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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.
    • B.J. Porter

      Moderation Team Change   06/16/2017

      After fifteen years of volunteer moderation at SA, I will no longer be part of the moderation team. The decision to step aside is mine, and has been some time in the works but we did not wish to announce it in advance for a number of reasons. It's been fun, but I need my time back for other purposes now. The Underdawg admin account will not be monitored until further notice, as I will be relinquishing control of it along with my administrative privileges. Zapata will continue on as a moderator, and any concerns or issues can be directed to that account or to the Editor until further notice. Anyone interested in helping moderate the forums should reach out to Scot by sending a PM to the Editor account. Please note that I am not leaving the community, I am merely stepping aside from Admin responsibilities and privileges on the site.
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Heaven can wait

Sailing Anarchists Affected by Cancer

3,252 posts in this topic

HCW

You have been on my mind the last few days. I can't say I know how you feel. But I do know that feeling that you can't get any lower or imagine feeling any worse. It always seemed to me it was when I had to drag myself to the doctor for yet another treatment. I could get a little relief by thinking about my best days on the water and dreams of more of those day.

 

I wish you comfort and peace and of course wellness. You are in my prayers. I will take you sailing with me through my thoughts.

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You know when you look into the eyes at the end of the bed that NO-ONE judges that as fraud so I'm sorry YOU feel it.

We do have a different view on repeat business which makes us doubt ourselves (I bet they were relieve they didn't need to snip anything out).... they are happy to see you but wish they didn't have to - especially when you turn up in that state.

Heres to taking a big deep breath & not feeling it coming.

 

 

Cheers Ozee,

 

I say "I" felt like a fraud for as soon as my intestines were pushed back into where they were supposed to be, my stomach started making the right noises again, and I actually felt pretty good, completely off my chops, but pretty good none the less.

 

However to have a well respected surgeon look you in the eye and apologise for not being able to do more is a pretty sobering situation.

 

"If I operate, you will most likely die, if I don't we wait until we have no other choice and then you will most likely die."

 

I'm damned if I do, and damned if I don't.

 

My insides fall out when I sneeze, when I cough, even from just getting out of bed in the morning.

 

It sucks.

 

And when you get yourself over the initial nausea of your insides falling out, then push and prod around to get them back in, you then feel sick for the next hour or so.

 

I really hate my life right now.

 

HCW, I'm going to tell you something my wife told me in the midst of all the fun and games, when I was evincing the same sentiment-

 

You are necessary.

 

Think on that. Repeat.

 

Paul

 

 

HCW, man o man... I haven't read all these pages, but your recent post really hit a sore spot... I don't know what to begin to say, but you'll be in my thoughts as are all the others who I've been through this dance with... the "earth walk" may or may not be long, but it most certainly is grand and you've done much to help others... very wise words from Paul's wife.

Grace, strength, and Godspeed to you.

 

Mark

+600! :P

You know you are "necessary" & thanks for all you have done & continue to do feeling shitty (from the outside that looks like 'in that state'... forgive me!).

If I'm about I'll puts the bits back in for you - I've had my hands in a few more cavities than my quota allows!

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You know when you look into the eyes at the end of the bed that NO-ONE judges that as fraud so I'm sorry YOU feel it.

We do have a different view on repeat business which makes us doubt ourselves (I bet they were relieve they didn't need to snip anything out).... they are happy to see you but wish they didn't have to - especially when you turn up in that state.

Heres to taking a big deep breath & not feeling it coming.

 

 

Cheers Ozee,

 

I say "I" felt like a fraud for as soon as my intestines were pushed back into where they were supposed to be, my stomach started making the right noises again, and I actually felt pretty good, completely off my chops, but pretty good none the less.

 

However to have a well respected surgeon look you in the eye and apologise for not being able to do more is a pretty sobering situation.

 

"If I operate, you will most likely die, if I don't we wait until we have no other choice and then you will most likely die."

 

I'm damned if I do, and damned if I don't.

 

My insides fall out when I sneeze, when I cough, even from just getting out of bed in the morning.

 

It sucks.

 

And when you get yourself over the initial nausea of your insides falling out, then push and prod around to get them back in, you then feel sick for the next hour or so.

 

I really hate my life right now.

What you need Sir, is an industrial strength Granny Girdle. Enjoy the little things that make your tail wage (so to speak).

{[[[[big hugs}]]]]

k8

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Thank you Mark, Paul, Oz and Kate.

 

I'm just tired of being in "Limbo". After 5 years I'm kinda hoping that my life could have had some sort of direction by now, alas I still find myself thinking only about tomorrow, let alone consider next week or beyond.

 

My Doctors have all said I should reconsider my sailing ambitions as my prognosis will deteriorate over time. Fabulous eh.

 

I appreciate that I am necessary, my kids let me know daily, however I'm stuck in La La Land and I can't work out to what extent I can or ever will be necessary, there isn't a quick fix for the problem I have, come to think of it there isn't one at all.

 

You can't do this, don't do that, you mustn't do this all gets a bit tedious after a while, and whilst I have some pretty worthwhile goals to hopefully achieve in my life, I can't help but think they are somewhat slipping away the longer this goes on and the older I get.

 

Kate I have a specially made suit that is worth some big $$$, however whilst it gives me the compression I need, it's not very practical, hot and doesn't allow me leave home if I have it on.

 

Air conditioning is my best friend as if I get too hot I make fluid, likewise if I get to cold my body freezes up, so 22 degrees C it is for me.

 

I'm truly sorry about sounding down, unfortunately the East Coast Weather isn't helping the cause either, however this is probably the side of Cancer that not many would see or hear about, the collateral damage so to speak that is left behind when the Cancer sleigh ride is gone.

 

From the very start of my Cancer ride, my Oncologist was positive with the odds and the 95% survival rate, we all were, my Oncologist was also conscious as logically were we too of the remaining 5% who wouldn't survive, however after my last round of surgery my Oncologist has revised his perception of the odds.

 

It now reads 95% survival, 4% mortality and 1% Shaun. I still brings a smile to my face when it's discussed.

 

It still sucks though.

 

Cheers,

 

Shaun HCW

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You can't do this, don't do that, you mustn't do this all gets a bit tedious after a while, and whilst I have some pretty worthwhile goals to hopefully achieve in my life, I can't help but think they are somewhat slipping away the longer this goes on and the older I get.

 

It now reads 95% survival, 4% mortality and 1% Shaun. I still brings a smile to my face when it's discussed.

 

It still sucks though.

 

Cheers,

 

Shaun HCW

 

1%, I like that!

 

Hey, you're allowed to get down. The trick is getting back up before too long. I've seen it a lot in the spinal cord injury world (Mrs RockHead is a paraplegic, accident 2 years after marriage). Those who stay down only continue to spiral deeper. You know you need to find the light, find your way out.

 

As far as what you can do, there's always a balance of what they tell you, what you want, and what you can and should actually do. But based on what I know about you from here, you'll find a way to keep sailing. Reconsider your sailing ambitions? Perhaps. It seems you might need to reconsider your methods. Maybe its some adaptations to your boat to reduce the likelihood of re-herniating, as that seems to be the current issue? Maybe it's a different boat. I don't know. But if a ventilator-dependent quadraplegic can single-hand a boat, you can find a way to keep sailing...

 

If I can help with any adaptive ideas, PM me. Also, think about looking up Chris Mitchell at Access Boats. Don't recall where in Oz he is, but he is a whiz at this sort of stuff.

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You can't do this, don't do that, you mustn't do this all gets a bit tedious after a while, and whilst I have some pretty worthwhile goals to hopefully achieve in my life, I can't help but think they are somewhat slipping away the longer this goes on and the older I get.

 

It now reads 95% survival, 4% mortality and 1% Shaun. I still brings a smile to my face when it's discussed.

 

It still sucks though.

 

Cheers,

 

Shaun HCW

 

1%, I like that!

 

Hey, you're allowed to get down. The trick is getting back up before too long. I've seen it a lot in the spinal cord injury world (Mrs RockHead is a paraplegic, accident 2 years after marriage). Those who stay down only continue to spiral deeper. You know you need to find the light, find your way out.

 

As far as what you can do, there's always a balance of what they tell you, what you want, and what you can and should actually do. But based on what I know about you from here, you'll find a way to keep sailing. Reconsider your sailing ambitions? Perhaps. It seems you might need to reconsider your methods. Maybe its some adaptations to your boat to reduce the likelihood of re-herniating, as that seems to be the current issue? Maybe it's a different boat. I don't know. But if a ventilator-dependent quadraplegic can single-hand a boat, you can find a way to keep sailing...

