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Looks just fine to us. Our biggest concern is how much is it going to cost? We’ll know soon enough! From J/Boats:

Responding to a growing need amongst sailors for a more comfortable, simpler and easy-to-own daysailer, J/Boats is excited to announce a sleek new 28 footer (the “J/9”) with perhaps the most
comfortable cockpit and easiest-to-manage sailplan in this size range.

“With the J/9, we set out to reimagine how to make sailing easier, more relaxing and more inclusive,” said Jeff Johnstone of J/Boats. “This is a boat you can sail by yourself in just a few minutes, or  bring along the
whole gang with plenty of room to spare. Escaping to the water and enjoying shared family adventure has never been more important, and the J/9 is the perfect platform.”

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They shrunk a J/100.

From the J/Boat web site:

"The daysailing community has not benefitted from a dedicated design from J/Boats since the award-winning J/100 (33’), which remains one of the most sought-after J’s created. The NEW J/9 offers the cockpit comfort and sailing features of a larger boat, at a price most will find competitive to the best brokerage offerings."

 

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The little tug that could...

20201121_083048.thumb.jpg.78c273e43bfa977834b623e82edf40df.jpg

So many things wrong for what will undoubtedly be a very expensive boat. Above deck furler, tallest winches I have ever seen, and two at that. Awfully high boom, may need a ladder to reef, and why are the stantions so tall? But then, I suppose the Mac26 was a big seller. This probably will be too, but I just don't get it.

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It needs to be under two tons all-up for the hoists around here.

Eliminate some of that needless structure in the stern and it could get there, plus it would sail better.

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The older I get the smaller and simpler the boat Id want to own. So I bought J80 this year as my retirement boat having turned 63. J/9 looks ok but at likely $100K -+ all up cost, not so much

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There have been multiple topics on CA and SA about this type of boat, most recently the Daysailer for old people thread. J boats come up as options often, but may be too "racy". The 100 is great, but hard to find and at 33 feet a bit long for a step down boat. Under 30 feet is a sweet spot around here since moorage is available at a lower cost as boats overall have been getting longer. I suspect the marketing folks at J recognize all this.

The boat as rendered as no traveler, room for a head below, and should be low maintenance. It's success may depend on price.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Varan said:

The little tug that could...

20201121_083048.thumb.jpg.78c273e43bfa977834b623e82edf40df.jpg

So many things wrong for what will undoubtedly be a very expensive boat. Above deck furler, tallest winches I have ever seen, and two at that. Awfully high boom, may need a ladder to reef, and why are the stantions so tall? But then, I suppose the Mac26 was a big seller. This probably will be too, but I just don't get it.

My J/122 has a below deck furler. It totally sucks. More friction and less leverage means I either need to turn downwind or put the furling line on a winch. I’ve comfortably furled bigger headsails by hand with above deck furlers.

Safe stanchion height is relative people size not boat size. So it’s not gonna change to stay in proportion with a smaller boat. But I believe some J/100s were sold without stanchions and life lines if you need the purity of driving without your seatbelt. 
 

 

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Not impressed.  Looks like they spent 15 minutes designing it.  I would seriously consider any of the wooden decked day sailors gliding the lakes of Switzerland long before I order this 80s looking tub.

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4 hours ago, SEC16518 said:

I really do not understand this "day sailing" market.....

While it's fun, most people do not sail at night. Hence "day sailing".

Sheesh, I have to explain everything.B)

Most boats are actually used just for daysailing, with an occasional short cruise thrown in, so why not design for the primary use?

I have a 48' custom that is heavily oriented towards fun sailing, but it's still a furniture boat with a lot of concessions (weight, volume, systems) to comfort.

I've sailed an Eggemoggin 47. if you drove one for an hour, you'd understand. 

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Nope. not gettin this...

I'm saving up all my pesos for an Ericson 35 MKII....All the cool kids have an E35!

 

This J Boat needs some sort of selling point other than small and costs a lot.   

Suggestions:

-Keel is actually a huge lithium Ion battery.   Electric drive from a WWII UBoat connected to the Battery Keel......Gets you home quick for Golden Girl reruns....

