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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Heaven can wait

Sailing Anarchists Affected by Cancer

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My story was Thyroid cancer. 1999

During the local summer beer (blood) can sailing season on our local lake I was told I had cancer. Being a sailing junky I asked the Doctor if this would interfere with my sailing season, he thought I was joking. The long and the short is I was able to use the one throwout race for surgery and keep on racing my 5o5 for the entire season. I did finish 1st in class and 1st overall for that season, however the club came together and gave me the Commodores Award for that year.

Turtleberg

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Welcome aboard Turtleberg and thank you Irishdriver for you sentiments.

 

My story started off reasonably straight forward, however one of the Glaring difficulties I faced was actually realising I had a problem.

 

My daughter on arriving home one Evening tripped over a rug and cannoned into my nether regions. As any male will tell this pain is quite intense.

 

My Pain didn't go away for a number of days, however what my Daughter had accidently done was bring on the Physical symptoms on much sooner than otherwise, which realistically saved my life.

 

Being self employed and totally focused in keeping my business afloat, I put off seeing the Doctor.

 

My wife had drilled me a number of times about seeing my GP, but standard Male reaction - put it off, put it off and before too long I'd was sucking on Neurofen like lollies.

 

Finally my wife made the appointment, and come Hell or high water I would be in the GP's rooms with that appointment.

 

My GP's first reaction was that I would have to watch my colesterole levels, however I did have a problem and promptly my GP made arrangements with a General Surgeon.

 

During this time I went downhill fast, a tumor had started to pull my spinal cord away from my spine. I have a very high tolerance of pain, however I would pass out almost at will.

 

The Day of my Surgery I passed out no less than 6 times, before I went into theatre.

 

The main moral of this story is simple especially for us Males, if you feel one of your Testis is irregular in shape, sore or harder than normal, see your GP ASAP, It might be nothing, however the sooner Testicular Cancer can be caught the better the odds of a short term full recovery.

 

Put it off like me, you take your chances, and to put it into perspective, at present there is a 95% success rate of surviving Testicular Cancer.

 

Lance Armstrong is one of 4% that have unlikely outcomes, I am one of the 1%, that have unlikely outcomes and serious complications.

 

That's all I can say, check yourself regularly around your gooley's, and don't ever think Males can't get Breast Cancer, check them regularly as well.

 

A friend of mines father died not long ago from Breast Cancer, and he was a Doctor.

 

Werd Folks

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My mother was diagnosed with Breast Cancer about two weeks ago, and they just did the surgery to remove some tissue. She had clear margins, and now she is gearing up for radiation, and she should be fine.

 

Thank goodness for early detection.

 

And I am going to keep running the Race for the Cure!

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My mother was diagnosed with Breast Cancer about two weeks ago, and they just did the surgery to remove some tissue. She had clear margins, and now she is gearing up for radiation, and she should be fine.

 

Thank goodness for early detection.

 

And I am going to keep running the Race for the Cure!

 

 

 

 

Werd Lumpy. :)

 

 

 

Just Bumping the Thread for Recidivist, best wishes mate.

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great day for a bump with this thread. I was on my way out the door to Relay for Life, ended up reading the whole thread, wow. You guys are amazing, and has given great purpoe to my running this evening.

-BP

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Today was one of those total gut wrenching kind of days.

 

Less than two weeks ago, a friend from the sailing world was diagnosed with lung cancer. One ironic part is that he had never smoked. The most ironic part is that he is an oncologist who has spent his entire adult life helping pull off miracles for those dealing with cancer.

 

He was a long time sailor. With his family, he raced an E Scow for years on Lake Minnetonka, and later owned a J 22. One of his sons was on my team during my college coaching days. My mother (a Realtor) worked with another of his sons to find them a new house recently. The doctor and his wife had just moved in next door to my mother.

 

Shortly after the diagnosis (just a week and a half ago), his family put up a web site hosted by a wonderful organization called Caring Bridge. They put up his "story," added photos, and took turns leaving journal posts about his early treatment in the hospital. In less than two weeks, more than 10,000 people have visited their web site from all around the world, and hundreds of them have left caring and supportive messages. Some of the most touching tributes have come from his colleagues, the doctors and nurses he's worked with and trained over the years, and his own patients. The journal posts made it clear that it would be a tough battle.

 

This morning, it all went wrong.

 

Dr. George Adams passed away suddenly this morning at age 65, less than two weeks after his diagnosis, possibly from a pulmonary embolism caused by the cancer in his lung that arrested his heart.

 

I'm totally crushed by this. In the long run, his family has already been helped by an outpouring of care and support, but grief rules at the moment, and I share that grief.

 

My own recent personal history with GIST cancer, as well as my MS diagnosis (both within the past two years) have brought some sense of perspective, but a sudden tragedy like this is a gut check that I can't easily put aside. Some things are beyond our control. Some things are not. It's time once again to focus on the positives, and to cherish the time, events and people that we have.

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Total sympathies DCMJ. Mum died 2 years ago in a similar fashion. One of the positives is that it was mercifully quick. You said it mate, cherish the time.

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A few monthes ago my Girlfriend told me she had cancer, but not to worry, that the doctors were telling her she would be in remision (sp?) by may. It's now April and they're telling her she has until June if she doesn't get a kidney transplant soon. Her cancer had spread, with a tumor connecting her lungs and liver, as well as tumors within both organs as well as her liver. All together she has something in the neightborhood of 30 tumors if i remember correctly. So she is now on the top of the donor list and will hopefully be recieving a kidney, as well as an aritfical kidney on the other side sometime later this week. I saw her tonight for the last time before she went to the hospital, where she will be in the IC and it will be very unlikely that I can visit. The doctor told her she has less than 50% on the surgery. tough news for a 16 year old girl.....

 

Andy

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Bad Andy,

 

One of the hardest things I've found is quite often dealing with peoples perspective with respect to Cancer, and any type for that matter.

 

They develop this mental picture of 'You're going to die' and consequently withdraw from you as a friend. You can't help that, it is a fact of life, however needless to say it still hurts.

 

In all of my hardest days, for someone to just to ask me how the hell I was going was everything to me and likewise will be for your girlfriend.

 

I know it sounds weird but if you have the opportunity, just ask simple everyday stuff, just for a minute reality will be forgotten, and it's very theroputic.

 

Stay positive yourself and her family and her will feed off your positive attitude.

 

Quite often the "Mind" dictates the bodies ability to fight, I've seen it first hand, and I'm a well smashed up example, but I'm still here.

 

Lastly try and get her to smile, does wonders.

 

With you bro, always. Feel free if you compelled to PM me, happy to help. Btw I only have 1 kidney, I've found I just wee alot more often.

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She's in surgery right now I'm not religious s the whole praying thing doesn't work for me....... hoping i guess is all i got

 

Andy

 

 

 

B Andy if she went into surgery with a positive outlook, she'll give everyone the finest performance of her life.

 

I'll tell you about my sister, and hopefully this may help you and others understand with some clarity what is to me quiet remarkable, and is in all of us. It's called Human "Spirit".

 

When I was 13, I fell into life as a teenager with the usual urges to better get to know the opposite sex, and more importantly the actual sex, but not long after my 13th birthday I'd discover the female anatomy in the most dramatic and non-sensual way I could have ever imagined .

 

My younger sister at the time was 10 going on 11, none of us had noticed her descrete little falls and the progressive fading of her complexion, until she fell off a relatively low wall and broke her arm.

 

We noticed after that fall the extensive bruising that was, well not normal.

 

My sister was taken to our Local GP, he would examined her as best he could with the Technology of the early 80's. A persistant flu was the diagnosis, and we went home.

 

My little sister was sliding away from us and we didn't know why, right in front of our eyes.

 

Too weak to move I can still remember the slight inhale and exhale of her chest, and the dust that had settled on her eyes, she could cry no more and she was too weak to close them.

 

My sister had gone from a persistant flu to this all in the matter of 12-13hours. Frantic at the deteriation of my sister the Doctor was called time and time again. Our Doctor had known right from the outset, that something was very, very wrong and was already on his way.

 

With a crash of the front door, our Doctor all 6'7'' of him breezed thru the house and straight into my sisters bedroom. I faintly heard "have you started your Periods yet?"

 

With that he picked up this limp figure that was my sister, and without hesitating made haste for the front door, "Follow me" he urged. And with that my sister and mum were gone.

 

My sister was rushed to the San Hospital in Wahroonga, then rushed by ambulance to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney.

 

I would not see my sister nor my parents for the next 3 months.

 

Staying with family friends, Dad would call and tell me she was doing OK, but I was growing increasingly frustrated as what was actually wrong with her.

 

Dad was finally able to get away from work, and able to get time to see me, point blank "What is wrong with my sister!" I fired.

 

Your sister has Acute Adult Leukemia, for which I had no understanding, however I would learn, and in a big hurry.

 

When my sister was originally rushed to hospital, she had been given 8 quarts of blood, which basically meant that she only had a litre and a half left in her body.

 

The onset of her first Period had meant she'd almost bled to death. She was too embarrassed to tell anyone, and in any rate she initially thought it was normal.

 

My sister would become the youngest Child in Australia to receive the NEW wonder drug Chemo-theropy and to this day, one of the first to survive.

 

Andy, the most significant time throughout all of the 6months my sister would spend in hospital was the time I was called by my father to spend some time with my sister. This on one hand was good, but upsetting on the other as my fathers voice was far from controlled over the phone.

 

The better part of the trip in was in silence, I knew all was not as it would seem.

 

I reached the ward where my sister's private room was, and was promptly met by my sisters specialists and 2 or three Nurses.

 

They handed me full greens and a face mask and once dressed guided me toward my sisters room. As I stood in the doorway I was greeted with a solid blast of fan blown air. Machine alarm bells sounded off in a distorted chorus as I neared her bedside.

 

The only machine that told me something I could actually understand was one that had her temperature.

 

42.3 Degrees C

 

This could not be my sister, as I stared at this limp flake of a soul that lay lifeless in that gale induced room.

 

I stood and watched for what I thought was hours, but in reality was only a few moments.

 

It all became very, very clear to me that from here on in no one upstairs was going to help, it was up to my sister, and my sister alone to win this battle.

 

I have never forgotten my sisters drawn sunken face from that day, and the hugely powerful strength the Human Spirit can instill in a person - It is their desire to live, their want to go on living with this life.

 

Like anything in our lives we learn to overcome our fears, we get up off the ground and walk, we take to the water and swim, we all have an abundance of human spirit, and in our darkest hour, it is in you, it is in me, it is everyones ability to fight the good fight and win.

 

I have carried my sisters fighting spirit thru my own fight with Cancer, and I too will win.

 

I believe in what all of us are capable of when we will ourselves on, what we all can do to survive when we have to.

 

No bible or holy book will tell you this. Power to your Girlfriend and thoughts with you Andy.

 

Hope this helps........HcW ;)

 

 

 

PS, My Sister is married with two kids and has been in remission for 20 Years now.

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Thanks for the support guys she made it through worried us for a bit when her heart stopped and a few other small complications but she's ok now and recovering

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She's in surgery right now I'm not religious s the whole praying thing doesn't work for me....... hoping i guess is all i got

 

Andy

 

 

 

B Andy if she went into surgery with a positive outlook, she'll give everyone the finest performance of her life.

