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kcwright

Olson 30 question

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I realize it’s an old sport boat but I was hoping someone will have an answer for me. I bought an Olson 30 a little over a month ago. Love the boat but I can’t seem to point as high as other boat out on the course. Is it me or the boat? Any tricks?

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I realize it’s an old sport boat but I was hoping someone will have an answer for me. I bought an Olson 30 a little over a month ago. Love the boat but I can’t seem to point as high as other boat out on the course. Is it me or the boat? Any tricks?

 

 

It could be sails, rig tune, wind conditions, bottom job, or you.... How is the boat set up? How many crew are you sailing with?

 

jibeset

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The Olson has a relatively shallow keel for it's length. To make the most of it's pointing ability, they like to be sailed fairly flat. Also. given that it is such a headsail driven boat; proper genoa trim is very important as well; including backstay adjustment. A well sailed Olson can point with the best of them. Best of luck.

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It could be sails, rig tune, wind conditions, bottom job, or you.... How is the boat set up? How many crew are you sailing with?

 

jibeset

 

Last night we had the #2 up (100%) and the wind was 20 gusting to 30 and there was 4 guys on board. Bottom was redone before the boat went in the water 6 weeks ago. As far as set up goes I guess it’s pretty standard for and Olson. It’s my first boat so if I sound a bit lost it’s because I am.

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4 bodies not enough in that breeze. A 100% jib is a #3 normally. Sounds like you could have used a 3 or a 4. How many spreaders do you have? I haven't sailed the two spreader boats but the single spreader you can damn near fold the mast in half trying to apply headstay tension. Main should be board flat. Two more guys on the rail would have been the difference.

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4 bodies not enough in that breeze. A 100% jib is a #3 normally. Sounds like you could have used a 3 or a 4. How many spreaders do you have? I haven't sailed the two spreader boats but the single spreader you can damn near fold the mast in half trying to apply headstay tension. Main should be board flat. Two more guys on the rail would have been the difference.

 

It's a 2 spreader rig, and the inside stays were a sloppy upwind last night. they have been ok in less wind, should I tighten them up a bit? How tight should the headstay be? so many questions.... Thanks for the feedback.

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Beverator beat me to directing you to the Olson class site. It's very helpful.

 

Most of the Olsons that do well sail with max legal weight on the rail upwind in a breeze.

 

If you are new to the boat and it hasn't been really well maintained the mast step could be soft and the sails could be a little tired, both will kill your upwind ability in a breeze.

 

Takes time to get the feel of the boat too. The more tiller time you get the faster you will go.

 

Good luck. Have fun. They are great boats.

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Being new to the Olson, we've been told that the boat likes alot of twist and does not like to be pinched upwind.

 

don't use alot of vang, keep traveler trimmed to weather, ease the sheet so the boom is centered on the pushpit and when trimming the genoa, talk to the trimmer and go with speed and pointing ability and find the grove...play with the car adjustments, you'll find it.

 

 

As for tension on the rig, when you're sailing up wind, the leeward stays should be just slacked...not floppy limp.

 

 

That should be enough for now...and like these guys said, most of this info is on the class website.

 

Where you at....midwest?

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The boats in Whitby, just east of Toronto. I'll read the class site again and get 2 more guys on the rail. I think the mast step is OK, sails are good not great but good.

Thanks for all the info guys

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The boats in Whitby, just east of Toronto. I'll read the class site again and get 2 more guys on the rail. I think the mast step is OK, sails are good not great but good.

Thanks for all the info guys

 

 

There's a good fleet in Kingston.... Also, we're trying to get the great lakes championship to BYC Detroit NOODS. Do you travel? We have a 2 day race in our area on Labor day weekend and would appreciate your competition....6hr drive, probably.

 

We are contemplating the '08 Chicago to mac race, also....there is 1 or 2 olson30s that race.

 

Here's a link to some races you might be interested in.....

 

http://www.charlevoixyachtclub.org/redfox/index.htm

 

http://www.ltyc.org/

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Right now I don't have a trailer... or a cradle for that matter. I bought the boat from Dave in Kingston, I hope to do some out of town stuff next year but I'm going to spend this summer getting my head around the boat. I haven’t even put up the chute yet.... This weekend I hope. Like I said I'm new!

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it costs about $3800 for a new custom trailer...built in a week.

 

Which one did you buy, Surfer girl or the other one?

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Well, for starters, even with 6 on the rail you should be under a #3 in

17 true. You have to sail it flat. At about 25, a #4 is fast.

 

What was said before about the keel is right, you have to get it moving

fast and keep it flat or you go sideways. Once you start scrubbing that

wide keel sideways, it creates massive drag and the boat is both slow

and sliding off to leeward. That's perhaps the single most common error

among Olson newbes, 10-15 degrees of heel is the limit. Therefore, rail

meat is important. Trying to carry too much sail is bad bad bad.

