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Warnemünde, Germany typical conditions?

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Hey all,

Anybody ever raced out of Warnemünde? I see the 2022 Laser Masters Europeans is there, and was thinking of trying to race that but was curious on the conditions.  I assume the regatta would be in June or July?

Cool town?

Thanks in advance

Cheers,

Mike

 

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Warnemünde ist the harbour town of Rostock. The city lives from tourists and cruise ships visits. The small city is located at the western side of the river and has some nice restaurants and bars on the pier. On the east side of the river is a nice yacht harbour with a splendid hotel.  Pedestrians ferry connecting both sides. Nice beach.

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Sorge-vor-steigenden-Infektionszahlen-Wa

Expect light to medium winds from either west or east parallel to the shore. Temperatures 22 degrees Celsius, Water 18-20. Waves depending on the fetch/duration of wind. Should be perfect for a nice sunny Laser regatta if this is what you are looking for. Have fun!

 

image.thumb.png.67bb558e1b174eecab2726ba6d279077.png

From windy. Hard to get other statistical data as most data is for the open sea /baltic. I will charter a Dehler 34 in June for a week starting from Warnemünde. Looking forward to this and keeping my fingers crossed that the corona boarders of Denmark and Sweden are open...

 

 

 

 

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What Knut said. The fleet will probably be located in the marina you see on the left in his first picture. It is a big (for european standards) marina / YC/ hotel / spa complex called "Hohe Düne". Nice bars and terrace to hang out in the sun, nice sauna to thaw yourself after a day of racing in the rain. It is also quiter than the other bank of the river which is full of touristic restaurants and souvenir shops.

Most small boat regattas are held in front of the beach you see on the right in the picture. Wind is mostly light and from the west, waves (if any) short and flat. No tide currents in the baltic. There is a regular wake from the Denmark ferry that can be used as a tactical advantage I am told...

BTW: If you plan to stay a little longer, Berlin is only about 2:30 hours by train, Hamburg about 3.

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Awesome, thanks guys. Sounds like my fat ass needs to get skinny and expect some light airs!

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town looks cute, btw.  enough stuff to do to keep the family entertained or should i have them meet me after the regatta? thinking of doing a road trip across Germany afterwards, and hopefully hook up with some of my Krass cousins in Rüdesheim.... 

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We did I14 Worlds there in 08. Cool town and don't forget to visit the Rostock Brewery. Great beer.

We had breeze, lots of breeze, mixed with short and steep chop. It's pretty shallow for a ways out from the marina, so we sailed to deeper water everyday.

For a Socal guy like me, it was cold and rainy. For a local, it was a typical summer day. Epic sailing in an epic town.

 

3178_75240264338_1748616_n.jpg

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1 hour ago, MikeR80 said:

town looks cute, btw.  enough stuff to do to keep the family entertained or should i have them meet me after the regatta?

Think so. Rarely went down since I was always sailing but it has some things.(relatively many students) Depends on what you want to do?
Half to one hour drive into a world heritage city. That can be quite nice. Then again, I am biased.
In Rostock, if the timeframe fits, there is speedsailing. Aka a half/day trip on a VO60. Not sure if you can do something like that locally or if it is worth a look.

As for sailing... can have a range of conditions. Light winds in summer are often the case. But windy can happen too and then usually days of it. Waves tend to get fairly steep and big if you have wind. Then again, it is the baltic, so they aren't that big.

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1 hour ago, Irrational 14 said:

We did I14 Worlds there in 08. Cool town and don't forget to visit the Rostock Brewery. Great beer.

We had breeze, lots of breeze, mixed with short and steep chop. It's pretty shallow for a ways out from the marina, so we sailed to deeper water everyday.

For a Socal guy like me, it was cold and rainy. For a local, it was a typical summer day. Epic sailing in an epic town.

 

3178_75240264338_1748616_n.jpg

Sick! what time of year were worlds?

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I think it was in August. It's a bit blurry from all the German Beer consumed but it was a strong regatta for us and we celebrated accordingly -_-.

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The baltic never is really warm and even in summer you might get norddeutsches schietwetter, so plan to that. There's no bad weather only wrong clothing.

If you want to do day trips rent a car and hit the Autobahn. I'd visit Hamburg over Berlin, but I'm biased.

