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craig

berrimilla - almost there

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goto http://www.berrimilla.com/

 

 

at last report Berri had 48 miles to south east cape and would be at iron pot late tonight

 

hope you get out to see them Josh (aka 42 south)

 

holy crap.. these guys have done a bloody voyage and a half.

 

Now they've just got to make it back to Sydney before boxing day.

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Just caught the end of a new story in the car, the jist was that Customs won't accept them reprovisioning off Bruny Island, but insists that they sail up to Hobart to do the paperwork.

 

They are saying this might cost them making the start line for the S-H.

 

King size bummer if true. Also, right now, there's a major northeasterly blowing right down the river on their nose, could be 40 knots out there.

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Latest Update from the yacht.

 

 

Sitrep: 2300hrs 11 Dec 2005 UTC 43’36”S 146’00”E Ref 645

 

The old bus shelter corners like a brick. We are 10 miles west of Maatsuyker with 40 to go to SE Cape - directly upwind. We wont get there until at least 1900 local time and that's if the wind stays the same and the forecast gale from the NE stays reasonably soft.

 

 

 

When we eventually put the Cape in the bag, we will go up the d'Entrecasteaux Channel between Bruny Island and Tas - Malcolm is meeting us to escort us in and 40 knots outside Bruny in Storm Bay will be a bit much for Wildfire. We expect to meet him up near Kettering and we will then continue into the Derwent and actually close the loop a bit north of the Iron Pot. A bit of frantic re-guessing might be necessary out there in RANSA country - sorry.

 

 

 

Nik - tried your mobile - it told me to go away and try again later - satphone probably couldn't reach it. No way we'll be in Hobart today - earliest possible if all goes well around 0400 tomoz local.

 

 

 

Just inadvertently spoken to Steve, then a sail change will now try to pull the mail in. I thinkwe have an antenna or tuner problem with the HF now that we can get feedback from real people. Will try to sort tomoz on Hobart.

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bit hard for berri

 

SOUTHEAST COAST, Tasman Is to South East Cape:

A Gale Warning is current.

Monday until midnight: North to northeast winds 25 to 35 knots, locally 40 knots. Seas 3 to 5 metres. Southwest swell 1 to 2 metres becoming confused.

Tuesday: North to northeast winds 25 to 35 knots shifting west to southwest at 20 to 30 knots then easing 5 to 15 knots and tending variable. Local sea breezes inshore later. Seas 3 to 5 metres decreasing. Confused swell to 2 metres tending southwest.

Wednesday: Northerly winds 10 to 20 knots, locally 25 knots offshore, tending west to northwest at 15 to 25 knots. Seas to 2 metres increasing. West to southwest swell 2 to 3 metres.

Thursday: Northerly winds 15 to 25 knots, reaching 30 knots in the east but lighter inshore in the west, increasing to 20 to 30 knots later in the east and reaching 35 knots offshore. Seas mostly 2 to 4 metres. West to southwest swell 2 to 3 metres.

 

 

SOUTHWEST COAST, South East Cape to Low Rocky Pt:

A Gale Warning is current.

Monday until midnight: Northeast winds 20 to 30 knots offshore before a 25 to 35 knot northwest change near midnight. Seas mostly 2 to 4 metres offshore. West to southwest swell 1 to 2 metres.

Tuesday: West to northwest winds 20 to 30 knots easing to 15 to 25 knots later. Seas 2 to 4 metres. West to southwest swell 2 to 3 metres.

Wednesday: North to northwest winds increasing to 20 to 30 knots then tending northwest. Seas 2 to 4 metres. West to southwest swell near 3 metres.

Thursday: Northerly winds 15 to 25 knots, reaching 30 knots in the west, shifting west to northwest later at 20 to 30 knots. Seas 2 to 4 metres. West to southwest swell near 3 metres.

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Craig,

Thanks for putting this up.

Really makes the desk job that much more bearable tonight.

Home safe, Berri.

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Their effort is just so impressive. I hope I can do half as much when I'm their age. Good luck for the next week. Its getting tight...

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What a great story! Can't wait to see them make it to the start line for Hobart. Do you think they will be doing the delivery back to Sydney at the end?

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Good stuff to make it back,bloody long way 2up in a Brolga.

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Taken this morning.

