K9u20

Older well known IOR Boats

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2 hours ago, billy backstay said:

I worked on the 45' Evergreen before the '82 SORC.  That's when Tim Stearns was dating the owners daughter Sharon Green.  That boat had as many hydraulic cylinders as it had sails!  Stearns had a van full of spares and drums of hydro fluid and two guys working full time to keep the hydraulics operating.  Seems silly now!!

It was silly then.

Word at the time was that Stearn had to be aboard whenever the boat sailed in order to keep the rig standing.

IMO that boat personified everything that was wrong with the IOR rule.

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3 hours ago, Sail12m said:

Looking for a used Saab

AC9376C4-96A0-4111-9AA3-A2DB18F78DC1.jpeg

I have a 9-3 Viggen I am looking to flog :D

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40 minutes ago, Sail12m said:

Good shape or beat up? Where? Would like a turbo x but few and far between.

It has seen better days - 330,000 km.  But engine still pulls like a frikkin' train.  

There have been a few Turbo X for sale locally but they always want too much.  There was a reasonably priced Aero XWD for sale recently - but I am a bit hesitant about their XWD system.  Seem to be a lot of issues with it, mostly to do with the eLSD.

Hey, what was with the down vote? -  not that I count ;)

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18 minutes ago, Sail12m said:

What’s a vote down?

The little "A" thingy on the top right corner of a post.  A user can click on that to "Like" or "Down Vote" that post. 

To restore balance in the world, I have "Liked" your post.  See?   You have now gone from  +1 to  +2

Similar crap to the whole FB "Like" stuff.  I'm sure Rimas can fill you in on the use of the FB "Like"

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52 minutes ago, Sail12m said:

What’s a vote down?

Try poking around Political Anarchy with a conservative comment on any  subject  :ph34r:

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52 minutes ago, SailBlueH2O said:

Try poking around Political Anarchy with a conservative comment on any  subject  :ph34r:

I thought you would know better than to try that.  I don't even think of stepping foot in those waters.

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6 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

I worked on the 45' Evergreen before the '82 SORC.  That's when Tim Stearns was dating the owners daughter Sharon Green.  That boat had as many hydraulic cylinders as it had sails!  Stearns had a van full of spares and drums of hydro fluid and two guys working full time to keep the hydraulics operating.  Seems silly now!!

What was the fascination with that era?? Fucking around with mast jacks is enough. I just about missed most of that thankfully.  

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Must have hit it inadvertently. Don’t care about all the social media nonsense. But I do like old IOR boats because I was part of it all back when things were right in the world!!

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2 hours ago, Sail12m said:

What’s a vote down?

One of each left on your post as a working example. :P

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12 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

I thought you would know better than to try that.  I don't even think of stepping foot in those waters.

When I first went down there it was like what you might see in a prison movie with the new guy into walking down the hall with all the prisoners shouting and screaming obscenities and insults  at the new guy.....Now it is the reverse...I am the prison guard walking down the tier banging my baton on each cells bars in the middle of the night just to see if they stir.... :P

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24 minutes ago, mad said:

What was the fascination with that era?? Fucking around with mast jacks is enough. I just about missed most of that thankfully.  

It was all the fun the crew had ice skating on the hydraulic fluid spilled on the cockpit sole when one (or more) of the cylinders started leaking.  Man that stuff is slippery.

Hydraulics had the benefit of being slow, heavy, expensive and inconvenient.  What's not to like?   And the lack of feedback was always interesting.  Nothing like trying to set up your rig at the leeward mark with a hydraulic forestay and backstay and not knowing where the rig really was fore and aft.  

 

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8 hours ago, Sail12m said:

Looking for a used Saab. There in someone’s yard in Maine is Ledgende. Peterson one ton. Odd where these things turn up!!

AC9376C4-96A0-4111-9AA3-A2DB18F78DC1.jpeg

Best snow car ever.  Unstoppable.

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On 1/29/2019 at 12:52 PM, bloodshot said:

so here's perhaps a dumb IOR-ish question:  what was the reason for those cutouts in the booms from some racing boats of this era?  weight savings?  access?

Those were a real pet peeve of mine, but everybody had to have them.  Like fins on a '50s Cadillac.

The lack of aerodynamic knowledge led to a lot of bad choices.  Those "lightening holes" in the boom saved a pound or two and produced air drag like crazy. 