 

If I can help with any adaptive ideas, PM me. Also, think about looking up Chris Mitchell at Access Boats. Don't recall where in Oz he is, but he is a whiz at this sort of stuff.

Reconsider having an anachist by your side so you can achieve want you want - you know there will be one (or more) available!

 

BTW RIP Chris O'Brien - thanks for showing us best practice as you saw it & helping us do a better job every precious day

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Hi all ,haven’t posted on this thread before.

My Mum is having her last chemo as we speak. (Lymphoma)

She has spent the last 3 months making plans for when she is better.

She turns 80 next week.

The Big C never met a tougher opponent.

And from an earlier post, they began chemo within 48 hours of diagnosis. She has suffered no nausea at all.

Hope this helps someone. Good luck all, my thoughts are with you.

And I am sure it has been said here before, but Lance Armstrong’s book 'It’s not about the bike' is a great read.

Not much yachting in it though!

I will let you know how she is getting on.

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Hi all ,haven’t posted on this thread before.

My Mum is having her last chemo as we speak. (Lymphoma)

She has spent the last 3 months making plans for when she is better.

She turns 80 next week.

The Big C never met a tougher opponent.

And from an earlier post, they began chemo within 48 hours of diagnosis. She has suffered no nausea at all.

Hope this helps someone. Good luck all, my thoughts are with you.

And I am sure it has been said here before, but Lance Armstrong’s book 'It’s not about the bike' is a great read.

Not much yachting in it though!

I will let you know how she is getting on.

 

 

Hang in there Lonley, and welcome to the best community within the SA community!

 

HCW... I have your back, man. Give me a holler any time you can use a hand with anything.

(Or at least any time it's something I can do from 9000 miles away. ;)

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You can't do this, don't do that, you mustn't do this all gets a bit tedious after a while, and whilst I have some pretty worthwhile goals to hopefully achieve in my life, I can't help but think they are somewhat slipping away the longer this goes on and the older I get.

 

It now reads 95% survival, 4% mortality and 1% Shaun. I still brings a smile to my face when it's discussed.

 

It still sucks though.

 

Cheers,

 

Shaun HCW

 

1%, I like that!

 

Hey, you're allowed to get down. The trick is getting back up before too long. I've seen it a lot in the spinal cord injury world (Mrs RockHead is a paraplegic, accident 2 years after marriage). Those who stay down only continue to spiral deeper. You know you need to find the light, find your way out.

 

As far as what you can do, there's always a balance of what they tell you, what you want, and what you can and should actually do. But based on what I know about you from here, you'll find a way to keep sailing. Reconsider your sailing ambitions? Perhaps. It seems you might need to reconsider your methods. Maybe its some adaptations to your boat to reduce the likelihood of re-herniating, as that seems to be the current issue? Maybe it's a different boat. I don't know. But if a ventilator-dependent quadraplegic can single-hand a boat, you can find a way to keep sailing...

 

If I can help with any adaptive ideas, PM me. Also, think about looking up Chris Mitchell at Access Boats. Don't recall where in Oz he is, but he is a whiz at this sort of stuff.

 

What he said- 1% Shaun!

 

The numbers have now improved on your side- to 96%?

 

Say yes. Attitude counts.

 

During my post op, I was wandering around the house dragging a BIG catheter bag behind me during hot weather non too happy, but then I did nickname the bag my chia pet ('cause if you water it, it grows...), and it helped cheer things up enough to get me through incontinence diapers (which was the next stage :o ) and on through many other really wonderful things. So then swinging a golf club was, er, problematic, from a water pressure control point of view, but I girded my loins, so to speak, stuffed the BULGING protection in my shorts and went out on the course as soon as I was ALLOWED (which was too fucking long, if you ask me), anyway, and put up with some pretty smarmy remarks about the back of said shorts bulging, but after I played with a couple of older gents who took it to the 4th (young mouthy shit) in our happy group, and then proceeded to tell their own merry tales of suffering and recouperation in detail and to the point where said young shit became a bit green and embarrassed, but to his credit apologized... anyway, I can't hit long, but I can accurately dink up the course with the rest of the dinkers, and I can't windsurf anymore, but I can sail Amati, and I know this isn't near to being as bad as you've got it, but I couldn't think of anything else to say, and I really want you to buck up some, so I hope it helps a leetle bit.

 

If you can find your sense of humour, it helps some...

 

 

 

Paul

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Hi all ,haven’t posted on this thread before.

My Mum is having her last chemo as we speak. (Lymphoma)

She has spent the last 3 months making plans for when she is better.

She turns 80 next week.

The Big C never met a tougher opponent.

And from an earlier post, they began chemo within 48 hours of diagnosis. She has suffered no nausea at all.

Hope this helps someone. Good luck all, my thoughts are with you.

And I am sure it has been said here before, but Lance Armstrong’s book 'It’s not about the bike' is a great read.

Not much yachting in it though!

I will let you know how she is getting on.

 

 

Hang in there Lonley, and welcome to the best community within the SA community!

 

HCW... I have your back, man. Give me a holler any time you can use a hand with anything.

(Or at least any time it's something I can do from 9000 miles away. ;)

 

Lonely, tell your Mum she's doing the right thing. My Mom was given 6 months after her last chemo (this was 17 years ago, breast cancer), and then said something to the effect of showing " those ignorant assholes who they're dealing with", made a bucket list, and got those to do's done before the another C finally did get her 7 years later, at a ripe old age of, well, if I tell, her ghost will find me in the n..n...night. Anyway, she got the list done in 5 years, and as she put it, "Imagine my suprise!" Oh, and she started swearing like a trooper after that last chemo. It was one of the things on her list. This from a women who washed my mouth out with soap for saying the word 'darn'. Charming.

 

(I don't know if you want to show your Mum this post, though...)

 

Paul

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Don't know the full story as I heard it second hand from someone who sailed on the boat but Mr. Mossop, owner of the Club Swan 42 "The Cat Came Back" was hit by a car years ago while helping someone change a tire. He was in a coma for a long time and apparantly when he woke up all he remembered was a cat hence the name of the boat and the black cat on the spinnaker.

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Thanks guys for you thoughts. I have showed mum this thread and she is getting into it. She is a true Anarchist at heart! (I asked her not to read other threads, particularly 1000 days. I don't want her to know how immature her son can be at times!) The sense of humor is what is getting her through. She and her Oncologist have a great repore going.

Hair gone, hands, feet and lips bleeding constantly and deep bone pain, but not a word of complaint, only worried about how the family is coping.

Mum, you are my hero.

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Paul,

Missed you on Saturday... saw Amati was registered, but didn't see you out in Elliot Bay for the LLS round the cans.

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So, I'm sitting in the basement cafeteria back at Mass General Hospital, having lunch at 17:15, while the Pebble is upstairs for his 9 month post-treatment MRI.

 

I know it's gonna be all good -He's wearing his Puma VOR t-shirt, and they just got their first leg win. Poor guy was a trooper in a 3+ hour delay, not having eaten since last night. But having been the emergency MRI that pushed back the schedule ourselves, it's impossible to complain. Not to mention pointless... Somehow I think even he gets that at 3 1/2.

 

Thank god for hospital wide wi-fi and SA to keep me distracted.

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Go the Pebble! Enjoy 'breakfast for dinner' ;)

That used to be a treat - having eggs and toast for dinner instead of for breakfast.

 

Huh? You were the emergency MRI that pushed back the Pebble's MRI? Everyone OK?!

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Just got back from doing the first half of the Save on Foods Van Isle 360. It is a great race. It is also my "So There" to cancer. I couldn't stop thinking about how lucky I was to do this race again (I got a little sappy at the start). Two years ago I had no idea what my future would bring. I wasn't sure if I would ever sail again. This was one of the last things that sidelined me that I had yet to do again. I am a lucky girl.

 

I did the Van Isle 360 four years ago. I was planning on doing it two years ago too. But, I was in the middle of Chemo and was bald. I followed the race on the internet and was mad at cancer that I wasn't there.

 

Before I started chemo I asked my oncologist if she thought I would be able to sail around Vancouver Island. She thought for a minute and said she thought that might be a nice thing for me. I was a little surprised, then I realized she was thinking of a Cruise Ship around the island. When I said I would be doing foredeck on a 32 foot sailboat she was pretty confident I wouldn't have the energy. She was right.