Stay away from Kölsch. :lol:

Say "Ich möchte diesen Teppich nicht kaufen. Bitte!" to order beer.

 

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From a statistical point of you get the nicest weather  (= mostly sunny and stable) in May and June in northern Germany. At some point the sea and air temperatures increase too much and the athmosphere starts to become a bit unstable with a higher chance of rain and thunderstorms. The rule of thumb is that the bad weather starts with Kiel Week which always is the last full week in June.

Regarding the sightseeing, as others have said Hamburg and Berlin are both close. You can do both as there is both a motorway and a fast train connection between the two. From Berlin other historic cities in eastern Germany are easily reached. Beyond that distances start to increase somewhat. There are also a few smaller cities with world heritage sites spread along the coast east and west of Warnemünde.

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My first thought was to say, it is going to be cold! My wife from Bremerhaven / Hamburg also says 'There's no bad weather, only wrong clothing ".

Enjoy the beer listed earlier. Just remember that there will be some for you when you get back to the dock.

Sail safe

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Warnemünde is good for a Weekend. You (she) can walk he whole town in about two days and still have time left for shopping, a harbor cruise or some hanging at the beach. Regattas can be watched from the beach, but are usually just too far away to identify single boats. The main city, Rostock, surely has nice spots but as a whole is rather industrial.

An alternative to "Hohe Düne" would be "Hotel Hübner" at the Beach side of Warnemünde. Much smaller, tasteful, family-owned, still with a spa area and pool @5th floor with sea view. With a rental bike or e-scooter you'll be at the YC in about 15 minutes. I'd stay away from "Hotel Neptun".

 

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18 hours ago, mathystuff said:

The baltic never is really warm and even in summer you might get norddeutsches schietwetter, so plan to that. There's no bad weather only wrong clothing.

If you want to do day trips rent a car and hit the Autobahn. I'd visit Hamburg over Berlin, but I'm biased.

Stay away from Kölsch. :lol:

Say "Ich möchte diesen Teppich nicht kaufen. Bitte!" to order beer.

 

Indeed, swimming in the Baltic sea is always a chilly proposition no matter the season.  Be careful!  

I don't know, Hamburg and Berlin are two very different cities.  Best to visit both if you can, they each have their charms.  Berlin has almost twice the population of Hamburg, both are big, 3.5 million vs 1.8 million.  Take that as you wish.  Both cities have many immigrants of all kinds and many tourists, especially in the summer and both cities are hardly typical of 'Germany' in many ways.  One big reason is that Hamburg is a major European port on the North Sea via the Elbe river, and Berlin because it's the Capitol. It's best not to drive in either city, especially in Hamburg with it's plethora of canals.  Parking is a nightmare in both.  The trains aren't quite cheap but the ICE (express) trains are worth the money.  Fast, clean, comfortable and usually, but not always on time.  Unless you like to stand, a seat reservation is recommended during peak times which is almost always.

If you want a genuine Kölsch you really need to go to Köln (Cologne) and get it fresh on tap.

That's an interesting way to order a beer!  I don't ever remember an ordinary bar, restaurant or gasthaus with carpet in it. 

If you get to Rudesheim, that is in my opinion one of the most beautiful places in Germany and for that matter, in the world that I have ever seen, and I've seen a bit.  There is a castle around every bend in the Rhein river and steep vine covered hillsides in between.  Many of the little towns are magical, right out of a picture post card and the white wines, especially the Rieslings are wonderful.  Rudesheim is known for its Rieslings.  Drive on the road on either side of the river and head north toward Koblenz, or take a boat tour for a few hours, or both.  This area is what many people think of when they think of the classic German scenery.  As a bonus, you aren't far from the town of Assmannshausen!  

(internet photo)
Rhine River Valley (Koblenz to Rudesheim), Germany in 4K Ultra HD - YouTube

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On 1/14/2021 at 12:23 PM, Irrational 14 said:

We did I14 Worlds there in 08. Cool town and don't forget to visit the Rostock Brewery. Great beer.

We had breeze, lots of breeze, mixed with short and steep chop. It's pretty shallow for a ways out from the marina, so we sailed to deeper water everyday.

For a Socal guy like me, it was cold and rainy. For a local, it was a typical summer day. Epic sailing in an epic town.

 

 

3178_75240264338_1748616_n.jpg

Rostocker Pils!

Get the brewery tour. THAT is cool.

