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      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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question_sailing

Gary W Mull

175 posts in this topic

I will turboing for doublehanded, racing Huelva-Gomera Island (750 miles) and the Spanish Doublehanded Championship.

 

What do you think?

 

It's cheaper and with good equipment...

 

www.questionsailing.com

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I like his stuff. He designed a Screamer 40 that is currently on the hard in Northern Michigan. The thing looks like an aircraft carrier. There is also a boat called Dolphin I think a 52 the I have always liked. Then, of course, the original Rocket 22

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Don't forget the Rangers, nice cruisers and good all around boats. Also, Blackallers (sp?) 12 from Frisco with the twin rudders, the fastest 12 when it was under control!

 

Will Museler

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here you go:

B)

http://www.members.dca.net/pwink/ranger/garymull.htm

 

 

Gary Mull in retrospect

In English or engineering, this talented yacht designer loved a sweet line

by Steve Henkel

(Reprinted from Good Old Boat magazine, with permission of the author)

Gary Mull

One day in 1985, a yacht designer, the late Gary Mull, wandered into the Connecticut office of Sailor magazine, where author Steve Henkel worked as editor-at-large. Whether he came hoping for some coverage of his work (successful naval architects are often good self-promoters) or just wanting to visit, Steve doesn't recall. But presently Gary and Steve found themselves facing each other across a table in the office. Steve clicked on a tape recorder, and Gary began talking about himself.

 

 

 

Afterward, the tape was transcribed, and Steve began to put Gary's words into some semblance of order for publication. Before Steve could finish, however, the magazine ran into financial problems and folded. The interview was packed away and forgotten.

 

 

 

Recently, while browsing among his old manuscripts, Steve, now retired and living in Florida, came across a copy of the interview. Gary Mull died of cancer in July 1994 at the age of 55. "After rereading the record of our conversation," Steve says, "it seemed appropriate to make an effort to get his story published, as a sort of minor testimonial to his well-lived life."

 

 

 

By any measure, Gary Mull was a successful designer. His credits include the Santana 22, 27, and 37; the Ranger 22, 23, 26, 29, 32, 33, and the SORC-winning Ranger 37; the Newport 30 and 33; the Kalik 44; the Freedom Independence, 28, 30, 36, 42, 45; a variety of winning raceboats from the Half-Tonner Hotflash, built by the Gougeon Brothers in 1976, to Two-Tonners like Carrot (1976), to the 12-Meter

 

USA; the Capri 22, which he designed with Catalina's Frank Butler in 1983 (more than 800 sold); and custom designs including the light-displacement speedster Improbable, the 6-Meter match racers St. Francis IV, V, and VI; Ranger, built by Goetz Custom Yachts and raced by Ted Turner in the 1979 6-Meter Worlds; and the maxi-boat, Sorcery. His boats were built in numerous other countries, including

 

Australia, New Zealand, Italy, Taiwan, Turkey, and Yugoslavia. He also served as chairman of the International Technical Committee of the Offshore Racing Council, the group that administered the IOR (International Offshore Rule).

 

 

 

Another measure of a designer is the number and record of people who apprentice under him and then go forth on their own. Over the years, Gary Mull trained many others who established their own enviable portfolios, among them Carl Schumacher, best known for his Express series. Other well-known yacht designers include Jim Antrim and Ron Holland.

 

 

 

Besides being a good designer, Gary Mull was characterized as "one of the best storytellers of all time."

 

 

 

Bay Area boat boy

 

It isn't easy to make a living as a sailboat designer, and most aspirants to such a calling find other sources of income to support their chosen lifestyle. But Gary - after a number of false starts - made it big as a full-time designer. He was born in the small California town of Beaumont, which he was fond of describing as "right next to Banning . . . and that's not too far from Ukipa." Later, his family moved to the San Francisco Bay area, where he lived the rest of his life. As a teenager growing up in the 1950s, he discovered his vocation when he joined the Sea Scouts.

 

 

 

"I have a good friend named Wayne Love," Gary said, "and he and I, as far as I know, were the only two guys in our group who wound up doing what we wanted to do. Wayne wanted to be a cowboy, and he is a cowboy - a real honest-to-God John Wayne, spurs-and-a-buckle-the-size-of-a-hubcap cowboy. And I wanted to be in

 

boats.

 

 

 

"Wayne was in the Sea Scouts, and one day he said, 'Do you want to go on a cruise?' I said, 'Yeah, great, what's a cruise?' It turned out to be on the Sea Scout 'ship,' they called it, which was a 26-foot whaleboat. The cruise consisted of rowing the whaleboat against the flood tide about 12 or 15 miles, beaching the boat and having lunch, and then rowing back against the ebb tide. I came back with a sunburn and blisters all over my hands, but discovered that I really liked boats, I mean really liked boats." As he grew up, Gary began racing on other people's boats and took jobs as a paid hand setting up boats and crewing.

 

 

 

English major

 

In college, however, Gary started out as an English major, because he wanted to be a poet. "I had a lot of fun," he said, "and it serves me well. I enjoy the language. It frustrates some of the people who work for me because I try very hard to use the word that means what I am trying to say - and I always try to say what I mean. Many people are pretty loose with the language. I hear a lot of people say 'it is exactly the same except that . . . ' and it can't be 'exactly the same except that . . . ' "

 

 

 

Gary went for a year to Pomona College, a liberal arts college in Southern California. "Then I had the choice of going to school the next year, or going on the Tahiti race," he said. "When you're 17, which would you pick?"

 

 

 

So he raced to Tahiti. On his return he went to Oakland City College for a short while. He "did English for a little bit," and then he signed on to help bring Good News (a well-known ocean racer of the time) back to the States from Bermuda. After that, he applied for a transfer to the University of California at Berkeley. He had all the credits, and making the switch, he figured, would be no problem.

 

 

 

"Then," he explained, "at Berkeley, I met an old girlfriend of mine from Pomona College, who now was an English teacher at a Berkeley high school. Her view was that, if you are going to be a poet, you have only a few options. You either have to come from a wealthy family, marry a wealthy wife, or get some real job to support

 

yourself while you are dealing with your poetry. The most common job for would-be poets is as an English teacher in a high school. There are a lot of frustrated poets teaching grammar to kids who don't want to learn it.

 

 

 

Teaching problems

 

"Then she began teaching at Berkeley High and telling me of all the problems of teaching. I asked her if she wanted to go out to dinner, and she said she couldn't because she had to grade a bunch of papers. I said, 'I'll help you grade the papers, and then we'll go to dinner. I'll grade for spelling and punctuation, and you can grade for

 

content.' So she gave me a red pencil, and I started whittling away. These kids were juniors in high school, and they had never heard of punctuation. There was an occasional period, and commas were not in evidence; their spelling was freestyle, I guess you'd call it.

 

 

 

"She looked over and said, 'My God, what are you doing?' I said, 'Are these kids Americans? Are they boat people or something?' She said, 'You can't grade this one badly because he happens to be black, and if you grade him down I'll get a visit from his mother and father and the NAACP. You can't grade this one down because he happens to be white, and if he is graded down I'll get a visit from his mother and

 

father and the minister saying, 'How come my white kid is getting graded down?' One other kid couldn't get bad grades because he was a football player, and another girl couldn't get bad grades because she was supposed to go to some hotsy-totsy women's college. My friend said she'd never been so frustrated in her life. She was, at this point, actually crying, and that sort of soured me on the teaching process, at least for high school."