 

I'll tell you about my sister, and hopefully this may help you and others understand with some clarity what is to me quiet remarkable, and is in all of us. It's called Human "Spirit".

 

When I was 13, I fell into life as a teenager with the usual urges to better get to know the opposite sex, and more importantly the actual sex, but not long after my 13th birthday I'd discover the female anatomy in the most dramatic and non-sensual way I could have ever imagined .

 

My younger sister at the time was 10 going on 11, none of us had noticed her descrete little falls and the progressive fading of her complexion, until she fell off a relatively low wall and broke her arm.

 

We noticed after that fall the extensive bruising that was, well not normal.

 

My sister was taken to our Local GP, he would examined her as best he could with the Technology of the early 80's. A persistant flu was the diagnosis, and we went home.

 

My little sister was sliding away from us and we didn't know why, right in front of our eyes.

 

Too weak to move I can still remember the slight inhale and exhale of her chest, and the dust that had settled on her eyes, she could cry no more and she was too weak to close them.

 

My sister had gone from a persistant flu to this all in the matter of 12-13hours. Frantic at the deteriation of my sister the Doctor was called time and time again. Our Doctor had known right from the outset, that something was very, very wrong and was already on his way.

 

With a crash of the front door, our Doctor all 6'7'' of him breezed thru the house and straight into my sisters bedroom. I faintly heard "have you started your Periods yet?"

 

With that he picked up this limp figure that was my sister, and without hesitating made haste for the front door, "Follow me" he urged. And with that my sister and mum were gone.

 

My sister was rushed to the San Hospital in Wahroonga, then rushed by ambulance to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney.

 

I would not see my sister nor my parents for the next 3 months.

 

Staying with family friends, Dad would call and tell me she was doing OK, but I was growing increasingly frustrated as what was actually wrong with her.

 

Dad was finally able to get away from work, and able to get time to see me, point blank "What is wrong with my sister!" I fired.

 

Your sister has Acute Adult Leukemia, for which I had no understanding, however I would learn, and in a big hurry.

 

When my sister was originally rushed to hospital, she had been given 8 quarts of blood, which basically meant that she only had a litre and a half left in her body.

 

The onset of her first Period had meant she'd almost bled to death. She was too embarrassed to tell anyone, and in any rate she initially thought it was normal.

 

My sister would become the youngest Child in Australia to receive the NEW wonder drug Chemo-theropy and to this day, one of the first to survive.

 

Andy, the most significant time throughout all of the 6months my sister would spend in hospital was the time I was called by my father to spend some time with my sister. This on one hand was good, but upsetting on the other as my fathers voice was far from controlled over the phone.

 

The better part of the trip in was in silence, I knew all was not as it would seem.

 

I reached the ward where my sister's private room was, and was promptly met by my sisters specialists and 2 or three Nurses.

 

They handed me full greens and a face mask and once dressed guided me toward my sisters room. As I stood in the doorway I was greeted with a solid blast of fan blown air. Machine alarm bells sounded off in a distorted chorus as I neared her bedside.

 

The only machine that told me something I could actually understand was one that had her temperature.

 

42.3 Degrees C

 

This could not be my sister, as I stared at this limp flake of a soul that lay lifeless in that gale induced room.

 

I stood and watched for what I thought was hours, but in reality was only a few moments.

 

It all became very, very clear to me that from here on in no one upstairs was going to help, it was up to my sister, and my sister alone to win this battle.

 

I have never forgotten my sisters drawn sunken face from that day, and the hugely powerful strength the Human Spirit can instill in a person - It is their desire to live, their want to go on living with this life.

 

Like anything in our lives we learn to overcome our fears, we get up off the ground and walk, we take to the water and swim, we all have an abundance of human spirit, and in our darkest hour, it is in you, it is in me, it is everyones ability to fight the good fight and win.

 

I have carried my sisters fighting spirit thru my own fight with Cancer, and I too will win.

 

I believe in what all of us are capable of when we will ourselves on, what we all can do to survive when we have to.

 

No bible or holy book will tell you this. Power to your Girlfriend and thoughts with you Andy.

 

Hope this helps........HcW ;)

 

 

 

PS, My Sister is married with two kids and has been in remission for 20 Years now.

 

 

HCW

 

Some of the most powerfull words I have ever read, there are tears in my eyes. There is no adequate reply, good on ya.

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Always a good read even for me.

 

How ever tonight I'm on fire 40.2 C on the old themometer and back on the old looopy pills.

 

I won't bore you all with the details, but I get infections regularly over the last 2 years, and this recent one is a doosey.

 

Bannished indoors until it heals so go lightly.

 

Is it hot in here or is it just me, ha ha.

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Dearest Heaven,

 

I must admit, it would be challenging for me to read all of yours and others writings here about all your suffering. I read a little and start to feel it.

 

All I wanted to add is this:

 

the heat you are feeling is the healing

the laughter you are doing is your willingness to grab hold of life

the fact that all these people on this thread are writing, is the supportive love that will continue to give you strength

 

Know it

Feel it

Believe it

 

I wish for you a sprinkling of magic healing dust (silly, corny...I know...and I can't help it)

It's not about a fight...

 

Healing loving strength,

from Hellion B)

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Just Bumping the Thread for Recidivist, best wishes mate.

Thanks HCW. I just got the chance to read the new posts - DCMJ, Bad Andy, your sister's story - gave the old tear ducts another workout!

 

And your 24 hour race is undoubtedly the inspiration for JRTC's idea of a "race for Diabetes" that he wants to organise. Good luck with it, and get over the infection quickly.

 

Cheers

 

R

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Remember HcW ... it's not a fever, it's a power surge :lol:

Hang in there - we're all here with you.

C/

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Reading this thread again reminds me that my life is far too complicated these days. Between balancing the demands of three jobs, living with MS, and spending about a week every three months wondering what my next regular CT scan (follow up to my GIST cancer) will show, I seem to be in a "loop" these days.

 

The more I think about it, the more I think I should make a sincere effort to get to Australia next fall for the big HCW event. The expenses and logistics involved will be major obstacles to clear, but it looks like a goal I'd like to set.

 

I do have a current passport, and I might have enough frequent flyer miles to get at least half way across the Pacific Ocean. I'll have to think about the rest.

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Cheers Guys, and one special Girl.

 

Just had a huge day in the sustained efforts to have the HcW 24-hour become an annual Event.

 

Just signed a Deal with Raffertys Resort for $45,000. per year for the next 5 Years.

 

I'm stoked as my dream just became a reality in a big way.

 

Maybe my body is working as well as it used to, however today just 'Blew' my mind.

 

Cheers again, might have a quiet beer to celebrate.

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That's great news!

Might just have a quiet beer too but will have to wait 12 hr or so ~ wouldn't do to show up at the office with beer-breath as I'm not an executive.

:P

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not myself but my dad who is, in my mind, the biggest legend there is, has just been struck by his second bout of cancer. but he tried to not let it get him down and sails his laser every weekend. he may come last, and doesnt have the best gear, but trains with brisbane's elite laser sailors, gets off his arse and gives it a go. he always said he wanted to do a laser worlds before he died so is heading to korea this year to experience the racing world he loves.

 

there is also another that i have known since day dot that had half his face removed due to skin cancer. he was a developer of the skiff moths and his son went on to become not only a moth world champion but also an olympic silver medalist. not bad for someone from a small country town in northern nsw.

 

so there you go - two people who i admire dearly both struck down with the big C but contribute to the sport and tell us youngsters of their tales.

 

no matter what illness you may encounter, feeling the wind and salt in your face somehow seems to make it all better and give a meaning to keep on fighting to make the next start line... even if it is in the fourth or fifth row...

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hence my moto in life...

 

we LIVE we SAIL we DIE

 

LSD - sailing is my drug - it keeps me going!

 

a day away from the water and i break out in a cold sweat and suffer serious withdrawals!!!

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I've Just got news that Don't Call Me Judge is to make the trip Down under to sail the Inaugural Heaven can Wait 24-hour, fantastic news, and I hope all of us Aussie Anarchists can shout him a Coldie?

 

DCMJ, how's your Liver?

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Props to you DCMJ! I won't/can't be there but I'm sure someone'll shout you a coldie for me! Cheers mate & good luck.

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Kudos to Don't Call Me Judge, taking the biggest step a buying His Plane Ticket to Australia to do the HcW 24hr, I'm honoured that you consider the HcW 24hr worthy and will look forward greatly to having a beer and laughs with you.

 

Well done.

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HcW,

Thanks for the invitation! I'm still a bit stunned that I made the impulsive move to buy my plane ticket tonight. I only just spoke (briefly) to my father and my boss in the last 24 hours to float the idea past them. When neither objected to my wacky idea, I figured I better just grab a seat on United Airlines while the getting was good!

 

To answer your question about my liver, so far it's holding up. I get regular blood work done because the Multiple Sclerosis drug I take 3x/week by injection (Rebif aka Interferon beta 1a) and the cancer drug I was on (Gleevec) can both be dangerous and affect liver function. So far, so good. I'll have at least one more regular CT scan before I head Down Under to check for cancer, as well as my regular annual MRIs to look at progression (or lack thereof, hopefully) of lesions in my brain and spinal cord.

 

I don't drink (quit the morning after I started when I realized I was very fortunate to have survived the night), but I'll look forward to hoisting a glass of something less alcoholic to ya when I get there!

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... well, I don't have cancer, but if any of you who know me wonder why I am the way I am (besides the obvious) I thought that you'd like to see what you can't see on the outside...

post-2542-1146232481_thumb.jpg

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Exactly one year ago on this date, I had a strange experience. This is the story I wrote in an email I shared with some friends and family on the evening of May 12th, 2005, and it seems like a good time to bump this thread anyway:

 

May 12th, 2005.

I have never been much of a morning person, and I don't start work most weekdays until 9:30am, so when it comes to mornings, 8:15 is usually plenty early to set my alarm clock. Although I've been having sleep problems for the past couple years, I usually sleep soundly once I actually get to sleep, and it's rare for me to ever wake up before my alarm goes off.

 

I was having a very strange dream this morning at about 7am. It's hard to explain, but somehow it involved people I don't even know, talking about time and events that I was unfamiliar with, and doing so with great urgency.

 

I woke up with a start (actually sat bolt upright in bed), confused and anxious. I was also feeling sudden abdominal distress. As I sat there trying to clear the cobwebs from my head, I felt like something strange had just occurred, and like I needed to "be somewhere else" right that moment. I tried recalling what was supposed to be happening today, and nothing special came to mind.

 

The abdominal pain wasn't going away, but it wasn't quite bad enough to cause serious concern yet. I thought to myself, "OK, it's Thursday. Do I have to do something right away this morning, or have to go somewhere or call someone?" I sat there dazed for a few more minutes, and reached over to look at my little dayminder on the bedside table. I saw that today was May 12th, and suddenly it dawned on me: Exactly one year ago today at 7am I was in surgery to remove my GIST cancer tumor.

