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Slowboat

Swede 55

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Hi Everybody,

Steve White here-owner of Vortex, 1990 built cold molded Swede 55. I just discovered this forum yesterday and have spent the weekend reading it-and recovering from a touch of flu or something. Fascinating and fun stuff. Amazingly, I don't have many pictures of my boat-I just never carry a camera around with me. But I'll try to figure out how to post them and put a few on. Can anyone give me the short version of how to do it?

Vortex is currently tucked away in her shed here in Maine, waiting for the summer. A couple of years ago I shipped her via Dock Express to St Thomas and kept her in West End, Tortola for the winter. Had a great winter of sailing and a little racing around there and then down to Antigua for the Classic Regatta. Was able to win first in Class B, Spirit of Tradition and first overall in Spirit of Tradition, beating the J Class boats Ranger and Valsheda (but only because they dropped out of the last race when they hit each other beating to windward!)

It has been interesting to read about your modifications for the boat and what has worked. Being a builder I'm always trying something new. I switched to the 2:1 mainsheet system like Slow 6 years ago and it is great! I added a small pair of Harken 16's (I think-maybe I'll go look) to handle the running backstays. I mounted them at the forward end of the aft cabin, so they are just right behind me.

3 years ago I replaced my 1x19 standing rigging with PBO. This was shrouds only. The headstay is rod. Backstay and running backs are Kevlar. The shrouds and 6 turnbuckles I took off weighed 100 lbs. The PBO and 6 turnbuckles I put back on weighed 33 lbs!!! I don't think I would save that much weight by buying a carbon mast. At the same time I decided to put more roach in my mainsail, so I moved the backstay chainplates all the aft on the deck to allow more clearence for the top of the main. I bought new Doyle Stratis main and blade jib. What a performance improvement! I could actually feel the difference of the weight savings and bigger main. I raced in the Opera House Cup that summer and was doing very well, leading ourclass when I happened to look up and saw the stb lower spreader bent up at the end! had to drop the main and withdraw, but didn't lose the rig. I had welded new terminal fittings to the ends of the spreaders and it broke there. I ended up buying new spreaders and end fittings, which is what I should have done in the first place. All has been good ever since.

Anyway-I'm happy to find such a bunch of enthusiasts. Should help make the winter go by.

Cheers

Steve

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I hopped a few beer can rides with David and Bird way back when... Definitely a unique individual, and a fun boat to sail. Sad to hear that he was lost. Found this link that has a little more information:

 

http://www.inwap.com...10/usenet/poole

 

 

Hello Puddin,

 

found this quite interesting although sad to read. Sailing a Swede 55 singlehanded that late in the year in high latitudes in the northern hemisphere ... Thank you for providing the information.

 

Best, Zebra

 

The boat was in Alameda and admired by many. I ac tually was walking out of the sailmaker when he was walking in with a furled headsail (long!) and asked what that was!

we had some nice chat . he departed for alaska shortly after and I remember reading that the cooler cover was part of the id at the time.. in www.latitude38.com and chat on the island

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SBW, in the harbor where Vortex is moored, she's a standout boat among all the other beauties nearby. If you post some pix, make sure to include one of the custom wheel. Amazing.

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Never sailed on one, but it almost makes me think of a bigger version of a Cayenne 41, which I have sailed on and is a pretty cool old boat.

post-34524-011970800 1291656761_thumb.jpg

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Hi Everybody,

Steve White here-owner of Vortex, 1990 built cold molded Swede 55. I just discovered this forum yesterday and have spent the weekend reading it-and recovering from a touch of flu or something. Fascinating and fun stuff. Amazingly, I don't have many pictures of my boat-I just never carry a camera around with me. But I'll try to figure out how to post them and put a few on. Can anyone give me the short version of how to do it?

Vortex is currently tucked away in her shed here in Maine, waiting for the summer. A couple of years ago I shipped her via Dock Express to St Thomas and kept her in West End, Tortola for the winter. Had a great winter of sailing and a little racing around there and then down to Antigua for the Classic Regatta. Was able to win first in Class B, Spirit of Tradition and first overall in Spirit of Tradition, beating the J Class boats Ranger and Valsheda (but only because they dropped out of the last race when they hit each other beating to windward!)

It has been interesting to read about your modifications for the boat and what has worked. Being a builder I'm always trying something new. I switched to the 2:1 mainsheet system like Slow 6 years ago and it is great! I added a small pair of Harken 16's (I think-maybe I'll go look) to handle the running backstays. I mounted them at the forward end of the aft cabin, so they are just right behind me.

3 years ago I replaced my 1x19 standing rigging with PBO. This was shrouds only. The headstay is rod. Backstay and running backs are Kevlar. The shrouds and 6 turnbuckles I took off weighed 100 lbs. The PBO and 6 turnbuckles I put back on weighed 33 lbs!!! I don't think I would save that much weight by buying a carbon mast. At the same time I decided to put more roach in my mainsail, so I moved the backstay chainplates all the aft on the deck to allow more clearence for the top of the main. I bought new Doyle Stratis main and blade jib. What a performance improvement! I could actually feel the difference of the weight savings and bigger main. I raced in the Opera House Cup that summer and was doing very well, leading ourclass when I happened to look up and saw the stb lower spreader bent up at the end! had to drop the main and withdraw, but didn't lose the rig. I had welded new terminal fittings to the ends of the spreaders and it broke there. I ended up buying new spreaders and end fittings, which is what I should have done in the first place. All has been good ever since.

Anyway-I'm happy to find such a bunch of enthusiasts. Should help make the winter go by.

Cheers

Steve

 

Steve...you JUST found this thread? Where have you been? ... :lol:

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Doc Haagan Daz,

Can't find you e mail address to send pics to.

 

Haji- As the famous Maine-iac said, "Harrd sayin', not knowin'"

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Hi Everybody,

Steve White here-owner of Vortex, 1990 built cold molded Swede 55. I just discovered this forum yesterday and have spent the weekend reading it-and recovering from a touch of flu or something. Fascinating and fun stuff. Amazingly, I don't have many pictures of my boat-I just never carry a camera around with me. But I'll try to figure out how to post them and put a few on. Can anyone give me the short version of how to do it?

Vortex is currently tucked away in her shed here in Maine, waiting for the summer. A couple of years ago I shipped her via Dock Express to St Thomas and kept her in West End, Tortola for the winter. Had a great winter of sailing and a little racing around there and then down to Antigua for the Classic Regatta. Was able to win first in Class B, Spirit of Tradition and first overall in Spirit of Tradition, beating the J Class boats Ranger and Valsheda (but only because they dropped out of the last race when they hit each other beating to windward!)

It has been interesting to read about your modifications for the boat and what has worked. Being a builder I'm always trying something new. I switched to the 2:1 mainsheet system like Slow 6 years ago and it is great! I added a small pair of Harken 16's (I think-maybe I'll go look) to handle the running backstays. I mounted them at the forward end of the aft cabin, so they are just right behind me.

3 years ago I replaced my 1x19 standing rigging with PBO. This was shrouds only. The headstay is rod. Backstay and running backs are Kevlar. The shrouds and 6 turnbuckles I took off weighed 100 lbs. The PBO and 6 turnbuckles I put back on weighed 33 lbs!!! I don't think I would save that much weight by buying a carbon mast. At the same time I decided to put more roach in my mainsail, so I moved the backstay chainplates all the aft on the deck to allow more clearence for the top of the main. I bought new Doyle Stratis main and blade jib. What a performance improvement! I could actually feel the difference of the weight savings and bigger main. I raced in the Opera House Cup that summer and was doing very well, leading ourclass when I happened to look up and saw the stb lower spreader bent up at the end! had to drop the main and withdraw, but didn't lose the rig. I had welded new terminal fittings to the ends of the spreaders and it broke there. I ended up buying new spreaders and end fittings, which is what I should have done in the first place. All has been good ever since.

Anyway-I'm happy to find such a bunch of enthusiasts. Should help make the winter go by.