 

I thought about all my fellow sailors who post here. I wish you all could have been with me.

 

It is two weeks long and 580 nm. It is a beautiful, fun race. Check it out www.vanisle360.com

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Go the Pebble! Enjoy 'breakfast for dinner' ;)

That used to be a treat - having eggs and toast for dinner instead of for breakfast.

 

Huh? You were the emergency MRI that pushed back the Pebble's MRI? Everyone OK?!

Actually, it was more like lunch for dinner, an adequate Ruben and there's a surprisingly good salad bar. A couple of hours later, back for a hot dog for the Pebble and a slice of pizza for me, after he woke up from the anesthesia.

 

No, no, no... everyone is fine! When the Pebble was diagnosed, there were several scans, not 8 weeks pre-scheduled, for sure! We undoubtedly screwed up other families days back then, so it was our turn to suck it up...

 

No official results yet, but the recovery room nurse said the radiologist didn't appear to be concerned about anything, or make any calls. That's almost good enough for me... Actually, that's damned close to good enough for me, the nursing staff always knows the real dope!

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Just got back from doing the first half of the Save on Foods Van Isle 360. It is a great race. It is also my "So There" to cancer. I couldn't stop thinking about how lucky I was to do this race again (I got a little sappy at the start). Two years ago I had no idea what my future would bring. I wasn't sure if I would ever sail again. This was one of the last things that sidelined me that I had yet to do again. I am a lucky girl.

 

I did the Van Isle 360 four years ago. I was planning on doing it two years ago too. But, I was in the middle of Chemo and was bald. I followed the race on the internet and was mad at cancer that I wasn't there.

 

Before I started chemo I asked my oncologist if she thought I would be able to sail around Vancouver Island. She thought for a minute and said she thought that might be a nice thing for me. I was a little surprised, then I realized she was thinking of a Cruise Ship around the island. When I said I would be doing foredeck on a 32 foot sailboat she was pretty confident I wouldn't have the energy. She was right.

 

I thought about all my fellow sailors who post here. I wish you all could have been with me.

 

It is two weeks long and 580 nm. It is a beautiful, fun race. Check it out www.vanisle360.com

Congratulations!

 

Be Happy. Fuck Cancer. :D

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Just got back from doing the first half of the Save on Foods Van Isle 360. It is a great race. It is also my "So There" to cancer. I couldn't stop thinking about how lucky I was to do this race again (I got a little sappy at the start). Two years ago I had no idea what my future would bring. I wasn't sure if I would ever sail again. This was one of the last things that sidelined me that I had yet to do again. I am a lucky girl.

 

I did the Van Isle 360 four years ago. I was planning on doing it two years ago too. But, I was in the middle of Chemo and was bald. I followed the race on the internet and was mad at cancer that I wasn't there.

 

Before I started chemo I asked my oncologist if she thought I would be able to sail around Vancouver Island. She thought for a minute and said she thought that might be a nice thing for me. I was a little surprised, then I realized she was thinking of a Cruise Ship around the island. When I said I would be doing foredeck on a 32 foot sailboat she was pretty confident I wouldn't have the energy. She was right.

 

I thought about all my fellow sailors who post here. I wish you all could have been with me.

 

It is two weeks long and 580 nm. It is a beautiful, fun race. Check it out www.vanisle360.com

 

 

 

Well done Behappy, congratulations on your mighty effort.

 

My only goal when I was able to sail again was to race my own boat again.

 

In 2006 I did exactly that, starting and finishing my very own Yacht Race.

 

See below for the link.

 

It's an accomplishment, and you should hold your head high, you're on your way back and it's inspiring. ;)

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Just got back from doing the first half of the Save on Foods Van Isle 360. It is a great race. It is also my "So There" to cancer. I couldn't stop thinking about how lucky I was to do this race again (I got a little sappy at the start). Two years ago I had no idea what my future would bring. I wasn't sure if I would ever sail again. This was one of the last things that sidelined me that I had yet to do again. I am a lucky girl.

 

I did the Van Isle 360 four years ago. I was planning on doing it two years ago too. But, I was in the middle of Chemo and was bald. I followed the race on the internet and was mad at cancer that I wasn't there.

 

Before I started chemo I asked my oncologist if she thought I would be able to sail around Vancouver Island. She thought for a minute and said she thought that might be a nice thing for me. I was a little surprised, then I realized she was thinking of a Cruise Ship around the island. When I said I would be doing foredeck on a 32 foot sailboat she was pretty confident I wouldn't have the energy. She was right.

 

I thought about all my fellow sailors who post here. I wish you all could have been with me.

 

It is two weeks long and 580 nm. It is a beautiful, fun race. Check it out www.vanisle360.com

Congratulations!

 

Be Happy. Fuck Cancer. :D

 

Amen. Well done BeHappy!

 

 

Seems to be going around my friends - another's husband just came out of surgery for pancreatic cancer. Ferchrissakes. :angry:

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Seems to be going around my friends - another's husband just came out of surgery for pancreatic cancer. Ferchrissakes. :angry:

 

Ugh. I hate to say it, but that's a particularly shitty one. Took one of my dearest friends/sailing buddies, godfather of my daughter. Secondary cancer after surviving testicular... He died the week before the Parlympic sailing trials. I started growing a goatee like his then, intending to keep it for a year. Now I plan on shaving when the Pebble is cancer free for 12 months. My own little tribute. RIP Mike.

 

Still awaiting results from yesterday's MRI. Usually have heard a preliminary report within hours, previously. I'm trying very hard to NOT freak out about the delay, since we didn't finish the scan until so late yesterday (6:30 PM). I've managed to only call the oncologist's office twice so far today.

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Not sure if you all heard the sigh of relief at 1645 EDT. Call from the Pebble's oncologist, all clear at 9 months post-treatment.

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Was wondering what that was - at 16:45EDT I was in the garden and all of a sudden "whooooosh". ;)

 

Excellent news!!

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Not sure if you all heard the sigh of relief at 1645 EDT. Call from the Pebble's oncologist, all clear at 9 months post-treatment.

 

Fantastic news!

 

Go the Pebble!

:)

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Just got back from doing the first half of the Save on Foods Van Isle 360. It is a great race. It is also my "So There" to cancer. I couldn't stop thinking about how lucky I was to do this race again (I got a little sappy at the start). Two years ago I had no idea what my future would bring. I wasn't sure if I would ever sail again. This was one of the last things that sidelined me that I had yet to do again. I am a lucky girl.

 

I did the Van Isle 360 four years ago. I was planning on doing it two years ago too. But, I was in the middle of Chemo and was bald. I followed the race on the internet and was mad at cancer that I wasn't there.

 

Before I started chemo I asked my oncologist if she thought I would be able to sail around Vancouver Island. She thought for a minute and said she thought that might be a nice thing for me. I was a little surprised, then I realized she was thinking of a Cruise Ship around the island. When I said I would be doing foredeck on a 32 foot sailboat she was pretty confident I wouldn't have the energy. She was right.

 

I thought about all my fellow sailors who post here. I wish you all could have been with me.

 

It is two weeks long and 580 nm. It is a beautiful, fun race. Check it out www.vanisle360.com

 

 

I'm sending you a big hug from Minnesota! Even if you are weak, the positive energy from doing this has GOT to feel good!

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Was wondering what that was - at 16:45EDT I was in the garden and all of a sudden "whooooosh". ;)

 

Excellent news!!

I was wondering why my beer suddenly re-filled itself..... Great news.

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Just got back from doing the first half of the Save on Foods Van Isle 360. It is a great race. It is also my "So There" to cancer. I couldn't stop thinking about how lucky I was to do this race again (I got a little sappy at the start). Two years ago I had no idea what my future would bring. I wasn't sure if I would ever sail again. This was one of the last things that sidelined me that I had yet to do again. I am a lucky girl.

 

I did the Van Isle 360 four years ago. I was planning on doing it two years ago too. But, I was in the middle of Chemo and was bald. I followed the race on the internet and was mad at cancer that I wasn't there.

 

Before I started chemo I asked my oncologist if she thought I would be able to sail around Vancouver Island. She thought for a minute and said she thought that might be a nice thing for me. I was a little surprised, then I realized she was thinking of a Cruise Ship around the island. When I said I would be doing foredeck on a 32 foot sailboat she was pretty confident I wouldn't have the energy. She was right.

 

I thought about all my fellow sailors who post here. I wish you all could have been with me.

 

It is two weeks long and 580 nm. It is a beautiful, fun race. Check it out www.vanisle360.com

Good stuff. I do wish I could have been there.