 

 

 

Instead of teaching, Gary decided to shift into engineering at Berkeley. He signed up to take a qualification test, given during the summer, to get into the College of Engineering. All summer long he expected a letter from Berkeley to arrive advising him when he was supposed to take the engineering test. But the letter never came.

 

"Finally," he said, "I went up to Cal (UC Berkeley) and told them I hadn't gotten the notice.

 

 

 

What name?

 

" 'Well, what's your name?' I was asked by an official.

 

 

 

" 'Mull.' They got out my file.

 

 

 

" 'Well, what do you want to take the engineering test for?'

 

 

 

" 'Because I want to study engineering.'

 

 

 

" 'But you are down here as an English Lit major.'

 

 

 

" 'No, no, I was an English Lit major; I transferred into engineering.'

 

 

 

" 'No, no, no. Here it says your intended major is English.'

 

 

 

"And there it was on the form: 'ENG.'

 

 

 

"I said, 'No, that's engineering, that's the abbreviation for engineering.'

 

 

 

"The official said, 'Not here. The abbreviation at the University of California is ENGIN, and the abbreviation for English is ENG.'

 

 

 

"Well, I had been taught that you never abbreviate the word English if you can avoid it, or you do ENGL. But Cal had its own abbreviations. Without the qualification test you can't get in the College of Engineering. So I was essentially stuck in English Lit for my third year." A linguistic purist, hoist by his own petard!

 

 

 

Eventually, he earned his mechanical engineering degree with an option in naval architecture. "I did all sorts of stuff by the time I finally got out of Cal," he said, "which was at a pretty late date. I went to school for a year, went to Tahiti for a year. I worked as a sailmaker for a year. I went back to school. I was in the Coast Guard. I got married."

 

 

 

The real stuff

 

He worked at Lockheed Shipbuilding as a consultant for a while and ran the engineering department of a shipyard for about four years. He got to know the commercial - what he called "the real" - naval architecture. "At the time," he said, "I sometimes wondered why I had to learn how to design general cargo ships and tankers and that kind of stuff, but even that has served me well since then."

 

 

 

Then he raced to Honolulu on the celebrated 33-foot ultralight S&S-designed Spirit, which he was in charge of setting up. After the race, with a small crew that included his new wife, he brought Spirit back to San Francisco. "The boat had no engine," he said. "We sailed her back."

 

 

 

When the couple got back to the mainland, they had no home, and Gary had no job. In fact, he hadn't interviewed for any jobs. So he and his wife stayed with her parents for a while. He remembered his father-in-law repeatedly asking about his plans.

 

 

 

"He'd say, 'Well, when are you starting work?' And I would say, 'Well, I don't really know.'

 

 

 

"'Don't you have to call and let them know you are back?'

 

 

 

"Well, it's a little bit more complicated than that because I don't have anyone to call. I'm going to have to start looking for a job.

 

 

 

"'You didn't interview before you left?'

 

 

 

"I'm sure he was thinking: 'Here is this lout that my daughter is married to, an absolute ne'er-do-well.' "

 

 

 

Antenna project

 

Finally Gary started working for a company in San Francisco that had a contract to redesign the antenna array on a couple of carriers for the U.S. Navy. Not long after, "the boss walks up to me one day and he says, 'Well . . . err, umm . . . err, umm, I don't know how to tell you this . . . umm, err, umm . . . I have to let you go.'

 

 

 

"I had only worked there three weeks. I said, 'Jeez, Bill, what did I do wrong?' And he said, 'No, no, no, your work is fine, but we lost the Navy contract, and last hired, first fired.' He felt so embarrassed he gave me three months' severance pay."

 

 

 

Gary used some of that severance pay to fly east. He interviewed with a number of yacht design firms, including the prestigious Sparkman & Stephens, where he was offered a job. He worked there for several years, and then his father-in-law suddenly died, leaving a family business. Gary and his wife drove back to California to try to help save the business, but by the time they returned to the West Coast, other family members had sold the business.

 

 

 

Gary again had no job and only "20 cents-worth of savings." But the company that he had worked for redesigning antenna arrays for the Navy rehired him right away, farming him out as an engineer to Lockheed Shipbuilding in Seattle.

 

 

 

While he was in Seattle, Gary's mother sent him a newspaper clipping of an engineering firm's ad looking for a naval architect down in the Bay Area. He responded, and as Gary explained it, "We sat down and the manager asked me my general background, where I went to school, and what I had been doing, and then I asked what the job would be. He said, 'Well, right now we just got the contract to do a12-inch, self-propelled, suction-cutter dredge for the state of Bahar, India.'

 

 

 

"I said, 'A what?' And he said, 'A dredge.' And I said, 'Gee, I'm afraid you've got the wrong guy, I don't know anything about dredges. I don't even know how they work.'"

 

 

 

Thinking there would be no job offer, Gary went back to Seattle. About a week later he got a call, asking when he could start. Gary answered, "I think you must have me mixed up. I'm about six feet tall, I'm the guy who doesn't know anything about dredges."

 

 

 

The manager's response was, "Yes, and you are the only one who admitted it." They negotiated a deal, and he worked there for a couple of years.

 

 

 

Sailboat commission

 

In those days, Gary spent time with a bunch of sailors who got together in Oakland for lunch on Fridays to talk about boats. There, in 1965, he met the owner of the W. D. Schock Company, a pioneer in cored construction, based in Santa Ana.

 

This is how Gary described the ensuing events: "Bill Schock kept saying, 'What would you do if you were going to draw a boat that would be faster than a Cal 20?' That was the real yardstick boat at that time. We were sketching on the backs of napkins, as we do.

 

"Right after that lunch, I had to fly to New York, and when I came back, there were all these messages on the desk, 'Call Bill Schock; Call Bill Schock,' so I called and said 'What do you need?' And he said 'Where the hell are the drawings?' I said, 'What drawings?' He said, 'You said you were going to design a boat for me.' I said, 'No,

 

you said you were going to call me if you wanted me to.' And he said, 'Well, I called.' I said, 'Oh!' And that got me started designing sailboats. The first one was the Santana 22."

 

 

 

It was a very successful first design, and W. D. Schock sold several hundred. Then Gary designed the Santana 27 in 1966. Before long both the Santana 22 and the 27 started cutting into the sales of the big competition, the Cal 20 and the Cal 25 and 28.

 

 

 

The Ranger story

 

As a result, Jensen Marine, builders of the Cal line at that time, saw both a problem and an opportunity. Jack Jensen already had a mutually exclusive agreement with Bill Lapworth, designer of the Cal 20 and others in that line, which stipulated that Lapworth couldn't design for anyone else and Jensen Marine couldn't build anything but Lapworth boats. So in 1967 Jensen started a new company, Ranger Yachts, with the same sort of exclusive arrangement with Gary.

 

 

 

For a while, things went swimmingly. Gary designed a broad line of Rangers: In chronological order the Ranger 26 (1969), 33 (1970), 29 (1970), 23 (1971), 37 (1972), and the 32 (1973). The Ranger 23 was used in the movie Dove, the story of Robin Lee Graham's single-handed circumnavigation (the real boat Graham started out on was a Lapworth 24). The Ranger 37, Munequita, won the 1973 Southern Ocean Racing Circuit. And the number of hulls coming from each model mold was

 

substantial. For example, 460 Ranger 33s were built before production was discontinued in 1978.