 

BerriSthOfTassyS.jpg

 

 

ED - can you put Berri on the front page please

 

besides Alex is a nice bloke

 

and we have enough bul$s^&* in the sailing world at present so lets try to even things up a bit

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Sitrep: 1725hrs 12 Dec UTC / 0425hrs 13 Dec EDT 43’27”S 147’04”E Ref 647

 

About 35 to RYCT, 27 to the end of the loop

 

We have just passed Cape Bruny. My glasses are fogged up. It's cold. It's pissing with rain and as dank and miserable a night for drinking the last Dr Wendy in the boat as you could imagine. However SE Cape is in the bag - we passed it just after midnight and we're looking to close the loop in the Derwent just north of the Iron Pot in about 9 hours. Cause for celebration. Yesterday was one of the most varied and difficult days any Examiner has ever tossed at me. Lovely dawn, Tasmania's jagged SE corner silhouetted against the dawn and receding into the pink greying mist to the north. Things started to deteriorate from there.

 

Nice gentle NE breeze turned into a snorter of 25 knots - Richard Bennett came out in his Cessna to take our picture ( photo of Berri ) off Maatsuyker which was special [ed: see references in lat log entry] - we were in T shirts and shorts nut almost as soon as he'd gone it was on. 25 knots rapidly became 40 and some urgent sail changing - out past the Mewstone ready to tack back towards the Cape and 40 became 50 true, about 55 -58 apparent with rapidly rising sea to at least 5 metres and some of them were much higher. Not perhaps my worst afternoon in a boat but definitely in the 'not having fun' category and it got worse.

 

And then a bit better, but the wind has been constantly on the nose or too little to be of any use then all over the place and now anywhere from on the nose to abeam. Not enough hands...we must have done at least 10 sailchanges - big ones - full main and 1 to 3 reefs and five - during the afternoon.

 

We are now in the d'Entrecasteaux Channel heading towards Hobart inside Bruny Island. We hope to meet a couple of friendly boats further up who have been waiting since yesterday and they will escort us in. Wooohooo!

 

 

 

Seems I have been misreported by The Australian newspaper, which I'm told said I was annoyed by Customs - far from it - they have been doing their utmost to help but within their rules which I fully understand and respect and all would have been well - the great bureaucratic principle of deniability would have been maintained and followed except that a huge fuss seems to have been made in Sydney about the decision not to allow us to resupply at Adventure Bay unless in an emergency. We weren't and wouldn't have been in an emergency so we just got ourselves ready by making more water and conserving diesel like crazy. No real problem - just another question from the Examiner.

 

 

 

Anyway - I would like to apologise to the Customs Department in Hobart for any grief our arrival may be causing them. It was not our doing and I very much regret any adverse publicity it may have generated. We have always been happy to go into Hobart as long as we have time in hand and that is what we are on the way to doing as I write. So - my apologies to you all -I think you do a really difficult job rather well and I have no argument whatsoever with your decision to stick to your rules.

 

And the diesel we conserved as a result is now getting us into Hobart against the wind in truly awful conditions so some good has come of it too.

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progress map has berri well in the channel

 

http://www.berrimilla.com/progmap.htm

 

 

UPDATED

SOUTHEAST COAST, Tasman Is to South East Cape:

Tuesday until midnight: Northwesterly wind at 20 to 30 knots tending westerly and easing 5 to 15 knots this morning becoming variable this afternoon with local sea breezes inshore. Seas 3 to 4 metres abating. Confused swell to 2 metres tending southwest.

Wednesday: Northerly winds 10 to 20 knots, locally 25 knots offshore, tending west to northwest at 15 to 25 knots. Seas to 2 metres rising. West to southwest swell 2 to 3 metres.

Thursday: Northerly winds 15 to 25 knots, reaching 30 knots in the east but lighter inshore in the west, increasing to 20 to 30 knots later in the east and reaching 35 knots offshore. Seas mostly 2 to 3 metres. West to southwest swell 2 to 3 metres.

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Truly impressive. I could be wrong, but I believe there was an article about these two in my fathers AARP newletter this month. Something about two older guys in a 30ft boat doing a 30,000 mile circumnav. Wish I would have read the article a little more closely now.

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wow what an amazing story! those old guys are crazy!

 

I've been reading thier site all morning, what great stories, but I can't find out what the Examiner is?

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I've been reading thier site all morning, what great stories, but I can't find out what the Examiner is?

