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Machrihanish

Sea Anchors & Drogues

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The Jordan series, ok, exellent concept,

Gale Rider, webbed chute shape, conventional cone design

The Para drogue,

 

then I run across a sea anchor called "Sea Brake" has webbing over canvas chute with a reverse cone in front, I have never seen one of these other than on the net and yesterday at the consignment store.

the manufaturer claims they don't spin so the use of a trip line and I was wondering if a person could use three strand rode for it and a swivel or two on the chain part.

 

I was wondering if anybody here has used one or knows of this type of sea anchor, any tips on it's use would be helpful too.

 

thanks for your time.

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You'll need to clarify what you are after, what you want it to do. A drogue and a sea/para anchor are two different things. A drogue allows the vessel to move forward slowly, say 1 1/2 knots, while the sea anchor basically "hooks" the vessel into what ever current exists.

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Here are some other discussions of drogues and sea anchors that might be of interest:

 

Drag Device Testing carried out by Steve Daschew and friends: http://www.setsail.com/s_logs/dashew/dashew311.html, with Evans Starzinger's comments and discussion from the peanut gallery: http://64.70.221.24/DiscBoard/viewtopic.php?t=1220

 

Making your own Jordan Series Drogue from scratch: http://64.70.221.24/DiscBoard/viewtopic.php?t=988

 

Bridle techniques for Sea Anchors and Drogues: http://64.70.221.24/DiscBoard/viewtopic.php?t=1356

 

Using a Drogue off the bow instead of the stern? http://64.70.221.24/DiscBoard/viewtopic.php?t=214

 

What are you going to attach your Drogue to? http://64.70.221.24/DiscBoard/viewtopic.php?t=208

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Catamount, they mentioned on one of the threads that nylon has a tendency to break under the constant stretch and ease of the line and that the nylon would build up heat internaly then break, have you ever heard of this?

The three strand seems to be the prefered anchor rode, why would it be different than on a drogue I wonder?

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Mac...,

 

Here are some other sites that might be of interest, if you're looking at drogues:

 

Jordan Series Drogue:

http://www.jordanseriesdrogue.com/

http://seriesdrogue.com/

 

Galerider:

http://www.galerider.com/

 

Sea Brake:

http://www.seateach.com/Seabrake.asp

 

Delta Drogue (from Para-Tech):

http://www.seaanchor.com/deltadrogue.htm

 

Boat Brakes (also from Para-Tech):

http://www.seaanchor.com/boatbrakes.htm

 

Florentino Storm Drogue (as mentioned in Daschew's review):

http://www.para-anchor.com/pro.stormdrogue.html

 

Cal-June/Jim-Buoy Storm Sea Anchors:

http://www.jimbuoy.com/pages/marine/anchors.htm

 

Finally in the back of Ocean Navigator Magazine, I came across a classified advertisement for the "Sea Gripper Storm Drouge" (sic) which gave a website URL, http://www.stormdrouges.com/ -- but the site doesn't seem to exist, nor does http://www.stormdrogues.com/ . There was a phone number, 619-277-0593, but I'm not sure what you can expect for $49.95 worth of yellow nylon from somebody who can't even spell "drogue."

 

Two other sites that might be of interest:

 

Drogues and Sea Anchors for Life Rafts: http://www.equipped.com/avraft13.htm

 

Sea-Anchors.com portal site: http://www.sea-anchors.com/

 

 

Regarding Three-Strand, as I understand it the problem with three-strand is it's potential to unwind itself if the drogue or sea-anchor were to rotate. Nylon is more susceptible to chafe than some other fibers, and this IS problem with a normal anchor rode, but most anchoring is done under relatively benign conditions, so it's not as much of an issue. I haven't experienced it, but I would expect the chafe problem (regardless of what fiber your rode is made of) to be exacerbated dragging a drogue in storm conditions, as each wave impacting the boat would want to make the boat surge that much more.

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I should say, the links I've given above focus on Drogues (as opposed to real Sea Anchors). The two big players in parachute-type Sea Anchors are:

 

Para-Tech Engineering:

http://www.seaanchor.com/seaanchor.htm

 

Florentino Para Anchors:

http://www.para-anchor.com/pro.offsanchor.html

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I've had a gale-rider, with (braided) rode, heavy swivel and bridle, nicely occupying prime real-estate in a cockpit locker for years now. I handle it once a year when arranging the locker - it's never been wet - so tell me, do they have any fun, alternate uses? Or do I need to go searching for a storm so I can use the damn thing? :blink: I always presumed that sea-anchors were for heaving-to (sort of), deployed off the bow to keep you pointed into the wind

and almost stopped, whereas the drogue was to be deployed off the stern when running before a storm to slow you down. I invite correction if I'm wrong (as I frequently am).