Cheers

Steve

 

Hey Steve,

 

how nice to meet you here. In case you won't manage with the pics, perhaps I can help with what I have in my files of your boat.

 

For the time being, something from Capetown. They have summer right now.

 

"Spilhaus III" (ex. Counterpoint, winner of the Annapolis - Bermuda Race soem years ago) is the second Swede 55 of this particular chap, so there is at least one fellow being mad about the boat as we are - in the southern hemisphere.

 

Best Zebra

post-24585-093465800 1292776968_thumb.jpg

post-24585-083240200 1292777052_thumb.jpg

post-24585-049048100 1292777130_thumb.jpg

post-24585-053110700 1292777198_thumb.jpg

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I remember watching Bird sailing into Berkeley marina single handed (at least I could only see one body on board) waaaayyy back in the day (like mid 80's). Don't know if David owned her then but the Swede 55 sure was and is a pretty boat...

 

I also recall hearing about the loss up north. Sad, indeed...

 

 

 

I hopped a few beer can rides with David and Bird way back when... Definitely a unique individual, and a fun boat to sail. Sad to hear that he was lost. Found this link that has a little more information:

 

http://www.inwap.com...10/usenet/poole

 

 

Hello Puddin,

 

found this quite interesting although sad to read. Sailing a Swede 55 singlehanded that late in the year in high latitudes in the northern hemisphere ... Thank you for providing the information.

 

Best, Zebra

 

The boat was in Alameda and admired by many. I ac tually was walking out of the sailmaker when he was walking in with a furled headsail (long!) and asked what that was!

we had some nice chat . he departed for alaska shortly after and I remember reading that the cooler cover was part of the id at the time.. in www.latitude38.com and chat on the island

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Boys (I assume few girls are around here)

 

all lanterns, anchorlight and steamlight working (at the same time!)

 

a meaningful moon,

 

a possibly warm and dry saloon

 

not to much snow on deck

 

a mostly pleasant or sensible gift situation

 

Best Zebra

post-24585-024991000 1293310780_thumb.jpg

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Hello Swede 55 sailors,

 

 

 

most of us live in the northern hemisphere with the boat on snow or ice covered hard right now. Thanks to youtube we can step aboard „Flying Cloud“ powering along Guam in way better conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best,

 

 

 

Zebra

 

 

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Hi Everybody,

Steve White here-owner of Vortex, 1990 built cold molded Swede 55. I just discovered this forum yesterday and have spent the weekend reading it-and recovering from a touch of flu or something. Fascinating and fun stuff. Amazingly, I don't have many pictures of my boat-I just never carry a camera around with me. But I'll try to figure out how to post them and put a few on. Can anyone give me the short version of how to do it?

Vortex is currently tucked away in her shed here in Maine, waiting for the summer. A couple of years ago I shipped her via Dock Express to St Thomas and kept her in West End, Tortola for the winter. Had a great winter of sailing and a little racing around there and then down to Antigua for the Classic Regatta. Was able to win first in Class B, Spirit of Tradition and first overall in Spirit of Tradition, beating the J Class boats Ranger and Valsheda (but only because they dropped out of the last race when they hit each other beating to windward!)

It has been interesting to read about your modifications for the boat and what has worked. Being a builder I'm always trying something new. I switched to the 2:1 mainsheet system like Slow 6 years ago and it is great! I added a small pair of Harken 16's (I think-maybe I'll go look) to handle the running backstays. I mounted them at the forward end of the aft cabin, so they are just right behind me.

3 years ago I replaced my 1x19 standing rigging with PBO. This was shrouds only. The headstay is rod. Backstay and running backs are Kevlar. The shrouds and 6 turnbuckles I took off weighed 100 lbs. The PBO and 6 turnbuckles I put back on weighed 33 lbs!!! I don't think I would save that much weight by buying a carbon mast. At the same time I decided to put more roach in my mainsail, so I moved the backstay chainplates all the aft on the deck to allow more clearence for the top of the main. I bought new Doyle Stratis main and blade jib. What a performance improvement! I could actually feel the difference of the weight savings and bigger main. I raced in the Opera House Cup that summer and was doing very well, leading ourclass when I happened to look up and saw the stb lower spreader bent up at the end! had to drop the main and withdraw, but didn't lose the rig. I had welded new terminal fittings to the ends of the spreaders and it broke there. I ended up buying new spreaders and end fittings, which is what I should have done in the first place. All has been good ever since.

Anyway-I'm happy to find such a bunch of enthusiasts. Should help make the winter go by.

Cheers

Steve

 

Steve...you JUST found this thread? Where have you been? ... :lol:

 

No kidding!

 

Here's what Steve & the Vortex team looks like, swooping through the lee of a Concordia yawl haplessly steered by yours truly at the Eggemoggin Reach Regatta '10. We probably would've done better if I'd steered with my hands and put the camera down instead of just driving with my knees, but I've never seen that many beautiful boats in one place at one time before.

 

I met both Steve & Haji that weekend and it was a pleasure in both cases.

 

Vortex

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Hi Everybody,

Steve White here-owner of Vortex, 1990 built cold molded Swede 55. I just discovered this forum yesterday and have spent the weekend reading it-and recovering from a touch of flu or something. Fascinating and fun stuff. Amazingly, I don't have many pictures of my boat-I just never carry a camera around with me. But I'll try to figure out how to post them and put a few on. Can anyone give me the short version of how to do it?

Vortex is currently tucked away in her shed here in Maine, waiting for the summer. A couple of years ago I shipped her via Dock Express to St Thomas and kept her in West End, Tortola for the winter. Had a great winter of sailing and a little racing around there and then down to Antigua for the Classic Regatta. Was able to win first in Class B, Spirit of Tradition and first overall in Spirit of Tradition, beating the J Class boats Ranger and Valsheda (but only because they dropped out of the last race when they hit each other beating to windward!)

It has been interesting to read about your modifications for the boat and what has worked. Being a builder I'm always trying something new. I switched to the 2:1 mainsheet system like Slow 6 years ago and it is great! I added a small pair of Harken 16's (I think-maybe I'll go look) to handle the running backstays. I mounted them at the forward end of the aft cabin, so they are just right behind me.

3 years ago I replaced my 1x19 standing rigging with PBO. This was shrouds only. The headstay is rod. Backstay and running backs are Kevlar. The shrouds and 6 turnbuckles I took off weighed 100 lbs. The PBO and 6 turnbuckles I put back on weighed 33 lbs!!! I don't think I would save that much weight by buying a carbon mast. At the same time I decided to put more roach in my mainsail, so I moved the backstay chainplates all the aft on the deck to allow more clearence for the top of the main. I bought new Doyle Stratis main and blade jib. What a performance improvement! I could actually feel the difference of the weight savings and bigger main. I raced in the Opera House Cup that summer and was doing very well, leading ourclass when I happened to look up and saw the stb lower spreader bent up at the end! had to drop the main and withdraw, but didn't lose the rig. I had welded new terminal fittings to the ends of the spreaders and it broke there. I ended up buying new spreaders and end fittings, which is what I should have done in the first place. All has been good ever since.

Anyway-I'm happy to find such a bunch of enthusiasts. Should help make the winter go by.

Cheers

Steve

 

Steve...you JUST found this thread? Where have you been? ... :lol:

 

No kidding!

 

Here's what Steve & the Vortex team looks like, swooping through the lee of a Concordia yawl haplessly steered by yours truly at the Eggemoggin Reach Regatta '10. We probably would've done better if I'd steered with my hands and put the camera down instead of just driving with my knees, but I've never seen that many beautiful boats in one place at one time before.

 

I met both Steve & Haji that weekend and it was a pleasure in both cases.

 

Vortex

 

 

Photo of Vortex is beautiful however must say all the photos in that file are magnificent. Must Some serious eye candy at that regatta.

 

Thanks for sharing.