That boat just doesn't take kindly to being over-grunted.

 

The best set up is for a straight mast (tiny bit fo prebend and tight lowers

to keep it so) with a main cut for that set up (pretty flat). If the mast isn't

stiff, you can't get a tight forestay and pointing in high winds

demands that.

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10-15 degrees, that flat eh... We weren’t even close to that. We did hit 8.2 knots up wind, averaging around 6.5.

I'll tighten up the lowers, I think the forestay is to loose. Next time there's that much wind I'll use the #4.

 

I bought Rocket now Northern Girl. She needs a bit of work, I'll take care of over the long cold winter!

 

Thanks

Kevin

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It's a 2 spreader rig, and the inside stays were a sloppy upwind last night. they have been ok in less wind, should I tighten them up a bit? How tight should the headstay be? so many questions.... Thanks for the feedback.

I don't know shit about the Olson 30, but I'd take the slack out of the leeward shrouds while sailing. Rig tuning doesn't stop at the dock.

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Sailing at the max weight is very important. It is vital in heavy air and does not hurt you in the light. Back in the 90's The fleet here in Seattle was pretty awesome. We had 20 on the line all the time. A #3 was normally sailed from 18-30 knots. Most here did not have a #4 because it never blew that hard for long periods of times. In the 4 nationals that I have done in them I have never put a #4 up and I have never seen one up in big wind. Good Luck!

 

jibeset

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it costs about $3800 for a new custom trailer...built in a week.

 

Which one did you buy, Surfer girl or the other one?

 

What manufacturer are you talking about for $3800?

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The #4 is very good for over 25kts. We use one on SF bay all the time when it get up to 25 or better.

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What manufacturer are you talking about for $3800?

 

 

Damnit...I knew someone would ask that question....I lost the email quote.....

 

 

It was a company out of one of the Carolina's...got the quote this spring when considering an Olson w/o a trailer.

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Damnit...I knew someone would ask that question....I lost the email quote.....

It was a company out of one of the Carolina's...got the quote this spring when considering an Olson w/o a trailer.

 

i got one from www.sail-trailer.com for my mini. very resonable cost and guys who will stand behind their work. these guys are out of georgia

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Another guy to ask is Dave Wilby he sells O30 trailers as well. Good guy and Canadian prices!

 

Janice & David Wilby

Owner/Operators

Pride Marine Group Inc.

4032 Bath Road

Kingston, Ontario

K7M 4Y4

(613) 634-1900

Order Line 1-888-732-8883

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Sailing at the max weight is very important. It is vital in heavy air and does not hurt you in the light. Back in the 90's The fleet here in Seattle was pretty awesome. We had 20 on the line all the time. A #3 was normally sailed from 18-30 knots. Most here did not have a #4 because it never blew that hard for long periods of times. In the 4 nationals that I have done in them I have never put a #4 up and I have never seen one up in big wind. Good Luck!

 

jibeset

 

Agreed with most of the advice given. Hike like crazy. Sailed one for several years in the early 90's in SF. Never used the #4. Hike like crazy. Need 1200+ lbs to sail competitively in one design. Get the rig tunes up and pull on the back stay until it hurts. Hike like crazy. Sail it flat. Ease the jib in breeze to keep the slot open and main working.

 

Also, did I mention that hiking helps?

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Rig tune will prove to be impossible without the "Beam of Destiny" installed between the chainplates. Tensioning the rig to prevent the leward shrouds from slacking will only squeeze the boat. Make a beam, install some form of jock strop ( I run two lines between the underside of the deck and the keel step), then start setting up the rig.

Pointing will only come once the rig is set up, and once you get some pre-bend in the mast to flatten out the main. I learned the hard way- trial and error- since there are no other O-30's in the lower Ches Bay. We'll be at CORK in Aug.

#111

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Rig tune will prove to be impossible without the "Beam of Destiny" installed between the chainplates. Tensioning the rig to prevent the leward shrouds from slacking will only squeeze the boat. Make a beam, install some form of jock strop ( I run two lines between the underside of the deck and the keel step), then start setting up the rig.

Pointing will only come once the rig is set up, and once you get some pre-bend in the mast to flatten out the main. I learned the hard way- trial and error- since there are no other O-30's in the lower Ches Bay. We'll be at CORK in Aug.

#111

This sounds like long-speak for the tensiometer....

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Rig tune will prove to be impossible without the "Beam of Destiny" installed between the chainplates. Tensioning the rig to prevent the leward shrouds from slacking will only squeeze the boat. Make a beam, install some form of jock strop ( I run two lines between the underside of the deck and the keel step), then start setting up the rig.

Pointing will only come once the rig is set up, and once you get some pre-bend in the mast to flatten out the main. I learned the hard way- trial and error- since there are no other O-30's in the lower Ches Bay. We'll be at CORK in Aug.