 

 

 

But as so often happens in the boating business, the scent of roses was not to last. As Gary explained with some bitterness, "They started getting aberrations because the corporate lawyers decided to run the boat business. What happened was that in 1973 Bangor Punta bought Jensen Marine and Ranger Yachts, and a new group of guys took over Bangor Punta. They were basically all attorneys - and I don't have any more against attorneys than most people have against attorneys, for the same reasons - but, anyway, they decided that they would begin to pull the corporate strings. They decided to change the corporate structure, and in so doing they committed suicide."

 

 

 

Markets covered

 

Under the original concept, said Gary, Bangor Punta had "O'Day boats, which essentially covered the low-ticket end of the market. They had Cal boats with an overlap at the bottom end that covered the medium-ticket end of the market. And they had Ranger Yachts, with some overlap, covering the high-ticket segment of the market. They had the market covered like a blanket."

 

 

 

Then management decided to change the structure. "I don't know what it's called," Gary said, "from horizontal to vertical (integration) or from vertical to horizontal, maybe on the diagonal, I don't know. But in any case they decided they would have one guy be director of the marine field in order to unify marketing."

 

 

 

That started some infighting. "O'Day wanted to improve their quality and build bigger boats," Gary said. "They wanted to encroach on the marketplace of the other two guys. They put a guy in Ranger who wanted to cut the costs at Ranger to get down to the low-ticket end. They began to mix up where the hell they were, and who they were, and where they were going."

 

 

 

It was a turning point in the designer's career. "That was a very bad thing for me because I had an exclusive contract with Ranger," Gary said. "I couldn't design for other production companies. I had cut myself off from the entire rest of the marketplace."

 

 

 

He had a bitter dispute with Bangor Punta's top brass, which ended with the termination of his contract and separation from the company.

 

 

 

Justice after all

 

"It was like going from a good business to no business in one day," Gary said. "But in the end, Bangor Punta's marine business went in the toilet, too, so maybe there is some justice after all. I had always had my own business designing production boats, so I just kept designing production boats, and I have been doing that ever since."

 

 

 

Bangor Punta moved the Cal division to Florida in 1981 and decided to pull the plug on Ranger. In 1983, Bangor Punta decided to get out of the sailboat business altogether and sold Cal and O'Day to Lear Siegler.

 

 

 

Gary's contract with Bangor Punta had given him some control over the Ranger molds, and he had a client who wanted to buy the molds for the Ranger 29, 33, and 37. A deal was struck but, according to Gary, Bangor Punta reneged and destroyed them all. That was the clear and final end of Ranger Yachts.

 

 

 

We got on to the subject of cruising boats. "We do a lot of cruising boats," Gary said. "But I don't like the word cruising boat. We do a lot of regular boats. Most of our designs are what I like to call 'really nice little boats.' "

 

 

 

When asked if he meant that he designed "club racer/ cruisers," he answered, "Ehhh . . . I think that every name that you give them other than 'good sailboat' shades what they really are. If you call one a club racer, what you are really saying is that it is a racing boat that isn't quite good enough to race against the real racing boats. It can only do club racing. If you call it a cruiser/racer, that's some sort of a hermaphrodite that is neither fish nor fowl, but it is probably slower than a racer/cruiser, which is also a hermaphrodite, but maybe looks racier than its cruiser/racer cousin."

 

 

 

Design parameters

 

When asked what kind of parameters he used when designing "just a really nice boat," he said, "It has to be good looking, and it has to sail well. It has to have good balance, and it has to have an airy, bright, pleasant interior so you don't feel like you are going to jail when you go down below.It's got to have a comfortable cockpit where you can work the boat without bashing your elbows or tipping over or whatever. It's a boat that, if you want to cruise it for a while, you can do it by simply

 

loading aboard the stores and some clothes, and just do it. If you want to race it, you can do that by off-loading some of the stores and gear and going racing. And, of course, it's not going to be a successful IOR boat, because it's not an IOR boat, but it's probably going to be a better cruising boat than 99 percent of the cruising boats on the market, which are caricatures of cruising boats."

 

 

 

That first interview eventually ended. But the following January, at the 1986 Miami Boat Show, Gary delivered another lesson in engineering and English. He was sitting in the cockpit of his latest design, a shiny new Freedom 30. He was casually asked whether the maximum speed of his intriguing new boat design was 1.34 times the

 

square root of the waterline length.

 

 

 

"I wish people would quit saying that," he retorted with intensity. "There's no such thing as a maximum speed under sail. There's a point at which the speed-versus-resistance curve begins to get very, very steep. At low speeds, a certain increase in horsepower gets you a fairly good increase in speed - but at high speeds, doubling the

 

horsepower only gets you a very slight increase in speed. Usually somewhere around 1.34 times the square root of the waterline length - the sailing waterline, not the static waterline - that speed/ resistance curve starts to get very steep. But there's no absolute limit."

 

 

 

High quarter wave

 

"But," he was asked, "doesn't the quarter wave start to build up higher than the cabintop?""No! That's not so!" he exclaimed. "I've never seen such a thing.

 

That's all magazine talk. That's not naval architecture. I'm continually seeing this 'maximum speed under sail' or 'maximum speed-length ratio' or whatever-the-hell, and it's totally meaningless to naval architecture, as an absolute maximum. It does

 

have meaning, because the speed-resistance curve does get very, very steep, as I say; but it seldom gets absolutely vertically asymptotic."

 

 

 

The topic switched to a safer subject, the Freedom 30 rig, and the observation was made that "the mast doesn't have any standing rigging except the headstay . . . "

 

 

 

"Jibstay!" he shot back. "A headstay goes to the head of the mast; that's why they're called headstays. Forestays or jibstays go somewhere below the head of the mast. You have 'stowage' with a 'w' on boats, not 'storage,' which is what you have in your garage.

 

"I want to keep the language of sailing clean. Life jackets are life jackets, not PFDs (personal flotation devices). Heads are heads, not MSDs (marine sanitation devices). Calling them MSDs is just an example of the government not doing anything except generating words and not accomplishing anything. It's typical bureaucratese. Everybody knows what a head is."

 

 

 

It was pointed out that there are two definitions for the word "head": the toilet or, alternatively, the room in which the toilet is located. The Mariner's Dictionary says that a head is "the compartment with toilet facilities." But again Gary shot back: "Yes, but when I say 'the head is stopped up,' that doesn't mean the door is jammed, does it?"

 

 

 

Epilogue

 

Gary was, of course, involved in many more projects than described here.

 

He worked hard for several years on the Golden Gate Challenge 12-Meter program for the 1987 America's Cup ("The 12-Meter stuff is just a 12-hour day, seven days a week. I haven't had eight hours' sleep in the last year or two."). The result was the radical forward-rudder USA skippered by Tom Blackaller. She showed promise but failed to win the trials.

 

Another of Gary's unusual designs was an ultra-high-performance 35-foot, ultra-ultralight (2,000-pound) sloop for Ron Moore with not only a winged keel but also a winged deck ("People who [will buy it] are the same kind of people who get Hobie cats, which capsize, and . . . if a guy is crazy enough to buy this boat, God knows what he is going to do with it!").

 

 

 

And he owned boats himself, of which he said, "I name all my boats after Humphrey Bogart movie roles. I've got Fred C. Dobbs (Treasure of the Sierra Madre) and Richard Blaine . . . do you know who Richard Blaine is?"

 

 

 

Gary's creative signature is to be found in other less-conspicuous places, like the Dorade boxes built into the corner of the cabin trunk, which form part of the water trap; Gary called them "sunshine boxes."