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Hi Everybody,

Steve White here-owner of Vortex, 1990 built cold molded Swede 55. I just discovered this forum yesterday and have spent the weekend reading it-and recovering from a touch of flu or something. Fascinating and fun stuff. Amazingly, I don't have many pictures of my boat-I just never carry a camera around with me. But I'll try to figure out how to post them and put a few on. Can anyone give me the short version of how to do it?

Vortex is currently tucked away in her shed here in Maine, waiting for the summer. A couple of years ago I shipped her via Dock Express to St Thomas and kept her in West End, Tortola for the winter. Had a great winter of sailing and a little racing around there and then down to Antigua for the Classic Regatta. Was able to win first in Class B, Spirit of Tradition and first overall in Spirit of Tradition, beating the J Class boats Ranger and Valsheda (but only because they dropped out of the last race when they hit each other beating to windward!)

It has been interesting to read about your modifications for the boat and what has worked. Being a builder I'm always trying something new. I switched to the 2:1 mainsheet system like Slow 6 years ago and it is great! I added a small pair of Harken 16's (I think-maybe I'll go look) to handle the running backstays. I mounted them at the forward end of the aft cabin, so they are just right behind me.

3 years ago I replaced my 1x19 standing rigging with PBO. This was shrouds only. The headstay is rod. Backstay and running backs are Kevlar. The shrouds and 6 turnbuckles I took off weighed 100 lbs. The PBO and 6 turnbuckles I put back on weighed 33 lbs!!! I don't think I would save that much weight by buying a carbon mast. At the same time I decided to put more roach in my mainsail, so I moved the backstay chainplates all the aft on the deck to allow more clearence for the top of the main. I bought new Doyle Stratis main and blade jib. What a performance improvement! I could actually feel the difference of the weight savings and bigger main. I raced in the Opera House Cup that summer and was doing very well, leading ourclass when I happened to look up and saw the stb lower spreader bent up at the end! had to drop the main and withdraw, but didn't lose the rig. I had welded new terminal fittings to the ends of the spreaders and it broke there. I ended up buying new spreaders and end fittings, which is what I should have done in the first place. All has been good ever since.

Anyway-I'm happy to find such a bunch of enthusiasts. Should help make the winter go by.

Cheers

Steve

 

Steve...you JUST found this thread? Where have you been? ... :lol:

 

No kidding!

 

Here's what Steve & the Vortex team looks like, swooping through the lee of a Concordia yawl haplessly steered by yours truly at the Eggemoggin Reach Regatta '10. We probably would've done better if I'd steered with my hands and put the camera down instead of just driving with my knees, but I've never seen that many beautiful boats in one place at one time before.

 

I met both Steve & Haji that weekend and it was a pleasure in both cases.

 

Vortex

 

 

Photo of Vortex is beautiful however must say all the photos in that file are magnificent. Must Some serious eye candy at that regatta.

 

Thanks for sharing.

 

Thanks! Glad you liked 'em. Any fan of pretty boats needs to have that event on their bucket list.

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I agree, I really like the look of these boats. They just look efficient to me. The fact that the rig is small for the hull just looks right. I liked the idea of a square meter boat - measure the sail area and try to get as much boat under it as possible. I wish these boats would have been more popular rather than the International Rule or Meter boats - square meter boats were the original ULDBs.

I never like the look of a boat when the LOA looks conspicuously longer than the mast. But the Swede-55 has always been a conspicuous exception.

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I never like the look of a boat when the LOA looks conspicuously longer than the mast. But the Swede-55 has always been a conspicuous exception.

 

Hi Vigilante,

 

 

 

enclosed two pics of „Birgit“, a kind of turbocharged Swede 55, named „Swede 75 special“. The „75“ refers to measured sail area due to the original sqm boat rule, not the lenght in feet. Boat bethed at the Royal Gothenburg Yacht Club GKSS in Langedrag/Gothenburg at the west coast of Sweden. To my mind she is he only boat to get your heart beating faster in the entire port, supposed to be the best at the west coast of Sweden.

 

 

 

 

And, Vigilante, she has a longer spar. rolleyes.gif

 

 

 

„Birgit“ won the Toern rund long distance race in 2010. Due to the number of rocks around it is better for locals to participate.

 

 

 

Note the powerul bowwave as „Birgit“ powers upwind. Similar concept as „Vortex“ (Swede 55, slightly made better here and there, lighter hull, stretched appendages and sails).

 

 

 

 

The Swede 55 story goes on with most boats passionately sailed, with modifications or replicas of the fibreglass ones, be it cold moulded or in advanced composites. There are always some sailors around in the yachting world interested in real boats.

 

 

 

 

For more background on Swede 55 and her predecessors: Have a look at the download area named „more“ at www.swedesail.de

 

 

 

Nice weekend,

 

 

 

Zebra

 

post-24585-092816300 1297417412_thumb.jpg

post-24585-009132300 1297417440_thumb.jpg

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Zebra,

 

Birgit is a very iteresting boat. Is she actually a Swede 55 hull? Or is she a new design? If she is a Swede 55 hull, they must have modified her ballast to carry the large rig-do you know any more about her that you can share, or any place I can read more about her?

Ice in our harbor here in Maine today-no sailing for another 2 1/2 months!

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Zebra,

 

Birgit is a very iteresting boat. Is she actually a Swede 55 hull? Or is she a new design? If she is a Swede 55 hull, they must have modified her ballast to carry the large rig-do you know any more about her that you can share, or any place I can read more about her?

Ice in our harbor here in Maine today-no sailing for another 2 1/2 months!

 

Hello JSW,

 

 

 

Swede 55 was planned to displace 7,75 t. The fibreglass result (bullett proof with considerable resin content by Fisksätra Varv) came ¾ t heavier, half load displacement being about 8,5 t. Checked this at my boat. Some boats being even heavier, aproaching nine metric tons. Numbers from various sources and unclear how much clutter was aboard.

 

 

 

Accoarding to builders information (Classic Swedish Yachts, Sweden) Swede 52 is supposed to displace 7,55 t (16,640 lbs) with 4,1 t (9,036 lbs) lead. As we all know, builders weight indications use to be a bit, if not very optimistic and I have not checked the real weight of the recent manufactures (early nineties, Swede 75 and the past decade, then named Swede 52). I observed that the revamped Swede 55s, named Swede 75 floats a little higher while having a lot more lead below. Swede 75 in the early ninties was planned for 7,75 t.

 

 

 

 

The carbon spar (1/3 to ½ tube weight) makes an interesting contribution to general stiffness, comfort in a seaway and upwind perrmance of the sleek, generelly tender boat.

 

 

 

I assume that "Birgit" (she has a slightly different stern shape) has the Divinycell Sandwich hull of Swede 75/52 with lowered centre of gravity of the keel (now bulb shaped, draft 2,10 m) and about/beyond 50 percent ballast ratio. Principal rig dimensions accoarding to Classic Swedish Yachts:

 

 

 

 

P 17,50 m (57.5 ft)

 

I 16,50 m (54 ft)

 

E 6 m (19.7 ft)

 

J 5 m (18.4 ft)

 

Main 62 sqm (665 sqft)

 

110 Jib 43 sqm (461 sqft)

 

Gennaker 185 sqm (1.983 sqft)

 

 

 

 

I had the oppotunity to sail a Swede 75 occasionally (with aluminum mast) in the nineties in different conditions: A fantastic experience. However, I would go even further - this is being a different story/dream.

 

 

 

 

 

I have seen Birgit (a Swede 75 special) only in the port of Langedrag/Gothenburg.

 

 

 

 

 

Best, Zebra

 

 

 

 

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I wish these boats would have been more popular rather than the International Rule or Meter boats - square meter boats were the original ULDBs.

I never like the look of a boat when the LOA looks conspicuously longer than the mast. But the Swede-55 has always been a conspicuous exception.

 

Seasons greetings from the german baltic seabord

 

Zebra

post-24585-036656800 1311443255_thumb.jpg

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Hi everybody!