- Optional Tesla Auto Pilot - Did you forget to take your nap before going sailing again?   No Problem!   Just push a button and Tesla Auto pilot will sail while you nap!

- Zoom Video Screen that doubles as hatch boards

and the #1 item that will get this boat sold is.......   Could you come up with some sort of Spin pole that extends from the bow and attaches to a modified downwind sail?   You could call it a J Spirit pole!

 

 

Small and Costs a lot......This has never helped to sell a boat. 

Is everybody sure that J Boats is not buying used J27's and applying a new coat of paint?   Then call it the J9?.....

 

 

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Jeez, this place is so full of hate these days.

Thanks J boats, hope you sell lots, so I may buy and sail one when I am old.

Seems fine to me, everyone wants a 50 footer on the water, a thirty footer for parking, and a 15 footer for bills.

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I hope they sell a ton of these and make the future owners very happy.

I imagine the design process went something like this:

"We are trying something new: this year we have a naval architecture intern!"

"OK, maybe have them look at the J/80 and see if they can turbo it a bit by adding some chines?"

<time passes>

"Did you forget to tell the intern that the chines go on the bottom of the boat, not in the cockpit?"

 

It looks like they took all the gently curved parts of the J/80 and replaced them with sharp corners. This seems to reference 1980s design idioms, and also suggests that you are supposed to sit in the boat, no hike out. It almost certainly makes a ton of senses for the target market. But you can just buy a Santa Cruz 27 from your favorite West Coast Craigslist right now for < $10k.

Edit: Also, J/Boats marketing department either needs to watch more or less Youtube. I'm not sure which.
 

 

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

While it's fun, most people do not sail at night. Hence "day sailing".

Sheesh, I have to explain everything.B)

Most boats are actually used just for daysailing, with an occasional short cruise thrown in, so why not design for the primary use?

I have a 48' custom that is heavily oriented towards fun sailing, but it's still a furniture boat with a lot of concessions (weight, volume, systems) to comfort.

I've sailed an Eggemoggin 47. if you drove one for an hour, you'd understand. 

What I don't get is, what is wrong with a J/88?  I'd rather drive a Ferrari on Sunday mornings over a 3 series convertible......

 

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I think it's great.  In 20 years when I'm retired at a cabin at the lake this would be great to have in my slip 

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7 hours ago, Varan said:

The little tug that could...

20201121_083048.thumb.jpg.78c273e43bfa977834b623e82edf40df.jpg

So many things wrong for what will undoubtedly be a very expensive boat. Above deck furler, tallest winches I have ever seen, and two at that. Awfully high boom, may need a ladder to reef, and why are the stantions so tall? But then, I suppose the Mac26 was a big seller. This probably will be too, but I just don't get it.

Stubby Girl?

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Time will tell and  J Boats has been successful by forecasting correctly what the market wants.   This boat might be intended for their French builder with any boats shipped outside of Europe looked at as just a bonus.  From what I can see so far a good to great J100 or more likely an Alerion 28 would be more desirable.  

Note there where two Tartan 26 daysailers for sale at $65k.    Nice looking boats but not getting much interest.    

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As @Cruisin Loser notes, this arrangement is very well-suited to how most people actually use most boats most of the time.  Daysailing needs a spacious cockpit not a spacious cabin, so in principle this looks fine for a lot of users.

If that's not your usage pattern, then fine: don't buy one.  But I suspect that for many sailors, the gap between their sailing dreams and sailing reality may make this boat a better fit than they want to acknowledge.

And J/boats has always been primarily a marketing outfit, so we can be sure that they have already identified a market for this boat.  They have good evidence on their side, in the shape of high demand for used J/100s.

Personally, I like this sort of boat a lot: big cockpit, fractional rig, slim hull.  That's a good recipe for a lot of fun, and an attractive proposition for newbie crew.  Personally, I'd want better sail controls and some cooking facilities, but I am sure I am not the target market.

