ago, bmiller said:

Not the foils, the rigging parts. Like giant spreaders at the base.

Oops - misread your post.  Yeah, what he said below.  Just like on oceangoing fish boats...albeit for a different purpose :-)

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If you get a boat that displaces 3 tons or more and rates over 180 PHRF, and can find a fleet to race it non-spinnaker, you can can keep going well into your dotage. Don't make the crew sit on the rail, leave the sheets cleated in the self-tailers,  have a younger crew member to set the whisker pole. Also, don't care if you win; just enjoy the tide and the sunset.

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Annnnd, the most successful PHRF racer I know said he "sails thru less water." There's a goal -- self improvement -- that doesn't rely on others at all.  

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On 11/8/2020 at 9:44 AM, Cruisin Loser said:

I find this saddening. I neither know nor care about the politics of most of our neighbors, although in Texas we sort of assume most are conservative, in Taos most are liberal, in New England it's a mix.

Politics should be about 10th on the list of important things in our lives, behind family, friends, work, community, faith (if applicable, it is with me), hobbies. Politicians live to divide us for their own purposes. If we let them succeed they win, and we are the poorer for it. 

Just my opinion, not worth the pixels it occupies. 

Cruisin, I agree with you, and I think until four years ago, it was pretty much the case for most of us. The divisions have been around for a while, but the last four years have been pretty weird. I'll leave it at that.

B.C.

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Yah, Yah, 72 (as a leap year baby I celebrated my 18th BD last February).  No fucking way am I going to the dark side, just logged 7 huge trees from the back of the house and waiting for the opportunity to cross the Cheese Curtain next summer and hang with my beautiful Canuck neighbors.  I am not going gracefully but kicking and sailing until the last breath.  Just Say'in...The Captain Abides

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Racing is for insecure people who have the need to make themselves feel better than someone else.  And if you have more money than a better poorer sailor you can beat them with better equipment.   
Once I figured this out I just started laughing at racers.  
 

cruising is where it’s at.  And I guess the same applies to cruising.  Whoever can afford to do it the most in the nicest boat wins. 

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1 hour ago, nebe said:

Racing is for insecure people who have the need to make themselves feel better than someone else.  And if you have more money than a better poorer sailor you can beat them with better equipment.   
Once I figured this out I just started laughing at racers.  
 

cruising is where it’s at.  And I guess the same applies to cruising.  Whoever can afford to do it the most in the nicest boat wins. 

Only if you’re insecure about your status in the world and comparing yourself to the “Jones” all the time.  You can have plenty of fun racing and/or cruising on a beer budget...lots of examples of that on this site.  Sailing is one of the most “scalable” activities around.  If you can’t afford to sail around the world, you can get 95% or more of the enjoyment by sailing around an island in a small lake. If you can’t afford a new J/111, you can have 95% of the fun on an old J-24...

 

 

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1 hour ago, nebe said:

Racing is for insecure people who have the need to make themselves feel better than someone else.  And if you have more money than a better poorer sailor you can beat them with better equipment.   
Once I figured this out I just started laughing at racers.  
 

cruising is where it’s at.  And I guess the same applies to cruising.  Whoever can afford to do it the most in the nicest boat wins. 

Somebody is a little cranky:-).  I think of PHRF racing as a reason to get your boat off the dock and enjoy the day with friends.  In our area, the boats that get used the most are the ones that participate in the "Fun Races"  weekly.  It just gives that extra bit of motivation to use the boat.

A lot of "cruisers" have grand ideas of cruising while their boats turn green at the dock.  I love cruising, but 90% of the sailing I do these days is racing or daysailing.

Sailing is frigging awesome!  Any excuse to get out there is a good one!  Currently looking for a racer/cruiser.

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1 hour ago, nebe said:

Racing is for insecure people who have the need to make themselves feel better than someone else.  And if you have more money than a better poorer sailor you can beat them with better equipment.   
Once I figured this out I just started laughing at racers.  
 

cruising is where it’s at.  And I guess the same applies to cruising.  Whoever can afford to do it the most in the nicest boat wins. 

On the coasts, in the mid west, YA..  Would love to go cruising, but all we got is puddles..  Racing is all we got and if it is OD and the boats are cheap..  S20(we get 10 ish on wed nights in normal years) so minus cruising grounds, I don't even want to look at the boat unless we getting ready for a race/season...  Grew up cruising...  Ya need somewhere cool to go..  

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2 hours ago, nebe said:

 Whoever can afford to do it the most in the nicest boat wins. 