 

So there, behappy. So there. You go girl :)

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Not sure if you all heard the sigh of relief at 1645 EDT. Call from the Pebble's oncologist, all clear at 9 months post-treatment.

 

 

Awesome news RH and ditto on go the pebble. ;)

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^^^ Outstanding news^^^

How goes it for you, J? How'd you finish in the virtualVOR overall? Kind thoughts your way. Be well. Make it nice.

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Not sure if you all heard the sigh of relief at 1645 EDT. Call from the Pebble's oncologist, all clear at 9 months post-treatment.

 

 

Way to go Pebble! That is great news and I have been praying and waiting to hear it. And way to go RockHead! We don't go through this alone, even as adults. The victories are to be shared! Whoohoo!

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Thank you all.

 

Yesterday I was thinking about how the goalposts are always moving... Survive the hydrocephalus (pressure in the brain) -score, but you're not done! Survive the surgery -score, but you're not done! Make it through the chemo and the first good MRI -score, but you're not done! Then the radiation, each 90 day scan... The next one is September - 1 year post treatment, a major milestone when the long term survival rates jump dramatically. But you're still not done yet! Next there's the 5 year mark -long term remission. Then I suppose you get to worry about secondary cancers. LOL

 

It would be so much easier if it were me, instead of my child.

 

Cheers to the the fighters, the survivors, the care givers, the worried family & friends, the docs and researchers.

 

Dan

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Today was one of the difficult days in the HcW household as we laid to rest a valued and much loved member of our family, our 10 year old Golden Retriever "Echo".

 

We saved "Echo" from an abusive owner when she was 3, extremely timid and upsettingly withdrawn she gradually began to shine with thanks to her ever present side kick Milo, our Shi Tzu.

 

Echo had never barked until she came to live with us nor had she ever set foot in a house. She'd spent her first 3 years within the confines of a trampoline too scared to venture any further.

 

Yesterday while Milo and Echo were out enjoying a very normal game of tag ( As they do ) during the odd break in the weather, Echo slipped off our back deck, which is only half a metre off the ground, falling awkwardly to the ground, however as usual she got up woofed and continued on with the game.

 

Last night however she was a little quiet and not quite herself. She wouldn't eat her Dinner (Totally out of character for a retriever) then by lunchtime she struggled to walk at all.

 

At 3pm I loaded Echo into the family Truckster and by 20 past Echo was put to sleep having broken her back.

 

We're all devastated especially the kids, however the most defining moment and definitely the most heart wrenching was Milo pleading to Echo to get up and play. It was just so upsetting to watch.

 

I'm not ashamed to admit that I lost it, and almost found myself almost unable to continue on and bury her, but with a heavy heart and tears streaming down my face, Echo slipped beneath the tossed soil hopefully now to a much better place.

 

I truly hope that we've help make her life a little better than it was, she was a beautiful sole who began to love life and grew to love and trust those around her, her family.

 

Strawberry Fields forever my Girl, rest in peace our much loved Echo.

 

HcW.

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Blubbing like a baby in the office reading this.What ever happens this thread always gets me.

 

Badger, Charlie the Mutt and I will keep you in our thoughts and throw some extra stones in the sea during walk time tonight for Echo.

 

I'm hope the cyber hug is reaching you and your family from UK - I don't know you but I do totally understand.

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Sending you hugs, HcW.

Helluva spirit in that dog, if she kept playing after the fall. Obviously enjoyed the life she lived. Good onya for giving her a better life than the one she started with.

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Thank you BG, Heavy Woman and Rockhead, it was a tough day for all the family and she'll be deeply missed.

 

Unfortunately we've lost both of our Golden Retrievers in just under 5 years, so both the Kids have taken the loss of Echo particulaly hard.

 

Milo our Shi Tzu is like a little boy lost today, he spent 3 or so hours curled up on Echo's bed last night, and is currently sitting by the front door waiting for her appear.

 

It's hard on the companion dogs they leave behind, Pathetic and sad to watch really.

 

Thank you again Guys, Echo is gone but she'll never be forgotten.

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Wow, I'm so sorry. That's pretty crazy, a dog with a SCI. I'm sorry.

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I know it has been a long time since I posted here, but going back and catching up on all the posts has been really terrific. I am so glad to hear so many are doing so well in your struggles. I love Pebbles line "Cancer fears ME." I think I will borrow that if its ok....

 

I was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma in 2004 and underwent six months of chemotherapy, beat the cancer and was given an 80% chance of making 10 years before relapse. my wife and I started doing alot of fundraising for the Leukemia Cup Regatta, and I think that's when I last posted.

 

I made it four years before I relapsed, which was last May. Upon relapsing, I underwent three more months of chemotherapy followed by an Autologus Stem Cell Transplant, which I underwent last September. It was brutal, but I made it and my cancer is back in remission.

 

My recovery has been going extremely well, in fact, I was cleared to go racing again in April, and last weekend I sailed on the Farr 395 Zoom in the Chicago NOODs. It was AWESOME to be back on the water in a big regatta. I had a blast and met a GREAT bunch of sailors....

 

Since I got my SA re-activated finally, I wanted to post and say thank you for keeping this thread going. I love hearing the success of people beating cancer. It inspires me tremendously.

 

My battle is far from over. My cancer is incurable, so its not a matter of if it returns, rather when. If you are interested in the story of my transplant, you are welcome to check out my blog at honitrav.blogspot.com.

 

And, I am sorry to hear about the loss of Echo. I know how hard that can be, I hope you are doing well.

 

Sincerely,

 

Travis

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It's awesome to have you back Trav, I read your Blog and can just about visualize all that you wrote such is elite crowd that you and I belong to.

 

I'm glad that you see this thread as the "Quiet Corner in a crowded room" and take inspiration from it, I know I do and as long as I live this thread will never be lost, I believe in the human spirit in all of us that will ensure this thread will always live on.

 

It's really great that you were able to get back out on the water again, I found it a somewhat heightened experience as my Chemo had affected me in ways I could have never imagined and not all good mind you.

 

You're fortunate to have your hair grow back the way it did, I'm finding that I've thinned out and grayer now than I ever was, although having kids will eventually do that to you.

 

I certainly hear what you are saying about our Cancer Journey being tough on our spouses, it certainly is almost to the point where they're desensitized by the Roller Coaster that is the Cancer Journey. I've found it much harder to be the Mr fix-it and have found that I've relied more and more on my Wife and the Kids to do what otherwise would have been second nature to me.

 

I'm sorry that your Cancer is incurable, my Fathers is also, but we'll battle on and together we'll all eventually beat this thing, in the mean time "Live Strong" and we'll worry about the Cancer bit when we have to.

 

My sincere regards to you and your beautiful family,

 

Shaun

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post-1052-1245850781_thumb.jpg "Charlie" - holding up well with cancer in the liver and spleen.

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I know it has been a long time since I posted here, but going back and catching up on all the posts has been really terrific. I am so glad to hear so many are doing so well in your struggles. I love Pebbles line "Cancer fears ME." I think I will borrow that if its ok....

 

I was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma in 2004 and underwent six months of chemotherapy, beat the cancer and was given an 80% chance of making 10 years before relapse. my wife and I started doing alot of fundraising for the Leukemia Cup Regatta, and I think that's when I last posted.

 

I made it four years before I relapsed, which was last May. Upon relapsing, I underwent three more months of chemotherapy followed by an Autologus Stem Cell Transplant, which I underwent last September. It was brutal, but I made it and my cancer is back in remission.

 

My recovery has been going extremely well, in fact, I was cleared to go racing again in April, and last weekend I sailed on the Farr 395 Zoom in the Chicago NOODs. It was AWESOME to be back on the water in a big regatta. I had a blast and met a GREAT bunch of sailors....

 

Since I got my SA re-activated finally, I wanted to post and say thank you for keeping this thread going. I love hearing the success of people beating cancer. It inspires me tremendously.

 

My battle is far from over. My cancer is incurable, so its not a matter of if it returns, rather when. If you are interested in the story of my transplant, you are welcome to check out my blog at honitrav.blogspot.com.

 

And, I am sorry to hear about the loss of Echo. I know how hard that can be, I hope you are doing well.

 

Sincerely,

 

Travis

 

Travis,

Welcome back! Thanks for taking the time to write your blog update, as well as post here. I know that while I sometimes have a hard time getting my thoughts about my cancer down on paper (OK, on the Internet, obviously), it always makes me feel better to let it all out. I am often surprised to find how the simple process of sharing makes a positive difference to other friends as well. You write very well. Please keep it up when you can. Inspiration works both ways. Thanks for inspiring all of us!