Also the part of Rostock across the street slightly to the right of the Hauptbahnhof is very beautiful. It was just starting to be restored in 98 when I was there.

Universitätsstadt Rostock has both a towing tank and a manovering tank. 

I was trying to find a postcard to show you what conditions are really like but can't find it, darn it.

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My plan would be to take a couple weeks to make my way south after the regatta,  maybe cut over to czech republic as well, and then eventually make my way to the South.  Is there any highways between Prague and Frankfurt?

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On 1/14/2021 at 4:42 PM, mathystuff said:

The baltic never is really warm and even in summer you might get norddeutsches schietwetter, so plan to that. There's no bad weather only wrong clothing.

If you want to do day trips rent a car and hit the Autobahn. I'd visit Hamburg over Berlin, but I'm biased.

Stay away from Kölsch. :lol:

Say "Ich möchte diesen Teppich nicht kaufen. Bitte!" to order beer.

 

sehr lustig...

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1 hour ago, MikeR80 said:

My plan would be to take a couple weeks to make my way south after the regatta,  maybe cut over to czech republic as well, and then eventually make my way to the South.  Is there any highways between Prague and Frankfurt?

No. In Europe major cities are typically connected by single lane roads to help keep the train industry healthy.

Google maps will give you good directions. I would recommend stopping in plzen on route. 

 

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16 minutes ago, JohnMB said:

No. In Europe major cities are typically connected by single lane roads to help keep the train industry healthy. 

They are sufficient for the horse drawn carriages we use here.

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3 hours ago, mathystuff said:

They are sufficient for the horse drawn carriages we use here.

We still have a few of them here. And their drivers and pasgrs still speak platdeutsche too

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49 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

We still have a few of them here. And their drivers and pasgrs still speak platdeutsche too

Platt is awesome. Sadly I didn't grow up with it and know very little.

Huulbessen (howling broom) for vacuum cleaner has to be one of the best words ever.

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41 minutes ago, mathystuff said:

Platt is awesome. Sadly I didn't grow up with it and know very little.

Huulbessen (howling broom) for vacuum cleaner has to be one of the best words ever.

My next drag boat is going to be named Huulbessen. :-D

 

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When you are going to Warnemünde you’ll fly to Berlin anyway.
From Berlin you can take the train (ICE is best, see https://www.bahn.com/en/view/index.shtml) or a rental car.
Reasons pro train: this is Germany. So you are allowed to drink beer on the train. In first class they even serve it at your seat. Reasons pro car: this is Germany. So rent a fucking Porsche and take it to the autobahn man, you know you want it!!! The last half between Berlin and Warnemünde is no limit and usually little traffic. :D 
Seriously, trains are best if you are one or two persons. For a whole family, I’d probably rent a minivan. Both trains and roads are excellent in the whole of Europe. Note that you’ll need a GSM smartphone with a local (prepaid) card for digital tickets and navigation. 
It’s still a few days until 2022. PM me when you know when and how you’ll be here. 

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11 hours ago, MikeR80 said:

My plan would be to take a couple weeks to make my way south after the regatta,  maybe cut over to czech republic as well, and then eventually make my way to the South.  Is there any highways between Prague and Frankfurt?

The E50 becomes autobahn 6 in Germany which will take you from Prague to Nurnberg and from Nurnberg autobahn 3 goes to Frankfurt.  About 5 1/2 hours.  Or you can stay on A6 to Heidelberg and then A5 to Frankfurt.  A3 is one of the busiest autobahns in Germany.  A6/A5 is only a little longer trip and less traffic.  It would be worth a rest stop in Nurnberg or Heidelberg on the way.  The Altstadt or old city is in the Nurnberg is surrounded by a 5 km long medieval wall, has a huge castle and many beautiful old buildings, restaurants and shopping.   On A6 is also the Auto & Technik Museum, chock full of planes, trains, automobiles and much more.  They have a Concorde and the Soviet SST mounted on the roof of one of the buildings and you can go in them.  You can see the planes from the autobahn.  Well worth a visit.  It's visible from the autobahn in Sinsheim and an exit takes you right to the museum.  I lived in Sinsheim for 7 years.  It's a little south of Heidelberg.  I'm not sure why you want to go to Frankfurt, it's often referred to as the Chicago of Germany, but without the charm  It's the only city in Germany with skyscrapers. just keep heading north on A5 and go to the Rhein River Valley.

