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      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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question_sailing

Gary W Mull

175 posts in this topic

 

i owned a ranger\mull half tonner with sail number 129.I bought it in 1983. The rig was taller than the normal ranger 28 and also had much deeper fin.

my morc sheet had it at a displacement of 5600 with keel weight of 2800 pounds...a good 50-50 ballast ratio. the boat was extremely fast in light air and very fast in heavy air.

 

we were doing a major upper gulf of mexico regatta (1986) out of gulfport ms. just after our our ten minute gun we smacked a submerged object hard enough to open a crack betwen the keel bolts. water started seepin in so we headed straight to the boat yard and got picked up. found out the hull was weak around the keel and you could actually swing the keel back and forth.

 

the yard guy proposed a fix nbut i didn't like it so i took a major flyer and called Mull at his office. Surprisingly he took my call. i told him what the issue was. he said he'd send me the scantlings for a proper repair. he also told me that the 28 was his favorite boat and he owned one he could look out his window and see. he told me the boat i had was one of a few he built to be light with a 50-50 ballast to weight and a deeper keel with a taller rig. he said all the boats built in this configuration had the floppy keel problem. and all of this while he was working on his '87 ac 12 metre program.

 

i got the info from him a week later and made sure the yard guys followed his instructions to the letter. I sailed this boat for years and picked up more silver with it than any other boat I had.

 

the 28, 32, and 37 are some of the prettiest boats i've seen. i love the tumblehome and the spring in the shearline...

pix?

I have a few that are framed...i'd have to scan them. The negatives and slides were lost in katrina.

it was fire engine red. It also had a hall 60\40 mast and a hall boom with internal out haul and reefing lines.

it got trashed in 91 during the farehope to pensacola race. lower shroud pulled out of the swedge which was all new rigging.

weather was bad with wind in the 25kt range and big, square waves. the spreaders almost beat a hole in the hull before we could cut it all away.

insurance totaled the boat so i bought a j-30 (swmbo wanted one). i'm glad i did but i miss the ranger.

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Gary Mull was very approachable. I was shocked when he died so young. I'd had lunch with him a few months earlier and he hadn't said a thing about being sick. He focused on living and on design. In those last years, his main business focus was engineering fiberglass laminates to work properly. He had a number of production boatbuilders as clients--he told me some of their laminate schedules were just all wrong and they needed help. He had that perfect combination of theoretical understanding combined with tremendous practical experience.

Don't quote me but in his later years had a big battle with the sauce that ended badly. I have this 3rd hand from a mutual friend. A lot of artistic/geniuses do.

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Origanally based on the Gary Mull Manatee,this is the Orion 50

 

Boomer hoping you can help me ? I own a Gary Mull Orion 50 . According to sail boat data 9 were built by Tah Shing. My one called Inca is a later one around 1986. Inca I believe is the only one " restored back to the naval architects original plan " apparently Orion just cut 8ft off the stern in the design making the stern like a barn door ! Really reinforcing the ugly Mull stern theory, but he is apparently not responsible for the Orion stern . Anyway I have owned the boat for about 3 years ago having purchased Inca ( formally Chumaco) in PV Mexico . I am trying to find out more about your comment " based on the Mull Manatee" I have been trying to find out what original Mull design the Orion 50 is based on , and you Boomer seem to know !? I will be happy to show you photos of Inca , currently in Fiji. She is a 58ft ketch with a long counter stern similar to many S&S. A pretty boat with a lovely hull shape and a great turn of speed . Many people ask if she is a Swan or S&S . I have looked pretty hard all over and your thread is the best lead yet . I did find some Mull 58 footers but not like mine they were more racer versions . The Orion 50 with the counter stern so 58 looks like an older design ? Maybe when Mull worked at S&S ? Thanks in advance Boomer !

 

Ps I am Australian , living in Sydney .