 

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13 minutes ago, Tyler Fields Photography said:

If you just want a simple, easy to sail design in 28', the Stuart Knockabout works pretty well.

 

DSC_5174-2.jpg

DSC_0156.jpg

DSC_9929.jpg

That's  lot of wood to take care of.  I'd actually take my J/9 with Raptor Deck or similar in the cockpit.

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Don't like it? Don't buy it. Like you coulda have anyway.

All your negative energy adds up to ZERO fucks given anyway.

 

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2 hours ago, Kent H said:

Time will tell and  J Boats has been successful by forecasting correctly what the market wants.   This boat might be intended for their French builder with any boats shipped outside of Europe looked at as just a bonus.  From what I can see so far a good to great J100 or more likely an Alerion 28 would be more desirable.  

Note there where two Tartan 26 daysailers for sale at $65k.    Nice looking boats but not getting much interest.    

There was a time when I thought the J100 was the perfect boat for the Newport RI area waters - it had a "real marine head" but none of the fancy BS that you don't need and use in a cabin that most people hardly ever enter. It could be single handed  and looked like it was relatively low upkeep.

Now that we sold our RI place I won't be getting one (unless we buy that lot we are looking at overlooking the bay)....but if I wanted a keelboat to single hand of a big enough size for any weather I think it has appeal.

And so would this boat - possibly...

One of the problem with boats is that when you finally have the money you may not have the strength or years! However, a target customer for these boats is a person who likely sees a 100K or more swing in their IRA and investment accounts in a  week or in a month - so give a good market (I happen to think that is a big predictor of new boat sales), some might treat themselves. 

As much as I like the lines of some of the classic daysailers, in a blow on the Bay I'd rather be pushing this thing. Even in those pics about some of those daysailers seem just about to be taking on water! 

My guess is that humming along in one of these on a sunny day in mid-summer in New England with a couple friends would be priceless. 

Well, maybe next life. Or maybe after I hit 72 and have the house built on that lot. 

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I agree with the maintenance issues. One of the big pluses of my 109 is the complete lack of exterior wood. Don’t get me wrong I love the look of varnished wood, but not enough to spend precious weekends working on it, or paying others to do it. Many classic daysailors look to be bigger time sucks than a Bene 50. The point of a small boat is to enjoy it.

 

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11 hours ago, Swimsailor said:

That's  lot of wood to take care of.  I'd actually take my J/9 with Raptor Deck or similar in the cockpit.

You sound like someone who has never actually held a varnish brush. If you had you would know that the most time consuming thing about varnish is waiting for the varnish to dry, the actual varnishing takes little time in comparison.

 
Case in point: time it actually takes to do the varnish work on my boat. My boat is a bigger day sailor than the Knockabout with a lot more bright work. 
 
Tape off all bright work - 1 - 1.5 hours
 
Initial sanding with 240 grit - 2.5 - 3 hours  My bright work is in good shape to begin with so that makes it easier.
 
Wash down bright work and deck with soap and water, dry bright work to avoid water spots - 1 hour
 
Next morning put on the first build coat of varnish - 1 - 1.25 hours
 
That afternoon put on second build coat - 1 - 1.25 hours
 
Next morning sand with 320 paper to flatten - 1.5 -2 hours
 
Wash down with soap and water, dry bright work - 1 hour
 
That afternoon put on final coat - 1.5 - 2 hours   I am more careful here as it is the final coat.
 
Remove masking tape - .5 hours
 
So, 13.5 hours of actual work, 3 days of drying time when you could do something productive like take a nap or read a book or paint the bottom. Note that I am using AwlWood, if I were using regular varnish I would do a third build coat.
 
Not too much to pay for pride of ownership.

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In defense of day sailing.

 
If I go on the club cruise there will be at least one day of no wind, at least one day of rain and probably one day of too much wind. When I go for a day sail I get to pick the weather and it it isn't good I'll pass.
 
I sail 4 or 5 days a week, 6 if there is a week end race. If there is no wind or rain, pass. If it blowing dogs off their chains, pass, Been there, done that, don't need to prove anything any more. I am going sailing to have an enjoyable experience not fight mother nature.
 