 

Here´s som nice pic's from a race i the Baltic Sea, called "Byxelkroken", last autumn. As you can see there were tough winds coming from behind (up to 40 knots) just before the finish of day 1.

 

Give you also a pic from a race this spring where you se her i full lengh.

 

My boat is Swede 55 No 2, called "Slanka Frun" (Slim Lady in english:) ). I've owned the boat together with a friend since 2006.

 

Jens

 

 

/post-54202-051569000 1312731345_thumb.jpgpost-54202-087006300 1312731369_thumb.jpgpost-54202-044225900 1312731505_thumb.jpg

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Hello Jens,

 

whaow, nice shots and nice sails. Is it the orginal Selden spar or is is modified? Deck looks like being refurbuished (painted) and covered with new treadmaster.

 

Would appreciate to see more fotos. Where in Sweden is the boat berthed? Swede 55 no 2 is the previous "Swedeheart" from 1977, true?

 

Enclosed a foto from early July this year, the binannual "Schlank and rank" race (which translates slim and tender) Fehmarn, northern germany, last stop to Lolland/Denmark.

 

Greetings,

 

Zebra

 

PS: More info about Swede 55 to be found at www.swedesail.de

 

You may like to have a look at the recently added section "more"

post-24585-036538900 1313170348_thumb.jpg

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Hello Zebra!

 

Yes it is the former Swedeheart. The guy we bought it from had her renamed to Immola back in 1999, so this is name No 3.

 

About the Seldén Spar - yes it is the original. After a little conversation with the first owner we have figured out that the profile is a little bit oversized for Swede 55, he says that it is dimensioned for the Swede 75.

 

We have refurbished the original Treadmaster with Treadcote paint with very nice result. You need about 1,5 litre.

 

The boat is berthed on the swedish east coast, in a small town called Valdemarsvik.

 

Give you some more pics.

 

Sincerely Jens

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Great to see another Swede 55 owner (and boat) here.

 

This was taken last Wednesday night in one of our beer can PHRF races. Yes, poor Rosina is very dirty. No backstay is fast, but I didn't realize just how far foward the mast was...

 

post-2826-058826500 1313347237_thumb.jpg

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Strange how the boat tends to get dirty... Took a swim and cleaned the waterline last Friday.

 

See you have a Gennaker, got one too but I don't use it very much. Prefer the Spin (when I got enough crew). My sail wardrobe contains 1 main (46 sqm), 1 ST-Fock (32 sqm), 1 Genua (48 sqm), 1 Jib-Top (72 sqm), 1 Gennaker (95 sqm), 1 Spin (117 sqm). The Main, ST-Fock and Genua is from 2010, the other ones is from 1999.

 

It would have been nice to get rid of the backstays...

 

Great to see another Swede 55 owner (and boat) here.

 

This was taken last Wednesday night in one of our beer can PHRF races. Yes, poor Rosina is very dirty. No backstay is fast, but I didn't realize just how far foward the mast was...

 

post-2826-058826500 1313347237_thumb.jpg

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Hello Jens,

 

one or two Swede 55 sailors extended the rig by riveting a slightly longer lower section to the junction (the original Selden Spar consists of two parts) thus extending the mast a little. Lifting the lower spreader slightly. Seems to be a economic way to give the boat a little more sailarea. As far as I know this was done at "Elisa", Swede 55 no. 3. Moving the headstay forward on the deck seems a common option.

 

Yes, the mast is pretty heavy (100 kgs bare tube weight plus standing and runnig rigging, alltogether 150 kgs). On the other hand it is rigid, withstands common mistakes in handling and lasts forever wich I do find beneficial.

 

Valdemarsvik is close to where all the 55s were built. Seems it takes a while to get to the sea. Beautiful waters!

 

Some day I would like to sail to Västervik.

 

Jens, do you know other Swede 55 sailors in sweden? There is one I know of in Västervik. It is number 21, she used to bear the name "Viveka" and later "Sparnoccio" and she came a couple of years ago from he south.

 

Your treadmaster looks quite good. Mine is pretty much worn (UV- light, abrasion etc). Did you start with the Treadmaster cleaner and then applying the Treadcote? I have mixed experience with such miraculous chemicals, therefore I am still reluctant.

 

Another sailing shot from July this year.

 

Sailors greeting to the east cost of Sweden

 

Best, Zebra

post-24585-071196500 1313948495_thumb.jpg

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Hi Zebra!

 

Interesting to hear the information about the spar. Our headstay has been moved forward by a former owner. If you some day are planning a trip to the Swedish east coast please get in touch! It would be nice to see you, share experiences and take a look on each other boats!

 

About other 55 sailors in Sweden I took in the Swedish sailing association "Svenska kryssarklubben" boat register I found following boats:

 

No 18 - Skuggfaxe (former So Long Resarö), berthed in Vaxholm (outside Stockholm)

No 30 - Fast Lane, berthed in Nacka (Stockholm). The boat former owner was Crister Bäckström. New owner is Angelo Morano

Alda (no production number is registred. Produktion year is 1977). Berted outside Turku in Finland. Winner of the "Gotland Runt" Offshore race in 2008

Swede 75 No 2 - Stina, berthed in Bankeryd (Lake Vättern)

 

There should also be one Swede 55 in Norrköping that's been under a bigger recondition for several years. My boat owner friend has tried to get in touch with him for several years but has failed.

 

The former owner of No 30, Crister Bäckström, made a list of Swede 55 boats that he had idenitifed on the Internet back in 2002. Boats mentioned there which I can't find in this topic is:

 

No 12 - Excalibur, berthed in Chesapeake Bay, USA

No ? - Susaija, berthed somewhere in Finland

No ? - Scirocco, berthed somewhere in Sweden

No ? - Mystic, berthed in Block Islands Great Salt Pond, USA

No ? - Santé, berthed in Montpellier Golfe Juan

No ? - As, berthed in Marseille, France

No 10 - Vilda Matilda, berthed somewhere in Sweden

No ? - Hera, observed in Villamoura Portugal

No ? - Kaniga

No ? - Sirilois, observed at the Azores, Portugal

 

If you want to track more Swede 55 owners is a tip to contact sailmakers in Sweden. Give you a list of sailmakers which could help you:

 

www.royalmarin.se (situated in Västervik)

www.hamelsails.se

www.lundhsails.se

www.boding.se

www.northsails.se

 

About our Treadmaster - we just cleaned with dishwashing fluid, a stiff brush and then rinsed with lots of water. Let it dry properly. Do accurate masking around the mat you want to paint, it's hard to get rid of the paint if it gets on the wrong place. Use a small roller to apply the paint.

 

Hope you get a nice sailing autumn!

 

Regards Jens

 

 

Hello Jens,

 

one or two Swede 55 sailors extended the rig by riveting a slightly longer lower section to the junction (the original Selden Spar consists of two parts) thus extending the mast a little. Lifting the lower spreader slightly. Seems to be a economic way to give the boat a little more sailarea. As far as I know this was done at "Elisa", Swede 55 no. 3. Moving the headstay forward on the deck seems a common option.

 

Yes, the mast is pretty heavy (100 kgs bare tube weight plus standing and runnig rigging, alltogether 150 kgs). On the other hand it is rigid, withstands common mistakes in handling and lasts forever wich I do find beneficial.

 

Valdemarsvik is close to where all the 55s were built. Seems it takes a while to get to the sea. Beautiful waters!

 

Some day I would like to sail to Västervik.

 

Jens, do you know other Swede 55 sailors in sweden? There is one I know of in Västervik. It is number 21, she used to bear the name "Viveka" and later "Sparnoccio" and she came a couple of years ago from he south.

 

Your treadmaster looks quite good. Mine is pretty much worn (UV- light, abrasion etc). Did you start with the Treadmaster cleaner and then applying the Treadcote? I have mixed experience with such miraculous chemicals, therefore I am still reluctant.

 

Another sailing shot from July this year.

 

Sailors greeting to the east cost of Sweden

 

Best, Zebra

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I used to own Swede 55 Hull 34 built in 1984. I was under the impression she was the last of the original 55's built.