Plus those ounces of weight saved in the boom were replaced with hydraulic cylinders for the outhaul and flattener weighing pounds.  

But then the IOR era as a whole was a weird, but sad moment.  Great fleets and people, having fun going slow, spending money badly, bending rules and steadily being driven into economic oblivion by the high priests of "yacht racing".

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24 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Those were a real pet peeve of mine, but everybody had to have them.  Like fins on a '50s Cadillac.

The lack of aerodynamic knowledge led to a lot of bad choices.  Those "lightening holes" in the boom saved a pound or two and produced air drag like crazy. 

Plus those ounces of weight saved in the boom were replaced with hydraulic cylinders for the outhaul and flattener weighing pounds.  

But then the IOR era as a whole was a weird, but sad moment.  Great fleets and people, having fun going slow, spending money badly, bending rules and steadily being driven into economic oblivion by the high priests of "yacht racing".

you are a bitter soul....the IOR era allowed many ,many,many sailors  to compete   all over the country and world...boat design and rule changes aside  and all the  money flushed  it was Fun

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2 hours ago, SailBlueH2O said:

Try poking around Political Anarchy with a conservative comment on any  subject  :ph34r:

Conservative comments don't get downvotes in PA.

Lunatic fringe right wing comments however.......

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1 hour ago, SailBlueH2O said:

When I first went down there it was like what you might see in a prison movie with the new guy into walking down the hall with all the prisoners shouting and screaming obscenities and insults  at the new guy.....Now it is the reverse...I am the prison guard walking down the tier banging my baton on each cells bars in the middle of the night just to see if they stir.... :P

Great analogies. :lol:

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On 1/14/2019 at 3:13 PM, 12 metre said:

It could also see double duty as a windseeker.

Also known as the Fingerlicker!

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7 hours ago, SailBlueH2O said:

When I first went down there it was like what you might see in a prison movie with the new guy into walking down the hall with all the prisoners shouting and screaming obscenities and insults  at the new guy.....Now it is the reverse...I am the prison guard walking down the tier banging my baton on each cells bars in the middle of the night just to see if they stir.... :P

Sounded like you were talking about going below on an offshore race when the off watch was in the racks!

- Stumbling

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9 hours ago, stumblingthunder said:

Sounded like you were talking about going below on an offshore race when the off watch was in the racks!

- Stumbling

LOL.... the analogies  would be it is reverse order  :-)....sleeping below offshore taught be to be a lifelong good sleeper...something might awake me but as soon as I process  the sound as not a threat I can instantly go back to sleep

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1 hour ago, SailBlueH2O said:

LOL.... the analogies  would be it is reverse order  :-)....sleeping below offshore taught be to be a lifelong good sleeper...something might awake me but as soon as I process  the sound as not a threat I can instantly go back to sleep

More like the difference between a young crew with a lot of piss and vinegar running through their veins and a.. more mature crew, where you are checking that they have not dozed off to their 'reward'!

And yes, my wife cannot get over how I turn off and on sleep in an instant.   I tell its the training of my youth.   I had to extract every last second of sleep from being off watch, yet still have an ear running while sleeping to be able to jump into action upon a noise that is not catalogued as 'normal'.

- Stumbling

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SB2HO & ST are 100% right on this. It's all about the skipper's "awareness", even if you're asleep. 

If something sounds or feels wrong, you're awake at once. Analyzed, it's either a problem, in which case you either call someone or go on deck to help solve it.  If it's a routine noise (halyard winch or something) you analyze the noise for a few moments, and realize it's all under control - just a reef going in.  Then you go back to sleep, but are subconsciously aware that the breeze is building and it may go a bit gnarly soon, so you will be called.  You go to sleep thinking "where are my boots?"

If there's shouting and blasphemy on deck you're out of your bunk like a rat up a drainpipe.

Otherwise, back to the land of nod.

It happens at home.  First flush of rain on the roof, a big gust of wind, a raccoon dancing on the tiles, the Union Pacific late night freight train delighting everyone with continued blasts on the hooter....  Then back to sleep at once.

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8 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

SB2HO & ST are 100% right on this. It's all about the skipper's "awareness", even if you're asleep. 