 

I had been admitted to the Hospital on May 8th, 2004 with serious GI bleeding, then spent four days in the ICU, getting 8 (or 9?) blood transfusions, and a battery of tests by 7 different doctors before the tumor was found (attached to my small intestine) at about midnight on the 11th, and surgery was scheduled for early the next morning at 7am.

 

I recently had my fifth "clear" CT scan done, and no new GIST tumors have appeared, so you can add me to the long list of cancer survivors. I'll be done with the actual "drug" part of my double blind study with Gleevec in June, but they will still do regular blood tests and CT scans for a number of years to come.

 

Today marks my one year anniversary of being cancer free. I'm living with Multiple Sclerosis (and asthma), but cancer is history!

:)

 

 

I managed to sleep in a few hours past 7am today, and actually had one of the better nights of sleep in many months. Today marks the 2 year anniversary of my successful cancer surgery. Stay tuned. I plan on being around to celebrate many more such days!

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Are those turnbuckles in there? If so, how do you tune the rig with those things?

;)

 

Good going on your second anniversary Judge man!

 

And no, there's no adjustment in there! :) It's fixed unobtainium links. When they need adjusting, they're going to have to open me up to get to it. Wanna see a side view?

post-2542-1147526033_thumb.jpg

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Nasty, Boatsh.... Nothing like having a Rod made for your back eh?

 

DCMJ, well done on 2 years clear, I've just got to get my Oncologist to give the official thumbs up, I can't see it any time soon which is a little frustrating.

 

Well done mate, may there be many, many more clear years.

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... cancer SUCKS! My old man went to have his surgery last week and they found more but as of now, they aren't going back in... We're all staying positive, my dad is invincible...

 

He (like many fathers) is the reason I started sailing...

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hi folks

a little story from the UK, no moral, no ending, but stories are meant to shared and many of the above have made me realise how lucky my wife and i have been

 

Oct 2003, my wife is diagnosed with breast cancer....8 months of chemo......she goes into hospital for a lumpectomy.....comes out having had a mastectomy.....radio theorpy for 24 days

 

we then go to New Zealand for 3 weeks over xmas...cost a fortune..LOL..but its only money, went sailing on a ex AC cup boat in Auckland harbour.......it rained !!!

 

 

me and my wife met through sailing of course, as i guess many on here have done...

 

anyway, when we get back it is discovered, though we suspected, that beacuse the breast cancer had been a late diagnoses, ( doctor was a ****), it has noe spread, through her lymph system to her bones and liver....

 

at the moment she is having a treatment break as she is not strong enough to have any chemo at the moment, and i have just talked to her on the phone and she is really down (((

 

last week she decided to give her sailing gear away as she is unlikely to need it again..( i was agaisnt it),

but on saturday i went sailing, fantastic day, force 3...sun...warm(ish) just doing some practisng for an hour...and do you know i didnt think about faking cancer once..

 

so for all those people who are dealing with it once removed...go sailing.....you WILL feel better

 

shark

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after having read what people are going through and knowing how my dad battled skin cancer, it reminds me just how mortal we all are. and like sharky UK, my dad kept up with his sailing. the only things you could see where his sunglasses, but he was out sailing. i have recently been found to have what millions of people around the world get all the time. a slipped disk. have been sailing with it for several years now thinking all along i just needed to get back into the gym. next week i go in for further tests and hopfully, therapy is all i need. what amazed me was that i only felt the pain after i was done sailing. they say laughter is the best medicine? i believe it is sailing.

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8 bells for my father Ken Jubenville. Fair winds and following seas dad.

 

That cancer is some nasty shit. :angry:

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Condolences to you and your family, Nacradude.

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8 bells for my father Ken Jubenville. Fair winds and following seas dad.

 

That cancer is some nasty shit. :angry:

 

 

 

Sorry to hear about that Nacradude, very sad mate - all the most sincere wishes to you and your family at this time.

 

 

 

Bowgirl, I see this thread as the "Secret Corner" of the Sailing Anarchy Home, secret only because it is a quiet, peaceful place where I for one reflect on my life, and gain solace and resolve from the stories of others.

 

I do hope that this thread lives on as we owe it to one and all to continue the good fight, not just on the Race Course, but for life itself.

 

Kudos to everyone posting here. ;)

post-5412-1149925435_thumb.jpg

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Considering that the HCW 24 Hour race for cancer is just over a month away, I thought it was time to bump this thread back to life. This thread is where the genesis of the event was born.

 

If you read HCW's own account, you can see why organizing this amazing event has become his labor of love, and reason for keeping hope and strength strong for more than a year now.

 

If you can still put together a boat, make it happen!

If you can't but want to help out anyway, I'm sure there either is (or soon will be) a way to make a contribution to help support cancer research directly through the regatta, even if you live miles (or continents) away.

 

HCW... any leads on how we can all make financial contributions in support of the event goals?

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Mum just diagnosed with cancer and spots in the liver.

 

Otherwise fit and healthy!

 

Thanks for this thread.

 

 

Cheers FR, best wishes for your Mum, the problem is Cancer doesn't differentiate, strength to her at this time.

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First time I've been to this thread - and it's amazing. All love and strength to you and your families and friends. Of all the tragedy I've been around, I've never dealt with cancer - it seems my family tends to have troubles with their hearts rather than, or before, cancer comes around. As of a few days ago, I am learning to deal with it, albeit with a patient who is less important to me than a mother or wife would be (but still damned important). With apologies to those who may feel this belittles the seriousness of the issues, this is the e-mail I sent out this morning to my friends, family and colleagues:

 

Good morning everyone.

Over the past year, you’ve all gotten to know our bullmastiff dog, Bob. Many of you have spent time with him, given him treats, and had him lean on you or just plain knock you over. Some of you have babysat or had him come over to play with your dogs. Hell, he’s even bitten one person on the e-mail list above (no hard feelings!) He has received so much love from all of you that he can’t wait to get in the car, knowing he’s coming to see some of his friends. Every Friday morning he goes to the door and stares at the car, just waiting to come out on a site walk with engineers, or to go to the office and get treats from Carol, petting from Bernie, to bark at Steve, to scare Norman and Kristin.

Bob has been sick for almost two months now. Originally he had a cough, but it developed into something where he can’t really breathe, eat, or move much. We spent a lot of time with the vets trying to figure out what is wrong with him. We finally brought him to Michigan State’s small animal teaching hospital and found out that he has a large tumor in his lungs which is putting a great deal of pressure on all of his organs nearby as it spreads through his body. It’s categorized as Lymphoma (cancer), and his is pretty far advanced (stage 5-B on a scale of 1 to 5). Lymphoma is systemic, and spreads pretty rapidly. The only positive thing about it is that it responds fairly well to chemotherapy, which in dogs is designed to allow the dog to live comfortably, not necessarily to try to cure them. This and euthanasia were really the only two options for us, as Bob couldn’t breathe without oxygen and couldn’t eat without a feeding tube.

Because of his young age and his strength, we decided to begin chemotherapy at MSU. We can’t afford it, and he’s probably got less than a 50/50 chance of living out the year, but we looked in his eyes last night in Lansing, and he wagged his tail and made bright eyes at us both, and we knew he was asking us to give him a chance. I had always said to myself that I wouldn’t subject a dog to chemo if it came to it – but I couldn’t argue with Bob.

He received his first dose of chemicals last night, and this morning Bob ate his first meal in over a week. This may be good news, or it may simply be a response to the steroids he’s receiving, but he’s giving himself a fighting chance – he was always a bit stubborn. He will receive another shot tonight, and if he responds to it then he may be able to come off the oxygen. Bob has lost about 25% of his body weight, so he’ll need to eat often. If he cannot breathe without help or eat by the weekend, he will likely not survive, but we’ll jump off that bridge if we have to come to it. As a bit of a side note, I think that all doctors could really learn a thing or two about bedside matter from the majority of vets that we’ve met. Especially at MSU, they are extremely caring, and they take all the time that you need to understand the issues and to be comfortable with your decisions.

In the meantime, I’m sure Bob will wag his tail if all of you take a second to send your thoughts, hopes, prayers, and love to him over in East Lansing. Have a cookie for him, and be extra nice to your pets and realize how lucky you are to have them, even when they eat your shoes or pee on the couch. I’ll keep all of you posted, and Meredith and I thank you all in advance for your wishes.

 

Best Regards,

 

Bob’s parents

25he4ir.jpg

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First time I've been to this thread - and it's amazing. All love and strength to you and your families and friends. Of all the tragedy I've been around, I've never dealt with cancer - it seems my family tends to have troubles with their hearts rather than, or before, cancer comes around. As of a few days ago, I am learning to deal with it, albeit with a patient who is less important to me than a mother or wife would be (but still damned important). With apologies to those who may feel this belittles the seriousness of the issues, this is the e-mail I sent out this morning to my friends, family and colleagues:

 

Good morning everyone.

Over the past year, you’ve all gotten to know our bullmastiff dog, Bob. Many of you have spent time with him, given him treats, and had him lean on you or just plain knock you over. Some of you have babysat or had him come over to play with your dogs. Hell, he’s even bitten one person on the e-mail list above (no hard feelings!) He has received so much love from all of you that he can’t wait to get in the car, knowing he’s coming to see some of his friends. Every Friday morning he goes to the door and stares at the car, just waiting to come out on a site walk with engineers, or to go to the office and get treats from Carol, petting from Bernie, to bark at Steve, to scare Norman and Kristin.

Bob has been sick for almost two months now. Originally he had a cough, but it developed into something where he can’t really breathe, eat, or move much. We spent a lot of time with the vets trying to figure out what is wrong with him. We finally brought him to Michigan State’s small animal teaching hospital and found out that he has a large tumor in his lungs which is putting a great deal of pressure on all of his organs nearby as it spreads through his body. It’s categorized as Lymphoma (cancer), and his is pretty far advanced (stage 5-B on a scale of 1 to 5). Lymphoma is systemic, and spreads pretty rapidly. The only positive thing about it is that it responds fairly well to chemotherapy, which in dogs is designed to allow the dog to live comfortably, not necessarily to try to cure them. This and euthanasia were really the only two options for us, as Bob couldn’t breathe without oxygen and couldn’t eat without a feeding tube.

Because of his young age and his strength, we decided to begin chemotherapy at MSU. We can’t afford it, and he’s probably got less than a 50/50 chance of living out the year, but we looked in his eyes last night in Lansing, and he wagged his tail and made bright eyes at us both, and we knew he was asking us to give him a chance. I had always said to myself that I wouldn’t subject a dog to chemo if it came to it – but I couldn’t argue with Bob.

He received his first dose of chemicals last night, and this morning Bob ate his first meal in over a week. This may be good news, or it may simply be a response to the steroids he’s receiving, but he’s giving himself a fighting chance – he was always a bit stubborn. He will receive another shot tonight, and if he responds to it then he may be able to come off the oxygen. Bob has lost about 25% of his body weight, so he’ll need to eat often. If he cannot breathe without help or eat by the weekend, he will likely not survive, but we’ll jump off that bridge if we have to come to it. As a bit of a side note, I think that all doctors could really learn a thing or two about bedside matter from the majority of vets that we’ve met. Especially at MSU, they are extremely caring, and they take all the time that you need to understand the issues and to be comfortable with your decisions.