Gary Mull did work for S&S for a couple of years. There is a chapter on the Manatee, in Arther Beiser's 2nd edition of "The Proper Yacht". The Manatee has a fin keel and separate skeg and rudder, quite similar to the Orion 50. I don't have my copy of "The Proper Yacht" handy, or it's not in my nautical library downstairs, probably tucked away in the third floor or attic with a lot of old nautical books. IIRC the Manatee was 54' overall, and very similar in profile to the Orion 50. She was also quite wide in the stern like the Orion 50. I'll dig around and see if I can find the book and photocopy the chapter on Manatee. May take a while because we have countless boxes of books in the upstairs and in the attic.

 

http://www.amazon.com/The-proper-yacht-Arthur-Beiser/dp/0877420963

 

http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=2755

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I sailed on a Mull 34 at Wisconsin. I think it's always been called "Soma" and used to be out of Chicago. It's more popularly known in Wisconsin as "the cow boat."

 

DSC03829.preview.jpg

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Origanally based on the Gary Mull Manatee,this is the Orion 50

 

Boomer hoping you can help me ? I own a Gary Mull Orion 50 . According to sail boat data 9 were built by Tah Shing. My one called Inca is a later one around 1986. Inca I believe is the only one " restored back to the naval architects original plan " apparently Orion just cut 8ft off the stern in the design making the stern like a barn door ! Really reinforcing the ugly Mull stern theory, but he is apparently not responsible for the Orion stern . Anyway I have owned the boat for about 3 years ago having purchased Inca ( formally Chumaco) in PV Mexico . I am trying to find out more about your comment " based on the Mull Manatee" I have been trying to find out what original Mull design the Orion 50 is based on , and you Boomer seem to know !? I will be happy to show you photos of Inca , currently in Fiji. She is a 58ft ketch with a long counter stern similar to many S&S. A pretty boat with a lovely hull shape and a great turn of speed . Many people ask if she is a Swan or S&S . I have looked pretty hard all over and your thread is the best lead yet . I did find some Mull 58 footers but not like mine they were more racer versions . The Orion 50 with the counter stern so 58 looks like an older design ? Maybe when Mull worked at S&S ? Thanks in advance Boomer !

 

Ps I am Australian , living in Sydney .

Gary Mull did work for S&S for a couple of years. There is a chapter on the Manatee, in Arther Beiser's 2nd edition of "The Proper Yacht". The Manatee has a fin keel and separate skeg and rudder, quite similar to the Orion 50. I don't have my copy of "The Proper Yacht" handy, or it's not in my nautical library downstairs, probably tucked away in the third floor or attic with a lot of old nautical books. IIRC the Manatee was 54' overall, and very similar in profile to the Orion 50. She was also quite wide in the stern like the Orion 50. I'll dig around and see if I can find the book and photocopy the chapter on Manatee. May take a while because we have countless boxes of books in the upstairs and in the attic.

 

http://www.amazon.com/The-proper-yacht-Arthur-Beiser/dp/0877420963

 

http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=2755

 

Actually the Orion is similar to the Manatee - it (Manatee) came first.

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I sailed on a Mull 34 at Wisconsin. I think it's always been called "Soma" and used to be out of Chicago. It's more popularly known in Wisconsin as "the cow boat."

 

DSC03829.preview.jpg

 

Is that a "Swampfire" copy? I loved those extreme stinger sterns Mull did - they may torture the water but they sure LOOK racy. :)

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By the way, think you've got enough crew there Butch?

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Dolphin got a second in PHRF class B in the BYC-Mac race this year. Not bad for a 40 year old boat.

First leadmine and sailboat racing I ever did was on the custom Mull 54 "Dolphin", ex "Namus".

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Here's one:

 

Gorgeous - got any more info on it?

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I sailed on a Mull 34 at Wisconsin. I think it's always been called "Soma" and used to be out of Chicago. It's more popularly known in Wisconsin as "the cow boat."

 

DSC03829.preview.jpg

 

Is that a "Swampfire" copy? I loved those extreme stinger sterns Mull did - they may torture the water but they sure LOOK racy. :)

If it's a Swampfire copy then I helped build a '76'77 version of that 3/4 tonner. But it doesn't seem to have enough tumblehome - hmmm. And sailing the boat with a fender out has zero class. A little respect please!