Nah.

Whoever is having the most fun wins. The most fun I've ever had on a sailboat was cruising with our kids. The 2nd most is just being on the boat with my bride. A nice boat helps, but anything clean and safe would probably be OK. In the 70's we cruised our family's little 28' Samurai sloop and had a blast.

Races have a place. Racing to Bermuda forces you to prepare both your boat and yourself to a high standard. The coolest place in American sailing is anchored at Woodenboat the night before and evening after the Eggemoggin Reach Regatta, and rowing around over 100 of the coolest boats on earth, all parked in one place for 2 nights. It should be a bucket list experience for every northeast sailor. The bride is not a racer, but she loves the beauty of the wooden boat races.

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On 11/8/2020 at 12:00 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

I, for one, would like to see more photos of your boat.

i don't know if you are familiar with The Hawk, a cold molded Bill Tripp one tonner that recently got an un-frickin-believable restoration at BBY, and has since done extremely well in wooden boat races. She seems more flush-decked than yours, and was built in Germany as a pretty much flat out race version. Beautiful, and boy does she sail. 

http://brooklinboatyard.com/the-hawk/

 

 

I have not previously seen The Hawk- beautiful, and restored to a level that I unfortunately don’t possess the resources to achieve. But inspiring.

Pathfinder is S&S design 2062, built in 1971 by Brin Wilson in Auckland, NZ for his own use. OAL is 39’ 8”, beam 11’ 6”, draft 6 1/2’, and displacement about 18,000 pounds. Construction is cold molded kauri, resorcinol glued, and sheathed in glass. She was the overall winner of the Sydney-Hobart race in 1971, and part of a winning NZ One Ton Cup team the next year, so a distinguished racing past. I found rather breathless Austrailian TV coverage of the ’71 race on You Tube, with lots of video of Pathfinder. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UATbws9TjUs

In my gallery here I have posted scans of a 5 page "new boat" article on Pathfinder from New Zealand Boating, which is nice for seeing the original configuration, along with a few other pictures. 

She was sailed to the Pacific Northwest in the 80’s, and as far as I can tell has been here ever since- though I found evidence onboard of at least one trip to Mexico.

Pathfinder is a bit of a project now, with peeling paint and in need of new sails and some interior updating. This was supposed to be my year to completely refinish the hull, but a virus had other ideas. I previously stripped and epoxy sheathed the cabin and reconfigured the cockpit to be more cruising friendly, but this year’s boat projects were limited to maintenance.  My wife and I develop decompression computers for scuba divers (she being the software/ hardware engineer & the brains behind the operation). Covid brought our business to a standstill and major (expensive) boat projects will need to wait until our new products are on the market.

Fortunately Pathfinder had superb original construction and decent care, so the work mainly involves fixing cosmetic neglect, and some updating to the interior and rig. Previous owners have made mostly positive and good quality changes- no disasters. In fact, the prior owner I purchased her from literally wrote the book on modern cold molded yacht construction.

She has a very special indefinable feel, and I’m looking forward to the time when I can devote the attention she deserves.496700437_Pathfinder_0286SM.thumb.jpg.e017813bd6486f83a014f8be67a76b61.jpg

 

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6 hours ago, Crash said:

Only if you’re insecure about your status in the world and comparing yourself to the “Jones” all the time.  You can have plenty of fun racing and/or cruising on a beer budget...lots of examples of that on this site.  Sailing is one of the most “scalable” activities around.  If you can’t afford to sail around the world, you can get 95% or more of the enjoyment by sailing around an island in a small lake. If you can’t afford a new J/111, you can have 95% of the fun on an old J-24...

 

 

google sanjuan 21 for an example...i owned one but never raced but the fact that quite a few people do means  i got a very nice 2 year old main on a beer budget!

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On 11/8/2020 at 2:26 PM, bmiller said:

Not the foils, the rigging parts. Like giant spreaders at the base.

Outriggers is an innovation that's been around for quite a while.  the willer of the vendee 08-09 had them.

220px-IMOCA-Foncia-in-Plymouth.jpg

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7 hours ago, Crash said:

Only if you’re insecure about your status in the world and comparing yourself to the “Jones” all the time.  You can have plenty of fun racing and/or cruising on a beer budget...lots of examples of that on this site.  Sailing is one of the most “scalable” activities around.  If you can’t afford to sail around the world, you can get 95% or more of the enjoyment by sailing around an island in a small lake. If you can’t afford a new J/111, you can have 95% of the fun on an old J-24...