 

I sold her in about year 2000.

 

I understand she is now in San Francisco area and has the name "Kyte" and has been repainted dark blue.

 

Here is a picture of her under her original color and name "Die Nadel" (sorry about my kid blocking the shot, but it is the only electronic picture I have of her.)

post-8115-023542100 1314247246_thumb.jpg

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We are finally up to speed this year, and having a great time with Rosina. We managed a 3rd last night, but it was in puffy 10-18 knot conditions. We went with the #2 and a full main. At times we had great speed, other times we were a bit over powered:

 

post-2826-060999900 1314288616_thumb.jpg

 

 

We have had better luck in our Weekend distance races. Currently first in our class (A-Class), and 3rd overall in the Spinnaker division.

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Well done Slowboat! The Swede 55 combined with a entusiastic crew is tough to beat under the right conditions!

 

I saw that you have installed a new mainsheet traveler system. What is your experience of that? Are you satisfied?

 

We are finally up to speed this year, and having a great time with Rosina. We managed a 3rd last night, but it was in puffy 10-18 knot conditions. We went with the #2 and a full main. At times we had great speed, other times we were a bit over powered:

 

post-2826-060999900 1314288616_thumb.jpg

 

 

We have had better luck in our Weekend distance races. Currently first in our class (A-Class), and 3rd overall in the Spinnaker division.

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Lot's of pages in this topic right now. Interesting information from you! If we all work together maybe we can track down all the Swede 55's and make a register to see what's become with all of them?

 

I used to own Swede 55 Hull 34 built in 1984. I was under the impression she was the last of the original 55's built.

 

I sold her in about year 2000.

 

I understand she is now in San Francisco area and has the name "Kyte" and has been repainted dark blue.

 

Here is a picture of her under her original color and name "Die Nadel" (sorry about my kid blocking the shot, but it is the only electronic picture I have of her.)

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Hello Jens,

 

 

 

this is the start of a condensed boat list with inevitable gaps, including rumors and guesses. Sweden, Finland, Norway to begin with:

 

 

 

The fraternity of Swede 55 aficionados spread over many countries is welcome to help to update and make necessary adjustments.

 

 

 

The design is signed by Knud Reimers in June 1975. Production must have been started in 1976 with the first boats delivered in 1977 and stopped in autumn 1979 with boat no 27 and others delivered in spring 1980, plus one hull for „Susaija".

 

 

 

Please note the boat list contains all Swede 55 variations, no matter there were called „Swede 75", „Swede 75 special" or „Swede 52", the boat with the mahogany superstructure („Susaija") or the cold moulded replica built in the US.

 

 

 

 

 

Twelve/thirtheen boats in Sweden?

 

- No 2 „Slanka Frun" ex. „Immola" ex. „Swedeheart" built 1977

 

- No 3 „Elisa" red hull, spar extended two metres, built 1977

 

- No 4 „Sweda" ex. „Prillan" from 1977, berthed Tyresö

 

- No 10 „Vilda Mathilda" built 1977, is or used to be in Stockholm waters

 

- No 15 „Scirocco" presumably built in 1987, now in Solna Sweden?

 

- No 18 „Skuggfaxe" ex. „So Long" ex „Columella II" presumbly buit in 1978, berthed in Vaxholm/Stockholm waters

 

- No 20 previously named „Viveka" then „Sparnoccio" now in Västervik (white hull, added jumper struts in the top)

 

- No 30 „Fast Lane" built in 1983, now in Nacka/Stockholm

 

- another Swede 55 in Norrköping for reconditioning (?)

 

- „Swede 75 special" named „Birgit" berthed at GKSS Lagedrag/Gothenburg

 

- Swede 75 no. 2 „Stina" ex. „Universal Heartbeat" came via UK, northern Germany back to Sweden, berthed Bankeryd/Lake Vättern

 

- another Swede 75/52 built in 1998

 

- one Swede 52 built in Gotland in 2006/07

 

 

 

 

 

two Swede 55 in Finland

 

There is a modified Swede 55 with wooden superstructure and shorter spar now named „Quintus" ex. „Suveren", ex. „Susaija", sailnumber L 5155. Apparently a pretty and well kept boat. Foto enclosed.

 

 

 

Boat no 5 „Alda", now sailnumber FIN 10481, previously in Sweden, white hulled, built 1977, berthed Turku waters

 

 

 

one Swede 55 in Norway

 

boat no S 8 (ex. „Geila III", Stockholm waters) came via Oslo to Etne/Bergen. Sail Number NOR 9091, name „Axe".

 

 

 

 

More Swede 55 mania to follow.

 

 

 

 

 

Best

 

 

 

 

 

Zebra

 

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Yes, there are two swede 55's in Finland:

 

Boat no 5 „Alda"

and

Boat no 21, Carina, which is ours and placed in Helsinki, Suomenlinna

 

Quintus was sold to Sweden in 2008, but had a litlle accident in rough weather when sailing back to Sweden.

The boat

Location

 

 

br, Tinke

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ref. "Carina"

 

Hello Tinke,

 

 

some late afternoon in the mid eighties, when approaching the port of El Kantaoui in Tunisia (North Africa) I was surprized to note a Swede 55 named „Carina“ standing high and dry next to the gasoline station. It was quite an experience to find such a particular boat, in my mind the essence of scandinavian yachting culture, in this part of the world with a lot of sand, camels and tourists looking for sun. She had a white, the original gelcoat hull, then.

 

 

She belonged to Olof Hildebrand (who invented and developed the Swede 55) and had kept her for a while in the Adriatic before moving to Tunisia with the attempt to build a „Super Swede 53“ (a Peter Norlin design).

 

 

From the mid eigthies to the mid nineties, „Carina“ was owned by a swiss gentleman, who had her berthed at the Balearic Islands (Ibiza or Mallorca). Later in the nineties she was brought to the Adriatic sea by her third owner and then went to the fancy Port Grimaud at Cote d’ Azur in the hands of her fourth (a german) owner.

 

 

Apart from the inevitable work to keep a 34 year old fibreglass boat with decades in the med, are you happy with „Carina“?

 

 

It would be nice to see fotos of her today.

 

 

Best, Zebra

 

 

Enclosed a shot taken in June this year with a lot of overcast, as common this summer with mixed conditions and – yes – occasionally even sun

 

 

post-24585-018616700 1314876932_thumb.jpg

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Hello all,

 

thank you, Zebra, for information of Carina. Olof took the boat to the Med in 1979, kept mainly in Cannes. Then the boat was until 1994 in Ibiza, where Carina was more or less a sailing toy. The owner, a Swiss industrialist, had a bigger boat (a Jongert) for serious business. Then Carina was a couple of years in Ravenna and in 1996 the fourth owner (Mr. German) bought it. He made a major refit in 1996/97 at Pier 12, including teak deck and blue hull. The boat was kept in Port Grimaud until we saw it in the Yacht World web-site, Feb 2009.

 

We knew that it is not very wise to buy a boat from the Med. But if you have owned S-30, when you'll naturally buy a Swede 55 for next boat. So, we went to Port Grimaud in Apr 2009 to check the boat. There was some osmosis problem in the hull, but still we made the deal.

 

We didn't notice then the leakage problems caused by the teak deck and not properly installed chain plates and bolts. As I wrote before (Sep 2009), our trip back to Finland ended in Portugal and the boat was transported by the truck to Finland. One could say that it wasn't very wise to buy a boat from Med.

 

Lots of renovations have been made during last year, as you can see from the pics below. The boat will go back to water next spring.

 

br, Tinke

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Boat of a similar type - the BB 10 meter. Here is mine with an asym up last weekend. Great singlehanded or with minimal crew.

post-9897-079886100 1315416225_thumb.jpg

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Hello Tinke,

 

 

after all you went through, you deserve many happy seasons with „Carina“. Puuh. Some yars ago I sanded several layers of antifouling down to the gelcoat and covered with Epoxy treatment. Awful times. I have kind of an idea of what you were facing.