In the meantime, I’m sure Bob will wag his tail if all of you take a second to send your thoughts, hopes, prayers, and love to him over in East Lansing. Have a cookie for him, and be extra nice to your pets and realize how lucky you are to have them, even when they eat your shoes or pee on the couch. I’ll keep all of you posted, and Meredith and I thank you all in advance for your wishes.

 

Best Regards,

 

Bob’s parents

25he4ir.jpg

 

 

Hey Clean, don't sweat it dude.

Although I lost my dad and hope you never have to go through any of that fucking shit, I had my black lab who sailed with me every time I single handed go blind on me at age ten. She ws my favorite being on the earth and her loss was one of the most tramatic in my life. By the way, I have a good friend that I used to race with that owns a animal cancer center in West Bloomfield that is one of if not the best in the state. If you want I'll give you the heads up on the facility in a PM.

 

Note, I wrote this after drinking Wild Turkey so blow me on the typ-o's

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Time to bring this back to page one.

 

This thread is what inspired me to get involved in the HcW 24 Hour race well over a year ago, and now it's almost here. I leave Minneapolis next Tuesday to head to Sydney, and I'm honored to be joining so many awesome folks who are also cancer survivors.

 

A big cheer to HcW! Your vision is about to become ours as well.

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Time to bring this back to page one.

 

This thread is what inspired me to get involved in the HcW 24 Hour race well over a year ago, and now it's almost here. I leave Minneapolis next Tuesday to head to Sydney, and I'm honored to be joining so many awesome folks who are also cancer survivors.

 

A big cheer to HcW! Your vision is about to become ours as well.

How very bizarre. I returned to this thread this morning (about 16 hr ago) and thought "it's time for a bump", but didn't do it.

 

Thank you, DCMJ, for bumping it and for following your inspiration.

 

Big cheer to both of you - you and HcW

(EDIT: And to all the others who've fought, regardless of whether they've won or not)

Edited by Bowgirl

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Now that the first Heaven Can Wait 24 Hour Yacht race for cancer is history, I want to once again thank HcW for inspiring me to fly around the world to participate with him, and many other cancer survivors last weekend on Lake Macquarie.

 

I'm still having a hard time collecting, much less expressing my thoughts about the meaning behind all of this, other than that I know in my heart that I was meant to share the experience.

 

Good people

Good vibes

Good karma

Good times!

 

My thoughts are with all of you who have in the past, or are currently affected by cancer and other major health challenges. If you can ever use a shoulder to lean on, an ear to bend, or a smile to share, please call on me.

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DCMJ and Bowgirl,

 

Thank you for well... just being you two, as for the greater part the HcW story would not have its fairytale without your support and yours specifically.

 

Time and again I drew strength and renewed focus from reading your posts and more importantly your personnal PM's, which has given me the mind to keep going.

 

Thank you.

 

For those not familiar with why DCMJ and Bowgirl have been my impetous to complete and achieve my goal, I can only state the following :

 

In 2004 after many months of Chemo and numerous Major Operations, I turned to my Land locked Racing Yacht, I planted in my front yard at home just prior to diagnosis, to inspire me to get the pair of us back out on the water and Racing again.

 

I was a battle as I had to build up enough strength to get out to the boat let alone sail the Old girl once more.

 

I settled on a date, which I thought was reachable and thought that maybe other Cancer Survivors would like to share in what would become part of my destiny.

 

The Title "The Heaven can Wait" is exactly that, I was just not ready to go just yet, and amongst other things instantly congeres up the sentiment for which the race was based.

 

The 24-hours is the critical lifespan we Cancer sufferers live with, we can't consider later this week, next week or Christmas, its what will happen tomorrow.

 

After realising the desire was there after running the idea past those here on Sailing Anarchy and moreso by many keen to participate I put on a trial to get some insight into how the Heaven can Wait 24-hour Yacht Race would work, and on the Saturday on the October Long Weekend 2005, 7 Yachts and Multi's from around the Lake showed up and started the trial.

 

I'd gained endorsement from the NSW Cancer Council and secured the Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol prior to the 2005 Trial, and with the boats starting from 1pm that Saturday, we were in full swing to learn whatever could for the "Real" Event pencilled in for 2006.

 

All boats competing in the trial gave glowing reports of the Course, and a little less glow of some unruly fishermen encountered, but we had smiles, and that was half the battle won. They'd all had a great time.

 

That was all I needed and set about my continued efforts to secure Sponsors to assist my Small Club and I to host the Main Event, it's an expensive business this Regatta Organising caper as I would find out further down the track.

 

After well over 100 letters and countless hours of driving, phone calls, and meetings, I had the sum total of one Sponsor namely Navman, who've been a long standing partner in a couple of my previous endeavours.

 

I pretty much lost the drive after being continually told There was no funding left, our budgets already done, or whatever other reason they could find, but it was disheartening all the same.

 

Bowgirl never gave up on me and numerous PM's later I'd re-charged somewhat and off I'd go again.

 

Christmas 2005 I still only the one Sponsor and a marginal chance of putting together an Organised Chook Raffle, and my boat was even more need of care that I started to really believe I wouldn't make the start of my own race or heaven forbid chook raffle.

 

By early 2006, I'd just about given up on the Heaven can Wait 24-hour amounting to anything bigger than an inter-Club Event and gave my boat even less chance of sailing again, let alone with me in my own race.

 

Both Don't call me Judge, and Bowgirl could sense I was down, and made the right noises at just the time and only a matter of weeks later I had 2 appointments that would ultimately change the fortunes of the Heaven can Wait 24-hour forever.

 

Raffertys Resort chimed in with a timely proposal that would have taken any prospective Event Organiser, they loved the concept, but more importantly that wanted me very much part of the package, and the deal was done.

 

Prime TV one of our local Television Stations were also keen to run with the idea, and an Add was made, the show was now on the road, and I was finally starting to see light from all of my efforts.

 

As with most things designated with a set date, time was a ticking, and there was oh so much to do.

 

I half heartedly compiled a Race NOR's, which I bounced off one of my Clubs technical members, and to my surprise wasn't that far off in my 2nd or third attempt.

 

With the help of All Piss and Wind, Knobblyoldjimbo and Remmie, we had a Race ready set of NOR's, and it was certainly a load off when we were able to get them released here on Sailing Anarchy.

 

With all of the support shown to the thread on Sportsboat Anarchy, anyone would consider the potential of the Heaven can Wait to be a runaway success, and I continued organising in earnest.

 

A month out my boat was still in pieces, the electronics were still in boxes, and the wiring was spread unfinished and disconnected from one end of the boat to the other.

 

There remained a large part of deck missing in my boats bow, where dry rot had set in, not being able to play with Epoxy, I had to rely on friends to help me out, and help they did.

 

Day in day out they'd appear and get stuck straight into fixing the little jobs that needed doing, and between the three of us we knocked the work over bit by bit.

 

2 Weeks out there wasn't much else I could organise and aside from the constant ringing of the phone and consistant supply of emails, I could finally sense that I just might make the start of my own Yacht Race.

 

I seldom saw my pillow much before 4am each night or should that be morning, then back up at 7am to get my kids organised for school.

 

So there I was a week out from one of the biggest Weekends of my life and I had a boat that finally didn't flop around on its trailer, and finally able to be towed up to Belmont to have its sails finally measured.

 

Back and forth to Raffertys Resort, to the Trophie Shop, to the sailmakers, to the Ship Chandlers, to the Clubs on the Eastern side of the Lake, to where ever I was needed to be, and after several days of doing I guess my cars pretty much knew they where they were headed.

 

With one night left to go, I still had to deliver the Eastern Lake side Course Marks to one competitors home and a Yacht Club, drop off the Trophies to Raffertys, and pick up and pay for my entire sail wardrobe for my boat.

 

Around 9pm I arrived home to find a "Teaky", beaming as he waltzed down the driveway to meet me. He was suitably impressed with my dimly lit steed sitting proud in the driveway, low and behold we still had much to do, and only a few hours to do it.

 

I worked til 2 or 3pm on various bits and pieces, and made a mental list of what still needed to be done first thing in the morning, and at 6am I'm at it again. Fit the tiller extention, sort the sheets and assorted ropes onboard downstairs on the boat, answer a dozen phone calls, and finally start loading what seemed "Tons" of gear. I dragged my pristene Outboard from out of its 3 year storage, and fitted onto the back of the boat, then with a flurry of slamming doors, we piled into the cars and started out for the Boat Ramp.

 

I still wasn't fully confident that we'd get to the startline, but we continued on regardless. On finally reaching the Boat Ramp, we were last cab off the rank. "Vivace" was there, "The Works" was there, "Mr Squiggle" was there and finally 'OSB Heaven can Wait' was there, I was finally starting to feel excited about the prospect of starting in my own Yacht Race.

 

The breeze by that stage had filled in by the stage we were finally able to launch the old Girl, and we watched "The Works" shoot off under motor around the point, closely followed by Mr Sqiggle, then in the now gusty conditions "Vivace" motor out and immediately get blown back into shore, it took several goes before Vivace too would dissappear around the point.

 

Finally in the water, the Old Girl bobbed around proudly awaiting me when I arrived back from parking the Car and Trailer, the Brand New Main fitted the Boom, which at this point in time was a bonus, however would it fit up the mast was another question.

 

As it turned out the sails were awesome, cheers Macdiamids, they fitted perfectly everywhere, and in what was 25 to 30knots the No.3 was a no brainer. Our main problem came from that thing we call a lift keel. Having not been lowered in 3 Years the keel had jammed good and tight in the confines of the centerboard case, and probably not a good time to have this happen with 25-30 knots of pressure bearing down on us and a full main.

 

The boat was actually no problem, however by having the keel stuck up in the fully "up" position our start was not going to be forthcoming. I was devastated, to be so close and yet just so far from what I'd set out to do, start in my own Race.

 

I turned the boat around and we headed back to the sheltered waters just behind the Headland we'd just come from, to hopefully have more luck with getting the keel down. again and again Nothing.

 

Teaky not prepared to stand there and give in to this inanimate object we call a keel, proceeded to jump up and down on the protruding keel, much to the giggles stirring from the cockpit, 'You're waisting your time Teaks', then one on the crew removed the keel haul rope from the winch, and within one or two jumps by Teaky, the whir of free running rope was heard, and the keel went down.

 

Thank God for that, was the collective cry, and we about faced and made for the start line, only an hour late, but we were off.

 

There was a collective cheer from shore as we finally got underway, only to pass Mr Squiggle being towed back to the boat Ramp with a broken Rudder, I felt for them as they'd travelled all the way from Queensland to compete.

 

Not able to ponder too much on anothers woes, we experienced another problem, the Spinnaker exit box up the mast had seized, we had no Spinnaker Halyard - Bugger.

 

30 knots up the backside and no Halyard, well not for long, we sailed on for a mile or so around the top of Pulbar Island then dropped the headsail, and set the kite using the Headsail halyard.

 

The rest was a wild ride down the Lake, and it was great.