This.

I've previously described my first time sailing - an old cement trough repurposed by a couple of pre-teen brothers into a "pram" with a sapling mast and a bed sheet sail.

Nearly 60 years later I still remember it as one of the best days ever on the water.

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5 hours ago, Blue Crab said:

Image may contain: one or more people, text that says 'I'M SORRY FOR WHATI SAID WHEN WAS DOCKING THE BOAT'

I want one. :D

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6 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Nah.

Whoever is having the most fun wins.

This.

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8 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Nah.

Whoever is having the most fun wins. 

With regards to skiing, I've always said the biggest smile on the mountain is the best skier.

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14 hours ago, Crash said:

Only if you’re insecure about your status in the world and comparing yourself to the “Jones” all the time.  You can have plenty of fun racing and/or cruising on a beer budget...lots of examples of that on this site.  Sailing is one of the most “scalable” activities around.  If you can’t afford to sail around the world, you can get 95% or more of the enjoyment by sailing around an island in a small lake. If you can’t afford a new J/111, you can have 95% of the fun on an old J-24...

 

See, this is what I've been thinking for a long time.  How much fun do I have, for the dollars spent?

I have a lot of fun playing clarinet and tenor saxophone.  For what I spend on one haulout, I could have a  1956  Buescher "Big B"   , bit fat-sound American tenor sax.  For a years berth rent, one sail and a haulout I could buy two brand new professional quality clarinets. The thing is, once you have those, aside from reeds and a $300 overhaul very three years, they're free.

I have a blast backpacking.  Anything new that I might possibly want is about $150...boots? I have two tents, I'll never need another one. I wouldn't trade my old Jansport pack for one of the new internal frame packs, I love my old Jansport.

Everything I do for fun returns a HELL of a lot more fun / dollar than sailing. I have to say that while I'm really looking forward to that one more trip across to Hawaii, I'm  also looking forward to daysails with a beer in the cockpit in a pretty boat and having bills that are 20% what theyare right now, while I'm in the middle of this prep. This is the fourth time I've prepped for a SHTP...went across twice, had to turn back once and I've got this one.  I'm having fun building a windvane, but enough is enough.

It''s time to just sail around here and dink around with little stuff and improve the fun/dollar ratio.

 

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You know what else looks fun?

The Texas 200....do it in a Lido 14 or an O'Day daysailer or a Harpoon 5.2.  I'd take a week to drive from California to Texas, and explore on the way, car camping. Then do the event, and take another week farting around on the way home.

The Puget Sound Water trail.....the precursor to the R2Ak....the 70-48.

And today, a buddy posted a video of a family taking a drift boat down the upper Missouri River.  I think that looks absolutely fantastic.  Do that in a little open-water rowboat?  That would be too much fun!

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11 hours ago, Oceanconcepts said:

I have not previously seen The Hawk- beautiful, and restored to a level that I unfortunately don’t possess the resources to achieve. But inspiring.

Pathfinder is S&S design 2062, built in 1971 by Brin Wilson in Auckland, NZ for his own use. OAL is 39’ 8”, beam 11’ 6”, draft 6 1/2’, and displacement about 18,000 pounds. Construction is cold molded kauri, resorcinol glued, and sheathed in glass. She was the overall winner of the Sydney-Hobart race in 1971, and part of a winning NZ One Ton Cup team the next year, so a distinguished racing past. I found rather breathless Austrailian TV coverage of the ’71 race on You Tube, with lots of video of Pathfinder. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UATbws9TjUs

In my gallery here I have posted scans of a 5 page "new boat" article on Pathfinder from New Zealand Boating, which is nice for seeing the original configuration, along with a few other pictures. 

She was sailed to the Pacific Northwest in the 80’s, and as far as I can tell has been here ever since- though I found evidence onboard of at least one trip to Mexico.

Pathfinder is a bit of a project now, with peeling paint and in need of new sails and some interior updating. This was supposed to be my year to completely refinish the hull, but a virus had other ideas. I previously stripped and epoxy sheathed the cabin and reconfigured the cockpit to be more cruising friendly, but this year’s boat projects were limited to maintenance.  My wife and I develop decompression computers for scuba divers (she being the software/ hardware engineer & the brains behind the operation). Covid brought our business to a standstill and major (expensive) boat projects will need to wait until our new products are on the market.

Fortunately Pathfinder had superb original construction and decent care, so the work mainly involves fixing cosmetic neglect, and some updating to the interior and rig. Previous owners have made mostly positive and good quality changes- no disasters. In fact, the prior owner I purchased her from literally wrote the book on modern cold molded yacht construction.