 

 

At least, you had the Dragon to recover from those dusty and nasty jobs.

 

 

Due to the new engine bed laminated into the bottom, I assume you installed a new engine? I guess you put in a way lighter Yanmar (copared to the original Volvo)? Which engine did you choose?

 

 

I still have the original Vovo MD 17C. Single circle sea water cooling replaced decades ago by fresh water cooling (the original Volvo kit) seems to have been wise.

 

Apart from an occasional reluctance to start second after the engine has run shortly, the good old Volvo works nice.

 

 

The boat is even more elegant with the dark blue hull.

 

 

Regarding the shape of your rudder, you should have asked me for giving you the ideal NACA profile.

 

 

 

To continue with the Swede 55 fleet spread over the countries, today Denmark an GB:

 

 

 

three Swede 55 in Denmark

 

DEN 14 „Calypso“, ex „Santé Montpellier“ ex „As“ (used to have the sail number FRA 16232, presumably boat no 14) is now in Skive, Limfjord, northern Denmark (refurbuished, sprayed gelcoat, teak deck, mahogany foot rail etc done by Vaerfted Skive, white hull).

 

 

DEN 25 „Es“ ex „Kaniga“ (previosly berthed in Kiel Schilksee, then Kopperby/Schlei) is now at Oresund (Rungsted or nearby) Denmark (refurbuished, sprayed desk and hull, teak deck, mahogany foot rail etc, refit done by Vaerfted Skive, white hull).

 

 

DEN 6 „So Long“ (presumably boat no 6) used to be in Espoo/Finland (sail number L 1085), until mid nineties, then had two german owners, berthed in Kiel. She is now in Thuro/Svendborg waters (Denmark) hull sprayed dark blue.

 

 

 

two Swede 55 in England

 

US – GBR 15 named „Lotus“ (presumably boat no 15, previously named „Tiara“ (not sure) came as deck cargo from the eastern seaboard of the US to the south coast of England (white hull).

 

GBR 26 named „Valhall“ is moored on the Itchen River/Southampton. Boat had initially a german owner who sold her somewhat soon in Guernsey.

 

 

 

More Swede 55 mania to follow

 

 

Best, Zebra

 

 

 

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Hi!

 

Would you please help me identifying the make/model of the boat on the pictures below? It is currently sailed on Lake Balaton, Hungary, but it also has a German (maybe Bodensee?) license number on its bow. Can it be an S30, or S40? Is this a Swedish boat, or maybe a Beck und Söhne? I found pics of many similar boats on the internet, but none of them were an exact match.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Punga Cove

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post-61793-090884600 1335990903_thumb.jpg

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Hi!

 

Would you please help me identifying the make/model of the boat on the pictures below? It is currently sailed on Lake Balaton, Hungary, but it also has a German (maybe Bodensee?) license number on its bow. Can it be an S30, or S40? Is this a Swedish boat, or maybe a Beck und Söhne? I found pics of many similar boats on the internet, but none of them were an exact match.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Punga Cove

 

The sail number might have been a clue, but ......

The following source: Schärenkreuzer Klasse shows photographs of a pretty different boat for GER 108, it might well be 2nd hand sails.

 

Let me say that you are pretty lucky to live near Lake Balaton which is a "living museum" of the Skerry Cruisers.

I had the luck to do business there in the early 90's just after the "change" and will never forget the sight of the neglected but sound pre-war SKs in the Balatonfüred shipyard, including, of course, the mighty 75s.

There were sailors around (now in their 60s) who had been active in the post-war years and some may know the boat, may be you can find them.

 

For you the SKs on Balaton in 1934! (in front of Tihany church is it ?)

post-6361-020631500 1336035420_thumb.png

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Hi!

 

Would you please help me identifying the make/model of the boat on the pictures below? It is currently sailed on Lake Balaton, Hungary, but it also has a German (maybe Bodensee?) license number on its bow. Can it be an S30, or S40? Is this a Swedish boat, or maybe a Beck und Söhne? I found pics of many similar boats on the internet, but none of them were an exact match.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Punga Cove

 

The sail number might have been a clue, but ......

The following source: Schärenkreuzer Klasse shows photographs of a pretty different boat for GER 108, it might well be 2nd hand sails.

 

Let me say that you are pretty lucky to live near Lake Balaton which is a "living museum" of the Skerry Cruisers.

I had the luck to do business there in the early 90's just after the "change" and will never forget the sight of the neglected but sound pre-war SKs in the Balatonfüred shipyard, including, of course, the mighty 75s.

There were sailors around (now in their 60s) who had been active in the post-war years and some may know the boat, may be you can find them.

 

For you the SKs on Balaton in 1934! (in front of Tihany church is it ?)

 

Thnaks for the photo! Yes, there are some really nice classic skerry cruisers on the Balaton, 22s, 30s, 40s and a few 75s. Fortunately, many of them have been beautifully renovated after the "change". If you are interested, check out

 

http://www.nemereii.hu/gallery.html

 

and

 

http://sirocco.mcorp.hu/20090630_izsak_szabolcs_emlekverseny?pic=7#galeria

 

of two beautiful 75s that are actively raced on the lake.

 

The boat I posted the pictures about is a relative newcomer to the lake compared to the old classics, and is a kind of rarity here. So far I found contradicting info about its origins (year built - 1973 or 1990s?, builder - Fisksätra Varv or Beck und Sohne or an other shipyard?, and its type - s30 or s40?) on the web in Hungary.

 

Thanks anyway.

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Punga Cove,

 

an S30 cruising squaremetre hull is 12,50 x 2,50. Does this match to the boat concerned?

 

I suggest to check with the 30 sqm class association: www.sk30.com

or Beck & Soehne: www.bootswerft-beck.de

 

Beck and Soehne used to build S30s and a larger Version, the Beck 40 cruising sqm type: 13 x 2,80 m

 

Check with their website.

 

Due to the superstructure I presume it is either a modified S30, a 40 cruising sqm or an amateur built boat - perhaps coming from Sweden.

 

Good luck and best

 

Zebra

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A foto and drawing of another Knud H. Reimers designed cruising squaremetreboat, named S40 and built by Beck & Söhne in Southern Germany: LOA 13 m, similar to the S30 series production boat in fibreglass (12,50 m LoA).

 

Note the Reimers deckshouse with the raised aft end of the superstructure. This particular boat was ordered without coaming and aft cabin.

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I would like to know more information about former Die Nagel,now called Kyte.Can you tell me how the Swede 55 sails under bad weather.Thank you for your answer.Bebert

I used to own Swede 55 Hull 34 built in 1984. I was under the impression she was the last of the original 55's built.

I sold her in about year 2000.

I understand she is now in San Francisco area and has the name "Kyte" and has been repainted dark blue.

Here is a picture of her under her original color and name "Die Nadel" (sorry about my kid blocking the shot, but it is the only electronic picture I have of her.)

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I would like to know more information about former Die Nagel,now called Kyte.Can you tell me how the Swede 55 sails under bad weather.Thank you for your answer.Bebert

I used to own Swede 55 Hull 34 built in 1984. I was under the impression she was the last of the original 55's built.

 

I sold her in about year 2000.

 

I understand she is now in San Francisco area and has the name "Kyte" and has been repainted dark blue.

 

Here is a picture of her under her original color and name "Die Nadel" (sorry about my kid blocking the shot, but it is the only electronic picture I have of her.)

Sorry, I did not see this post until today. I sailed Die Nadel (now Kyte) in some 35-40 knots winds and she was very well behaved both up and down wind. I found that leaving the 150 up and reefing the main was the best in up to about 25 and when it really got windy (30+) she did well under main alone. Great boat and the inspiration for my new vessel which is almost finished construction.

post-8115-0-91415500-1375027641_thumb.jpg

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Hello Swede 55 sailors!

 

I have Swede 55 in Turku Finland,

it is number 4 from 1977,

S/Y Alda, I have sailed it since 2006.