 

Gary was famous for overall short waterlines for IOR uses and "walk down" transoms.

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I sailed on a Mull 34 at Wisconsin. I think it's always been called "Soma" and used to be out of Chicago. It's more popularly known in Wisconsin as "the cow boat."

 

DSC03829.preview.jpg

 

Is that a "Swampfire" copy? I loved those extreme stinger sterns Mull did - they may torture the water but they sure LOOK racy. :)

If it's a Swampfire copy then I helped build a '76'77 version of that 3/4 tonner. But it doesn't seem to have enough tumblehome - hmmm. And sailing the boat with a fender out has zero class. A little respect please!

 

Gary was famous for overall short waterlines for IOR uses and "walk down" transoms.

 

Ha that is the sailing club's Pirate Day. Class goes out the door in favor of rum, rum, and some pants-free sailing. That also explains why the boat looks like a bunch of Haitian refugees.

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In 72 when I got off the return plane at Norton from a flight tour in country, a friend picked me up and we drove to San Diego where I put a deposit on a Ranger 23 . Then went and slept for 14 hours. Have since owned a 26 a 28 and of course a bunch of other boats. What is puzzling me about this thread is no mention of La Forza, which always put me in a state of awe.

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My favorite Mull design was the custom MORC 30 he built called "Horse" that the Bostons raced on the west end of Lake Erie. Flush deck, wide transom and transom hung rudder. Very cool design...

 

Another was the Mull 3/4 tonner "Vanpire" that won the 3/4 ton Worlds in the 1970s. Had crew cockpits on either side of the dog house... Nice.

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My favorite Mull design was the custom MORC 30 he built called "Horse" that the Bostons raced on the west end of Lake Erie. Flush deck, wide transom and transom hung rudder. Very cool design...

 

Another was the Mull 3/4 tonner "Vanpire" that won the 3/4 ton Worlds in the 1970s. Had crew cockpits on either side of the dog house... Nice.

 

Wasn't that "Swampfire"? I loved Mull's IOR boats with those extreme sterns - Swampfire, Hot Flash (1/2 Ton by Gougeons), Gonnagitcha (Two Ton by Nawlin's Marine). The side crew pits were not a good idea IMO.

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In 72 when I got off the return plane at Norton from a flight tour in country, a friend picked me up and we drove to San Diego where I put a deposit on a Ranger 23 . Then went and slept for 14 hours. Have since owned a 26 a 28 and of course a bunch of other boats. What is puzzling me about this thread is no mention of La Forza, which always put me in a state of awe.

I agree, Hostage, LaForza was something else. Larry from the famous Larry thread did post this shot a few years ago. It is the reincarnation of the the original Mull 52. She was more impressive in black though.

 

post-33230-0-25198600-1379010721_thumb.jpg

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My favorite Mull design was the custom MORC 30 he built called "Horse" that the Bostons raced on the west end of Lake Erie. Flush deck, wide transom and transom hung rudder. Very cool design...

 

Another was the Mull 3/4 tonner "Vanpire" that won the 3/4 ton Worlds in the 1970s. Had crew cockpits on either side of the dog house... Nice.

 

Wasn't that "Swampfire"? I loved Mull's IOR boats with those extreme sterns - Swampfire, Hot Flash (1/2 Ton by Gougeons), Gonnagitcha (Two Ton by Nawlin's Marine). The side crew pits were not a good idea IMO.

Vanpire came along 1 year later winning the 3/4 ton cup (world's). Very, very similar boats in design but later ones lost some of their tumblehome.

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Maxx, whatever did happen to "Clockwork Rocketship?"

"Rockwork Croc-a-shit"? Dunno really except I sailed on it for a few times, after the fact, when a friend bought and sailed it out of Tsawwassen Yacht Club. He's a PHRF measurer and on to a J35. Where it actually landed is anybodies guess. Maybe the First Nation brothers dragged it up onto the beach and made it into a smokehouse or sweat lodge.

 

I see him once and awhile I'll ask him. He might be lurking around here anyway.