 

Blake

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Thanks for the replies y'all! Always feels awesome to hear something positive.

 

I kinda agree with Pebbles...."Cancer fears ME!". So I just focus on today, being happy, spending time with Hope and Honore(my wife), and getting in a good sail when I can.

 

Yea Heaven....we're in a fraternity that nobody wants into...at least that's the way I look at it. But, I like to say I welcome anyone unfortunate enough to belong and will support them to the best of my ability anytime. I have noticed the chemo has affected alot of things in negative ways. The worst is my short term memory. Not only do I have trouble with recall, ("ie tell me to bring you a beer and its 50-50 I'll remember when I get to the fridge"), but there are large parts of my life I simply no longer remember. Thank God for pictures....although some of those rum parties are probably best left in the no memory category!

 

Strangely, my hair came back brown and very fine...when it used to be salt and pepper and fairly coarse...funny how that works.....although I keep threatening to shave it off again for the summer.

 

Thanks again y'all.......you are awesome......

 

Peace,

 

T

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Thanks for the replies y'all! Always feels awesome to hear something positive.

 

I kinda agree with Pebbles...."Cancer fears ME!". So I just focus on today, being happy, spending time with Hope and Honore(my wife), and getting in a good sail when I can.

 

Yea Heaven....we're in a fraternity that nobody wants into...at least that's the way I look at it. But, I like to say I welcome anyone unfortunate enough to belong and will support them to the best of my ability anytime. I have noticed the chemo has affected alot of things in negative ways. The worst is my short term memory. Not only do I have trouble with recall, ("ie tell me to bring you a beer and its 50-50 I'll remember when I get to the fridge"), but there are large parts of my life I simply no longer remember. Thank God for pictures....although some of those rum parties are probably best left in the no memory category!

 

Strangely, my hair came back brown and very fine...when it used to be salt and pepper and fairly coarse...funny how that works.....although I keep threatening to shave it off again for the summer.

 

Thanks again y'all.......you are awesome......

 

Peace,

 

T

 

Hey Trav

 

Welcome back to our little club.

 

I had "chemo brain" for about 8 months after my chemo (although some would argue I still have it.) I was forgetting a lot of little things and seemed to have minor thought process glitches. It is much better now, 1 1/2 yrs later.

 

My hair was salt and pepper, straight and thick before chemo. Now it is salt and pepper, fine but a lot of it and crazy curly. I get on a boat and it looks like a fright wig. Bald was cold but it was easy! So, I just keep sailing and don't worry what I look like. That's what those red Mount Gay hats are for. I refuse to wear on of those pink hats with a pink ribbon.

 

Sailing is the best therapy. I am so happy I am sailing regularly again.

 

You, and everyone in this thread, are in my thoughts and prayers.

 

Sail often.

Peace!

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What with working way to hard to keep in front of the economic tsunami we're facing, and having troubles with my password, I haven't checked in for a while. And when I see all that has been going on, it really humbles me.

 

This merry band.

 

Hang in there everybody. Hang in.

 

Paul

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And from the "Support Crew" ... my girlfriend's husband (liver cancer) had a follow up visit with the oncologist.

 

Incurable, no chemo/drugs beyond painkillers, no hope, no drug trials, nada. Not a friendly or hopeful word out of the Doc, and "all future updates/communications can be handled by phone". (PHONE?!?!) Now I understand that it's never good to be the bearer of bad tidings, especially when there's no hope, but a little compassion please! That one just has me speechless in anger & disbelief.

 

So, a side effect of the liver cancer is loss of appetite. He's dropping weight like crazy. He also picked up a C-Dif infection while in the hospital being diagnosed which is exacerbating his weakness as it has resulted in uncontrollable diarrhea. My girlfriend is doing her best to stay positive and ensure she doesn't get the C-Dif, but she doesn't really know what to think or do. To her point, how do you plan for your life partner to suddenly not be there one day? It's a matter of weeks or months, and they've been together over 40 years.

 

Since I'm 500 miles away, the best I can do is send cards and let him/them know I'm thinking about him/them in between phone calls.

 

Anyone want to start a card-brigade? I think it'd lift his/her spirits a lot if there was a sudden flood of cards from around the globe. Nothing much required, just a "thinking of you" note and a stamp to Canada.

 

Please send me a PM and I'll respond with their mailing address, if anyone's interested.

 

In the meantime, please keep Skip & Janet in your prayers.

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And from the "Support Crew" ... my girlfriend's husband (liver cancer) had a follow up visit with the oncologist.

 

Incurable, no chemo/drugs beyond painkillers, no hope, no drug trials, nada. Not a friendly or hopeful word out of the Doc, and "all future updates/communications can be handled by phone". (PHONE?!?!) Now I understand that it's never good to be the bearer of bad tidings, especially when there's no hope, but a little compassion please! That one just has me speechless in anger & disbelief.

 

So, a side effect of the liver cancer is loss of appetite. He's dropping weight like crazy. He also picked up a C-Dif infection while in the hospital being diagnosed which is exacerbating his weakness as it has resulted in uncontrollable diarrhea. My girlfriend is doing her best to stay positive and ensure she doesn't get the C-Dif, but she doesn't really know what to think or do. To her point, how do you plan for your life partner to suddenly not be there one day? It's a matter of weeks or months, and they've been together over 40 years.

 

Since I'm 500 miles away, the best I can do is send cards and let him/them know I'm thinking about him/them in between phone calls.

 

Anyone want to start a card-brigade? I think it'd lift his/her spirits a lot if there was a sudden flood of cards from around the globe. Nothing much required, just a "thinking of you" note and a stamp to Canada.

 

Please send me a PM and I'll respond with their mailing address, if anyone's interested.

 

In the meantime, please keep Skip & Janet in your prayers.

 

 

Send me a note. I'd be honored to pass along a card to them!

 

Just a bit over 5 weeks now till I hop on a plane for my annual flight down under to do battle on behalf of Shaun's cancer at the HCW 24 hour race.

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I just PM'ed you.

 

I'm not much good with prayers - but happy thoughts and a card I can do!

 

Happy thoughts to everyone else on this thread too.

 

I'm off racing a family friends boat in his local regatta next week as he can't whilst he's fighting bowel cancer - so I'd appreciate it if you would all keep Mike in your thoughts too.

 

HW.x

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Thanks you two. Return PMs sent.

 

Will definitely keep Mike in my thoughts, HW.

 

Good luck in the race, DCMJ. I'm more than a little green, but I know my trip (our trip) will come.

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This weekend is the annual Leukemia Cup Regatta here in Chicago, and I have been asked to be the Honorary Sailor again this year because I made it through the Stem Cell Transplant last year. Although I feel a little awkward being the Honorary Sailor two years in a row, I agreed because so many people who attended last year and heard my speech would like to know how I am doing and hear a bit about the transplant.

 

So here I am today, beginning to write my little speech and I thought about Pebbles' quote, "Cancer fears me!", and if it's ok with you RockHead, I would like to use it in my talk. I'll give Pebbles credit, but it just so perfectly fits what I want to say. Would that be ok with you?

 

When I'm done I'll post the talk here if you want so you can see it.

 

Thank you,

 

Travis

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This weekend is the annual Leukemia Cup Regatta here in Chicago, and I have been asked to be the Honorary Sailor again this year because I made it through the Stem Cell Transplant last year. Although I feel a little awkward being the Honorary Sailor two years in a row, I agreed because so many people who attended last year and heard my speech would like to know how I am doing and hear a bit about the transplant.

 

So here I am today, beginning to write my little speech and I thought about Pebbles' quote, "Cancer fears me!", and if it's ok with you RockHead, I would like to use it in my talk. I'll give Pebbles credit, but it just so perfectly fits what I want to say. Would that be ok with you?

 

When I'm done I'll post the talk here if you want so you can see it.

 

Thank you,

 

Travis

 

Travis, absolutely feel free to steal that line. I actually appropriated it from a pediatric cancer organization - see www.cancerfearsme.org. It's a somewhat more polite approach to the way I really feel (see the first line of my sig). And seize the opportunity to be the Honorary sailor a second time. Just think of the last one as warming up the crowd, this time you can really blow them away. Maybe use some of the sailors' stories from here, if you want to expand their vision or take the focus off yourself.