 

Frankly, when I find myself out offshore in 40-45+ knots, I already feel pretty stupid for not believing the weather forecast (confession - I'm pretty much limited to seasonal coastal cruising), but even in those conditions a storm jib on the inner forestay and deeply reefed main seem to work pretty well. You guys must be looking for some pretty horrendous conditions - the sort I promised my wife I'd avoid if possible.

 

I guess the drogue is like a life raft - you have it hoping to never use it. I flake the rode in its turtle every year just in case Gremlins have gotten in and tied it in knots. But then, I also have the life raft inflated, inspected and repacked every year too, and make sure the EPIRB tests OK.

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I've had a gale-rider, with (braided) rode, heavy swivel and bridle, nicely occupying prime real-estate in a cockpit locker for years now. I handle it once a year when arranging the locker - it's never been wet - so tell me, do they have any fun, alternate uses?

 

You can use it as a basket for recovering overboard crew or other flotsam or jetsam that you might want to crane aboard.

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8/15/2008

Hi,

Recent email from satisfied user Jordan Series DRogue

 

Thanks,

 

Dave Pelissier

Ace Sailmakers

3-D Colton Road

East Lyme, CT 06333

860 739 5999

860 739 7999 fax

AceSailmakers@yahoo.com

JordanSeriesDrogue.com

 

 

mike clelford" <sailingpig@hotmail.com>

Add sender to Contacts

To:

acesailmakers@yahoo.com

Message contains attachments

USHUAIA TO RESCUE.zip (2021KB)

Hi chaps,

 

you may or may not remember the will it or wont it arrive on time saga of the jordan drogue i ordered whilst in ushuaia last november (it was sent to my home address in england so's the wife could bring it out with her) , however it did arrive and boy oh boy am i glad.

There is no question about it but that jordan drogue works like a dream.

The attached is an unedited version of our story that was printed in the july 2008 issue of yachting monthly (uk).

 

I have been asked by a few people how i retrieved the drogue so i thought i may give you my method although i have no doubt that other people use the same.

I first tried pulling in one of the bridles by winch etc etc but that didn't work to great, i then tried using the anchor winch but that caused problems with the boat sailing from side to side and catching the droguettes, the next time i deployed the drogue i attached a polyprop line to the drogue line and then to retrieve just winched it all in over the stern. I found the centre polyprop line to be far easier to use than the bridle lines as it kept the stern central and i didnt need to release either bridle form the cleats until all the pressure was off them.

(the first time i retreived the drogue took 1 1/2 hours, once i 'd got this method sorted it took 20 minutes).

I also used floats on the bridle lines to keep them from snagging my boarding ladder and hydrovane steering sysytem.

All in all everything worked magnificently and i cannot sing the Jordan Drogues praises loud enough, many thanks Mr Jordan and many thanks Ace sailmakers, may all your wishes and dreams come true a thousand times over.

 

 

mike clelford

2008JSDuserAccts.doc

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then I run across a sea anchor called "Sea Brake" I was wondering if a person could use three strand rode for it and a swivel or two on the chain part. I was wondering if anybody here has used one or knows of this type of sea anchor, any tips on it's use would be helpful too.

 

To try to answer your specific questions - the seabrake is moderately popular in australia but we don't see them much anywhere else. If I remember correctly, their first product was a solid plastic drogue which was very difficult to stow and expensive and then they moved to this fabric one.

 

You could use 3 strand and a swivel but double braid is better construction for this application. Unlike a para-anchor, you don't want/need much/any elasticity in a drogue rode. Elasticity will increase chafe. The drogue pulling thru the water will provide most all the shock load cushioning you need. INHO dacron double braid is the right drogue rode. But if you have a spare three strand anchor rode and don't have or want to get a long piece of double braid you could use the three strand - give it good chafe protection and get the best swivel you can (most of them don't really spin very well when under load).

 

In use its pretty much like all the other single element drogues (like the galerider). A bridle is very helpful, and you need to develop some experience with wave shapes/size to be able to pick the best rode length to put out. Sometimes the wave conditions make 100' the best length and other times you really want 600'. All the single element drogues have the potential to pull out of steep wave faces and let the boat accelerate/surf exactly when you don't want it to, so we use them in really shitty conditions but use a multi-element solution (either a two-elemnet drogiue we made ourselves or a full series drogue) when we are expecting the very very worst wave shapes.

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Maybe I missed it, but should not somebody explain that some of these devices are more or less passive storm responses (once deployed) while others are not. I think that aspect figures large into the question of which is preferable and when.

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