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FastYacht, Horse was a bit newer; probably around the time the Kirby 30 was introduced or just after. I believe I saw Pretty Penny on yachtworld.com a few months back. Another Mull 30, The Shadow is on now for $75k. A bit crazy if ya ask me.

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It would be unfortunate if Gary's serviced to Rule & Measurement Committees were not acknowledged. Lots of time and money were given back to his beloved activity.

 

Karl

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I love my Ranger 33. We have had it for almost 10 years. Here she is in cruising mode. Boat has never touched salt water.

post-4411-0-28450000-1379033373_thumb.jpg

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We love ours too, even after 26 years...Nice weekender, sails well for a dinasaure, and still looks nice. The 33 can also be very aggravating to the competition around the bouys. I was in touch with Bob Grey years back who very successfully sailed his 33 in the trans pack. Not something I would do, but the boat's capable.

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I am trying to track down information on the Kalik 44, Her hull was built by Hyundai Heavy Industries in Uslan, Korea, and her interior built by Jachtwerf Vennekens, Belgium in 1981.

 

It seems to be a well-out fitted blue water cruiser. I am concerned about the build quality.

Any experience with these boats you could share is appreciated.

 

She was designed by Gary Mull.

~~~Alan Bates

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I had the opportunity to helm Sorcery in wind speeds of high 20's run back to San Diego. It was one of those experiences that I'll never forget. That six feet of freeboard was 12". We were making 18 knots of boat speed with Robin Sodaro on one wheel and I on the other. The loads that boat generated were incredible. Big hole in the water.

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Ya, me too.

 

But wasn't there a Kalik dealer in Seattle at one point? The brand might have cratered - it was 1981 after all.

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Ya, me too.

 

But wasn't there a Kalik dealer in Seattle at one point? The brand might have cratered - it was 1981 after all.

FWIW,

 

 

AFAIK the Kalik brand was started by Belgian businessman Mr Moorkens.

 

On one side he had developed his pre-war bikes and cars business into a very large european importer of Far East cars.

On the other side he was an avid yachtsman racing a succession of Class I yachts in parallel to a significant series of one-tonners.

 

There was therefore no surprise when in '76 or '77 he introduced the Kalik brand, originally on J. De Ridder designs,then Gary Mull, drawing on his existing extensive partnership with Hyundai and on their GRP capacity.

The boats looked sturdy but I have only seen them from outside.

 

A deep turn in Kalik's fate came in '79 when Mr Moorkens abruptly died at the helm of his S&S 45', in a breezy race of Cowes week.

 

In the following years I felt, although I have no détails, that his sons -busy developing the group into what is today one of the largest Belgian businesses- distanced themselves from the yachting industry.

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There was at least one Kalik in Seattle. I think it ended up with one of those whacky winged keels that the Finnish guy, Reijo Salminen (sp) invented.. I remember talking to Gary about visiting Korea. He said the conditions at the yard were grim.

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Thanks Moody. Looks like a typical thread: "A good business that got into boat building until their money is gone!" I believe Hyundai tried that in power yachts too. Couldn't get any traction. Too many "far east" builder around. In NA the place lousy with them at that time. Now only a few good ones survived.

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I commissioned a bunch of those Kalik's for the dealer here in Seattle on Lake Union back in the 70's to early 80's. IIRC they were trying to be a poor man's Swan. Teak decks and all. They didn't seem to be badly built, but never sailed one or saw one a few years later.

 

Oh, and loved those crew cockpits on the Mull 3/4T! Ours was aluminum, the guys on deck sure made a lot of noise when trying to sleep during our overnight races below. Especially for an owner.....

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Clockwork Rocketship is owned by Blair ( Bozo) a long time crew member of Als's......that boat is up the river or in his yard - forever being worked on.

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I am looking to find a 22 ft boat that Gary designed in multichine ply for a builder in washington state and

possibly a source for plans. Had a name like "commencement 22 " designed during the late 1980s