 

 

 

Gary was nothing if not an entertaining conversationalist. Quickwitted and often humorous, he once asked, "How do you make a small fortune as a naval architect? Start with a large fortune." Fun was the operative word, in life and in boats. In describing the design objective of the Ranger 22 (the production version of his

 

near-legendary Pocket Rocket), he said, "The basic parameter was fun. When we had a decision to make in the design office, we always asked, 'Is it going to contribute to making it more fun?' "

 

 

 

Jim Donovan, who worked with Gary, summed up his former boss this way: "Gary Mull was the 'teacher' for many talented yacht designers, one of the best storytellers of all time, and an excellent cook. He had a very organized and systematic approach to the design process along with a great attitude on how to balance work and enjoy life. Although yacht design sounds like just a lot of 'fun,' it's usually just a tremendous amount of work. I was very lucky to work with Gary; he was an excellent person."

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thanks for the article n104... that's a good read...

 

it does amaze me when you look at the pocket rocket, compared to how the modern shape of a 'sport boat' has evolved, how ahead of his time he was.... plumb bow, huge cockpit, all the beam back aft, etc etc...

 

/c

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One thing to keep in perspective is in his later years there were many people working under Mr Mull, As he was off doing what he did, they were keeping his name alive and putting out some of the badest rides of the day. If one looks at the later designs that came from his office there is a mixture of many of the top names of today and each had their unique flair that can be scene in product.

I have had the privilage to be on one of the later designs that holds his name sake and what in interesting ride it is, as mentioned above like an aircraft carrier..

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Gary was a very good designer and a couple of times I went to him for help with problems. But far more than that he was a quality man. I can remember one night when they refused to serve us in an Annapolis bar full of drunks. We were raising hell. He was good at that too. I consider it a rare privalege to have known him.

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Many years ago (and maybe is response to some kids who also sailed), Gary wrote down the rules of physics that effect the performance of a pinebox derby car that I guess that Cub/Boy Scouts may still race today.

 

If I remember right, he said that as much of the weight of the car needs to be near the rear of the car so that when it is raised up on the ramp, it has the most potential stored force for acceleration as it goes shooting down the ramp.

 

Does anybody else remember this, and just for the heck of it does anybody have a copy? It might make some Anarchists here who have kids in the Scouts a hero to their kid.

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Hey guys i'm searching for info about Gary W Mull...

 

I only know one good link: http://www.members.dca.net/pwink/ranger/garymull.htm

 

What do you think about his designs...

 

Probably, i will bought one:

 

Dione 82, built in 1981 near Barcelona (Spain)

Owned a Mull 38 one-tonner built in west system by Goetz for a few years. Great off-wind boat. Gary was very helpful when we replaced the wood keel with lead - shared original drawings and advice. It was much appreciated. Good guy.

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In my teens I worked at the John Beery Co. in Alameda, a chandlery and Ranger dealer. Gary had his office upstairs. When John Dane sailed the Ranger 37 Munequita to a win in the SORC. Gary had one hell of an impromtu party. He was truly a great man.

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Many years ago (and maybe is response to some kids who also sailed), Gary wrote down the rules of physics that effect the performance of a pinebox derby car that I guess that Cub/Boy Scouts may still race today.

 

If I remember right, he said that as much of the weight of the car needs to be near the rear of the car so that when it is raised up on the ramp, it has the most potential stored force for acceleration as it goes shooting down the ramp.

 

Does anybody else remember this, and just for the heck of it does anybody have a copy? It might make some Anarchists here who have kids in the Scouts a hero to their kid.

 

Re pinewood derby and the Scouts...put the axles (nails) in a drill motor and polish the hell out of them with a cloth and toothpaste...wicked fast.

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Thanks for all the coments....!!!!

 

And if you have more, say me...!!!

 

Cheers from Cadiz Bay ( probably, the best spot for sailing in Europe... ;) )

 

www.questionsailing.com

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He did design some true dogs and some very ugly sterns.

The IOR rule made Gary make those weird shape booties...........man where they crazy to steer downwind..............TIME FOR DA BLOOPER

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Gary Mull also designed 58' Dora III for Lynn Williams of Chicago, and later another 58 footer, the bright orange "Famous NAMIS" ("World's Fastest Orange Ocean Racer") for Phil Watkins of Chicago. NAMIS was a great boat to sail on, and I remember one very windy 100 miler out of Chicago, when we beat the 64' S&S DORA IV boat for boat, to great surprise and jubilation.

 

Later, he designed the 82' IOR Maxi SORCERY for Jake Woods of Los Angeles, who still races the boat. SORCERY won the MEXORC this February.

 

He did not revolutionize yacht design in the way that Doug Peterson did with Ganbare, but he designed a large number of innovative, fast and comfortable boats, and contributed greatly to the evolution of yacht design.

 

He was an engaging commentator, and in the 80's, wrote a regular column for Seahorse on design and racing in general. I remember one long and witty discourse on the history and recent developments in the America's Cup that ended:

 

"If that seems crazy, just remember, it all started with a bunch of guys who built a yacht to make money."

 

Gary Mull was a unique individual, and a great wit. Sailing could use more of both.

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Ahhh, Brings back fond memories.

 

I had one of his designs back in the late 70's to '85. An aluminum 3/4 ton built by Echenlaub, with the pointy stern. And can you say "tumblehome"? I even had crew cockpits on the sides, and a small skipper cockpit. Cool boat though. It would roll like some of the old petersons, but you could steer through it because of the skeg. Yes, it was blooper time then!

 

WHen he was up here for the 6 meter worlds, I had just bought the boat, and he was sailing with Ted Turner, they came out on a wed. night beer can with us to help get the thing going. Great story teller and willing to help a young sailor. I hear it is still going today as a cruising boat....wheel steering, big cockpit and all.

 

I have measured many of his IOR boats of the day. I always enjoyed seeing the new inovations he put in them.

 

To me he was and always will be a talented designer and a fine gentleman.

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Snap...see you there. Which boat do you have? Will you be there Mon. or Wed.?

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Gary Mull had more then a few of his six-meter designs in the 1979 Worlds placing in the top five out of 25 boats.Pelle Petersson's Irene won that year and the late Tom Blackaller placed second in the Gary Mull designed St. Francis VII.Gary Philbrick was fourth in the Mull designed St. Francis V (St. Francis V won the worlds in '73 with Tom Blackaller).Ranger was fifth with Ted Turner and Gary Mull.Not a bad showing for Mull designs against the best six and twelve meter designers of that period.BTW Doug Peterson designed a six meter for Hank Thayer for the '79 Worlds,but I believe they were below mid-fleet in the final standings.

 

Two weeks prior to the worlds in '79 Commodore Thompkins won the '79 North Americans in St. Francis VII,also never loosing a race in the defender series,Ranger was second.

 

 

Ranger won the US Nationals in '81 with Andy Rose driving.

 

It should be noted that six-meter racing is a combination of good crew work,good design and sails.It used to bust the pants off of Olin Stephens when one of his older 30 year old designs would beat his latest state of the art six meter or twelve meter creations.Buzzy III comes to mind as a 1956 design that was always a winner out of Maple Bay,British Columbia (Maple Bay used to be the hotbed of six-meters,along with Seattle in the 60's.)The 1938 S&S designed Goose was another six-meter that did well for many years,was third or fourth in the 73 Worlds.The Goose had qualities that influanced Gary Mull in his initial six-meter work,no doubt inspired by his stay in Olin Stephens office.

