dylan winter

Trangia v Origo v Maxie -3 Metho stoves v 1.5 pints of water

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2 minutes ago, chester said:

no, there is the cooker and then if you want heat you buy a blower lid that makes it a heater.  the blower is an optional extra...as the brits would say

i don't know if i'd risk using it in the tropical summer, even without the optional extra

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Just now, Trovão said:

i don't know if i'd risk using it in the tropical summer, even without the optional extra

:D having no expeience with troopical summers, i defer to you conclusions!

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2 minutes ago, chester said:

:D having no expeience with troopical summers, i defer to you conclusions!

100+°F in the shadow...:blink:

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5 minutes ago, Trovão said:

i don't know if i'd risk using it in the tropical summer, even without the optional extra

Any galley range is torture during tropical summers, doesn't matter the fuel.  We grill on the rail almost exclusively during Chesapeake summers.

Veggies are grilled or grill-roasted, wrapped in foil with a spritz of EVOO, salt and pepper.

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9 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Any galley range is torture during tropical summers, doesn't matter the fuel.  We grill on the rail almost exclusively during Chesapeake summers.

Veggies are grilled or grill-roasted, wrapped in foil with a spritz of EVOO, salt and pepper.

agreed. but still, some can be worse than others...

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

Yeah, I was using the same stuff.  Jesus, if denatured alcohol is being regulated I guess keeping the propane system on the boat wasn't a mistake after all.

I'm not sure how soon it will be regulated outside of California, but there are a number of other products that will burn in the stoves that are less regulated and work as well. The lightweight backpacker crowd has been discussion options for awhile. Lots of articles and youtube videos discussing options like this https://www.99boulders.com/best-alcohol-stove-fuels?fbclid=IwAR04Fb3zjA7k_TNpKhte1G4P_RJzolSbBNdQ3RQSONVa7QbgkdIsRnv3Qr8

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3 hours ago, Ishmael said:

We keep one of those single-burner stoves stashed on the boat just in case. For steak, I prefer our Magma BBQ. The Magma also makes great toast.

Me too on the Magma. That is a high heat device unlike my galley range and the perfect place to grill anything thick. Plus it makes a great second burner off the aft rail.

We have a large thick frypan to fits inside and the top closes over it, except for the metal handle, which makes it perfect on a rolling boat.

For cooking breakfast home fries, eggs, bacon, all together, it''s the perfect burner. A little slow to first heat up but then it's easy to run from low to high. I would think it's a little like cooking on an Aga. 

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I'm into heat when I cook. The tools so to speak. I like to change the chemistry of the food. Searing, I love searing things. :)

Marine 'cookers' are usually a step between campfire and household, at their best. A cooker that puts out much heat needs a strong vent overhead, something you never see on a boat (under 80' or so). An oven is one thing, or a burner beneath, which can utilize much of the energy being burned and limit excess heat. 

Broiling works mostly on radiation from above. 

How much heat does it take to broil? Quite a bit I think, or you need extra time. For something about 1" thick, it takes approx. 7-8 minutes per side to reach an internal temperature of 145F (and that is with the broiler pre-heated for 10 minutes or so). 

The overhead burner on my old restaurant stove runs from front to back and spreads a flame over the entire broiler grill. High energy waste lost in simple heat not to mention energy used. 

1806965395_Broiler.thumb.JPG.a875d2889c3cddea9fb63413e422bb54.JPG

 

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When I moved ashore, I was shocked at how quickly popcorn pops on an electric stove compared to alcohol on the boat.

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On 11/15/2020 at 1:28 PM, Beanie 101 said:

They may have stopped making Origo stoves but the technology is now being adopted in the developing world as an alternative to charcoal and wood cooking fuels, responsible for extensive land degradation.  The US’s Gaia Project is promoting Origo-type stoves that can be assembled locally in countries like Ethiopia and Tanzania.  See in particular these ones http://cleancook.com/productsstove-sales/.

In fact, Dometic/Origo transferred/donated the tech and patents to CleanCook. So the canisters are interchangeable, one generation improved.

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Easiest way I've found to fill an Origo cannister is to drill a 1/4 hole in the bottom of an empty soup can or a red Solo cup. Take the (cool) cannister out of the stove, put the can or cup over the hole and fill with fuel. It'll trickle into the cannister, spill free. Neat enough that, assuming no open flames nearby, I'm comfortable refueling in the galley sink rather than the cockpit. 

New gaskets can easily be cut from 1/8 nitrile. I think a 12x12 sheet can be had for a few bucks. I'd agree that if you're using the stove daily it's not worth bothering with them but useful if the stove isn't going to be used for a week or so. 

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