A boat I always liked was a boat called Horse a 30ft morc boat designed just before the pocket rocket in the late

70s.

I know this is digging way back into this thread, but I think one of the Commencement Bay 22s is still down at Tacoma Yacht Club, named The Grin. Cool little boat.

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I am looking to find a 22 ft boat that Gary designed in multichine ply for a builder in washington state and

possibly a source for plans. Had a name like "commencement 22 " designed during the late 1980s

A boat I always liked was a boat called Horse a 30ft morc boat designed just before the pocket rocket in the late

70s.

I know this is digging way back into this thread, but I think one of the Commencement Bay 22s is still down at Tacoma Yacht Club, named The Grin. Cool little boat.

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Here's the SeaHorse report on the 3/4 Ton Cup Swampfire won.

post-52142-0-62715300-1392886607_thumb.jpg

post-52142-0-27859800-1392886643_thumb.jpg

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Stopped one day at a lake/reservoir in Pennsylvania on the way to Annapolis for some regatta or other.

Guy comes up to me and asks if I know anything about sailboats. I must have had a regatta or sail maker

t-shirt on or something. So I agreed to take a look at his boat which had been struck by lightening the night

before. Luckily, it was still floating and pretty undamaged except for black marks inside the cabin where the

lightening danced around before it hit the centerboard trunk and found a way out.

 

So I asked about the boat which was pretty cool looking and something I hadn't seen before.. The owner

said it was one of only 6 Ranger produced designed by Gary Mull. It was 28', had a board, fractional

rig, and didn't look at all like the Ranger 28 which I was familiar with. The hull shape reminded me more of

the Ranger 26.

 

Haven't seen nor heard of another one since. Anyone have any ideas on what this was ?

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Stopped one day at a lake/reservoir in Pennsylvania on the way to Annapolis for some regatta or other.

Guy comes up to me and asks if I know anything about sailboats. I must have had a regatta or sail maker

t-shirt on or something. So I agreed to take a look at his boat which had been struck by lightening the night

before. Luckily, it was still floating and pretty undamaged except for black marks inside the cabin where the

lightening danced around before it hit the centerboard trunk and found a way out.

 

So I asked about the boat which was pretty cool looking and something I hadn't seen before.. The owner

said it was one of only 6 Ranger produced designed by Gary Mull. It was 28', had a board, fractional

rig, and didn't look at all like the Ranger 28 which I was familiar with. The hull shape reminded me more of

the Ranger 26.

 

Haven't seen nor heard of another one since. Anyone have any ideas on what this was ?

There is a Ranger 26 (1980) with a fractional rig, dagger/lifting keel, which is extremely rare. (Never even seen a photo of one other than the original brochure which someone sent me.) http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=248

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There will be a party at the Vallejo Yacht Club on April 30, 2016 (in conjunction with the Vallejo Race), to celebrate Gary Mull, the four of his 30' boats still on San Francisco Bay -- Chico, Lively Lady, Pretty Penny, and The Shadow -- and to celebrate the builders of these boats, especially Hank Easom. But the idea behind this party is also that a lot of people have raced on these boats, and this is a chance to get together again, swap stories, eat a little, drink a little. If you are of that number, come along!

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Check out this Ranger 37 just after being sprayed with a newly installed retractable bowspirit mod (from a C&C 110). The guy that overhauled this boat really powered through the refit in record time. A stunning result in my opinion. Mine is still pretty, but not quite the same wow factor just yet.

post-100744-0-33543100-1445522874_thumb.jpg

post-100744-0-58114300-1445523082_thumb.jpg

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One of the wildest sailing experiences I have ever had was on a Ranger 37 years ago. DDW in 50 true and big waves at night, the 17K lb plus IOR lead mine was surging off the waves, lifting out of the water and hitting 17-18 knots. No feel on the helm, not sure how much of the undersized rudder was still in the water. When we hauled the boat a couple weeks later, the fiberglass fairing around the leading edge of the rudder was gone. Mull drew some great boats for his time. My personal favorite is still Hotflash the 1/2 tonner. Very quick boat and a WEST system woodie to boot.

More stories please! Will help get me through the winter!