 

It also helped having a good start and an agressive skipper,Tom Blackaller of St. Francis and Sunny Vynne in the 60's in Seattle come to mind.

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Old picture of Tom Blackaller at the helm of St Frances VII in the '73 Worlds

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La Forza del Destino (WildFire) was one hell of a boat. Dominated Long Island Sound for many years.

 

 

Norm Rabin's (sp?) La Forza del Destino was one hell of a fast boat, but dominant is a bit of hyperbole. Indeed, I don't recall La Forza winning any races and in those days I did them all on competing boats. No crumbs meant on Gary Mull. He was great. Just setting the record straight.

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the first boat I ever raced on was a Mull 47.. it was launched as "Gonna Git Ya" in the 70's.. it was donated to the Navel Academy and resurrected as "Reprisal" it is now known as "Carrot" and is located in Gibson Island, I think.. at least that's it's last known location to me..

was a fun boat.. a great platform to work on.. it had a real stinger ass end on it.. and was squirrelly as hell downwind.. anything lower than 145' and ya really needed the blooper

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My favorite Gary Mull design,except for the stern,the Ranger 28

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Santana 22 pegged knot meter at 14 knots downwind in a double handed race.......best experience on the water...............

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14 knots...was that just a momentary burst coming off a wave....couldn't of held that speed for very long.

 

We have a Ranger 23 as well,used to have two until I sold the other one last year.We've taken these boats out over 1500 times over the years,single-handed (light) and crewed (heavy).Usually downwind in 25+ knots,under main and 150 ,maintained 8.2 with bursts to 9.3 off of waves. Downwind in 35+,under main and 110 could maintain 8.7 with bursts to 9.7.Flying the spinnaker you could maybe add a knot and a half to two knots to that speed in high wind.

 

A few times when the boat was stripped of all excess gear,no batteries,maybe 1/2 a gallon of fuel and the smallest outboard mounted,no water and just a six pack of beer on board for extra weight.In 30+ singlehanding

the boat would unwet or lift up onto a total plane for sustained bursts of 10 seconds or more and just sizzle,the amazing thing about this was how light the helm got with all weather helm disappearing.I was usually just awe struck by what was happening as the boat just skipped over the top of waves and was more concerned about an accidental jibe as I followed the gust off,then looking at the speed on the knot-meter or the GPS to confirm my speed.I would say the fastest would be maybe a tad over 12 knots.

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The Ranger 23 and 33 are two of my favorite Mull designs and I was lucky enough to have owned both. All Rangers remain good PHRF boats, despite the vintage. I think that says someting about Mull as a designer.

 

Carl Schumacher, designer of the Express 34 and 37, trained under Mull.

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Origanally based on the Gary Mull Manatee,this is the Orion 50

post-4773-1145210880_thumb.jpg

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not sustained......blowing about 35-40 knots full main and 110 jib off the wind in 15 foot waves.......we were getting the knot meter pegged going down the green monsters......when at speed the boat just came alive with a light helm

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Santana 22 pegged knot meter at 14 knots downwind in a double handed race.......best experience on the water...............

 

I guess I would call the Santanna 22 my first "real boat" Hull #26, Loved that boat.

Had it for about a yr up in Long Beach, when I lost the rig, (aluminum chain plates can you say stupid!!)

Took the boat back to Shock's and had new mast fabed from a 525 mast section, internal halyards, lead everything aft, some new UK sails, redid the bottom with an epoxy coat and realy started racing the boat, lots of fun.

Won the crew of 2 around Catalina, dont know the real top speed, but pegged the old signet downwind many times running down thw back side of Catalina. And going to weather, it would heal just to about you had water comming over the coamings and just stay there.

Won lots of club races in Newport when not racing other bigger boats, sold it to move up to a bigger boat, I would buy that boat again if I could find it and it was in solid shape, even got engaged on that boat.

Very solid and overlooked design, definately not as exciting as many of Gary's other designs but definately one of the boats that got him started.

Regards

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One of the wildest sailing experiences I have ever had was on a Ranger 37 years ago. DDW in 50 true and big waves at night, the 17K lb plus IOR lead mine was surging off the waves, lifting out of the water and hitting 17-18 knots. No feel on the helm, not sure how much of the undersized rudder was still in the water. When we hauled the boat a couple weeks later, the fiberglass fairing around the leading edge of the rudder was gone. Mull drew some great boats for his time. My personal favorite is still Hotflash the 1/2 tonner. Very quick boat and a WEST system woodie to boot.

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Sailed quite a few races on the Mull 45 Fait Accompli. Weird looking boat but she sure sailed well to weather and reaching.

 

Espo may remember the battle for the Gold Watch in the 93 Rolex IMS series. It was a testament to the boat and her designer that not only was she up there and won the distance race overall by daylight, but to how well she could still sail and how easy she was to use.

 

Pretty funny it was between a J35 and the Mull from the racer/cruiser division with all the other dedicated IMS hardware floating around the Sound at the time. (For you Espo bashers they did start one race early...sail up the course for 7 minutes...return, restart and still win. Fackers!!)

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Either I missed it, or no one has yet mentioned Mull's landmark 42' "Improbable". Cold-molded in NZ in 1970 (I believe) for Belvedere's Dave Allen, the boat had a quite a career willing the 1971 Miami-Montego Bay race, racing SORC, Admiral's Cup, Sydney-Hobart, etc. Lousy IOR rating but the boat could get going downwind which was rare in those days.

 

My dad, Len Schwab, bought the boat in 1976 when we were sailing up the Norcal coast. He was looking for a bigger boat than the 38 cutter we were living on...when we first saw Improbable in Newport I think...I said something like "Dad, there's that famous cool boat, that one would be great!" He said "What in the hell would we do with a racing machine like that"...or words to that effect.

 

Well...a while later we were holed up in San Luis Obisbo, waiting for a break in the NW tradewinds. We had tried unsuccessfully to make headway north against the notorious prevailing coastal wind and waves along with several other cruisers who were hanging out there, waiting. Well, in came this HOT looking bright red machine that got my attention (how could it not?), so I waved them over to raft alongside without even asking Dad if it was ok.

 

Turned out to be Improbable. Kim Desenberg (one of many great Norcal sailors who raced on the boat in it's heyday) and crew were taking the boat up the coast to SF. I asked "Wow, it's horrible out there, are you going to hang out here until it gets better?" to which Kim replied, "no, we have a schedule to keep, we're off in the morning!". After he was out of earshot, my dad said "They'll be back, no one can go upwind in that shit out there, especially in that lightweight racing toy...".

 

Well, off they went the next morning, never to return. When we finally made it up the coast ourselves, we went to visit Dave Allen and my dad wound up buying the boat. We were living on the 38' cutter, and moved all of our junk onto the docks at the San Francisco YC and onto our new home. We had fun skate boarding all over the hills in Tiburon...;-)

 

Sailing up the coast to Seattle, it was a whole new world to be on a boat where actually had to SLOW DOWN just to keep from freaking out as the boat flew upwind launching over the 12-15' coastal swells. We did some local racing as family in Puget Sound with mixed results (the Buchan Family were superior racers....), but I was hooked. Great boat. My dad still has it, up in Birch Bay near Blaine, Washington.