 

For me the most special part of the Weekend was actually being able to get to start in my own boat, what ever happened after that was a definate bonus. I was never going to win nor did I expect to, especially giving the rest of the fleet an hours head start, but there were numerous times that repaided all the effort that I'd put into this very weekend and I was so proud to even be there.

 

One is seldom overjoyed at the prospect of spending 4 or 5 hours parked in the middle of a Lake with no or very little wind, however watching the sun slowly climb up over coast the "For the weary sailor, the sun will rise in the morning" the words rang true as I was finally a weary sailor, and I was still here.

 

The boys and girl onboard appreciated the mental picture of my wife spending hours, days, weeks beside my bed and accepted our becalmed situation par for the course, it needed to be done, and we did it.

 

The Heaven can Wait 24-hour is so much more than just a Race, it is an experience, and you will find that true character we all possess, and it will affect you, if for only 24-hours you consider those living with Cancer, then this Race has done its job.

 

A very big Cheers to each and every one of you who came along for the ride, we made a difference and it felt good.

 

HcW.

 

DCMJ and Bowgirl ;)

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<speechless>

 

Thank you

 

... and you're welcome ^_^

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HCW, I am so proud of you. Your courage and determination inspire me.

gotta sign off now, I'm tearing up.....

-msg

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Take to the Sea Once More.

 

 

With bleary eyes I wander the waves of blue and emerald green

 

The heavens vast and empty expanse drawing me, willing me near

 

The bitter salt wells in my eyes, time and again

 

a cold slap from my memories as I sail onward, forever onward

 

I've moved on from what I've left in my wake, forward I push on, I now fear not where the tides take me

 

Onward is where my boat is leading me, to ease my soul from the scurge and ravages of this life

 

I know not of the my pain in my heart anymore, my loss is no more to bare, I know nothing but onward of following winds and clear sky's

 

As the daylight falls far behind me, I fear not of the Darkness, the endless abyss void of guiding light

 

the fair winds and calm seas now call me, direct my sail ever onward

 

Rest easy now for it is for the weary sailor that the sun will rise again in the morning.

 

 

 

HcW.

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The Inaugural Raffertys Heaven can Wait 24-hour Yacht Race 2006

 

Before I dive into the nuts and bolts of this years Race, I'll take you back a couple of years and start from there, namely because a couple of Goals I set for myself back then fell into place this October Long weekend.

 

The 24th June 2003 will long be etched in my memory as the day my life would change forever.

 

The Big "C" was the diagnosis, and for a guy living in his prime, this was a body blow and a somewhat difficult pill to swallow.

 

I've always lived my life knowing that if in any troublesome situation I'd want to know the very worst it can be and deal with that, rather than pussy foot around with bits and pieces, however well this plays is out of course is subjective, but nevertheless I treated my Cancer with the same mentality and conviction.

 

On finally being allowed home after months in Intensive Care after my 2nd and 3rd Operations I quickly learnt the value of dreams, because my body as smashed up as it was would it once again allow me to ride high and sail my faithful Young 780 Sportsboat and race again.

 

I'd spend hours trying to get myself out to my boat only to have to stop and turn back from exhaustion. For what I didn't know then is the road back from where I'd been was going to be one of the toughest, most painful journey's I'd ever undertaken.

 

In the Summer of 2004 around October I achieved my first goal, I had climbed up into the cockpit of my Land Locked escape machine and for just a moment I was headed for the wild blue Yonder and it felt good.

 

During that time I made myself a simple promise, that one day my boat and I would one day get back out on the water and Race once more. I thought of what sort of racing could I still do, was Racing Offshore still an option, or am I setting my expectations just too high.

 

The end result of all of my surgery was I was lucky just to even be here, let alone take on the rigors of Long Hauled or passage Racing.

 

I'd settled into living my life 1 day at a time courtesy of my throng of Doctors and Specialists, my wife more so as she knew where I'd been and where I could end up again. So it was the next 24-hours, then the next 24-hours, then the next and so on.

 

My Oncologist, a painfully shy and highly educated fellow was arguably one of my biggest fans. The type of Cancer I had has a pretty good survival rate courtesy of today's Medicine, however I'd turn out to be any Oncologists worst nightmare, as I found and continue to find news ways of complicating my condition ever further. But for guy that really has a terrible job, we shared more than a few laughs despite all of my setbacks.

On visiting my Oncologist yet another time I noticed a smallish photo at the back of his desk showing him with a gaggle of bald headed kids laughing at something that was obviously very funny, however the logo's on all of their Peak Caps made me think.

 

With that I went home, and out loud I stated to my boat that for 24-hours sometime in the future the pair of us would take on Lake Macquarie and I'd raise some money in support of my Oncologists Charity of choice the NSW Cancer Council.

 

I'd had an idea that if I was to fulfill my promise, I'd have to get friends to help me and so that was it.

 

My Grandmother, easily my biggest fan had always sung my praises namely for my attitude, I'd always said to her that "Heaven was just going to have to wait, cause I've got some Yacht Races to win," which still today always makes her laugh. My tongue in cheek comment would steadily ring louder in my mind and even today as I reflect, was a definitive stage in what would ultimately be known as the "Heaven can Wait" 24-hour Yacht Race.

 

After a couple of visits from various sailing friends, I ran the idea by them , and the instant response was "This Race could really be a big thing".

 

In all of the months of Organising the HcW 24-hour, I never once considered the fame that one might attracted if and when my Race became a reality. Sure I'm passionate about it, however I'd no sooner fade into the background rather than be bestowed any glory, because it just isn't me. I simply wanted to organise a race that I thought I could still do.

 

I'd found Sailing Anarchy some time ago whilst I was undergoing Chemo, but never really had the time or energy to really get into it until after my 3rd Op when being couch bound was all that I could do.

 

Owning a Sportsboat, I soon found SBA a significant fountain of information, and I found out too that I still had something of relevance to offer albeit longer term memories rather than day to Racing.

 

The Heaven can Wait 24-hour concept was first posted here on SBA back in June 2005 and the Rest they say is history.

 

Over the October Long Weekend in 2005, I organised a Trial of the Event predominately to get a feel for the interest out there. 24 boats initially put their hands up to participate, and through one mister meaner or another the Trial fleet started with 7 boats.

 

3 of the original 7 crews have backed up from last years Trial to do this years Event, and understandably figured prominently in the final results of this Years Race, knowing where to go and what to expect.

 

I on the other hand had to take in what they'd said and prepare myself in some way to take on the Race for myself.

 

Organising what is essentially now a large Event for our region, and trying to campaign your own boat seldom pays off, however I had a plan that I'd maintain working on my boat during the day and organise the Race at night. This kind of worked for a short time, before the mindless and obscure task of confirming Sponsors became my day and night time vocation, and slowly but more alarmingly the opportunity to work on my boat became somewhat of a Religious experience as the HcW 24-hour began to pick up a following.

 

In the Summer of 2005 I had 3 or 4 meetings with various potential Sponsors when I was approached by Raffertys Resort. Armed with only my long term Sponsor NAVMAN Marine Electronics, I sat down with the owner of the Resort and much to my surprise was offered the lifeline far beyond any of my expectations and agreeing on terms was merely a formality.

 

During that same week I'd been offered a deal with Prime TV, one of our regional Television Stations, so needless to say any desperation I'd harboured that week soon became forgotten. The Raffertys Heaven can Wait 24-hour now had grown wings and we were flying.

 

Between Renee from Raffertys Resort and I, we would secure Ensign Wines, Newcastle International Airport, Stockland Holdings Ltd, RFD Australia and of Course Sailing Anarchy USA as the principle Sponsors for the event that we are indebted to for their assistance.

 

With a month or so to go till the Start of the Inaugural Event, my poor boat sat in pieces, I just couldn't get time to get anywhere near it. Two close friends from my Yacht Club soon took it on amongst themselves to alternate working on my boat and between the three of us we made effective headway, with all the little jobs that needed to be done, but more importantly they were finally being done.

 

With 2 weeks to go, it was tight, we still had much to do on the boat and even more to do on organizing the now Main Event.

 

Day in day out I'd work from 7am till 2 or 3am sorting out the Race and knocking over the jobs on the boat that had to be done.

 

Two weeks out and my body started to throw me yet another curve ball, I pulled out a drawer at home. The front of the drawer came off in my hands and the remaining section off the draw effectively back flipped and ran down my shin.

 

Generally not a big deal normally, however the drawer would carve a nice 1 inch x 1 inch slice out of my shin, which rapidly became infected because of my Lymphedema.

 

Not content to leave me with this to deal with I broke a tooth in half the same day, and I can say honestly that there is nothing more debilitating and painful than a broken tooth, not to mention me being on Warfarin so the Dentist couldn't pull out what was left of the tooth.

 

Finally on the Eve of the Race and armed to the teeth with pain killers and anti-biotics, I delivered the Race Marks to the Eastern Clubs in readiness for the following day. My boats sails were finished and ready to go and at 6pm on the Friday, I realised that I might just make it to that Start line.

 

Our very own Teaky and active Sailing Anarchist arrived whilst I was out and became an instant idol of my son, if not for the lofty height of the man, it was his Car.

 

Saturday Morning, Teaky and I got stuck back into it from 6am, drilling this attaching that, until another 2 of my crew appeared and the tempo was increased another notch again. It was rapidly becoming showtime.

 

Running seriously late to get to the boat ramp, we were met by an assortment of Sportsboats, Anarchist bfp with his Boatspeed 23 Mr Squiggle, The Works an Elliott 770, Vivace a Bethwait 8metre Rocketship and my OSB Heaven… . It was then and there I began to feel the excitement build, I might actually achieve goals today I began to think.

 

After the Boat ramp Carpark emptied somewhat, we spent a few nervous moments man handling my boats 11metre Rig, finally it stood proud, and we were all set to put OSB Heaven can Wait, back in the water once more.

 

The inherent problems in expecting a boat that has been lying idle for the better part of the last 3 years to work let alone perform, would prove critical, as fate would throw up 1 last wobble as we would soon find out.

 

We launched the boat, I parked my 4WD and trailer, and we headed out onto the Race course. Already running late by some half an hour, I steered the boat away from the Wharf, whilst the boys set down the keel. "Bugger" the Keel was stuck up, we continued on believing that the sway of the boat in the fairly heavy breeze would loosen the stuck appendage, with no such luck. Everything all but seemed lost as it was not a great idea to continue in 20-27knots of true breeze with the keel stuck up, so within sight of the Startline, we reluctantly conceded defeat and turned the boat around to head back to the boat ramp. I was guttered to get that close and fall short all because of a keel that wouldn't follow the script.

 

Teaks not willing to give up started jumping up and down on the problem component, and after 2 or 3 jumps the Centreboard dropped, we were back on.

 

Running almost an hour late, the main fleet was a blur of sails on the horizon, we headed the boat North and with all of the best intentions we set to get the our small kite up for the short blast down to Pulbah Island, before we'd probably have to drop the kite only to re-hoist once rounding the Island with the larger kite for the broad reach down to Belmont.

 

Problem number 2 became evident when the Spinnaker sheave refused to work, so we had to change over and use the Jib Halyard.

 

Great start this was?