My boat was designed as a day sailor. I can get under way by myself in 10 minutes and put it away in 10 minutes It has a self tacking jib so sailing single handed is a breeze. The jib is roller furled and the main furls on the boom, furling the main takes 30 seconds. There is an electric winch to get the main up. Did I mention that the main is really big? So if it is a nice day and the sea breeze has filled in I'm going sailing. If a couple of friends come along that's great maybe we will fly a spinnaker. If nobody can come I will go alone, the boat was designed for it. And if it is a light air day I'll fly a code zero, it is roller furled and easy to handle single handed.
 
My boat was designed as a day sailor but it is capable of cruising. There are comfortable accommodation for two and pipe berths for two more. There is a marine head with stand up head room. Headroom in the galley and navigation station, you can stand up to put your pants on.
 
My boat was designed as a day sailor but I race it. It is not a serious race boat but we have taken our share of silver. It is particularly effective on a reach or down wind. 14 knots is not unusual in a good breeze. Its small non overlapping jib penalizes it upwind. It is a very stiff boat and can be raced effectively with 4 active people, now that I getting along in years I like to have a 5th. As far as weather is concerned it is racing; you take what you get.
 
Some of the folks on this thread only see there boats if there is a race. To my mind they are not getting much value from their boats. Most of us use our boats for a lot more than racing; racing is fun but that is not all there is. In reality, we mostly day sail. Don't have time to cruise for a week or month. We do the Wednesday night race and day sail with family and friends on the weekend. If you are retired as I am there are a lot of day sailing opportunities.
 
When I retired I was looking for a project and decided to design a boat for the way I actually sail. Mostly day sailing, an occasional cruise, and not too serious racing. L Francis designed some boats he called "Maine day boats". Quite Tune was one of them. Biggish day sailors with enough accommodations to overnight. If you were having a great sail you could keep on going, drop the hook in some convenient cove and return the next day. I like that concept.
 
 
 
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On 11/21/2020 at 4:10 PM, SEC16518 said:

I really do not understand this "day sailing" market.....

That's something you do when the sun is up... otherwise it's called night sailing..

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My best guess is that any exterior wood on this boat is an option as was done on several J 100's.  

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On 11/21/2020 at 4:47 PM, maxstaylock said:

Jeez, this place is so full of hate these days.

Thanks J boats, hope you sell lots, so I may buy and sail one when I am old.

Seems fine to me, everyone wants a 50 footer on the water, a thirty footer for parking, and a 15 footer for bills.

Hate since the days of the old Sailing World forum...never changes.

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19 hours ago, JimBowie said:

@sailormann44 what kind of boat?

JimBowie      Bagatelle is a KISS44. Kiss as in Keep It Simple, Stupid. She is an Eric Sponberg design from 2000, cold molded, cored plywood deck, cored fiberglass house and cockpit, carbon fiber mast.

IMG_1174.JPG

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On 11/21/2020 at 10:39 AM, Varan said:

The little tug that could...

20201121_083048.thumb.jpg.78c273e43bfa977834b623e82edf40df.jpg

So many things wrong for what will undoubtedly be a very expensive boat. Above deck furler, tallest winches I have ever seen, and two at that. Awfully high boom, may need a ladder to reef, and why are the stantions so tall? But then, I suppose the Mac26 was a big seller. This probably will be too, but I just don't get it.

I’m just curious, are you just being sarcastic, or did Scot’s usual problem with posting pictures trick you?  If you click on the picture, it turns in to a normal looking J boat. 
 

edit:  sorry, I meant click on the original picture. The one in your post is now permanently a tug boat!  :D

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I like the looks of the J9. Tiller! Centerline companionway! What's not to like?

Yes, it's primarily a day sailer, but it would likely be fine for a weekend. I'll be curious to see actual photos of the boat as built.

One thing I noticed is that there are no cockpit winches. That will make single-handing difficult. It looks like the traveler may be aft of the tiller, with a barney post in the cockpit. I think I'd opt for no barney post. I also like the idea of the above deck furler - simplicity.