 

Haji

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Improbable was mentioned in Steve Henkel's article,but I was going to add a few notes about that amazing boat and a picture or two,but haven't found any decent pics yet.Do you have any you can send for this post Bruce?

 

Young Ron Holland saved rent as a house guest of Gary Mull while serving as draftsman on Improbable.

 

Improbable set the corrected time record for the Pineapple Cup in 1972,I believe Improbable still holds the record of 2 days and 22 hours.

 

Improbable served notice to the sailing world in the '71 Admirals Cup.In the second inshore race Improbable(the sole New Zealand entry) really attracted a lot of attention surfing up the Solent at incredible speeds to take sixth place on corrected. This also served notice that the New Zealanders were some pretty damn good sailors,but it also helped having a fast boat like Improbable.

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Improbable was mentioned in Steve Henkel's article,but I was going to add a few notes about that amazing boat and a picture or two,but haven't found any decent pics yet.Do you have any you can send for this post Bruce?

 

Young Ron Holland saved rent as a house guest of Gary Mull while serving as draftsman on Improbable.

 

Improbable set the corrected time record for the Pineapple Cup in 1972,I believe Improbable still holds the record of 2 days and 22 hours.

 

Improbable served notice to the sailing world in the '71 Admirals Cup.In the second inshore race Improbable(the sole New Zealand entry) really attracted a lot of attention surfing up the Solent at incredible speeds to take sixth place on corrected. This also served notice that the New Zealanders were some pretty damn good sailors,but it also helped having a fast boat like Improbable.

 

Will look around for pics...but that was before the "digital" age!

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Yes,that's exactly what I was looking for an old picture.Perhaps your dad can send one if at all possible.Hope all is going well with you and OP.Take care.

 

Boomer

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Boomer,

 

This shot of Cowes Week 71 enlightened a very cold college winter in a grey city.

It was the Yachting World october 71 cover, photograph by Gordon Yeldham.

If I remember well Commodore Tompkins was in the crew.

 

Haji, very good to hear that this all-time favorite has a knowledgeable and caring owner :)

post-6361-1145290030_thumb.jpg

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2 wood 6 metre beauties with characteristic Mull transoms.

 

post-6597-1145292737_thumb.jpgpost-6597-1145292876_thumb.jpgCourage VI

 

post-6597-1145292481_thumb.jpgValentina

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There was also an article penned by Gary that appeared in Latitude 38 many years ago. In the article Gary explained all about how Alcatraz was a floating island and was anchored in the bay by the Spanish. The article was complete with pictures of Alcatraz leaving "wakes" on the flood and ebb tides. Even detailed the anchor system. Funny as hell.

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Either I missed it, or no one has yet mentioned Mull's landmark 42' "Improbable". Cold-molded in NZ in 1970 (I believe) for Belvedere's Dave Allen, the boat had a quite a career willing the 1971 Miami-Montego Bay race, racing SORC, Admiral's Cup, Sydney-Hobart, etc. Lousy IOR rating but the boat could get going downwind which was rare in those days.

 

Haji

 

Nice article about her in Good Old Boat magazine in the fall of '03 I believe, with lots of good pics.

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Either I missed it, or no one has yet mentioned Mull's landmark 42' "Improbable". Cold-molded in NZ in 1970 (I believe) for Belvedere's Dave Allen, the boat had a quite a career willing the 1971 Miami-Montego Bay race, racing SORC, Admiral's Cup, Sydney-Hobart, etc. Lousy IOR rating but the boat could get going downwind which was rare in those days.

 

Haji

 

Nice article about her in Good Old Boat magazine in the fall of '03 I believe, with lots of good pics.

 

My dad was supposed to get me a copy of that! I know, I know, the lazy cheapskate son should have bought a copy himself....;-)

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Santana 39

Santana 27!

(phrf 196...)

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Hey boomer.. Thanks for the photos..nice to see there are other Ranger fans still around.

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First leadmine and sailboat racing I ever did was on the custom Mull 54 "Dolphin", ex "Namus".

post-2465-1145322469.jpg

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Hey boomer.. Thanks for the photos..nice to see there are other Ranger fans still around.

 

With a Ranger 23 & 28 yes I'm kinda hooked on Rangers.Always liked Gary's designs,he was always a bit on the cutting edge.If he was still around I'm sure he'd be into the lighter and flatter go fast sleds,some of his protege's struck out on their own following the fast is fun crowd,Gary would have had to eventually follow suit.

 

Pic of my Ranger 28

post-4773-1145332067_thumb.jpg

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Boomer,

 

This shot of Cowes Week 71 enlightened a very cold college winter in a grey city.

It was the Yachting World october 71 cover, photograph by Gordon Yeldham.

If I remember well Commodore Tompkins was in the crew.

 

Haji, very good to hear that this all-time favorite has a knowledgeable and caring owner :)

 

Thanks for the cover from Yachting World and Improbable!

 

'71 was the year of the boys from down under setting new standards for pushing a boat in world class ocean racing.The Aussies were showing there worth in rough going just like the lone New Zealand boat.

 

The Aussies would have won the Admirals Cup if Koomooloo hadn't lost their rudder forcing their retirement,if Koomooloo had placed 12th or better Australia would have won.Syd Fischer and crew had a smoking race flying home in 40 knots of wind under spinnaker until they gybe broached.Ragmuffin was pinned for quite a while until a crew member cut the preventer on the boom,finally up she come but she shredded the spinnaker.The crew hoisted the genoa and off she took wing and wing,until the crew could hoist a bullet proof storm spinnaker which could take the punishment.Ragmuffin just took off once everything was settled down,surfing at 14 knots and even doubling some waves surfing down the front of one wave and up the back of the next wave. It was a little crazy to continue on under spinnaker when all the other boats were under poled out genoas,but it made the difference and Ragmuffin and crew won by about two and a half hours.

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Hey guys, thanks for all the comments...!!!

 

I Spain Gary Mull is only know by only a small group of people. I learn a lot with these post!

 

Do you have more comments...????

 

;)

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Boomer,

 

This shot of Cowes Week 71 enlightened a very cold college winter in a grey city.

It was the Yachting World october 71 cover, photograph by Gordon Yeldham.

If I remember well Commodore Tompkins was in the crew.

 

Haji, very good to hear that this all-time favorite has a knowledgeable and caring owner :)

 

Thanks for the cover from Yachting World and Improbable!

 

'71 was the year of the boys from down under setting new standards for pushing a boat in world class ocean racing.The Aussies were showing there worth in rough going just like the lone New Zealand boat.

 

The Aussies would have won the Admirals Cup if Koomooloo hadn't lost their rudder forcing their retirement,if Koomooloo had placed 12th or better Australia would have won.Syd Fischer and crew had a smoking race flying home in 40 knots of wind under spinnaker until they gybe broached.Ragmuffin was pinned for quite a while until a crew member cut the preventer on the boom,finally up she come but she shredded the spinnaker.The crew hoisted the genoa and off she took wing and wing,until the crew could hoist a bullet proof storm spinnaker which could take the punishment.Ragmuffin just took off once everything was settled down,surfing at 14 knots and even doubling some waves surfing down the front of one wave and up the back of the next wave. It was a little crazy to continue on under spinnaker when all the other boats were under poled out genoas,but it made the difference and Ragmuffin and crew won by about two and a half hours.

 

That's why that summer of 71 left scars all through the winter with us (then) youngsters

Pushing hard was getting the owners' old boys out of the cockpit and boat , while these winning aussies and kiwis had hairs the same length as ours. ......... anarchy was on its way !