 

From the Berrimilla Glossary

Examiner, The: - S/he Who Must Be Placated; 98, 179, 180, 182, 188, 190, 200, 208, 210, 10 Aug, 327 and many others

I.e. S/he who sends all the weather systems.

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These guys seem pretty cool, although I couldn't see going around on that boat. Maybe with a frying pan and winch handles it would make it more palitable.

 

They even named a drink after a beloved SA brother:

from the Berri glossary: Dr Grumpy: -a particularly desperate brew of gin and cider;

 

I want to know what a Dr. Wendy is....anyone???

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Two days later and I'm still reading the log, about to approach Cape Horn. This is so real its like I'm really out there. its an amazing site.

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This is truely a wonderful adventure... and the log makes great reading!

 

Anyone for an anarchists welcome when they pull into Sydney?

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Love the comment from the Berri "Gust Book"

 

Name: Ian

E-mail: rhumbdo @ tiscali.co.uk

Location: Chatham UK

Interest: Sailor

Date: 17-Dec-2005 02:55

 

G'Day Pete and Alex,

It's a little inconsiderate of you to actually finish the voyage......what the hell am I going to look at every morning now? I'll have to watch TV or something, but don't you worry about me, you just carry on regardless!

"Congratulations" seems too little to say, your logs have been addictive and the pair of you are inspirational. You have my total admiration and respect - I salute you both. Good luck in the S2H. Looking forward now to 'the book' and to my ever closer departure date for my own circumnavigation next June. Well done fella's, good on ya!

Ian

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Latest on Berri's Arrival

 

 

"They are well up on schedule, and so will be stooging around a little bit outside the Heads to engineer a triumphant entry though the Heads at 8:00am (timing for the media) and then she will make her way regally directly to the CYC. The CYC is sending its tender down to meet them, and rumour has it a few helicopters and media type will be buzzing around as well."

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That's awesome. These guys are more than deserving of it.

 

Man do they ever make me feel old at the ripe age of 23!

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Yes Berri is home.

 

Went out early saw a great sunrise and there She was all on her own.

 

We were the only yacht out there.

 

Finally joined by a few yachts and other boats and about 7.30 the CYC tender turned up and gave them their 2005 S2H Battle Flag and in she came.

 

About 25 boats plus 1 helicopter. Finally joined by 2 Waterways boats for crowd control.

 

Alex and Peter were very chatty while waiting for the media.

 

An epic journey by two great seamen. Alex said that Berri is not allowed to be used as a training yacht due to not being built to ABS. I think she is proven !!!

 

He also would like to do the S2H two up but the rules nay NO !!!

 

There humour was as per the website and a big well done boys.

 

Philc.

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Latest on Berri's Arrival

 

 

"They are well up on schedule, and so will be stooging around a little bit outside the Heads to engineer a triumphant entry though the Heads at 8:00am (timing for the media) and then she will make her way regally directly to the CYC. The CYC is sending its tender down to meet them, and rumour has it a few helicopters and media type will be buzzing around as well."

 

 

Gotta give Alex & Peter the Gold medal for persistence and guts! Gotta give the CYC the gold medal for rank hypocrisy. These guys did the Fastnet 2 handed and circled the globe and now they have to pick up crew to just to do the Sydney-Hobart race! Puh-leese!

 

The CYCA just doesn't get the idea of short handed sailing. All attempts to get them to accept short handers entering their races, or running short handed divisions over the last ten years or more have been brushed off. Last time I was invlved the response was "we'll get back to you on that at the right time" - those practised in the art will recognise that to mean "F**k off".

 

Yet, the commodore will give the 2 handed Berri guys - great blokes they are too - a (well deserved) heroes welcome today because it gets them publicity for the Sydney - Hobart

 

Sux.

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From this mornings SMH.

 

Two Hobarts, a Fastnet and around the world in one year

Email Print Normal font Large font By Tim Colquhoun

December 20, 2005

 

Advertisement

AdvertisementWHEN Berrimilla sails in through Sydney Heads this morning and berths at Rushcutters Bay, it will mark the end of an epic 12-month adventure for its crew, Alex Whitworth and Peter Crozier.

 

Well, nearly the end.

 

There's the small matter of another Sydney to Hobart race, which will bookend a quest that began with last year's event.

 

In between they have spent more than 250 days at sea, having sailed to and from Britain to compete in the Fastnet race, finishing second in their division.