 

Br

J-P

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The "Francis Lee" (a custom Perry Sliver Class Daysailor) was greatly influenced by my old Swede 55 Hull 34. (Now known as Kyte.)

 

The "Francis Lee" has a few inches more beam at 9'10", 10 feet more LOA at 62' and 15 feet more LWL at 55' and maybe 1000 additional pounds of displacement at 19,000. We will carry quite a bit more sail area at 1185 sq ft (no overlapping headsails) and 46% ballast bulb drawing 10 feet.

 

She is in her finishing stage here in Seattle. Hope to have a sailing report before the end of the month.

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Hello Swede 55 sailors!

 

I have Swede 55 in Turku Finland,

it is number 4 from 1977,

S/Y Alda, I have sailed it since 2006.

 

Br

J-P

Whaow, nice fotos. Kindly post more to help through the winter.

„Alda“ ex. „Sweda“ ex. „Prillan“ from Stockholm waters, true?

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Hi

Yes my boat S-4 1977 is same boat, first meny years in Stockholm / KSSS, I bought it from Vesterås / Mälaren.

 

Hello Swede 55 sailors!

 

I have Swede 55 in Turku Finland,

it is number 4 from 1977,

S/Y Alda, I have sailed it since 2006.

 

Br

J-P

Whaow, nice fotos. Kindly post more to help through the winter.

„Alda“ ex. „Sweda“ ex. „Prillan“ from Stockholm waters, true?

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Hi Swede 55 Sailors,



regarding Swede 55 rudder bearings, have a look at:



http://segelreporter.com/panorama/winterlager-erdmann-braschos-ueber-die-buchsen-wissenschaft-nicht-nur-an-seiner-swede-55/



Running the text through a translator might help all those not understanding german.



Will be continued with more about in depth Rudder surgery.



Best, Zebra


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A rendering of Swede 55, to help through the last weeks of this winter. Nice lines ...post-24585-0-25353100-1395147817_thumb.jpg


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Hi Zebra,

Interesting article about reairing the rudder on your boat, and interesting to read by Erdmann Braschos. We shared some correspondence a few years ago. My german is very limitd but I gather the connection between the blade and the SS post was compromised and you chose to repair. Years ago when Vortex was returning from Bedrmuda to Maine she got caught in a nasty squall in the Gluf Stream. While surfing dawn a wave at 17 knts in 55 knts of wind, the rudder post (heavy wall SS pipe) was bent, but remained operable fortunatly. I repaireed the rudder by straightening it and then installing a new piece of smaller SS pipe that fit inside the existing pipe and weld it in place.

tat was in 1997 and I have been worried about it ever since.

This year I decided to replace the rudder with a completely new one of carbon fiber. I choose a blade designed by Jim Taylor and discussed with him my idea for removing the fixed skeg in front of the rudder completely, which he agreed was a good idea. I also choose to replace the rudder tube and install new roller bearings, upper and lower for improved feel. These bearings were made by Jefa. I re-used my old quadrant and all other gear. The old blade was cedar and fiberglass, and with the addition of the SS repair, weighed in at a whopping 150 lbs. My new carbon rudder totaled 50.5 lbs and is probably a lot stronger! Also, no more worries about crevice corrosion. The new blade is a bit smaller (shorter in length fore and aft, but same depth) and I do notice that the boat doesn't turn a tightly while manouvering around the docks at slow speed. Under normal sailing conditions the helm feels much better, although I believe that is mostly due to the roller bearings. The replacement took about 25 hours of labor and rudder and bearing cost was in the $9000 range.

To see the shape of it go to www.brooklinboatyard.com and look at the Taylor 49 we are currently building-same rudder-almost exactly

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JSW:

I am working with Mr. Baschos on an article about Kim's new 63'er right now.

I look forward to hearing your report on the new rudder performance. I think it will be wonderful.

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Hi Bob,

I've been following Kim's new build of your design for a while now. Very interesting, and I love interesting boats. My dad, Joel, designed a 63' sloop for Kim years ago, losely based on the 55's years ago, but Kim never had it built. It is much more traditional in appearence, especially the cabintrunk.

I can't wait to see the first sailing pictures of the new one. Any dates for trials yet? Care to comment on the double ender verses the transom? Visions of Oceanus by Bill Garden?

I sailed all last summer with the new rudder and wish I had some real data to report, but can only say it "feels" faster. Removing 100 lbs of weight and reducing both wetted surface and reducing the foil width must have improved her. I haven't been able to tell any difference by removing the small skeg, but it was additional weight (beyond the rudder weight) and surface area.

Now I'm looking at my old fashioned keel shape-but that is a lot of work-even with the bronze floors the boat has!

Steve White

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Steve:

We sailed the boat last weekend in light air only and all aboard were extremely happy with the performance. We were lucky to have a racing fleet around us so there were plenty of boats going to weather to gauge our performance. She's fast and loves to point. Helm is just shy of neutral in the light stuff but there's enough weather helm to it to get a good feel. I was initially concerned about lee helm is light air.

 

The boat is a double ender simply because that is what Kim wanted.

There is zero similarities between Frankie and OCEANUS other than both are double enders.

I love OCEANUS but that hull shape is a total mystery to me,. I raced on OCEANUS when I was a kid and it has the boat speed of an 8 meter. Tat's it.

More inspiration came from Herreshoff's Sailing Machine. Kim sent me a copy of those lines and we went with the canoe like short ends.

sails9_zps094c71aa.jpg

sailsgreatsternshot_zps12c7658d.jpg

sails12m_zps91688451.jpg

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Hi Bob,

I've been following Kim's new build of your design for a while now. Very interesting, and I love interesting boats. My dad, Joel, designed a 63' sloop for Kim years ago, losely based on the 55's years ago, but Kim never had it built. It is much more traditional in appearence, especially the cabintrunk.

I can't wait to see the first sailing pictures of the new one. Any dates for trials yet? Care to comment on the double ender verses the transom? Visions of Oceanus by Bill Garden?

I sailed all last summer with the new rudder and wish I had some real data to report, but can only say it "feels" faster. Removing 100 lbs of weight and reducing both wetted surface and reducing the foil width must have improved her. I haven't been able to tell any difference by removing the small skeg, but it was additional weight (beyond the rudder weight) and surface area.

Now I'm looking at my old fashioned keel shape-but that is a lot of work-even with the bronze floors the boat has!

Steve White

 

Steve,

 

Working with your Dad on that design was a delight, he was a kind and delightful man. My wife and I met him many years ago via Aage Nielsen's daughter and I will never forget what a nice guy he was and how well he received us.

 

I realized after having John Guzwell build a half model of that vessel, that I had wandered far away from my original Puget Sound daysailor concept. My fault, not Joel's, but I learned a great deal from working with your father and he had a major influence on my ongoing thinking as I continued to dream about this vessel.

 

Finally I teamed up with my long time pal Bob Perry and we made it happen. She is a double ended vessel because she is named after my late dad Frank, and he loved double ended vessels. She is also very simple and straight forward as she was not designed to be anything other than a Puget Sound daysailor and occasional weekender.

 

If you ever get to Seattle dinner is on me after we go for a sail. We will invited Bob too.

 

Best to you Steve,

 

Kim

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Thanks Bob and Kim for the replies. I love the sailing photos-it sure looks like she likes the light air, which I can't say is true for Vortex. What is the sail area/displacement ratio for Frankie? mid 20's?

I assume that the interior is as simple too.? I envision a vee berth forward, then a head aft of that, full width of the boat and then a saloon with seats/berths and galley aft at the companionway?

I saw some photos of her being built and as I recall she was strip planked with cedar (?) and then covered with a few layers of e-glass? We've done 4 different daysailors with cedar strip planking and a single layer of 9 oz.uni-directional carbon inside and outside, overlapping at the centerline. It has been very successful, but the boats are only 10,000 lbs displacement or less.