 

Anyway we finally managed to get around the Eastern End of Pulbah island, and with the Raffertys Resort Mark missing in action, we were able to get our larger Spinnaker up and concentrate on the boats we were now in hot pursuit of somewhere in the distance.

 

We absolutely blasted down the course and one by one we caught the tail enders, by Speers Point, the most Northerly point of the Lake we had our Division in sight.

 

Game On.

 

Hang on a minute the mark is gone, and after a few nervous moments debating what our next course of action was, we set about rounding the Volunteer Coastal Patrol boat stationed there and began the tortured belt to windward.

 

The Work back up the Western shore of Lake Macquarie became a "Bash" as with a number 3, the Main was all but useless in the 30 something Knot gusts, however boat by boat and little by little we made our way up toward the tail end of our Division, by the time we reached the Mannering Park Buoy, we were well and truly in sight of the leaders, and more importantly gaining. My experienced Aussie crew were in awe of the brand new set of sails aloft, not tried until we set sail at the start of this race. They were working beautifully, and it showed in the boats performance.

 

As darkness fell we rounded the Mannering Park Buoy, and set the spinnaker for what was ultimately the most awesome rides of my life. Settled under our large Red Kite we slid into the darkness, and whilst the winds had eased the expectation of the night hadn't, and amongst the soft glow of the surrounding lights from the shoreline we knifed our way North again.

 

The winds had eased to around 15knots and due to the altered course, courtesy of the days strong winds we were able to hold the kite the entire length of the Lake.

 

Just Glorious Sailing, in total darkness with just the soft glow and hum of the shoreline in the distance we set about locating the rounding mark in Belmont Bay, then the replaced mark at Speers point.

 

With the fading warmth of the day's temperature, and the deceptive ambiance of the night air with the wind following, the rounding of the Speers Point Mark would be a slap in the face if we didn't already need one.

 

Man it was cold.

 

In the haste to get the boat in the water and get going to the start, I'd left my nicely folded wet weather gear neatly packed in the back of my car. Not much good there I realised and grabbed what ever would keep the night air at bay.

 

Armed with a pair of tracksuit pants, a T-shirt and fleecy jacket I resumed my position on the rail and promptly began to freeze. Having a lady on board kept the political correctness almost to an acceptable level of crudeness, however be weary of the Teaky, he is a deviate, and can reduce any civilized conversation into a blue theatrical, which would ease a little of the pain of my progressively freezing. Linda our intrepid female aboard provided me with a little warmth as she did everything…..well almost everything to get some feeling back into my arms and legs. Seriously it was cold.

 

As with all highly charged particles, the energy eventually runs out and Teaky was no exception. Without a murmur he disappeared into the darkness that was the Cabin and promptly found refuge in the only clear berth downstairs. Without much of a fight the Teakster was in the blissful land of nod and nothing was going to change that.

 

As the wind progressively lightened the coast back up the Lake became a slow, steady work up the Western Shore, into Toronto round the Mark, harden up then onto Wangi.

 

I'd noticed the Starboard Nav light dim to the point that its use was negotiable, so I promptly set up the emergency set, then ah oh the Port side started to go as well. TEAKY GET UP…..nothing, so cramps and all I grabbed the suitcase that fixes anything and made my way into the bowels of the boat. Easier said than done just quietly, what with all the eskies, Cartons of beer and well…crap, that had found it's way down there, til finally I reached the boats nerve centre, well batteries anyway. I disconnected the lights battery and re-rigged them into the main house battery, bingo and back into the lands of being visible again.

 

There is something to be said when in the depths of darkness, we were still surrounded by Nav lights, and it was something else to guess whether they are our Competition or just fishermen. You'd watch for the lights then the tri-angle above them and it consistently provided entertainment as to whether we were catching or falling behind, we always reckoned on the obvious, however it always kept us focused on the chase in front of us.

 

Pretty consistent winds stayed with us all the way up the work to Wangi, then onto Mannering Park once more. Around 2 or 3 am the wind had dropped out to a Zepher, and produced one of the more spectacular displays of boat handling only seen on rare occasions. On passing the Cardinal mark just off Frying Pan Point the boat started to pirouette uncontrollably and around we went, "aground" sensational. One of the best aspects of sailing a Sportsboat is they don't take much to heal, and without to much drama we were off again.

 

Obviously pleased to be free of the Mud we sailed on and rounded the Mannering Park Buoy and started back on our way up the Lake. You would not believe what happened next…..Yep…..exactly the same place, and dare I say the same patch of mud we hit bottom again. Aside from laughing the pirouette was happening again, and once more we'd heal the boat out of trouble, and off we went... again, with Teaky blissfully asleep downstairs.

 

The remainder of the night proved much a matter of just trying to keep warm and awake without upsetting the boat. Any chance we'd had of catching Animus before the dual groundings quickly evaporated after that and they became another light in a sea of colour that was the shoreline.

 

We sailed to Belmont Bay then onto Speers Point almost by remote control at this stage, and for the better part it was just my crewman Phil and I guiding our steed.

The Two most extraordinary times that are certainly the most vivid have to be dusk and dawn, and this Sunday was no exception, with an almost glassy haze filtering over the water and the smoky spray of clouds across the sky, the Sun began its slow climb over the Eastern Skyline, and with it the last remnants of the night land breeze that had stayed with us all night. Man it was cold.

 

As the temperature slowly began to rise with the sun, so did Teaky, and so did his sense of humour. Those of us that had remained on deck and more or less glued to our own little section of cockpit all stared at each other almost in amazement as this 6 foot something fellow unravelled himself from the depths of the cabin, "Morning Chaps, where are we?"

 

You've got no idea how hard that question is on your ear drums when you've had only about an hours sleep in the last 2 days….oh it hurt.

 

Once the obligatory Monty Python "Morning - Morning - Morning" was over and done with we coasted up the Western Shore again to Toronto. The wind however had obviously forgotten to wake up and we sat, and we sat, and we sat, and we had a really good lesson in Toronto Real estate pricing and a guide to notable landmarks around the place. Geese we had a long enough time to look at them.

 

Painful it was to become, with the seemingly mindless crawl up the Western shore, and for the first time the entire Division was collectively parked all in the one bay, awesome.

 

It was Game on if and when the expected Sea breeze began to filter thru. We managed to get past Obsession just before the Toronto Mark, and quickly put in some distance between us. The Other Woman and Terror Two were next on the hit list and we were in stealth mode. It was fair and reasonable that this was all we could achieve in 2-5 knots if that. The Call came over the Radio that our course was shortened and was to be straight to the finish, cool for us, however perplexing those ahead who'd chased what little breeze there was into and around the Wangi Mark.

 

One of the stunning things and quite frankly startling things to come about that morning was the sheer number of well wishes out on the Lake to cheer us all home, there were hundreds of them, time and again a yacht or Cruiser would coast aside us and cheer us on. It was something I will never forget nor anyone else on the boat. It isn't always easy to look cheery and be so sleep deprived when our well wishers have all had showers, breakfast and a good night's sleep, but it was most enjoyable all the same.

 

We had finally managed to pull in Terror Two and the Other Woman, and the three of us barrelled down the lake in a slowly building Nor'easter, The Other Woman went for the kite first and we rapidly overtook her as it was just too tight, however the shortened course direction had provided us with a choice, whether to sail over the Top of Pulbar Island, or risk sailing below, we chose the over the top, meanwhile the other two set up for around the bottom.

 

Usually in a Nor'easter the over the top option was much more favourable as the breeze should stay with you, except for this Sunday Morning on the 1st of October, where the logic of nature left us, and we wobbled our way over and down the side of Pulbar only to watch the other 2 sail past in much better pressure. Oh well it was worth the risk, it just didn't work this time.

 

The placing's didn't alter as we made our way up to the finish line, and with the blast of the air horn my dream was a reality. I had started and finished something that I had created pretty much on my own, and it felt like nothing else I'd ever done.

 

My crew were quick to shake my hand and regardless of where we had come we'd already won, and no one could take that away from us.

 

We dropped the sails and made our way back to the boat ramp, where even more faces greeted us to congratulate me for what we had done.

 

Easily the most defining moment for me was the friendly handshake from Gybeset obviously moved by the accomplishment and by us all who participated.

 

For the first time the exhaustion of my body overtook the exhilaration of what I'd just achieved and more than a few tears rolled down my face. For that Sunday basking in the most spectacular of days, the job was done my Goals realized and it felt good.

 

The Greater Sailing Anarchy family deserve much of the credit for the success of the Inaugural Raffertys Heaven can Wait 24-hour, I just filled in the missing pieces and together we have all created the start of something special for the here and now, and possibly a legend for the future to come.

 

The Raffertys Heaven can Wait is true test of character, it is certainly not easy, however it is easily the most rewarding race I have ever done, and to share it with so many Sailing Anarchists from far and wide was an honour, and I shall always hold close.

 

Those Anarchists that form the honour Roll for all their efforts in getting this Event up and running are as follows : Mel, Phil, Don't call me Judge (For a sensational effort just being here all the way from the US) Teaky (Legend), bfp, Wrinkly, Knobblyoldjimbo, Recidivist, Jolly Roger Tornado Crew, Bad Jelly, Bunnabaroo, Gorn Frantic, DAVO, Hair or the dog, Windward Mark, Capt Araldite, MH 111, Bow Girl, Sportscar, Gybeset, Ed and Dawg, SteveAUS, Allpiss&wind, LZ and especially OzRick who is still fighting the good fight - I missed having you here mate.

 

For those I've forgotten you to can hold your head high.

 

This was a remarkable Sailing Anarchy effort and I wish to thank you all for your support, as I couldn't have done this on my own.

 

Job Well Done Sailing Anarchy feel proud, you all deserve it. Oh and we raised in excess of $20,000 for the NSW Cancer Council and the Volunteer Coastal Patrol who also deserve a big thankyou.

 

Cheers people and a huge thank you,

 

Heaven can Wait

 

 

 

 

10/09/06

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Seldom has a member on SA ever been more true to his (or her) screen name than Heaven Can Wait.

 

 

HcW-

You've lit the torch yourself, and carried it on an epic journey. I "only" missed two months of work after my own GIST cancer surgery, but the courage you've dredged up to fight your battles far outweighs what I've been through in the past three years.

 

Now it's time for others (plural!) to step up and carry the torch for you (and with you). If I was living in OZ, it would be an easy choice to volunteer for the "job" myself, but living on the other side of the planet has a few drawbacks. My goal is to find a way to save my own money so I can afford to return for the next event. Next time I'd like to invest more of my personal time and energy into raising funds to support research and programs for cancer patients (on behalf of the NSW Cancer Council) through this great event.

 

I want to be able to look back years from now and say, "Wow... look where this started, and look where it is now!"

 

In order to do that, the rest of us need to take the load off HcW's shoulders and get the ball rolling. It will take a lot of sweat and tears for the long vision to come into focus, but we really need to let him pass the torch around. It's all about sharing the load. He's done far more than his share of lifting. Now it's our turn.

 

Who can step up to the plate with me to help lift some of that load off his shoulders?

 

Blake

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Yeh that really sucks.

 

Everytime i'm out sailing with no shirt, i kick myself and think of this thread, i've got enough troubles and cancer would be even worse!