I'd like to see the full hull, interior and sail plan. The boom is pretty long, which makes me suspect that the jib will be small, sort of like an S-Boat.

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17 minutes ago, Monkey said:

I’m just curious, are you just being sarcastic, or did Scot’s usual problem with posting pictures trick you?  If you click on the picture, it turns in to a normal looking J boat. 
 

edit:  sorry, I meant click on the original picture. The one in your post is now permanently a tug boat!  :D

Little bit of both. On my android, I need to enable auto rotate and turn the phone 90 degrees for the correct aspect. Only seems to be an issue with pics the ed posts. Maybe my phone doesn't like him.

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15 minutes ago, Bull City said:

I like the looks of the J9.

Yes, it's primarily a day sailer, but it would likely be fine for a weekend. I'll be curious to see actual photos of the boat as built.

One thing I noticed is that there are no cockpit winches. That will make single-handing difficult. It looks like the traveler may be aft of the tiller, with a barney post in the cockpit. I think I'd opt for no barney post. I also like the idea of the above deck furler - simplicity.

I'd like to see the full hull, interior and sail plan. The boom is pretty long, which makes me suspect that the jib will be small, sort of like an S-Boat.

Jib track on cabin top. 110% max, likely 100%. Blocks at base of mast means halyards and controls also likely running back to the two cabin top winches. Busy place. Split backstay, no adjuster shown, but suspect typical small jboat adjuster like the j80 block and tackle arrangement. Cannot tell if rudder is transom hung or mast keel stepped.

Personally, i was hoping for more of a European style daysailor with self tacking jib and large easily depowered squaretop main. Instead, its just another jboat. Nothing wrong with that. They sell a lot of them. (The 80 makes a fine daysailor, weekender, in my opinion, if not having a built in head is acceptable)

 

 

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6 hours ago, Varan said:

Jib track on cabin top. 110% max, likely 100%. Blocks at base of mast means halyards and controls also likely running back to the two cabin top winches. Busy place. Split backstay, no adjuster shown, but suspect typical small jboat adjuster like the j80 block and tackle arrangement. Cannot tell if rudder is transom hung or mast keel stepped.

Personally, i was hoping for more of a European style daysailor with self tacking jib and large easily depowered squaretop main. Instead, its just another jboat. Nothing wrong with that. They sell a lot of them. (The 80 makes a fine daysailor, weekender, in my opinion, if not having a built in head is acceptable)

This looks like a more comfortable cockpit than the 80.

The J22s had the cabin top winches instead of cockpit winches. It's a PITA when single handing.

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On 11/21/2020 at 5:14 PM, SEC16518 said:

What I don't get is, what is wrong with a J/88?  I'd rather drive a Ferrari on Sunday mornings over a 3 series convertible......

 

88 is a fun boat, but it's pretty powered up for a daysailer - it needs a few guys hiking pretty early as the wind builds

so, sure - for younger fit people who are already decent sailors.., who sail with a few friends,.., and who don't mind getting a bit wet.., the 88 is fine for daysailing.

but for an older couple, who just want to go out for a pleasant day on the water,  the 88 is not ideal.

i'm not saying this new boat is ideal - i don't know much about it yet.

the 100 is pretty good, but 33ft is bigger than some want. The 80 has an outboard which makes it kind of a pain for some people.

 

 

 

 

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Agree with your last comment!  I love my J-80 but hate the outboard.  Luckily, I live in Hawaii, so the out board lives in the dock box.

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I really like it! I think it could be quite popular on the European lakes!

The problem with the J88 is that it's 2m Draft is just to much for most Lakes, otherwise It would be a very nice racer/day-boat as it is more "boat" than a J70 or Melges 24.

My family used to own a J80 wich was perfect for the lake, as it was quick easy to handle and the big cockpit allowed for daysailing with friends and family. 

The only main issue was indeed the Outboard engine, which is just a mood killer when you want to take out your non sailing friends for a gin & tonic on the water. 

Thats when the family decided to buy something more stylish with an inboard electric engine wich in the end was a total disaster!