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Looks like they fit Vetra up with a new"ish" elliptical rudder too. Nice job!!

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When I was a kid there was an ad in Sail magazine for the 37. Stern on shot of her power reaching with her rail down. Holy crap it was boat porn. It was like looking a women but with inverse curves. I think I was just entering puberty...

 

One of the prettiest IOR designs out there next to my C & C 40.

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In my teens I worked at the John Beery Co. in Alameda, a chandlery and Ranger dealer. Gary had his office upstairs. When John Dane sailed the Ranger 37 Munequita to a win in the SORC. Gary had one hell of an impromtu party. He was truly a great man.

 

That was the boat in the ad in Sail magazine...Lust at first sight for a sailing pre-pubescent.

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Kind of a post script to this thread, I remember Gary coming to a Ranger 33 fleet meeting here in the NW in the early 80's nice guy, very funny loved the class. At the time in the Seattle area we could have 10+ boats out racing all season. Our family's R33 Crystal is Tied up here at the house . Behind her is St Francis V the Six Meter. Its a good looking line up !

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Reply to sailblueh20

Yes, fastyacht's dramatic photo is of Pretty Penny, a sister ship to Lively Lady, and also to

Lickety Split, The Shadow, and Chico

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Reply to sailblueh20

Yes, fastyacht's dramatic photo is of Pretty Penny, a sister ship to Lively Lady, and also to

Lickety Split, The Shadow, and Chico

Sail against Lively Lady in the same class in the 1969 SORC...

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There will be a party at the Vallejo Yacht Club on April 30, 2016 (in conjunction with the Vallejo Race), to celebrate Gary Mull, the four of his 30' boats still on San Francisco Bay -- Chico, Lively Lady, Pretty Penny, and The Shadow -- and to celebrate the builders of these boats, especially Hank Easom. But the idea behind this party is also that a lot of people have raced on these boats, and this is a chance to get together again, swap stories, eat a little, drink a little. If you are of that number, come along!

Now if we could only get another west coast buyer for Lickety Split. We really could do a one design - mull 30 fleet. Now that would be an exceptional sailing class.

 

http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/23417

post-42767-0-05397200-1446517222_thumb.jpeg

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Our Santana 22 loved the wind. The more the better.

Typical stories go like this. Singlehanding out of Hood River on the Columbia river. 35+ knots of wind against the current so's it was a little choppy. Deep 2nd reef and storm jib. Turn around at Swell City for a downhill sleigh-ride. Enough breeze that more sail wasn't needed. Catch a wave, peg the knot meter at 10 knots and keep it there. Some boardhead would sail up to give me an atta boy. The dogs, Holly and Jazz, Great Dane-Aussie crosses, would lift their big heads to see who it was, leaving said boardhead speechless.

 

International board sailing championship at Hood River. Too much wind so they shut down for the day. Talking with a disillusioned competitor who flew in from Australia that wondered if the wind ever abated.

Load up the wife, three young kids and dogs to go for a sail. Some 35' Taiwanese double ender out there trying to sail against the wind (with the current) not making any headway at all. We sail right by them in style.

Thank's Gary.

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Something has got to be up with the Swampfire for $6,500 than just some soft spots in the deck.

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This looks like a good buy for someone who likes Mulls boats. A Swampfire copy built for the world 3/4 Ton championships in Victoria in '78.

 

http://vancouver.craigslist.ca/rds/boa/5277900496.html

Yes it was. But he owner, Ted Trenholm, decided "not" to compete for the world's regatta in Victoria which was odd as it was moored at RVic. I never heard the story of why. I see that the crew cockpits were cut out for a flush deck which most of the Mull 3/4's did after the fact. There was one in Seattle too and of course the one I helped in aluminium in North Vancouver for a EHYC member - Rod Whitfield. We didn't do the boat with tumblehome like Swamfire, Impatience, Christopher Robin etc as forming with aluminium was difficult in the shop we had. Mull said no worries doing it that way and it might be a saw off with the lower windage against putting the crew outboard. Great boat to work on with the crew cockpits. The primary, secondary and control winches were right there.

 