 

"It's been amazing in all sorts of ways," Whitworth said by phone yesterday, as he and Crozier sailed up the NSW coast.

 

When Berrimilla pulled in to Hobart at the end of the 2004 race, Whitworth and Crozier dropped off the crew and headed straight back down the Derwent River and turned left.

 

Rather than returning to Sydney the easy way, they went "the long way", crossing the Pacific and passing under Cape Horn, competing in the Fastnet in August and then back via the Cape of Good Hope and the Southern Ocean.

 

Today they complete their circumnavigation of the globe and, despite being confined in such close quarters together for so long, the pair have managed to remain firm friends.

 

Asked why he did it, Whitworth, 63, says the idea of sailing around the world has long appealed. "It's sort of been in the back of my mind since I was about 10, and it's a neat idea to do a Hobart, a Fastnet and a Hobart all in the one year," he said.

 

With the highs there have also been the inevitable lows, in weather terms anyway. The worst? "Sitting in a nasty green, rolling, seething, horrible thunderstorm off Montevideo with purple lightning zapping into the sea all around," Whitworth said.

 

"I just had to sit there because I knew there was a ship out there and I was going to die any time in the next three seconds."

 

When Whitworth and Crozier, 60, step onto land this morning they will be greeted by Cruising Yacht Club of Australia Commodore Geoff Lavis, who will also hand over the prestigious Royal Ocean Racing Club Seamanship Award for an outstanding act of seamanship.

 

The award was announced in London on November 22 while Berrimilla was somewhere in the Southern Ocean.

 

On the horizon for Whitworth when he finally does return to land on a semi-permanent basis are "at least two books" chronicling the adventure. Competing in the 2007 London marathon also appeals to the keen runner.

 

Meanwhile, skippers from some of the big Sydney to Hobart boats - including Alfa Romeo's Neville Crichton, Stewart Thwaites from Konica Minolta, Mark Richards from Wild Oats and Sean Langman from AAPT - plus Robert Hick from Toecutter, the smallest boat this year, will be at Martin Place today at 12:30pm.

 

The line honours and handicap trophies will be on display and a spinnaker packing competition will be held. Two tickets aboard a ferry for the Boxing Day race start are up for grabs.

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Well done Alex & Pete !

 

This morning after they pulled the boat into the CYC , they were getting stuck into a case of well deserved Fosters !

 

Once again , well done !

 

FS

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From this mornings SMH.

 

When Berrimilla pulled in to Hobart at the end of the 2004 race, Whitworth and Crozier dropped off the crew and headed straight back down the Derwent River and turned left.

That's the second time this week I've seen journos demostrate that they aren't that good at geography - it's a fackin long way to england if you turn left out of the Derwent ain't it?

 

Oops ... forgot .... congratulations Alex and Peter ...... lets hope Berri kicks some arse in the Hobart - can't wait for the books to start appearing.

 

If you turned right you would be working against the Roaring Forties. Maybe thats why(except for a mob of mad poms and occasional Frenchman)all the round the world races go from west to east.

 

I expect the pre-race briefing on the 24th will see a sustained round of very well deserved applause.

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Well begging my pardon and excuse me to pieces, but it's just that you turn left out of the Derwent to go to Sydney - just like Alex and Peter have in the last few days. Guess it's more straight ahead than right, but it definitely ain't left!

 

 

Not to be pedantic or nothin', but from the Derwent (not Storm Bay) it's left, and then left again to get to Sydney, and also left and left again to go around the world, just that in the latter case the left turn is not so sharp, unless of course you want to go via the Ross ice shelf.

 

The Ross ice shelf, it should be pointed out, is particularly good for observing rooting penguins and thus getting a heads up on the forthcoming SH forecast. Or was that the other thread..............?

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Becalmed in the Derwent with six miles to go! These guys are the real sailors, cheers for Berri.

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Wager they are consulting rather heavily with the Doctor... additional medicinals have probably been broken out of emergency stores too.

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While most folks have been paying so much attention to canting keels and such, it's great to read about these guys -- true sailors! Gillawa also has an intersting story, and she has about 150 NM to go. The front runners aren't the only stories worth reading. Most of us have more in common with the guys at the back of the pack anyway.

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Have to say, Berri looks content swinging on its mooring again after such a long time. Love to make the barbie, but out 'o town. If I see the blokes at RANSA between now & then I'll buy them a libation...

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