Sinsheim Auto & Technik Museum | Sinsheim Museum | Sinsheim Germany  Auto & Technik Museum, SinsheimTraveltrade - Congress- und Tourismus-Zentrale Nürnberg    Nurnberg Altstadt with the castle in the backgroundNuernberg's beautiful city center - Review of Altstadt, Nuremberg, Germany  - Tripadvisor    The middle of the Altstadt in Nurnberg and the Pegnitz river.

HEIDELBERG BADEN-WÜRTTEMBERG, GERMANY Heidelberg is home to Germany's  oldest university, founded in 138… | Cool places to visit, Germany castles,  Rhine river cruise 

Heidelberg, the castle and the Neckar river.

 

A word of caution.  Prague is very cool and worth a visit, but also extremely crowded with tourists in the summer.  The old city portion is relatively small with many narrow streets and walking around sometimes you feel like a salmon swimming upstream.  Also in the summer just about all of the highways are choked with the usual trucks, and also people driving on their summer holiday.  Expect traffic jams and delays.  To add to that, there's an old joke in Germany.  Q: "What are the 2 seasons in Germany?"  A: "Winter and Baustelle".  A baustelle is a construction zone.  In the summer if you travel more than 100 km on the autobahn, you will almost for certain encounter a baustelle and the ensuing traffic slowdown.  In addition, every year there are more and more speed limits on the autobahn.  There will be places you can go 120 mph+ but don't expect to do it the entire trip.  It would be a nice trip in spite of that, I'm just warning you about what you might encounter.  If you really want to speed unimpeded on the autobahn nowadays, about 3 a.m is the best time to do it.  I've lived in Germany (Nurnberg and Heidelberg) and Poland for the last 20 years, and that's been my experience.

 

9 hours ago, JohnMB said:

No. In Europe major cities are typically connected by single lane roads to help keep the train industry healthy.

Google maps will give you good directions. I would recommend stopping in plzen on route. 

 

I'm not sure what's the attraction Pilsen, you can buy Pilsner beer anywhere.  Last time I was in Pilsen was some years ago and it looked like every other gray, run down, ugly former communist industrial city.  Time would be far better spent in Nurnberg or Heidelberg.  

If you want more info, feel free to p.m. me.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, 10thTonner said:

When you are going to Warnemünde you’ll fly to Berlin anyway.
From Berlin you can take the train (ICE is best, see https://www.bahn.com/en/view/index.shtml) or a rental car.
Reasons pro train: this is Germany. So you are allowed to drink beer on the train. In first class they even serve it at your seat. Reasons pro car: this is Germany. So rent a fucking Porsche and take it to the autobahn man, you know you want it!!! The last half between Berlin and Warnemünde is no limit and usually little traffic. :D 
Seriously, trains are best if you are one or two persons. For a whole family, I’d probably rent a minivan. Both trains and roads are excellent in the whole of Europe. Note that you’ll need a GSM smartphone with a local (prepaid) card for digital tickets and navigation. 
It’s still a few days until 2022. PM me when you know when and how you’ll be here. 

While the ICE is wonderful and comfortable, (I have a Bahn Card 50 1st Class and used it often until the pandemic), they are also relatively expensive.  If you buy a ticket a few days before the trip it will cost you, and there's a chance the train you want will be sold out, especially at peak times in the summer.  If you can plan ahead you can buy your tickets a few months out and get a much better price.  For example, right now if you book a ticket on the ICE from Berlin to Frankfurt Main in June, the best price in 2nd class for 1 person is about $20.00 one way, which is a great deal.  The full price is about $120.00.  First class is from $30.00 to $220.00 full price.  The cheapest tickets sell out fast.   For 2 people or more, the cost of a rental car is far cheaper and gives you more freedom to be spontaneous and also saves you the trouble of lugging suitcases on and off the trains and through the cities.  If the hotel doesn't have parking, which most don't, there are parking garages in all of the big cities, average price is about $25.00 a day.  The average price for gas in Germany is around $5.00 a gallon.  It's a little cheaper in Czech.

The choice really boils down to your travel preferences and how many people you are with.  Either way has it's advantages and disadvantages, but in Mike's case I think driving is the better option.

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Thanks, I want to go to Frankfurt to connect with my cousins just west of there.  I've taken the train all over Europe previously, so I get it.  