 

Karina, PM or email me with names and addresses. I'd also be honored to send a note to your friends.

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Thanks Rockhead

 

... and it's with a C, not a K :P

 

 

 

Congrats, Travis. It's an honour that I'm sure you'll give dignity, grace and humour to. Would love to read your speech.

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This weekend is the annual Leukemia Cup Regatta here in Chicago, and I have been asked to be the Honorary Sailor again this year because I made it through the Stem Cell Transplant last year. Although I feel a little awkward being the Honorary Sailor two years in a row, I agreed because so many people who attended last year and heard my speech would like to know how I am doing and hear a bit about the transplant.

 

So here I am today, beginning to write my little speech and I thought about Pebbles' quote, "Cancer fears me!", and if it's ok with you RockHead, I would like to use it in my talk. I'll give Pebbles credit, but it just so perfectly fits what I want to say. Would that be ok with you?

 

When I'm done I'll post the talk here if you want so you can see it.

 

Thank you,

 

Travis

 

 

Likewise from me Trav, draw any strength you can from these hollowed boards and run with it.

 

I never stop feeling awkward about being "The Cancer man" in my endeavours Down Under, but regardless it's a title I wear with respect and dignity (I hope).

 

If creating the HCW has taught me nothing else, it's never give up on your dreams. I held onto a dream that I would sail again, in 2009 I'll line up for my 5th HCW, 4th Officially.

 

C, PM or email me also, it would be my pleasure to send your friend a little Goodwill.

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In overnight news, I underwent my Sleep Apnea testing overnight hooked up with more wires and cables that I think I've been fitted with before.

 

Aside from the discomfort and several annoying flashing lights, I awoke to find our dog Milo just as entangled in the wiring as I was.

 

I hope the test turns out OK, as forgetting to breath while I sleep isn't a good look.

 

Also awoke to a phone call from my Sister in Law letting us know that my wifes 103 Year Old Grand Mother past away over night.

 

Brilliant Lady, who lived a charmed life and will be sincerely missed by all who knew her. 103 is a fantastic innings.

 

It's been a tough day in this household.

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Thanks RH. Best wishes to Pebbles....Hope he's still after it.

 

And my condolences to you and your wife HCW...although I know you are long in spirit and will get through tough times, it doesn't make them any easier. Best of wishes to y'all.

 

I'll post the speech here when I'm done with it. Thanks for the support, y'all are right. Someone's gotta carry the flag out there, who better than the one who made it. It a way, it's a chance to carry the flag for so many who cannot themselves.

 

Hopefully, we'll keep finding more cures, and helping more people.

 

Carina, send me their address and I'll be happy to drop them a note.

 

Love to y'all,

 

Trav

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First off best of luck to you HCW.

 

So I just skimmed over this thread and was seriously moved. I guess you could say Im young (nearly 16), and I never really payed much attention to all the stuff you hear about carcinogens. Sunscreen is worn sparingly, etc.

 

So other than being more careful with sunscreen and wearing proper gloves, masks, and such when working with epoxy, fiberglass, etc. what are some other basic things to watch? (I guess misshapen testicles as well)

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So other than being more careful with sunscreen and wearing proper gloves, masks, and such when working with epoxy, fiberglass, etc. what are some other basic things to watch? (I guess misshapen testicles as well)

Moles that grow to be larger than a pencil eraser, and/or are of irregular shape and/or color.

 

And yes, as I learned first hand last year, to misquote Wilford Brimley, "Check your nuts, and check them often."

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Thanks you two. Return PMs sent.

 

Will definitely keep Mike in my thoughts, HW.

 

Good luck in the race, DCMJ. I'm more than a little green, but I know my trip (our trip) will come.

 

Carina,

Card is in the mail. :)

 

 

Trav-

Nice job! I'm rooting for you! Make cancer fear you!

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PMs sent, HcW & Trav.

 

Can't thank you guys enough for being so thoughtful for Skip & Janet. I'll let you know what they say when they receive the cards.

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I've been avoiding this thread for awhile as I feared it would stir up too many memories of past losses and battles within my family. Well... in the last three weeks all of that has changed. My dad who is 67 was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia 3 weeks ago yesterday. After consulting doctors in Providence RI and Boston, we were fortunate enough to get a spot in with the Fabulous group at Dana Farber in Boston. He was admitted last week at Brigham and Womens hospital to start his first seven days of chemotherapy with more to follow.

 

I cannot say enough about the staff who is working on saving his life. They are all angels - the docs, nurses, counselors - every one of them. He is fortunately sleeping through most of this treatment but is struggling to keep his blood pressure up. I'm praying for a miracle right now - as the odds don't look encouraging. Reading some of the stories on this list have brought a renewed sense of hope.

 

If anyone knows or has family/friends in the Brigham and would like to get messages to them - I would be more than happy to pass anything along as I'm there 5 days a week right now.

 

It's a long road...

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Hang in there Steve...your presence alone makes a world of difference, whether you realize it or not. I remember so many long nights laying in the bed in isolation during my Stem Cell Transplant trying to stay positive by dreaming of a beautiful beam reach under full sun with the breeze up and the spinnaker flying. And just feeling like I wanted to die.

 

Through it all, my wife(Honore) and baby daughter(Hope) were there to remind me of what I was fighting for, even when I was feeling the darkest. My wife used to say to me, "Honey, it's like sailing close hauled in rough seas. It''s rough now, but it won't be that way forever, at some point we'll get to fall off(onto a reach she meant)."

 

In my opinion, chemotherapy is harder on the loved ones than the survivor in many ways. I know it was EXTREMELY hard on my wife to see me suffer during my transplant. But for me, it just was what it was. Yes, it sucked, but I didn't have much choice, so I kept a positive outlook and soldiered on.

 

You're in our prayers....please keep us posted on how things are going. I know AML's a toughie.

 

Love & Hugs,

 

Hope, Honore & Travis

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Steve,

 

If you need anything (like a couple of hours on the water to recharge YOUR batteries), I'm not far out of town. Just PM me, I'll take your Viper sailing, or for a ride on the RIB to a deserted island, with adult beverages. I know what those sort of breaks did for me while my son was going through it.

 

Dan

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You guys are fantastic! Truly awesome to have the ability to talk with people going through the same struggles. I may take you up on a sail soon!

 

Best

Steve

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Hey Steve,

All of you support people are the really heros in this cancer Merry-Go-Round. It is not an easy job but it is greatly appreciated by those of us on the cancer side. I know when I was going through my treatment I was so thankful for my family, regular friends and sailing friends. I don't think it was always easy to put up with me. I probably didn't say thank you as much as I should have.

 

I remember going on a Tuesday evening sail with my friend Stuart after my fifth chemo treatment. It was a great break and felt so normal. He did even make me trim anything. It would have taken me all night to bring in a sail.

 

I have been on your side as well. My father died of cancer 20 years ago and my sister had cancer while she was pregnant with my nephew (who is now a great, six foot tall, 14 year old). Be good to yourself too. Take breaks. Talk with others. Go Sailing!!!

 

My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

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Update from Janet - Skip's in hospital. She was unable to care for him at home. Between the effects of liver cancer and the infection, he was too weak and not eating. Now the hospital says they want him out, and the hospices don't want to take him because of the risk of spread of the C-Diff. Both told her to get her kids to help out if it's too much for her. I guess when you're in your late 60s everyone just assumes you have kids and grand-kids who can step in and help out. They're childless. <<sigh>> Too many rocks, too many hard places.

 

First card arrived, and they were thrilled. Brought a smile to them both, which is all I could hope for. Thank you, Anarchists, for helping to deliver that.

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Update from Janet - Skip's in hospital. She was unable to care for him at home. Between the effects of liver cancer and the infection, he was too weak and not eating. Now the hospital says they want him out, and the hospices don't want to take him because of the risk of spread of the C-Diff. Both told her to get her kids to help out if it's too much for her. I guess when you're in your late 60s everyone just assumes you have kids and grand-kids who can step in and help out. They're childless. <<sigh>> Too many rocks, too many hard places.

 

First card arrived, and they were thrilled. Brought a smile to them both, which is all I could hope for. Thank you, Anarchists, for helping to deliver that.

 

 

It was a simple thing to mail a simple card. We sometimes forget that those kind of small things can go a really long way when the chips are down.

 

Blake

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Man, this thread tears me up and makes me thank god for my health... as it is i've had 4 squamus skin cancers removed luckily they have all been topical.