 

JRTC RIP Oz Rick

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I was diagnosed with Melanoma last. I had surgery on my birthday (Nov 5) and went sailing later that day. I really just sat at the wheel, but it was better than sitting on a couch feeling sorry for myself. When we got back to the doc 3 days later the guys from Jubilee (I think Red 36.7 from SC) asked if I had got hurt while sailing. In a weird way it was the best thing anyone could have said to me. I never got to thank them for that, so thanks Jubilee!

 

Heaven can definitely wait!

 

 

 

EDIT - I'm 30, have Italian blood and I got it, so you can too!

 

WEAR A SHIRT!

WEAR A HAT!

WEAR SUN SCREEN!

THE ALTERNATIVE SUCKS!!!!!!!!!!!

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Cancer sucks. A life long family friend has just recently learned she has cancer.

 

She is 33 married with two small children. It started as cervical cancer. They did surgery and radiation but as of last week it has spread to her spine and some organs. She is gong to continue treatment in hopes of getting a few more months with her husband and kids.

 

She and her family are holding up amazingly well. I cant imagine how awful it would be to know I would not be around to raise my kids. Her name is Kristin and I know she appreciates any and all prayers.

 

RIP Rick

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Fatima, my mom beat hers last year. Figure took a beating, but she's as good as ever. She's shopping for a new pair and can't get my stepdad to agree on a model. Wishing you the same blessings.

 

RIP Rick

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It would be remiss of me not to reflect on the year 2006 that was, the numbing hours spent putting a Regatta together and the saddening news of losing a friend in the wash up to an event to Celebrate our Cancer Survival.

 

Rest easy Ric, our thoughts go with you and your family this Christmas.

 

To the focus of the future, and reflect positively on the road we have travelled so far.

 

2007 I trust shall be everything and more to those who believe in the human spirit, and to those battered by or who will feel the ravages of Cancer, believe that any fight is a good fight, and my thoughts go with you.

 

The Human Spirit shone brightly in 2006, and for a moment there were many that would be the best that they could be and Celebrate those of us who've survived Cancer, and reflect on those we have lost along the way.

 

2006 will always remain a pinnacle in my life, having grasped the satisfaction of achieving what I was never mean't too, and in doing so to hopefully stimulate others to reach for their own stars.

 

I have, I did and it was one of the most extraordinary goals I have ever achieved, made all the more heartfelt by the support of Sailing Anarchy.

 

In memory we reflect, in Celebration we support those that will win the good fight of time that has past and when required to do so in the future.

 

Thank you one and all providing the proverbial "wind beneath my Wings", as without SA my HcW 24-hour Race would not have flown.

 

It has and I wish you all a Merry Christmas, and prosperous and healthy New Year.

 

HcW.. ;)

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I started reading this thread a few minutes ago. I plan to go back and read it all. To say I am touched, inspired or simply awed by your stories is an inadequate use of words.

 

I bought my first boat only a year ago. I did it because my youngest son had an interest in sailing and I wanted to show him how much fun it could be. I haven't posted or sailed much since then, as our lives have been topsy turvey and I was away much of the time. A month ago, I came home. Just after, he announced he wanted to go sailing with me

"all the time" and maybe "learn how to race".

 

Funny, 10 years ago last week, when he was only 15 months old, we learned he had leukemia. Not the kid kind, which is bad enough, but a rare and aggressive form of AML that kids (so the doc said) NEVER get. Two years of hell, then watching doctors cry when he relapsed the second time in his brain, listening as they told us to "take him to the beach, to places he'll never get to see, because his prognosis is very poor", to the miracle of a cord blood transplant that really worked. Our lives were changed forever.

 

As a result of his battle, I've become a Trustee of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, I'm on a police bicycle team that rides in relay across the US and Canada each summer to fundraise for the LLS and my wife and I volunteer as first contacts for parents of kids needing bone marrow transplants. Like I told my wife, because of cancer, we've learned a lot, we've grown a lot, but I would rather have read the book..

 

My son wants to race in the Leukemia Cup next summer. At the same time, I'm supposed to be bicycling to Orlando from Houston with my police team (via Tennessee and South Carolina), so going to the regatta might not be possible. But my little C22 Sport has a trailer and there are other regattas. I hope to make at least one next year with my 11y. SURVIVOR crew.

 

As an example of cancer playing no favorites, my wife was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer last month, just a day after I came back home. She is now on chemo and radiation will follow, then herceptin, which was just approved for her form of the disease. Still her attitude is good and she is encouraging us to keep the faith.

 

Research into cancer is paying big benefits, but much work needs to be done. My son benefited from two clinical trials. My wife is benefiting from similar trails.

 

As someone else posted, STI-571, now called Gleevec, was a miracle drug for patients with CML and other forms of leukemia. Our son was on FK506, now called filigastim for GvHD (graft vs. host transplant complication). My wife's herceptin was in a trial that was ended for humantarian reasons last year. Herceptin worked so well for her type of cancer, they stopped the trial and offered the drug to everyone, suspending the placebos. These treatments don't cure/save cure everyone, but they cure a lot of them or at least keep the disease in check. Today, more drugs are on the horizon for a broad spectrum of cancers (cancer is not one disease, but many).

 

Good attitude and a strong will won't work miracles. But it will help. Every day you survive is another day closer to a Cure.

 

God Bless,

Ricky

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I started reading this thread a few minutes ago. I plan to go back and read it all. To say I am touched, inspired or simply awed by your stories is an inadequate use of words.

 

I bought my first boat only a year ago. I did it because my youngest son had an interest in sailing and I wanted to show him how much fun it could be. I haven't posted or sailed much since then, as our lives have been topsy turvey and I was away much of the time. A month ago, I came home. Just after, he announced he wanted to go sailing with me

"all the time" and maybe "learn how to race".

 

Funny, 10 years ago last week, when he was only 15 months old, we learned he had leukemia. Not the kid kind, which is bad enough, but a rare and aggressive form of AML that kids (so the doc said) NEVER get. Two years of hell, then watching doctors cry when he relapsed the second time in his brain, listening as they told us to "take him to the beach, to places he'll never get to see, because his prognosis is very poor", to the miracle of a cord blood transplant that really worked. Our lives were changed forever.

 

As a result of his battle, I've become a Trustee of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, I'm on a police bicycle team that rides in relay across the US and Canada each summer to fundraise for the LLS and my wife and I volunteer as first contacts for parents of kids needing bone marrow transplants. Like I told my wife, because of cancer, we've learned a lot, we've grown a lot, but I would rather have read the book..

 

My son wants to race in the Leukemia Cup next summer. At the same time, I'm supposed to be bicycling to Orlando from Houston with my police team (via Tennessee and South Carolina), so going to the regatta might not be possible. But my little C22 Sport has a trailer and there are other regattas. I hope to make at least one next year with my 11y. SURVIVOR crew.

 

As an example of cancer playing no favorites, my wife was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer last month, just a day after I came back home. She is now on chemo and radiation will follow, then herceptin, which was just approved for her form of the disease. Still her attitude is good and she is encouraging us to keep the faith.

 

Research into cancer is paying big benefits, but much work needs to be done. My son benefited from two clinical trials. My wife is benefiting from similar trails.

 

As someone else posted, STI-571, now called Gleevec, was a miracle drug for patients with CML and other forms of leukemia. Our son was on FK506, now called filigastim for GvHD (graft vs. host transplant complication). My wife's herceptin was in a trial that was ended for humantarian reasons last year. Herceptin worked so well for her type of cancer, they stopped the trial and offered the drug to everyone, suspending the placebos. These treatments don't cure/save cure everyone, but they cure a lot of them or at least keep the disease in check. Today, more drugs are on the horizon for a broad spectrum of cancers (cancer is not one disease, but many).

 

Good attitude and a strong will won't work miracles. But it will help. Every day you survive is another day closer to a Cure.

 

God Bless,

Ricky

 

 

Ricky,

Thanks for sharing. Every month or so, I go back to this thread because it provides me with personal inspiration.

 

Hang tough for your son and wife. To me, 90% of the battle starts with the attitude we choose to take. I took Gleevec for a year as part of a clinical trial after my GIST cancer surgery. As I posted before, it could have been a placebo, but even my doc laughed at that possibility considering the side effects I felt when I was taking the drug daily from June 2004 to June 2005. It's been 2 1/2 years now, and as of my last CT scans just a week ago, I'm still "all clear" with no new cancer.

 

Here's to some of the same hope for your family!

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Ricky,

Thanks for sharing. Every month or so, I go back to this thread because it provides me with personal inspiration.

 

Hang tough for your son and wife. To me, 90% of the battle starts with the attitude we choose to take. I took Gleevec for a year as part of a clinical trial after my GIST cancer surgery. As I posted before, it could have been a placebo, but even my doc laughed at that possibility considering the side effects I felt when I was taking the drug daily from June 2004 to June 2005. It's been 2 1/2 years now, and as of my last CT scans just a week ago, I'm still "all clear" with no new cancer.

 

Here's to some of the same hope for your family!

 

 

Likewise thank you from here in sharing your story Ricky.

 

Unfortunately life does serve us curve balls from time to time and it is in how we meet them that can have a marked reflection on the end result, and your Son and Wife will pay testimony to that positive thinking.

 

 

I feel humbled that you've chosen to confide in this thread, as I'm sure others here will appreciate and I wish you and your family all the best that life can offer hopefully in the very near future.

 

Regards,

 

HcW.

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Just having a bit of flat spot today....well I've sort of had it for the last week or so.

 

Just completed a barrage of tests, which left me somewhat drained and pretty sore, and finally the Doctors have given me their reports.

 

Cancer (Complete Remission) Yay.

 

L2 Compressed Fracture in my spine - Ooops wonder how I did that.

 

Find out one of my Kidneys was "Sacrificed" during one of my operations. Bugger

 

Liver enlarged - What does that do again??

 

3 abdo wall herniatis - That would be why my belly has a few more "Bumps" than normal.

 

Mild to severe progressive Renal Failure - Ah oh that means my One good Kidney is failing.

 

Oh well more specialists next week, just thought I'd check in and pick myself up again. It does work, this thread as a pick me up.

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It's also a support network HcW.

 

One of the great things about this place is that on those days when it's hard to hold yourself up, there are many who are willing to step up and hold you up for a while until you feel you can handle it again.

 

You've come so far, and accomplished so much. No one said it was going to be easy, but by god it's a rewarding life, isn't it? I know that of all of the stumbling blocks I've come across, I am always in awe of what I can do - things that I would not have done if someone hadn't thrown a kink in my plan. Would you have planned a 24-Hr Race if your health was perfect? There's much good that comes as a result of the things that happen to us in life.

 

So you're being poked and prodded, and things that were bad are on the mend and a couple of surprises are coming up. We'll be right beside you getting through it all.

 

Now ... stop drinking so much dammit - it's endangering your liver and the resulting falling down is breaking your bones! :P (no, no drinking problem. I drink, I get drunk, I fall down, no problem) :lol:

 

:) Much love and good thoughts my friend.

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Reading about the experiences here has at times been difficult but always inspiring. Looking at HCW shows us what we are capable of.