The issue with these Modern ultra stylish day-sailers, mini Wally's etc. is that they are produced by small low volume manufacturers.

So the new 4x more expensive daysailer:

- turned out 300Kg heavier than advertised (a Desaster on a lake since 90% you sail in (0-6Kts of Wind)

- the rig dimensions seemed to be way off

- rudder balance was a joke (The boat yawed to weather in the lightest of gusts)

- other than the stylish looks the build quality was bad

When we then wanted to have things fixed the yard went bankrupt, in the end we were able to sell it to someone who was ready to spent the money on fixing it bc he liked the looks of it.

Therefore I think the J/9 would be a very sensible option!

I have wasted thoughts on a J80E, a J80 with an inboard eclectic engine and teak flooring would be the perfect boat for what I want! but financially not feasible at this time

.

 

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, schraz said:

Thats when the family decided to buy something more stylish with an inboard electric engine wich in the end was a total disaster!

 

Schraz, was the inboard electric a problem, or was it the other stuff you mentioned?

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On 11/21/2020 at 5:25 PM, Kent H said:

Note there where two Tartan 26 daysailers for sale at $65k

Retirement boat, Retirement Price...

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22 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Schraz, was the inboard electric a problem, or was it the other stuff you mentioned?

The inboard engine sucked in some water an was damaged but got repaired.

The other stuff that I mentioned made the stylish daysailer an absolute nightmare 

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From J Boats

Basic J9 - $105,900

J9 w/ Electric Inboard - $TBD

J9 w. Diesel Inboard - $125,850

Of course a list of options and add-on available too.

Pricing put's it way beyond my budget, even after someone else has owned it a few years and it's available on the second-hand market.  That said, I think the pricing is reasonable and the market is potentially strong enough for a good round of orders by March or April.

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18 hours ago, highlander709 said:

From J Boats

Basic J9 - $105,900

J9 w/ Electric Inboard - $TBD

J9 w. Diesel Inboard - $125,850

Of course a list of options and add-on available too.

Pricing put's it way beyond my budget, even after someone else has owned it a few years and it's available on the second-hand market.  That said, I think the pricing is reasonable and the market is potentially strong enough for a good round of orders by March or April.

Those numbers surprise me.   They are lower than I expected.    Boston Whalers  are selling as well as numerous powerboat lines.   J Boats may be on to something about demand for a boat like this at those starting price points. 

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Besides propulsion and sails, what would need to be added to the Basic J/9 to sail away?

Do you think the self-tacking would involve a jib boom, like the Hoyt?

Apropos of nothing, I bought a new J/22 in 1984, with main, jib & genoa, 5 HP OB, turn key about $14,000 IIRC.

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Seems to me that a self tacking jib track system would be ideal for the day sailing or singlehanded crowd.  Much less interruption during wine and cheese tasting.  I'm also surprised that both the jib and main sheet are not close to the helm for the same reason.

People seem to love the J boat brand. They will probably sell a bunch of them.  And J will release something similar in a slightly different size in a few years to keep the marketing machine ticking.  Feels like this one will be close to 150k before its sitting at the dock ready to impress your friends.

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I got a call back from the J-Boat guy in N.C. about the J/9. He really didn't know much except that they have 12 orders, and the first boats are supposed to be delivered in April '21. 

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On 11/27/2020 at 9:23 AM, Bull City said:

Besides propulsion and sails, what would need to be added to the Basic J/9 to sail away?

Sunk costs you never get back like freight/shipping, dealer prep/commissioning, sales tax.

Bottom paint, instruments and all the other odds and ends that ultimately could cost a few thousand.  

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On 11/25/2020 at 1:30 PM, Bull City said:

Some interesting tidbits here:

https://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2020/11/21/j-9-seeks-to-reimagine-sailing/

Boats are supposed to be available Spring 2021; they have some orders

“This is the first one in the range of perhaps four daysailers. We have a number of orders for larger ones already.”

I wonder what this means for the larger version J/121 Stu alluded to In his interview with The Editor.

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