 

now a dear friend of mine who had a double masactomy(sp) 13 yrs. ago has just been diagnosed with a spot on her sternun and is now going through chemo. she is in increadibly good spirits and will fight to the end!

 

one of my best friends, also an anarchist, had throat cancer removed 3 yrs. ago and the only thing that kept him

going was looking forward to sunday sailing on flying scotts...he would come almost crawling to the boat, i'd have it rigged for him, get in race as hard as he could, then would almost not have the strength to get out of the boat, i'd de-rig with help of other locals and make sure he would make it home.

 

also i lost a cousin to leukemia many years ago... he did not make it past 12. he was one of the craziest sob's i've ever met... a man child, he knew he had just a few short years on this planet and made the most of them.

I know he's one of my guardian angels! (love ya Sammy)

 

Sorry for the rambling but whenever i think i've got it bad or have a horrible day i think of this topic and find strengh

to continue on taking care of an elderly parent (my mother) who is recovering from a series of mini-strokes and dementia.

she also gives me imspiration as her humor and attitude is fucking awesome.

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So other than being more careful with sunscreen and wearing proper gloves, masks, and such when working with epoxy, fiberglass, etc. what are some other basic things to watch? (I guess misshapen testicles as well)

Moles that grow to be larger than a pencil eraser, and/or are of irregular shape and/or color.

 

And yes, as I learned first hand last year, to misquote Wilford Brimley, "Check your nuts, and check them often."

 

 

my dermatologist has told me that my skin issues were caused many years ago due to NOT using sunscrean etc... but back then all there was was zink ozide and i hated the stuff. so lube up at least 1/2 hr before you get out in the sun so the sunscrean can absorb into your skin!

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Just got home to the news that Skip passed away this morning, with Janet at his side.

I have no words.

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Just got home to the news that Skip passed away this morning, with Janet at his side.

I have no words.

 

 

Very sad news indeed. Please give my very best to Janet again. Big long hugs all around**

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Just got home to the news that Skip passed away this morning, with Janet at his side.

I have no words.

 

 

Geeze C, I am so sorry to hear about this, please accept my deepest sympathy's to both you and Janet.

 

I'll send a PM to you.

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Just got home to the news that Skip passed away this morning, with Janet at his side.

I have no words.

 

Oh God - you aren't going to believe this - I just walked round the corner to the shop during my lunch hour and bought a card to send to Skip and Janet - I was so busy last week I forgot - I feel terrible, thier address is still taped on the corner of my computer screen in the office.

 

BG I hope you are doing okay, and I will send the card to Janet anyway.

 

Thinking of you

 

HW.x

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I'm leaving the address on my computer - to remind me to think of you, Janet and Skip every day.

 

HW.x

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Just lost my Aunt to a very aggressive cancer, she was diagnosed several months ago. She was only a few months older than me. An avid sailor and loved life!

 

RIP Rose !

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Just got home to the news that Skip passed away this morning, with Janet at his side.

I have no words.

 

Words don't cut it right now. I am so very sorry for your loss...

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Thank you HW - not to worry about the timing of the card. I think these things work out the way they do for a reason. It'll arrive right on time. :)

 

I'm delivering hugs in person on Thursday, and that will be good for both Janet and I. I'll bring my laptop and show her this thread, as I tried to explain to her how I knew these wonderful people in far off places and that they were thinking of her & Skip ....

 

 

 

Sailho - I'm sorry for your and your family's loss. Fair winds, Rose.

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Thanks, Rockhead.

 

"All shall be well" (Julian of Norwich)

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Today was one of the difficult days in the HcW household as we laid to rest a valued and much loved member of our family, our 10 year old Golden Retriever "Echo".

 

We saved "Echo" from an abusive owner when she was 3, extremely timid and upsettingly withdrawn she gradually began to shine with thanks to her ever present side kick Milo, our Shi Tzu.

 

Echo had never barked until she came to live with us nor had she ever set foot in a house. She'd spent her first 3 years within the confines of a trampoline too scared to venture any further.

 

Yesterday while Milo and Echo were out enjoying a very normal game of tag ( As they do ) during the odd break in the weather, Echo slipped off our back deck, which is only half a metre off the ground, falling awkwardly to the ground, however as usual she got up woofed and continued on with the game.

 

Last night however she was a little quiet and not quite herself. She wouldn't eat her Dinner (Totally out of character for a retriever) then by lunchtime she struggled to walk at all.

 

At 3pm I loaded Echo into the family Truckster and by 20 past Echo was put to sleep having broken her back.

 

We're all devastated especially the kids, however the most defining moment and definitely the most heart wrenching was Milo pleading to Echo to get up and play. It was just so upsetting to watch.

 

I'm not ashamed to admit that I lost it, and almost found myself almost unable to continue on and bury her, but with a heavy heart and tears streaming down my face, Echo slipped beneath the tossed soil hopefully now to a much better place.

 

I truly hope that we've help make her life a little better than it was, she was a beautiful sole who began to love life and grew to love and trust those around her, her family.

 

Strawberry Fields forever my Girl, rest in peace our much loved Echo.

 

HcW.

 

HcW, you're really going through it. We just lost our West Highland White Terrier of 16 + years yesterday morning. Supposedly not much of a boat dog (terrier, as in terra firma), but among a lot of other boat things, he figured out tacking- I'd call out 'ready about', he'd get up, I'd yell 'helms alee', and he'd move to the other side of the boat, while making sure to be in the way of Lorrie tending the jib. His sense of humor. He was convinced that the porthole above the galley was his takeout window. He survived a 55 knot storm in an Ultimate 20 with dignity and calm. If you've ever seen any of Bob Perry's boat cartoons, and read the inscription "Mac", now you know who they're for.

 

Great dog, and my constant companion, esp for the last 6 years, riding shotgun during the day while I drove around attempting to keep at least some of the pianos of the Greater Seattle Area safe for Musical Culture. He liked high performance cars, leaning into the corners, paws gripping the passenger seat bolsters so as not to slide across the hard German Leather. He was old enough to take his driver's test. Stood on the bow of the boat at any marina mugging for food, or keeping the boat safe. Died in my wife's arms and me petting him after faking very convincingly for a couple of months (we think, because like every thing else he did, he did a very good job of it)) that he didn't have congestive heart failure. Ate like a pig, and played with us right up to the end. Died of old age. I should be so lucky.

 

A real shock, how sudden it all happened, and I'm walking around with a lump in my throat, heaviness in my gut, tears in my eyes, and lead in my legs.

 

I know it's different for everybody, losing a dog, but Lorrie's and my heart go out to you and your family. May you find some strength in the courage, playfulness, and nobleness of your dog's example, as we found (and are finding still, wonderfully enough) from our little guy.

 

 

Ready about, Mac, helms alee.

 

Paul

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I'm sorry for your loss, Paul. Mac's tacking in the clouds now, not a care in the world, waiting for the day you come around to take the helm again.

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Speaking of such challanges...what is the lattest on Gary Jobson.

Gary is kicking arse in Annapolis MD in the Etchells' fleet.

 

I first started sailing the Leukemia Cup the year after Gary had gone through his treatment. He still took the time to make the trek to our kick off party and looked pretty grim. He was rail thin and looked tired.

 

Saw him again this spring and he's joking about the fact that he's gained all the weight back and then some.

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Hey Steve,

All of you support people are the really heros in this cancer Merry-Go-Round. It is not an easy job but it is greatly appreciated by those of us on the cancer side. I know when I was going through my treatment I was so thankful for my family, regular friends and sailing friends. I don't think it was always easy to put up with me. I probably didn't say thank you as much as I should have.

 

I remember going on a Tuesday evening sail with my friend Stuart after my fifth chemo treatment. It was a great break and felt so normal. He did even make me trim anything. It would have taken me all night to bring in a sail.

 

I have been on your side as well. My father died of cancer 20 years ago and my sister had cancer while she was pregnant with my nephew (who is now a great, six foot tall, 14 year old). Be good to yourself too. Take breaks. Talk with others. Go Sailing!!!

 

My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

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Hey Steve,

All of you support people are the really heros in this cancer Merry-Go-Round. It is not an easy job but it is greatly appreciated by those of us on the cancer side. I know when I was going through my treatment I was so thankful for my family, regular friends and sailing friends. I don't think it was always easy to put up with me. I probably didn't say thank you as much as I should have.

 

I remember going on a Tuesday evening sail with my friend Stuart after my fifth chemo treatment. It was a great break and felt so normal. He did even make me trim anything. It would have taken me all night to bring in a sail.