Four years ago my wife was diagnosed with breast cancer and it was growing fast. Six months later after surgery, heavy chemo and radiation she was on the somtimes bumpy road to recovery. That summer she tried to join us on race night even though it sometimes made her sick. Mostly she was an enthusiastic passenger. That summer she set another goal for herself. There is a race in our patch called the Lake Ontario 300 and she decided she wanted to try it. Two years later, the first women's crew finished the long course tired but happy. Last summer the same crew finished third in their division and 11th overall, beating all the guys from our harbour that also did the race. To say that I am proud of her is a huge understatement.

Watching her recovery has sometimes been painful, but cancer has given both of us a renewed sense of life. It has made us better people and we continue to grow. My wife has become my inspiration.

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It's also a support network HcW.

 

One of the great things about this place is that on those days when it's hard to hold yourself up, there are many who are willing to step up and hold you up for a while until you feel you can handle it again.

 

You've come so far, and accomplished so much. No one said it was going to be easy, but by god it's a rewarding life, isn't it? I know that of all of the stumbling blocks I've come across, I am always in awe of what I can do - things that I would not have done if someone hadn't thrown a kink in my plan. Would you have planned a 24-Hr Race if your health was perfect? There's much good that comes as a result of the things that happen to us in life.

 

So you're being poked and prodded, and things that were bad are on the mend and a couple of surprises are coming up. We'll be right beside you getting through it all.

 

Now ... stop drinking so much dammit - it's endangering your liver and the resulting falling down is breaking your bones! :P (no, no drinking problem. I drink, I get drunk, I fall down, no problem) :lol:

 

:) Much love and good thoughts my friend.

 

 

Thank you C, just feeling a little blue at the moment.

 

I'm certainly proud of what I've accomplished since, however from my perspective the feeling doing something useful has been the richest reward.

 

Again thank you, can I make you my friend too? ;)

 

 

 

Flash, I'm pleased that you had the time to stop here and gather your thoughts. SA amongst all of the ego's and opinions does have a heart, especially when you know where to find it.

 

I do hope that your Wife bounces back better than ever from all of her treatment, it certainly isn't pleasant and please always remember there are always people here to lend you their shoulder. The sensational Girl above is arguably the best I know.

 

Cheers,

 

HcW..

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Just having a bit of flat spot today....well I've sort of had it for the last week or so.

 

Just completed a barrage of tests, which left me somewhat drained and pretty sore, and finally the Doctors have given me their reports.

 

Cancer (Complete Remission) Yay.

 

L2 Compressed Fracture in my spine - Ooops wonder how I did that.

 

Find out one of my Kidneys was "Sacrificed" during one of my operations. Bugger

 

Liver enlarged - What does that do again??

 

3 abdo wall herniatis - That would be why my belly has a few more "Bumps" than normal.

 

Mild to severe progressive Renal Failure - Ah oh that means my One good Kidney is failing.

 

Oh well more specialists next week, just thought I'd check in and pick myself up again. It does work, this thread as a pick me up.

 

 

HcW,

Great news on the cancer! Despite the continued laundry list of other ills, that's still a huge victory!

 

I'm coming up on the three-year mark being cancer free since my surgery on May 12th '04. (I wish it was that easy to get rid of my MS as it was to cut out the GIST cancer, but oh well... at least I'm still walking.) I had hernia surgery last year as well. I think there was some sort of relationship to what I went through recovering from my cancer surgery, but it's all repaired now.

 

The kidney thing for you is obviously a tough one, but please stay positive. Like Bowgirl, I'm sending my very best vibes around the globe your way!

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HcW,

Great news on the cancer! Despite the continued laundry list of other ills, that's still a huge victory!

 

I'm coming up on the three-year mark being cancer free since my surgery on May 12th '04. (I wish it was that easy to get rid of my MS as it was to cut out the GIST cancer, but oh well... at least I'm still walking.) I had hernia surgery last year as well. I think there was some sort of relationship to what I went through recovering from my cancer surgery, but it's all repaired now.

 

The kidney thing for you is obviously a tough one, but please stay positive. Like Bowgirl, I'm sending my very best vibes around the globe your way!

 

 

Cheers Mate, just a bit of a low blow. :lol::lol::(

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Hello again. Great to hear the race was such a success.

 

If you look back in the posts you'll see I posted when my mother was diagnosed last August. THings have moved on. Allow me to waffle on for a bit; I think it might be therapy.

 

Mums condition is inopperable, but she was otherwise healthy and active.

 

A few weeks after that my wife and I headed off on a trip round the world. We'd been planning for ages, and mum wouldn't let us cancel (the plan had been for the family to meet us in Perth for christmas). So with a heavy heart we headed off. Constant telephone calls from some of the more bizarre places on this earth (Skype seams to be better the more remote you are) kept us in touch. There were set backs, hospital trips and emergency operations, and dealing with that from a bolivian village is difficult, but she wouldn't have us back, and trying to give your dream the attention and enthusiasm it deserves was difficult. But to then hear her voice across the web telling me all the info on the latest pictures I'd posted told us it was the right thing to do. Dad and my elder brother were digging in to look after her, and through a lifetime of nursing other people a huge and extraordinary group of friends were getting things done. At christmas time she had a scan and showed a 40% reduction!

 

Time went on, one of the life decision I made was to get back to sailing, properly. And what's is perhaps the toughest challenge around at the moment? The International Moth. One call later to Bladerider, and 1st May was the agreed delivery date.

 

But with 6 weeks of our finish approaching, things for us started to change. We were out of sorts with getting back on the road after a few weeks settled in a hut in Goa. Calls home showed things weren't so good, despite what people were saying, it must have clicked for me that it wasn't the same. Also my wife's parents were going through the health mill aswell. And timing being what it was I took a look at the bank accounts, and perhaps it was time to call it a day. We phoned BA, and it was a case of either go tomorrow or wait 6 weeks. We went.

 

At first all seamed well. It was great to be home, and our early arrival meant our home was still let, and therefore we bunked down at my parents house, taking on a little of the load we had missed. Dad was ill from a chest infection, and seamed to look old. Mum's treatment had had to be reduced to a level where she could stay with it, but otherwise she looked OK.

 

3 weeks after getting home, Dad was in hospital with a lack of mobility and coordination in his left side, and extreme headaches. At first it was thought to be a mild stroke, but I was sat next to him when the doctor told us it was a brain tumor, probably a secondary off a lung cancer. What do they say about life passing before your eyes, it happened then. Now I can remember feeling him relax and regress into his memories at that precise moment. With one of my parents ill, it was just a hick-up, something you can target and make the most of, support her to the best of your ability and get her better. Two parents ill with cancer was devastating, winding. But you can't dwell, or be melancholy, because whatever I felt, it was nothing, not a bit to what they felt.

 

Steroids eased the preasure in his head, the symptoms abaited and we got him home, back to his old self. He had his 67th birthday at a local pub, smiles all round. Needless to say the improvement didn't keep and 3 weeks after leaving, he returned to hospital. Mum was due her 6 month scan, and Dad was badgering me to make sure she got there, that she was rested. And for mum it was bad news. The reduced treatment had not worked, and things were back, and a little worse, to where we started. It was another bad moment. Life is changing. People you love, adore, are suffering.

 

I knew things were up when Dad had forgotten mum's results were due. We didn't feel the need to tell him. Wherever he was, or wherever he was going, he was now focussing on himself. 10 days after returning to hospital he died, in his sleep, with his family.

 

150 plus people attended his funeral. I think he expected 15. He was a racing driver and car builder from way back, and faces came out of no where from my childhood memories. The family sport is motor racing, and it had been my brother who had taken on the sport, I left him to it and went sailing. He races a Historic Sports fiat x1/9 which he and dad build. It is stunning and immaculate. All the questions were when was I going to take up a real sport and race the car. His obituary made Autosport (the big motor racing magazine in the uk), it was a nice thing.

 

It's now 3 weeks down the line, and I'm wondering if 'it's hit me yet', if i'll ever get over it. The offpat sayings are despicable. What am I supposed to get over. He was my father. He was the finest man I ever met. I'm trying to keep my mother in one piece, trying to keep her mind off her terminal cancer and the fact she's just lost her husband of 39 years. I'm trying to take on the mantle of being the head of the family (my brother was never giong to be), the one who had to make the phone calls, the one everyone comes to for the solutions. I don't have the solutions, I despise the phone calls. How can life change so much in 7 months?

 

But that is a just a self indulgent window into my darker moments. My moth's here in 6 weeks (it was to be 2 weeks, but Bladerider are running behind) and I'm going to sail that bloody boat, I'm going to stop at nothing to hold my head-up and say i've not given in, i've done the most i can, and I'm going to record every moment, and maybe post it in Dinghy Anarchy, because it's life, and it will force me not to take it easy, not to cop out, to treat it like he always told me, always be able to sleep with a clear conscience.

 

And I'm going to race his car. I'm getting a race licence and I'm going to experience racing the car my dad built.

 

I appologise for the longest post in history. I don't know if anyone will read it, and i don't know I care. I appologise for bringing down the tone in the single most relevant topic this forum owns, and you guys out there dealing with this are astronomical, phenominal. Anyway you judge yourselves in your life is nothing to the way, any way, you are dealing with this. We read daily in these forums of olympics, americas cup, round the world, they are nothing, they are egos, thrills. Just living with this day to day is beyond any other achievement I can think of.

 

So for me, I have my plan, and the most important part is to see a smile on my mothers face everytime i see her.

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FatimaRules, thank you for sharing yourself and updating us. What you've been through and are going through is tremendous.

 

First of all, it's not the longest post (I think BellaSailBabe gets that award LOL), and secondly, it's bringing down the tone at all! It's a story of your courage and how you and your Mom are facing the challenges of life. You're facing them, not running from them. You're making important choices on how you plan to LIVE, not just exist, from this day forward. That's to be commended IMO.

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FatimaRules, wow. Hard story to read, but well worth it.

I look forward to your future posts on Dinghy Anarchy. Healing through sailing, especially with a fun toy like the Moth, will definitely help give you a new life.

Hugs,

Joy.

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Fatima, you don't have to apologise for anything, you've again proved why this Thread is every bit important to not only those fighting the good fight, but for those sharing the load of the ones they love, which is equally just so important.

 

Your account of what has transpired over recent months knocked me flat, and I honestly mean flat as I too have recently shared your own desperate situation in part. I can't walk away from my predicament, it will always follow me where ever I go, however my wife had been struggling with severe chest pains only recently and for the first time in over 3 years I didn't know what I was going to do next, after all my wife and I had been through I thought that was it I was going to loose her just like that.

 

Fortunately her Heart tests came back negative and we've now started on a different direction in our lives, but more importantly I still have my best friend and wife still beside me.

 

My children are too young to understand just how close they came to loosing their parents, and I certainly feel for your own situation being in your position in life.

 

I truly hope that your Mum will have that smile to greet you for many days yet, and that you follow your dreams and cherish each day that's laid out in front of you.

 

Be there for your Mum, but most importantly be strong to yourself in these difficult times, and you will always have friends here on SA to hopefully help share the load.

 

Take care Fatima.

 

HcW.

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