She has a very special indefinable feel, and I’m looking forward to the time when I can devote the attention she deserves.496700437_Pathfinder_0286SM.thumb.jpg.e017813bd6486f83a014f8be67a76b61.jpg

 

Brin Wilson boats are very well put together and built to last, the shop at Gulf Harbour Marina, on the Whangaparoa Peninsula 3/4 of an hour north of Auckland does mostly repairs and small one off items now.

I have a soft spot for S&S designs they are usually very sea kind especially in a blow.

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7 hours ago, Alan H said:

You know what else looks fun?

The Texas 200....do it in a Lido 14 or an O'Day daysailer or a Harpoon 5.2.  I'd take a week to drive from California to Texas, and explore on the way, car camping. Then do the event, and take another week farting around on the way home.

The Puget Sound Water trail.....the precursor to the R2Ak....the 70-48.

And today, a buddy posted a video of a family taking a drift boat down the upper Missouri River.  I think that looks absolutely fantastic.  Do that in a little open-water rowboat?  That would be too much fun!

Too bad I gave away my Harpoon 5.2.

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8 hours ago, Navig8tor said:

Brin Wilson boats are very well put together and built to last, the shop at Gulf Harbour Marina, on the Whangaparoa Peninsula 3/4 of an hour north of Auckland does mostly repairs and small one off items now.

I have a soft spot for S&S designs they are usually very sea kind especially in a blow.

I'd love to visit the area someday when the world calms down. There is one other Brin Wilson built boat I know of in the Pacific Northwest, designed by Richard Wilson. The owners have the same observations about the excellent construction that I do. After 50 years the quality and details do show. 

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9 hours ago, Navig8tor said:

Brin Wilson boats are very well put together and built to last, the shop at Gulf Harbour Marina, on the Whangaparoa Peninsula 3/4 of an hour north of Auckland does mostly repairs and small one off items now.

I have a soft spot for S&S designs they are usually very sea kind especially in a blow.

I can attest to the sea kindly-ness in a blow. As an added bonus, they have very pleasing lines.

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1 hour ago, Slick470 said:

My wife bought me a version of that shirt... 

I just ordered one via my wife. :D

Lots of possible variations;

"I'm sorry for what I said when the spinnaker was going up / coming down"

"I'm sorry for what I said when the anchor dragged"

In fact there are virtually endless possibilities.

 

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Always a pleasure to see real boathandling on display. I don't have that level of expertise but I know it when I see it.

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I did local races in the mid to late 90s and it was fun as long as at least some of the crew could put their drink down long enough to help sail the boat.

My first serious sailing came in the mid 70s.  But it was far from a race boat.  We took the boat from Chicago to Mac Island and back.  I never wanted that trip to end.  When the racing days came along, I enjoyed learning and getting better, and occasionally winning.  But cruising was always more enjoyable.  No stress, just enjoying the ride and visiting new places. 

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"I'm sorry for what I said when my beer went over the side"

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On 11/10/2020 at 10:24 PM, Alan H said:

You know what else looks fun?

The Texas 200....do it in a Lido 14 or an O'Day daysailer or a Harpoon 5.2.  I'd take a week to drive from California to Texas, and explore on the way, car camping. Then do the event, and take another week farting around on the way home.

The Puget Sound Water trail.....the precursor to the R2Ak....the 70-48.

And today, a buddy posted a video of a family taking a drift boat down the upper Missouri River.  I think that looks absolutely fantastic.  Do that in a little open-water rowboat?  That would be too much fun!

This looks like just the right boat for that Texas 200.

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/88936

 

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On 11/8/2020 at 1:01 PM, Weyalan said:

reaching strut? ;)

 

 

On 11/8/2020 at 12:26 PM, Mid said:

Outriggers .

And one now one may ask, what is (in French), “un hook”?  I’m guessing it means one of the hook-like foils that stick out of the hull (e.g., in Vendee Globe IMOCAs).  
 

Third  “hook” damage according to one of the latest race updates.  
 

Troisième problème de hook sur le Vendée Globe!

https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-avarie-sur-l-occitane-en-provence-armel-tripon-se-deroute-vers-la-corogne-a93160d6-23e2-11eb-9955-30d4cdb051c8?fbclid=IwAR3bW_wdTt1NAEmqk5Rqi1-810VHlJMQofsU62mYCD5_qHUGJZkaS4yq3cs

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