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Hobie Anarchy

Y Flyer - WTF?

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OK, so I'm going to be racing in US Sailing's Championship of Champions regatta in a Y Flyer.

Cyrul-Y-FLYER.jpg

 

It's a bit a paradigm shift from my boats (Hobie 14, 16, 17 and Tiger) that weigh 200 lbs less and go four times as fast. It's also been 30 years since I've raced monohulls (Lasers & Sunfish).

 

What makes the Y Flyer tick? Crew weight, heeling angle, strings to pull?

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I haven’t sailed one since 1980, but it's a hard chine, single centerboard & rudder, scow. Sail with a bit of heel.

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in anything less than dogs of chains I think you want to keep it on the chine both up wind and down. Talk to scow sailors at your club. Also it's good to be on starboard gybe downwind even though you're winged out since it makes a difference tactically.

 

Things I learned racing a Star which is conceptually similar I think: if you trim the jib downwind so the telltales fow backward (from leech to luff) that's fast. Sailing by the lee is OK if you need to just trim your sails the best you can. Couldn't figure out if it's best (downwind) to rock the main up or the jib up. I guees you want to go the way that neutralizes the helm so you're not dragging the rudder thru the water which I guess is boom up. Downwind standing up is not slow if that's comfortable.

 

Totally different to cats where the apparent is forward all the time. They reach pretty quick with that big main. Hope you have breeze.

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OHMYGODICANTBELIEVEIT! A post about something that is happening in my part of the world. That never happens.

First off HA, you are coming here, so beers are on me if you drop me a PM. Secondly, I am a leadbelly sailor with almost no insight to offer, except that I have crewed a couple of times for a guy who's won the Y Flyer Nats a couple of times plus once for another guy that's pretty good. Both great guys that will be happy to help you out if you can withstand their Y Flyer sales pitch. Here's what I've got:

It's not got a chute and that whisker pole is one long somebitch, so whoever is deploying that thing needs to practice a bit.

I kept getting in trouble for making the boat too flat. They like it on its chine upwind and down.

Doesn't roll tack worth a shit.

I'm big (6'3" 210lbs) and we crush everybody upwind if its blowing, just like you'd expect.

The lake you'll be on is fairly small, but doesn't seem especially quirky. No current, topo influences are obvious.

Downwind it seemed faster to me to have the boom side high and lots of jib luff curvature (which sorta becomes the leach if you are doing it right), though there seems to be two schools of thought on that second part.

Woody boats with dark decks are damn hot in Arkansas in the summer.

Jib seems oddly devoid of reference points for trimming. Best I could come up with was to spend some time before the races poking my head down there to get a good look at it, then getting a mental picture of what the foot looked like as a rough guide.

I never figured out the fore & aft weight trim, but I'm not a scow guy. It didn't seem to much matter where we were as long as the angle of heel was right.

If I think of something more useful, I'll let you know.

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Thought of a couple more things. Not sure if this is like what you are used to, but was a bit different for me:

The vang is more of a mast bend control than a mainsail twist control. It shoves the boom forward harder than it pulls it down.

The rig is unloaded completely at rest. The jib has a wire luff. So the jib halyard effectively controls forestay tension (along with the mainsheet) and there is a jib cloth adjustment that controls draft the way that the jib halyard does in a boat where the forestay is "loaded".

Everybody seems to wing it and go DEEP downwind. Didn't even see anybody attempt to play the AW angles downwind in my 3 days of racing. Just get in front of a puff and milk that baby for all it's worth.

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OK, RB - you're on about the beer (I can never resist free beer). Check your inbox.

 

I'm working on getting a buddy of mine to crew for me who's got some monoslug experience (Lightnings, lead haulers), so we won't be completely in the dark.

 

We'll be a combined weight of about 380# - is that good or bad?

 

How do you de-power upwind? Vang? Traveller? Cunningham? Hike, bitch!?

 

I'm assuming we won't be able to adjust mast rake (borrowed boats), but what's optimal?

 

I assume you jam on the jib halyard tension upwind to avoid sag and ease off downwind?

 

What about the barber haulers? What kind of slot does this thing like?

 

Strangely, it sounds a lot like a Hobie 16 upwind (jib halyard / mainsheet tension is everything) and a Hobie 14 downwind (sail DDW, stand up to provide more windage and look back for the puffs)

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At 380, just hike unless it's howling. Both guys I sailed with went to the vang and traveller for depower. No idea about rake, but the boat that the fleet owns has a decent feeling helm and the guy that set it up is probably the best out there, for whatever that's worth, so look at that one if all else fails. Barberhaulers seemed to be just off while beating, then on going downhill. Could have used hooks like on a Thistle just as easily. Keep in mind, I've only sailed the things about 4 times, so this advice may be worth what you paid for it.

I'll see what I can do about your Bass request.

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Really Long Past.

 

But I looked up Y Flyer on SA and found this...

 

So, how did you end up doing?

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Fun event. Well organized and RC work was first class for the 20 boats..

Who knew that Arkansas was so scenic?

Everything from light air to one day of strong winds.

Standing around on the ramp a decision was being made as to whether to race these borrowed boats in big wind.

Then somebody noticed a big flock of buzzards circling overhead.

They sailed us anyhow.

I placed 7th, incidentally. Certainly the oldest skipper there.

Dave Ellis

Tampa Bay, Florida

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