I'll have to dig out my shots of the build and on the water.

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Something has got to be up with the Swampfire for $6,500 than just some soft spots in the deck.

 

The owner is pretty clueless about selling - they have listed that boat a number of times at ever falling prices and I've tried a few times to see it. The first time was in 2012 when it was up-island and after several failed attempts to view it I gave up. The next time I was shopping it was listed again but in the city for less than the first time but more than now and again, no luck in seeing it. Actually he said it had sold that time but now it's the same guy so....

 

It looked pretty decent from outside.

 

This looks like a good buy for someone who likes Mulls boats. A Swampfire copy built for the world 3/4 Ton championships in Victoria in '78.

 

http://vancouver.craigslist.ca/rds/boa/5277900496.html

Yes it was. But he owner, Ted Trenholm, decided "not" to compete for the world's regatta in Victoria which was odd as it was moored at RVic. I never heard the story of why. I see that the crew cockpits were cut out for a flush deck which most of the Mull 3/4's did after the fact. There was one in Seattle too and of course the one I helped in aluminium in North Vancouver for a EHYC member - Rod Whitfield. We didn't do the boat with tumblehome like Swamfire, Impatience, Christopher Robin etc as forming with aluminium was difficult in the shop we had. Mull said no worries doing it that way and it might be a saw off with the lower windage against putting the crew outboard. Great boat to work on with the crew cockpits. The primary, secondary and control winches were right there.

 

I'll have to dig out my shots of the build and on the water.

 

 

Where did "New Infidel" end up Maxx?

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Something has got to be up with the Swampfire for $6,500 than just some soft spots in the deck.

 

The owner is pretty clueless about selling - they have listed that boat a number of times at ever falling prices and I've tried a few times to see it. The first time was in 2012 when it was up-island and after several failed attempts to view it I gave up. The next time I was shopping it was listed again but in the city for less than the first time but more than now and again, no luck in seeing it. Actually he said it had sold that time but now it's the same guy so....

 

It looked pretty decent from outside.

 

This looks like a good buy for someone who likes Mulls boats. A Swampfire copy built for the world 3/4 Ton championships in Victoria in '78.

 

http://vancouver.craigslist.ca/rds/boa/5277900496.html

Yes it was. But he owner, Ted Trenholm, decided "not" to compete for the world's regatta in Victoria which was odd as it was moored at RVic. I never heard the story of why. I see that the crew cockpits were cut out for a flush deck which most of the Mull 3/4's did after the fact. There was one in Seattle too and of course the one I helped in aluminium in North Vancouver for a EHYC member - Rod Whitfield. We didn't do the boat with tumblehome like Swamfire, Impatience, Christopher Robin etc as forming with aluminium was difficult in the shop we had. Mull said no worries doing it that way and it might be a saw off with the lower windage against putting the crew outboard. Great boat to work on with the crew cockpits. The primary, secondary and control winches were right there.

 

I'll have to dig out my shots of the build and on the water.

 

 

Where did "New Infidel" end up Maxx?

 

If ended up in the bay area but that was a very along time ago. I think the crew cockpit were cut out of it and painted blue robin egg blue. Where it's now? Who knows.

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Bump-

 

Hi all Mull fans. We are putting together a retrospective/celebration of Gary Mull's work for this year's Strictly Sail Pacific Boat Show.

The show will run from April 7 - 10, 2016, and has been moved from Oakland's Jack London Square to Richmond's Craneway Building

and the Inner Harbor Basin.

 

Majority of activity will take place on Saturday, April 9. We'll have a raft up of 8 to 10 Mull designs that will be open to show attendees.

We have a commitment of 4 so far- Santana 22, Ranger 23, Ranger 30.7 and Ranger 33- and are looking for more.

 

We plan on having a couple of panel presentations from people who knew and worked with Gary.

 

And we are looking for pictures, drawing, graphics that you can send us or loan us for display. There will be a staffed tent protecting these.

 

Also a celebrity regatta you can join in by making a donation that will go to local youth sailing programs. And finally a cocktail hour.

 

If you're interested in getting involved or have questions, please PM me.

 

Thanks. Hope we can turn out a bunch of folks that can tell stories, share pictures, have a good time, etc.

 

Radical Move