Kim, I travel a fair bit these days and have a good friend and ex-employee that is an instructor at the boatbuilding school in Port Townsend. I went to his wedding summer before last and we loved the area. If I get out there again I promise to take you up on your dinner invitation. I bet we would have some fun.

Best,

Steve

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Steve,

 

Yes, mid 20's SA/Disp. 10 foot draft with lead bulb ballast, carbon rudder and mast.

Interior a simple larger version of the Swede55 queen forward two long settee berths in salon. Very empty ends.

1" western red cedar sheathed in 24 ounce triaxial Vectorply set in West System epoxy (under the supervision of Russell Brown and input from West System staff.)

All interior structure is foam core composite reinforced at key points. Cabin/deck/cockpit all one piece foam core composite.

The boat was engineered by Tim Nolan to a very high standard. (He was afraid I might take her off shore, so he engineered her accordingly.)

Cheer, KB

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Here you go. I just love this guy's work.

Layout_zps71279be3.jpg

The ballast ratio, waterline length and lightweight construction seem to make „Francis Lee“ an interesting Swede 55 successor.

„Francis Lee“ being covered in braschosblog (http://segelreporter.com/kategorie/blogs/braschosblog/)

at www.segelreporter.com

http://segelreporter.com/blogs/besonderes-boot-der-19-meter-lange-doppelender-francis-lee/

paste and copy the text in: http://translate.google.com/#de/en/

to get a rough translation.

 

Best, Zebra

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I gotta say, as much as I am enamored with Frankie, I like Vortex better! And every year or two I have an irresistable urge to dig out my book and drool over the drawings of Joel's Design #50.

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I gotta say, as much as I am enamored with Frankie, I like Vortex better! And every year or two I have an irresistable urge to dig out my book and drool over the drawings of Joel's Design #50.

I like Vortex a lot. I considered buying her way back many years ago when Steve had her for sale. Cool boat.

 

And I also had a JW designed Sakonnet 23 for a while. Great little boat.

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Hi Zebra,

Interesting article about reairing the rudder on your boat, and interesting to read by Erdmann Braschos. We shared some correspondence a few years ago. My german is very limitd but I gather the connection between the blade and the SS post was compromised and you chose to repair. Years ago when Vortex was returning from Bedrmuda to Maine she got caught in a nasty squall in the Gluf Stream. While surfing dawn a wave at 17 knts in 55 knts of wind, the rudder post (heavy wall SS pipe) was bent, but remained operable fortunatly. I repaireed the rudder by straightening it and then installing a new piece of smaller SS pipe that fit inside the existing pipe and weld it in place.

tat was in 1997 and I have been worried about it ever since.

This year I decided to replace the rudder with a completely new one of carbon fiber. I choose a blade designed by Jim Taylor and discussed with him my idea for removing the fixed skeg in front of the rudder completely, which he agreed was a good idea. I also choose to replace the rudder tube and install new roller bearings, upper and lower for improved feel. These bearings were made by Jefa. I re-used my old quadrant and all other gear. The old blade was cedar and fiberglass, and with the addition of the SS repair, weighed in at a whopping 150 lbs. My new carbon rudder totaled 50.5 lbs and is probably a lot stronger! Also, no more worries about crevice corrosion. The new blade is a bit smaller (shorter in length fore and aft, but same depth) and I do notice that the boat doesn't turn a tightly while manouvering around the docks at slow speed. Under normal sailing conditions the helm feels much better, although I believe that is mostly due to the roller bearings. The replacement took about 25 hours of labor and rudder and bearing cost was in the $9000 range.

To see the shape of it go to www.brooklinboatyard.com and look at the Taylor 49 we are currently building-same rudder-almost exactly

Hi Steve,

 

I remember meeting you and your father vividly. And later that afternoon in the mid nineties I had the chance to borrow a dinghy and row to Vortex, spent some time studying her from many angles, details you altered.

 

Didn’t know you had a skeg in front of your rudder.

 

I still have to check the weight of the rudder being repaired (extra lever welded) resin to hold it in place, plus some kgs of Filler added to achieve to supposed shape. Will then run part 3 of the Swede 55 rudder Story at: http://segelreporter.com/kategorie/blogs/braschosblog/

 

There will be a study of a recommendable profile.

 

However, all Swede 55 owners (original Fisksaetra Varv manufactures) should check their rudder with a metal detector and find out how many levers are actually inside the blade. Due to the drawing, there should be three.

 

Best,

 

Zebra

 

 

 

post-24585-0-02926600-1396261721_thumb.jpg

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Hi Zebra,

Interesting article about reairing the rudder on your boat, and interesting to read by Erdmann Braschos. We shared some correspondence a few years ago.

Hi Steve,

 

congratulations to your new rudder. I did not know Vortex has a skeg in front of ist rudder. Swede 55 as manufactured by Fisksaetra in Sweden 1975/76 - 1979 has a kind of fin protruding from the hull but sitting entirely above the spade rudder. So do the successors being built later by others (using the same mould).

 

I would have preferred to get a new 25 kgs (55 lbs) rudder with a stock made out of carbonfiber made instead of adding approx 15 kgs (33 lbs) to the already 70 kgs (154 lbs) heavy rudder. Total_ 85 kgs/187 lbs.

 

There was stainless steel for the extra lever arm being added, plus resin to hold it properly in place (foam was not the best material to take the loads but lasted long), then fairing compound for improving the shape.

 

For me is was a matter of practicabiliy (budget) not to replace parts of the fairly heavy and mostly wellbuilt if not oversized fibreglass boat, displacing approx 8,5 – 8,7 metric tons (18.740 – 19.180 lbs). Further I doubt if these efforts would be reasonable for my boat.

 

Once this would be done, I would see the „need“ to replace the solid aluminium casted rudder quadrant of 3,1 kgs (6,83 lbs) by a better and lighter one. All this aboard a boat used for (fast) cruising and some races ...

 

Third part of the Swede 55 Rudder story online.

 

Part one covered the bearings:

http://segelreporter.com/panorama/winterlager-erdmann-braschos-ueber-die-buchsen-wissenschaft-nicht-nur-an-seiner-swede-55/

 

Part two the repair and addition of a lever arm:

http://segelreporter.com/blogs/winterlager-chirurgische-massnahmen-am-offenen-ruder/

 

Part three is now online and covers the selection of the ideal profile, preparation and work done to apply it to the blade:

 

http://segelreporter.com/blogs/winterlager-chirurgische-massnahmen-am-offenen-ruder/

 

 

It should be easy to paste and copy it to any online translator like: http://translate.google.com/#de/en/

 

 

However I am interested to see fotos of the new Vortex rudder here in this thread.

 

 

Best,

 

Zebra

post-24585-0-32996600-1397659484_thumb.jpg

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Vortex looks amazing!

 

The big projects this year on Rosina are rebuilding the icebox, and replumbing the head. I'm making the icebox larger & better insulated. I'm also replacing the Norcold compressor with a new one...should be a sailing season with cold beer!

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Boy, Vortex is pretty. Remember rowing circles around her in the nineties.




Vintage Volvo MD17C due to be lowered back in place. Sturdy and pretty reliable auxiliary engine – mostly.



26 Kw (35 HP) at 2.500 rpm, 317 kgs (700 lbs). Won't blame it for itsweight. It might decide to stop running.



Best, Zebra


post-24585-0-17117700-1400071651_thumb.jpg

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Sometimes you forget the ubiquitous compromizing compromize. Then the beauty and thrill of sailing matters more than money issues.


post-24585-0-03840500-1405340901_thumb.jpg

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Beautiful boats. Whenever I see a picture of one I always think, ‘you’d want your own swinging mooring, wouldn’t want to be paying for dock by the foot.’

Sometimes, the harbourmaster is nice and helps you to shorten the 52 feet. You just need to know where the nice guys are.

post-24585-0-29901700-1406794721_thumb.jpg

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Swede 55 and a Swan probably same age. Two scandinavian boats with different conceps. Light displacement and easy to handle sails, more displacement and huge foretriangle as common in IOR days