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The Humbolt 30 is another nifty Mull design. Do a Forum search for Mull and/or Humbolt and you'll find more than one discussion about the boat, the designer and Alan H's ideas about resurrecting the Humbolt 30 molds, which are stored somewhere up the NorCal coast...

 

BTW, great story Haji. When are you going to write the book about the first half of your life?

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My first boat was a Mull 1/4 tonner, from ~1976. Bought it for cheap and slowly cleaned it up while sailing the hell out of it. It had the classic IOR shape - big wide beam, really narrow pinched stern. It would go upwind like nobody's business, but off the wind it was squirrelly and no match for a J24. A lot of great memories of sailing and drinking beer on that boat.

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There was also an article penned by Gary that appeared in Latitude 38 many years ago. In the article Gary explained all about how Alcatraz was a floating island and was anchored in the bay by the Spanish. The article was complete with pictures of Alcatraz leaving "wakes" on the flood and ebb tides. Even detailed the anchor system. Funny as hell.

 

I was going to mention that peice - a pre SA bit of Anarchy. Written as an April Fools bit and completely brilliant. Re Published some years later in Bay & Delta Yachtsman and still had people going. I had a well known and established broker and respected yacht guy in his own right came into our shared office to ask me if I'd seen the article and did I know that Alcatraz was in fact a floating island! I had to explain to him the source and concept of this finely crafted and superbly executed complete pile of bullshit. After all he was about to go to the Yacht club for lunch with the boys armed with this newly aquired bit of important information to share. As funny as it may have been I just couldn't let it happen - had too much respect for the guy.

 

But nicely done Mr. Mull....re-published a couple of years after the death and still good enought to be the gift that kept on giving!!!!

 

If Gary was still with us today I am certain you would find his posts sprinkled amonst the rantings of us lesser lights. He had a great & ribald sense of Humour and I'm certain SA would have appealed to him.

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Haji,I 'm glad you brought up Improbable again.Years ago you may remember there was a list of all time favourites.One of mine, as you may remember was sailing that boat out here in Aus with Skip Allen.

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th_38935_Untitled_1.jpg

 

New Zealand fielded IMPROBABLE Admirals Cup '71

Built by T.K Attkinson in wood, with her main feature a large rudder hung of her transom. Owned by American D.Allen, she just squeezed into the contest by virtue of her having two thirds New Zealand crew.

Ron Holland;W.Tomkins;Skid Allan;David Wahle;JimGannon.

 

I had the offer of doing the Hobart to New Zealand race but knocked it back due to other committments.

Having raced against her she was a quick boat.

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Humbolt 30

 

More on the H30...Here's a pic and specs for one that was acquired by an Anarchist in the PNW. The asking price was between $15k-$20k.

post-200-1145541915_thumb.jpg

post-200-1145541945_thumb.jpg

post-200-1145541971_thumb.jpg

post-200-1145541985_thumb.jpg

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Alcatraz a floating island

 

Great find Boomer, I still have one of the original hard copies lurking in my files - even re-reading it today it's still bloody brilliant!!!

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Yes,it is! Gary's typical wit at it's finest.

 

BTW like your broker friend,I took it all in hook,line and sinker.It wasn't til a few weeks later that I found out it was a joke.Luckily I didn't go around declaring Alcatraz was a floating island other then making a comment about it to my wife,her somewhat sceptical reply was "is that so".

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Gary Mull had more then a few of his six-meter designs in the 1979 Worlds placing in the top five out of 25 boats.Pelle Petersson's Irene won that year and the late Tom Blackaller placed second in the Gary Mull designed St. Francis VII.Gary Philbrick was fourth in the Mull designed St. Francis V (St. Francis V won the worlds in '73 with Tom Blackaller).Ranger was fifth with Ted Turner and Gary Mull.Not a bad showing for Mull designs against the best six and twelve meter designers of that period.BTW Doug Peterson designed a six meter for Hank Thayer for the '79 Worlds,but I believe they were below mid-fleet in the final standings.

 

Two weeks prior to the worlds in '79 Commodore Thompkins won the '79 North Americans in St. Francis VII,also never loosing a race in the defender series,Ranger was second.

 

 

Ranger won the US Nationals in '81 with Andy Rose driving.

 

It should be noted that six-meter racing is a combination of good crew work,good design and sails.It used to bust the pants off of Olin Stephens when one of his older 30 year old designs would beat his latest state of the art six meter or twelve meter creations.Buzzy III comes to mind as a 1937 design that was always a winner out of Maple Bay,British Columbia (Maple Bay used to be the hotbed of six-meters,along with Seattle in the 60's.)The 1938 S&S designed Goose was another six-meter that did well for many years,was third or fourth in the 73 Worlds.The Goose had qualities that influanced Gary Mull in his initial six-meter work,no doubt inspired by his stay in Olin Stephens office.

 

It also helped having a good start and an agressive skipper,Tom Blackaller of St. Francis and Sunny Vynne in the 60's in Seattle come to mind.

 

 

I actually sailed on Buzzy III, but after the 1979 worlds. The owner at the time (Kirk Palmer) was a gifted sailor, but even that could not overtake the time difference between Buzzy and the newer sixes at the 1979 Worlds in Seattle. Nevertheless, I seem to recall Kirk telling me that Buzzy III was built in the 50's, not in 1937 as you indicate, although I may be wrong. Also, I'm not so certain about Maple Bay being a hotbed of six meters. While I know that the Maple Bay regatta drew quite a few local sixes, I think they were mostly from Victoria (Saga, Alarm to name a few). Victoria used to have a fairly large six meter fleet, even up to the eary 80's. But I understand that this was killed off by the introduction of Arunga, a more modern Pelle Petterson design, which would annihilate the entire fleet of older sixes.

 

A little off topic but there is a great article on classic sixes in the April edition of Pacific Yachting and the restoration Eric Jesperson and other have done on some legendary sixes. Well worth a read and good to see this rag thinking out of the box a little more these days rather than the "cruising your Bayliner to Bowen Is." drivel they used to beat to death.

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carrot

 

Yep, that's the old "Reprisal"/"Gonnagitya"

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Isn't Carrot one of Ted Turners old boats?

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Posted (edited)

My Gary Mull Story,

 

About 3 weeks after I got out of the army (84) I get invited to do a race on a express 37 with my dad on one of his friends boat. I get to the boat and my dad is standing on the boat talking to Gary (they sailed together a lot as kids) my dad introduces me to him and he immediately dose a double take looking at me then my dad (You cant tell the difference in us if you look at pictures at the same age) and then asks me how old I was and I say 22 he instantly comes back with I’ve been laid more than you. I spend the whole day thinking here is this famous designer and he comes up with that. He told me at the end of the day that when he saw me he flashed back to when he was 22. Great man and yacht designer and yes I own a R23 4knt shit box.

 

 

Thanks for bringing a memory of a great day with my pop!!

Edited by War Dog

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Some IOR sterns

 

Does anyone know anything about that red half tonner? It has been for sale forever in boatshed.portsmouth.com. Seems like a decent buy, but why it's not selling?

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Gary was one of the best men I have known. He saved my ass on a few occasions.

To go pub crawling with him was always exciting. They refused to serve us in a Nap dive one night and Gary and I had to get drunk Marines to buy our drinks for us. He was absolutely the best design reviewer ever. The guy could write.

We'd be far better off if he was still around.

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... boatshed.portsmouth.com. ...