This trip would be with a few young kiddos, so a rental van would be awesome.  Does anywhere in Germany rent a VW pop top or similar?

 

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26 minutes ago, MikeR80 said:

Isnt Pilsner more of a czech thing?

Rule of thump: all clear beer is a Pils(ner). It's the equivalent of pale lager in english, I think.

If you go camping you should hit campsites. Germany does not allow camping everywhere like in the scandinavian countries. Unlikely you would run into trouble, but best to avoid it nevertheless.

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4 hours ago, mathystuff said:

Rule of thump: all clear beer is a Pils(ner). It's the equivalent of pale lager in english, I think.

If you go camping you should hit campsites. Germany does not allow camping everywhere like in the scandinavian countries. Unlikely you would run into trouble, but best to avoid it nevertheless.

I do believe all clear beers are lager, which is a beer conditioned at a low temperature.  You are correct that pilsner is a pale lager.  In addition, they use a specific kind of hops in most pilsners, Saaz hops.  It is the bite of the hops in pilsner that makes it one of my least favorite beer varieties.  But Ironically I love the Czech Bud, it doesn't seem to be as 'hoppy' as Pilsner Urquell, the original pilsner beer that was brewed in Pilsen and hence the name, or many other pilsners.  Or pils if you are German.  

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5 hours ago, MikeR80 said:

Thanks, I want to go to Frankfurt to connect with my cousins just west of there.  I've taken the train all over Europe previously, so I get it.  

This trip would be with a few young kiddos, so a rental van would be awesome.  Does anywhere in Germany rent a VW pop top or similar?

 

I would imagine you can rent such a vehicle if they still make pop up vans.  If they are old, I have no idea.  Google might help.  

Depending on how many young kids and how young, I can see where the train would not be the best option for you.  Even with the kid fare.

So your cousins are the ones that live in the Rhein river valley.  If you happen to stop in Nurnberg, there is the DB Train Museum and it is very kid friendly.  Many hands on exhibits especially for the tykes.  Real train equipment is pretty hard for kids to break.  There is also a toy museum in Nurnberg.  And a bunch of other cool shit.  I've said for years that the Nurnberg Tourist Bureau should hire me.  I'm always talking up Nurnberg.  With the exception of the world famous Kristkindlesmarkt (Christmas market) in December, It is the least tourist filled big city in Europe that I've ever seen.  And there's ton of history there, it's a beautiful city and there's lots to see and do.  And the Bavarians are overall the nicest, friendliest people in the entire country.  Maybe they don't want a bunch tourists (except at Christmas time), I don't know.

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5 hours ago, mathystuff said:

If you go camping you should hit campsites. Germany does not allow camping everywhere like in the scandinavian countries. Unlikely you would run into trouble, but best to avoid it nevertheless.

 

6 hours ago, MikeR80 said:

Website looks ok but seems to aim more at the 20-something surfer crowd. You have to clean the van yourself at the end etc... And what mathy said: no free camping in the wild here. You’ll need to rent a slot at an organized campsite. (And these often look and feel like parking lots.) 

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1 hour ago, Ed Lada said:

I love the Czech Bud

A man of taste, I see.

Best beer you can get in every supermarket around here, imo.

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Another downside is that the campsites are usually outside the bigger cities. So to drive in for a little sightseeing, you’ll have to pack everything back into your van. With a family of four, I’d rather rent a non-camper van like Renault Espace, VW Touran, Ford Galaxy or so and stay in holiday apartments. Lots of semi-professional offers on Airbnb. These local sites also have many good flats and small houses, but are all in German: 

https://www.ferienwohnungen.de/

https://www.fewo-direkt.de/

https://www.fewo24.de/ 

 

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On 1/19/2021 at 10:44 AM, 10thTonner said:

Another downside is that the campsites are usually outside the bigger cities. So to drive in for a little sightseeing, you’ll have to pack everything back into your van. With a family of four, I’d rather rent a non-camper van like Renault Espace, VW Touran, Ford Galaxy or so and stay in holiday apartments. Lots of semi-professional offers on Airbnb. These local sites also have many good flats and small houses, but are all in German: 

https://www.ferienwohnungen.de/

https://www.fewo-direkt.de/

https://www.fewo24.de/ 

 

Thanks much. Google Chrome automatically translates

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