#111

 

Out in SF I have tuned a few Olson with out the Beam. All are just as fast as the ones with a Beam. You have to remember to let your shrouds off after the races each weekend.

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Out in SF I have tuned a few Olson with out the Beam. All are just as fast as the ones with a Beam. You have to remember to let your shrouds off after the races each weekend.

I call Bullshit on that one.

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I call Bullshit on that one.

 

Olson 30 can be sailed with no beam of destiny. If the boat is in good shape. I sailed my O30 Wild Turkey in PNW 5 years with out it and did just fine. Key aspects are. Correct Rake. Flat main lots of back stay to keep forstay correct. Get the crew to hike and sail at max wieght. Change to No 3 at 18knts app. No 2 is only usefull in a narow range and not realy worth it.

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I call Bullshit on that one.

To name a few boat winning boat that did not or do not have a Beam in SF that are winning Olson. The list contains Hoot, Family Hour, Naked Lady, Zephros/Voodoo Child, Impulse, and I could go on. All these boats are stiff and you don't need the Beam if the boat has not been abused. Family Hour has installed a Beam but it didn't need it yet.

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To name a few boat winning boat that did not or do not have a Beam in SF that are winning Olson. The list contains Hoot, Family Hour, Naked Lady, Zephros/Voodoo Child, Impulse, and I could go on. All these boats are stiff and you don't need the Beam if the boat has not been abused. Family Hour has installed a Beam but it didn't need it yet.

 

#1: Go back to H.S. and retake basic writing for idiots.

#2: You have mentioned just about every boat in the SF fleet. You must be a rigging-god. I still call B.S.

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Fine my grammar is not perfect.

Why don't you come to Nationals in a couple of weeks and see how many boats that don't have the Beam installed.

Also I have been rigging and racing Olson for 17 years.

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Is there a way to tell how stiff the boat is?

 

Pull the back stay on max and look at the lifelines if they go slack the boat is bending Also with back stay on and off measure the distance accross the main bulkhead. Look for compresion in the mast step. Almost all have mast step issue and need work there.

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All good thoughts above. We used the #4 a lot in San Francisco when doing doublehanded races. It helped a lot.

 

lateral rig tune is important. I cna't remember the details, but we had issues for some time with getting the right tension between the cap shrouds and the inner shrouds. Without getting this right, the boat is much harder to sail upwind.

 

I agree with others that twist in heavy air, with a flat main and lots of backstay, is the way to go. Sounds like Aperson really knows his stuff. I used to sail on Run Wild (which had a beam of destiny and an awesome mast step) for several years in the mid 90s.

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Just got our O30 this spring and have already found that the boat needs boat speed first to get it to point with competitors. We sail mostly in flat water and have found that a slightly open main and gen produce the ability to reach off a few degrees to build speed after a tack and the boat amazingly just starts to point by itself once decent speed is up.

 

With a #1, 6 kts is easily a good target speed before thinking of pointing. If it drops below, you will drop down again. Play the sail trim and go fast first. You'll point as high as anybody then. Pinch and you'll be doing 5 and DFL.

 

HOWEVER, this is a newbie speaking about the O30 and disclaimer follows:

 

Free information is worth just what you paid for it.

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Just seconding Apersons thoughts. I agree with him. I also

know of some very fast boats without the beam. I think the

top two boats in the Santa Cruz nationals didn't have it. Capitol

Affair and Lunchbox. 'Nuff said.

 

It's a short masthead rig with a fairly wide base for it's size. Lots

and lots of shroud tension doesn't do that much for you.

Now, back in the day, when folks would put 8 gorrillas on the rail,

it was far more important. But then they limited crew weight to

1300, and then later to 1150, I think. Much less stress on the shrouds.

 

That said, I sure can't think of a way having it could hurt the boat.

 

As long as the leewards are not becoming really slack, what

you have enough tension.

 

Check out Buzz Ballingers website.

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Just a quick update for any of you guys interested. Last week in 0-4 knots we got the gun and won on corrected as well. Last night in 20-30 knots we finished second, third in corrected time. I used as much input as I could from everyone and turns out it worked as our standings show. Still only had 4 crew, with 2 or 3 more we could have done much better. Thanks again for all the advice everyone.

 

Kevin Wright

Northern Girl

O30 Hull #72

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HI-JACK....

 

 

 

Spinnaker pole stored on the boom.....what say you? Faster, easier, 'cleaner'...or troublesome for the cockpit?

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HI-JACK....

Spinnaker pole stored on the boom.....what say you? Faster, easier, 'cleaner'...or troublesome for the cockpit?

 

 

Mucho faster, easier and cleaner. We had a "sock" made that attaches to the track on the boom. All lines are "hidden". Cockpit doesn't even know it's there. It's also easier on "fantasy land" as they can call for a tack immediately after the douse. Foredeck is completely cleared afer pole is stowed. We do have a carbon pole so weight issues are not a concern.

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