 

I have been on your side as well. My father died of cancer 20 years ago and my sister had cancer while she was pregnant with my nephew (who is now a great, six foot tall, 14 year old). Be good to yourself too. Take breaks. Talk with others. Go Sailing!!!

 

My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

 

Sorry about that double post. A bit of good news here. After a month in the hospital and 10 days of chemo, the leukemia is in "hiding" and we got dad home last night. We're waiting for specifics but more chemo will follow in a couple of weeks and then hopefully, a partial stem cell transplant. I cannot say enough about the staff at Dana Farber in Boston. They are miracle workers.

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Hallelujah! Happy Homecoming to your Dad, Steve.

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Hey Steve,

All of you support people are the really heros in this cancer Merry-Go-Round. It is not an easy job but it is greatly appreciated by those of us on the cancer side. I know when I was going through my treatment I was so thankful for my family, regular friends and sailing friends. I don't think it was always easy to put up with me. I probably didn't say thank you as much as I should have.

 

I remember going on a Tuesday evening sail with my friend Stuart after my fifth chemo treatment. It was a great break and felt so normal. He did even make me trim anything. It would have taken me all night to bring in a sail.

 

I have been on your side as well. My father died of cancer 20 years ago and my sister had cancer while she was pregnant with my nephew (who is now a great, six foot tall, 14 year old). Be good to yourself too. Take breaks. Talk with others. Go Sailing!!!

 

My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

 

Sorry about that double post. A bit of good news here. After a month in the hospital and 10 days of chemo, the leukemia is in "hiding" and we got dad home last night. We're waiting for specifics but more chemo will follow in a couple of weeks and then hopefully, a partial stem cell transplant. I cannot say enough about the staff at Dana Farber in Boston. They are miracle workers.

 

 

Good news about your dad, Steve. Fingers crossed.

 

Paul

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Good news about your dad, Steve. Fingers crossed.

 

Paul

 

 

 

With any kind of luck, we're going sailing on Sunday! Keep a good thought for some decent weather in Rhode Island!

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Good news about your dad, Steve. Fingers crossed.

 

Paul

 

 

 

With any kind of luck, we're going sailing on Sunday! Keep a good thought for some decent weather in Rhode Island!

 

 

I hope that your Dad continues to kick goals, great stuff.

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I finally received the results from my Sleeping tests done seemingly weeks ago now and it wasn't pretty.

 

Turns out the night I was wired up from head to toe I was able to get almost 6 hours sleep so I thought, looking at the results I had apparently stopped breathing 89 times during those 6 hours which doesn't sound like I actually got much sleep at all.

 

I have to have further tests on a number of CPAP Machines to find the one that best suits my condition and that will be my lot for life unfortunately.

 

I may have Severe Sleep Apnea, but now at least we're moving forward in being better able to manage it, so hopefully the alternative is just that little bit further away. :)

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I shaved today.

 

That may seem an insignificant thing, but not for me, not today.

 

In the final days of practice before the US Paralympic Trials for sailing, I received word that a very dear friend of mine had succumbed to cancer. He had survived an initial battle with testicular cancer for about 7-8 years before he was diagnosed with secondary cancers - colon and pancreatic. He fought that for about 2 years before the beast won. His name was Michael Byrnes. He was a sailor, teammate & friend, the Rockette's godfather, and in many ways larger than life. During the Trials, while my wife was competing, I was following the old racer's superstition of not shaving before a big race. Every day for 10 days was a big race, so at the end I was rather scruffy. During that time, while I didn't tell Mrs. RockHead about Michael's passing, I decided to honor him by keeping a beard and mustache like he normally wore, for one year. It was during that year, just 3 months later, that my son was diagnosed. My commitment to wearing that beard changed to the Pebble being cancer free for one year.

 

His 1 year post-treatment MRI was yesterday. I called the oncologist's office for results today, just before I went home for lunch.

 

I shaved today.

 

I don't throw around words like "remission" and "survivor" lightly. But it might be time to dare to begin to utter them. The 5-year survival statistics at diagnosis were grim for the Pebble. 70%-75% of the children with his diagnosis do not survive 5 years post diagnosis. But for a parent, statistics are meaningless, it's a binary thing -your child is either alive or not. The first year after treatment is when recurrence is most likely. The statistics improve dramatically if there is no recurrence in the first year post-treatment, pretty much reversing, IIRC. But again, statistics are nearly meaningless. It's still a binary thing, and there's always that chance... and after pumping a body full of incredibly toxic drugs and radiation, there's always the risk of secondary cancer, as with Michael. We'll be having regular MRI's for a LOOONG time. The worry will never go away.

 

Sunday was the Pebble's 4th birthday. Today was the gift -he remains cancer free.

 

I shaved today.

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Beautiful story - just sitting here admiring your courage as well as your little one's - all the best to you and your family. Happy Birthday Pebbles!

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And as the circle of life turns, I just found out that one of the nicest & best racing sailors at our club lost his battle today. Fuck.

 

To Horst Lachmayer.

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And as the circle of life turns, I just found out that one of the nicest & best racing sailors at our club lost his battle today. Fuck.

 

To Horst Lachmayer.

+1000

 

Horst was too frail from battling cancer to do his own prep work this year.

Half way though the season we found out he would be going out for the last 3 races.

 

1st race back and he takes 2nd.

Gets a 5 minute standing O in the hall during cup presentation.

 

Fair Winds Horst.

You were a hero to many of us.

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Good news. Clean Face.

 

Paul

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And as the circle of life turns, I just found out that one of the nicest & best racing sailors at our club lost his battle today. Fuck.

 

To Horst Lachmayer.

+1000

 

Horst was too frail from battling cancer to do his own prep work this year.

Half way though the season we found out he would be going out for the last 3 races.

 

1st race back and he takes 2nd.

Gets a 5 minute standing O in the hall during cup presentation.

 

Fair Winds Horst.

You were a hero to many of us.

I wish I had been there for that.

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I don't know where else to go with this but here. My friend Fred is dying, losing weight rapidly and the cancer is growing. He was diagnosed about a year and a half ago. Pancreas. We always call him Red Fred because he always and I mean always has HotBall candies on him that he hands out to everyone: his grocery store clerks, bartenders, mailmen, cops when they pull him over and us, his friends.

I've know him for ten years and they are many fun memories and many many drinks and BBQ's shared. And a metric shit~ton of laughter and jokes.

 

It isn't so much his death that bothers me: he has made peace with it, spirtually, has made his arrangements for his services and his stuff. It's that I don't know how to say goodbye. And I feel selfish for feeling this way: HE'S the one who is dying, why am I the one who doesn't know how to say goodbye? I will still be here. I don't want him to die and I don't want him in pain anymore. I don't want RedFred to have to see himself as that skinny, ill person he has become now. He won't get better. My friend Barbara who is with him says the doctors say it is a matter of days, maybe weeks. He is home though and for that, I am thankful.

He's like 6 feet tall and not fat but a BIG guy. A shell now.

I am very sad and I don't want him to know how sad I am. I want him to be at peace and go on to his next life. Because it is time. It is his time. And then I feel like a shit for wanting him to step into his next life. He isn't alone, friends or family is always with him. He is in North Carolina and I am in New York. I don't know how to pick up the phone and call him. I just feel like I can't. I don't want him to hear me cry because he has always faced what is happening to him with such dignity and laughter and that god~damn endless supply of HotBall candies. I don't know how to say goodbye.

 

I have never lost anyone to an illness who was so young. He is 57 I think now. My other friends and family I have lost were all older or they died young suddenly so there was just the shock of it all that numbed things. How do I tell him goodbye? Because I have this chance to do it while he is alive.

 

Thanks for listening everyone. And keep RedFred in your thoughts please.

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Sorry to hear that MSG. Keep your chin up. Tell Fred how you feel.

 

We just found out that our daughter-in-law has breast cancer. Two malignant tumors and malingnancy on a lymph gland. Starts chemo next tues. Shes' only 40 and is the beautiful mother of our 2 wonderful grand daughters, ages 6 & 3. She's going lose her georgeous long blond hair. On top of that, she's battling the flu right now. We don't know how to comfort her...

 

Fuk.

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Thanks AM. I will. I just needed the place here to sort some things out in my heart and head.

 

I'm sorry to hear about your daughter-in-law. Terrible news. I will keep her in my thoughts. Show her this thread for comfort, she isn't alone in her journey. This place has such huge shoulders and support, the quiet corner of SA. And her hair will grow back. Do they live nearby?

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