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Hi all,

I recently adquired a Dione 98 from 1979 from Gary Mull in Valencia Spain, and until now I must say I am completely satisfied with it.. It's a great little boat, very good at sea, and a great upwinder... 

If anyone has one around Valencia, let me know so we can share experiences..

 

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Checking in here with my 1981 Kalik 40 Red Dog.  Boat gets a lot of compliments, and she did great in the delivery down from CT to Miami.

If anyone has any info about this, please comment!  I've got the original blue prints for the boat as well.. 

 

 

IMG_6948.JPG

IMG_7007.JPG

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This makes me want to sail my Santana 22.  In fact, I think I will. Nationals this weekend

 

There's a cherry one for sale BTW (not mine, and no I wont buy an ad) for a ridiculously low price.  Entries still open...

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A Santana 22 was my first sailboat. It was perfect for windy Hood River.

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Have to say my favorite Mull design is the Ranger 26, based mostly on the fact that I have spent the better part of the last year getting to know one :)

FB_IMG_1499924806662.thumb.jpg.9b528ff0437ac3618b5a1bb65a8d563b.jpg20170713_154800.thumb.jpg.e033295181d8d9c646a9f983721582f5.jpg

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I also have a letter from Gary on the Ranger that was given to I believe the dealer. Have a scan of it on here but it stinks. If anyone wants a copy of it just shoot me a pm.

 gallery_123587_1257_1153943.jpg

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That letter is a collector's item!  I knew both Gary and Buster. Great guys.

 

I most certainly agree with you on the Ranger 26.

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I think I once read somewhere that the Ranger 26 had collected more racing hardware than any other production boat. Not sure when or in what category, fleet or handicap system but I think I got that right. 

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2 hours ago, kinardly said:

I think I once read somewhere that the Ranger 26 had collected more racing hardware than any other production boat. Not sure when or in what category, fleet or handicap system but I think I got that right. 

I'm not surprised really All Ranger/Mull designs always in the hunt in any fleet. I took a Ranger 22 in trade when I was up grading to a larger vessel. Still it was a sexy boat in those days; still his really.Didn't race it much to my regret now.

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7 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

That letter is a collector's item!  I knew both Gary and Buster. Great guys.

 

I most certainly agree with you on the Ranger 26.

If you don't mind me asking, I'm curious who is/was Buster?

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order:

Buster was Roland Hammond. Pretty sure his real name was "Roland" but everyone called him Buster. He was a Newport Beach guy who was president of Ranger before he became president of Islander.. He was a very fine man, very patient with me when I first started designing for Islander. He knew production  boats and building inside and out. I was very lucky to have had the chance to work with him.

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I raced on a Ranger 33 for a couple of years.  Sweet sailing boats, easy to keep going in light air.

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I could never resolve the metrics of the R 33 with its performance. I raced against them in our Yamaha 33. We were about 600# lighter, had more SA to displacement, slightly more water line, taller rig (although our ribbon main may have been part of the story) and yet there we would be watching them eat us up downhill, forcing us to fight uphill to a virtual dead heat at the finish. Something about that hull made it very easily driven in the light stuff for sure. 

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12 minutes ago, kinardly said:

I could never resolve the metrics of the R 33 with its performance. I raced against them in our Yamaha 33. We were about 600# lighter, had more SA to displacement, slightly more water line, taller rig (although our ribbon main may have been part of the story) and yet there we would be watching them eat us up downhill, forcing us to fight uphill to a virtual dead heat at the finish. Something about that hull made it very easily driven in the light stuff for sure. 

Downwind speed vs Y33 is likely due to beam.  R33 beam = 9.6 ft while Y33 beam = 11.0 ft  Technically BWL rather than beam per se,

If you take 2 boats with similar sailing length and displacement, the narrower boat will usually be faster downwind.

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