 

Of course you intend to refer to portsmouth.boatshed.com (and no, I don't know anything about that boat)

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There's a lot of his designs here in Enzed.

His Mull 40 and 42 boats still get very good money and are highly regarded as cruisers now.

 

237_3778_2.jpg

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I'm sure someone in Oz will correct me if I'm wrong, but I think he also designed the Sonata 26 / 8m trailerable yacht that had quite a reasonable production run here in Australia. Stern is very IORish looking at some of the pictures here from that era

 

Two Heads

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I might have the wrong guy..but i'm pretty sure it was Mull who explained the 12 Metre rule as: "A boat that costs a stack of hundred dollar bills 12 meters tall."

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One of my favorite designers because of his 6mR's, I have always liked his stuff. I crewed on a Ranger 23 when I was young and we won this 300 boat race, overall, two years in a row. In a Ranger 23. We also had a couple of 1/2 and 3/4 ton Mull desings around here that were sailed hard and often did quite well under PHRF. Torture machines. If you weren't bloopin' you were rocking so hard that you'd throw everyone off the boat. Little bit grinder cockpits and big ol' in the way houses.

 

We lost an important figure in American sailing when he passed.

 

RD

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I am looking to find a 22 ft boat that Gary designed in multichine ply for a builder in washington state and

possibly a source for plans. Had a name like "commencement 22 " designed during the late 1980s

A boat I always liked was a boat called Horse a 30ft morc boat designed just before the pocket rocket in the late

70s.

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Boomer,

 

This shot of Cowes Week 71 enlightened a very cold college winter in a grey city.

It was the Yachting World october 71 cover, photograph by Gordon Yeldham.

If I remember well Commodore Tompkins was in the crew.

 

Haji, very good to hear that this all-time favorite has a knowledgeable and caring owner :)

 

Commodore Tompkins was in the crew, was (essentially) the sailing master. Improbable has to lose the gorgeous outboard rudder to make rating. I was to sail on her in the '71 SORC, but she got to St. Pete very late and I'd already made a commitment to sail with someone else. Have always regretted that. :-(

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 09:56 AM

 

I'm sure someone in Oz will correct me if I'm wrong, but I think he also designed the Sonata 26 / 8m trailerable yacht that had quite a reasonable production run here in Australia. Stern is very IORish looking at some of the pictures here from that era

 

+1

 

2 versions

 

trailable / fixed keel ... internal ballast helped to stiffen the area around / fore / aft of the keel

 

was it a cast - off quarter ton design ???

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Origanally based on the Gary Mull Manatee,this is the Orion 50

 

Boomer hoping you can help me ? I own a Gary Mull Orion 50 . According to sail boat data 9 were built by Tah Shing. My one called Inca is a later one around 1986. Inca I believe is the only one " restored back to the naval architects original plan " apparently Orion just cut 8ft off the stern in the design making the stern like a barn door ! Really reinforcing the ugly Mull stern theory, but he is apparently not responsible for the Orion stern . Anyway I have owned the boat for about 3 years ago having purchased Inca ( formally Chumaco) in PV Mexico . I am trying to find out more about your comment " based on the Mull Manatee" I have been trying to find out what original Mull design the Orion 50 is based on , and you Boomer seem to know !? I will be happy to show you photos of Inca , currently in Fiji. She is a 58ft ketch with a long counter stern similar to many S&S. A pretty boat with a lovely hull shape and a great turn of speed . Many people ask if she is a Swan or S&S . I have looked pretty hard all over and your thread is the best lead yet . I did find some Mull 58 footers but not like mine they were more racer versions . The Orion 50 with the counter stern so 58 looks like an older design ? Maybe when Mull worked at S&S ? Thanks in advance Boomer !

 

Ps I am Australian , living in Sydney .

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I'm sure someone in Oz will correct me if I'm wrong, but I think he also designed the Sonata 26 / 8m trailerable yacht that had quite a reasonable production run here in Australia. Stern is very IORish looking at some of the pictures here from that era

 

Two Heads

There was the Sonata 8 and a little latter the 6.7

Both JOG killers in the early 1980s before David Lyons came along.

Heyday of JOG racing is Australia.

The Nationals had a 130 mile ocean race there for a while as the long race and huge fleets from about 1976 through to 1982

The 8s as a keelers had a steel fin and internal ballast.

The keelers were lighter than the lift keelers

Real quick uphill in big waves.

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Some IOR sterns

boat on the right was built up the Pasig River in Manila, Philippines. started life as Sun Set Strip.

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I've owned a Mull Freedom 45 CC for 7 years. One of the best cruising boats I've been on. Takes a little bit of breeze to get her going, but in 15 true we reach at 8 or 9 knots. Good boat with few compromises.

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i owned a ranger\mull half tonner with sail number 129.I bought it in 1983. The rig was taller than the normal ranger 28 and also had much deeper fin.

my morc sheet had it at a displacement of 5600 with keel weight of 2800 pounds...a good 50-50 ballast ratio. the boat was extremely fast in light air and very fast in heavy air.

 

we were doing a major upper gulf of mexico regatta (1986) out of gulfport ms. just after our our ten minute gun we smacked a submerged object hard enough to open a crack betwen the keel bolts. water started seepin in so we headed straight to the boat yard and got picked up. found out the hull was weak around the keel and you could actually swing the keel back and forth.

 

the yard guy proposed a fix nbut i didn't like it so i took a major flyer and called Mull at his office. Surprisingly he took my call. i told him what the issue was. he said he'd send me the scantlings for a proper repair. he also told me that the 28 was his favorite boat and he owned one he could look out his window and see. he told me the boat i had was one of a few he built to be light with a 50-50 ballast to weight and a deeper keel with a taller rig. he said all the boats built in this configuration had the floppy keel problem. and all of this while he was working on his '87 ac 12 metre program.

 

i got the info from him a week later and made sure the yard guys followed his instructions to the letter. I sailed this boat for years and picked up more silver with it than any other boat I had.

 

the 28, 32, and 37 are some of the prettiest boats i've seen. i love the tumblehome and the spring in the shearline...

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i owned a ranger\mull half tonner with sail number 129.I bought it in 1983. The rig was taller than the normal ranger 28 and also had much deeper fin.

my morc sheet had it at a displacement of 5600 with keel weight of 2800 pounds...a good 50-50 ballast ratio. the boat was extremely fast in light air and very fast in heavy air.

 

we were doing a major upper gulf of mexico regatta (1986) out of gulfport ms. just after our our ten minute gun we smacked a submerged object hard enough to open a crack betwen the keel bolts. water started seepin in so we headed straight to the boat yard and got picked up. found out the hull was weak around the keel and you could actually swing the keel back and forth.

 

the yard guy proposed a fix nbut i didn't like it so i took a major flyer and called Mull at his office. Surprisingly he took my call. i told him what the issue was. he said he'd send me the scantlings for a proper repair. he also told me that the 28 was his favorite boat and he owned one he could look out his window and see. he told me the boat i had was one of a few he built to be light with a 50-50 ballast to weight and a deeper keel with a taller rig. he said all the boats built in this configuration had the floppy keel problem. and all of this while he was working on his '87 ac 12 metre program.

 

i got the info from him a week later and made sure the yard guys followed his instructions to the letter. I sailed this boat for years and picked up more silver with it than any other boat I had.

 

the 28, 32, and 37 are some of the prettiest boats i've seen. i love the tumblehome and the spring in the shearline...

pix?

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