If something sounds or feels wrong, you're awake at once. Analyzed, it's either a problem, in which case you either call someone or go on deck to help solve it.  If it's a routine noise (halyard winch or something) you analyze the noise for a few moments, and realize it's all under control - just a reef going in.  Then you go back to sleep, but are subconsciously aware that the breeze is building and it may go a bit gnarly soon, so you will be called.  You go to sleep thinking "where are my boots?"

If there's shouting and blasphemy on deck you're out of your bunk like a rat up a drainpipe.

Otherwise, back to the land of nod.

It happens at home.  First flush of rain on the roof, a big gust of wind, a raccoon dancing on the tiles, the Union Pacific late night freight train delighting everyone with continued blasts on the hooter....  Then back to sleep at once.

Thank fuck it’s not just me!!:P

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2 hours ago, P_Wop said:

It happens at home.  First flush of rain on the roof, a big gust of wind, a raccoon dancing on the tiles, the Union Pacific late night freight train delighting everyone with continued blasts on the hooter....  Then back to sleep at once.

 

There was an upside down compass, on the overhead above my bunk, on the 65' Boomerang, that I ran for a couple years.  All I had to do when sleeping, was open my eyes for brief look-see, to determine if the person on watch steering, was on the proper course or not.  Never seen that before or since, but it was a great feature!!

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2 hours ago, mad said:

Thank fuck it’s not just me!!:P

When folding a blanket, I follow the tapes.....never a twist!

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My whole life for the first fourty years was about racing sailboats. From Larchmont junior race week to the sorc to America’s cup campaigns that’s all I cared about. Then a bad marriage and eight years off it’s still all I know!!!

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3 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

There was an upside down compass, on the overhead above my bunk, on the 65' Boomerang, that I ran for a couple years.  All I had to do when sleeping, was open my eyes for brief look-see, to determine if the person on watch steering, was on the proper course or not.  Never seen that before or since, but it was a great feature!!

One boat I sailed on had a speed repeater in the skipper's quarterberth.  If boat speed dropped to, say 7.5 knots, he'd bang on the side of the cockpit and yell out "Do 8!".

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3 hours ago, hobot said:

When folding a blanket, I follow the tapes.....never a twist!

My wife gets so pissed that I still band the blankets!

- Stumbling

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4 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

There was an upside down compass, on the overhead above my bunk, on the 65' Boomerang, that I ran for a couple years.  All I had to do when sleeping, was open my eyes for brief look-see, to determine if the person on watch steering, was on the proper course or not.  Never seen that before or since, but it was a great feature!!

They are still out there:

https://www.vikingcompass.com/teco.html

ritchie-telltale-compass-never_1_84f7772

I have not found a new one in the inter-verse, but they must still be out there, somewhere.

- Stumbling

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5 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

There was an upside down compass, on the overhead above my bunk...Never seen that before or since, but it was a great feature!!

IIRC, it's called a pilot compass.  super-useful on single-handed deliveries

 

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11 hours ago, Recidivist said:

One boat I sailed on had a speed repeater in the skipper's quarterberth.  If boat speed dropped to, say 7.5 knots, he'd bang on the side of the cockpit and yell out "Do 8!".

Not IOR, but there was one of those on the SC50 I sailed for a couple of years around 2001-2003 together with a repeater for AWA. Unfortunately, the fastest I have ever gone on a sailboat was watching that knotmeter rapidly accelerating past 25 then 30 as the AWA swung to the wrong side and the 2AM crew sailed the boat, effectively in free fall, into a round down in a 40 knot puff about 50 miles off Morro Bay on the way to Catalina.

We should have had the chicken stays rigged as a mast head VHF antenna is not at its most effective when the mast is lying on the deck.

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On 1/29/2019 at 11:55 PM, SailBlueH2O said:

both...

IMG_0008.jpg

And tertiary, as a backup anemometer.   After sailing a particular boat for a while, you could tell how hard the apparent wind was by what part of the boom whistled louder.

- Stumbling

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1 minute ago, stumblingthunder said:

And tertiary, as a backup anemometer.   After sailing a particular boat for a while, you could tell how hard the apparent wind was by what part of the boom whistled louder.

- Stumbling

and a faster recovery from spreaders in the water IOR  broach

 

IOR3.jpg

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2 minutes ago, SailBlueH2O said:

and a faster recovery from spreaders in the water IOR  broach

 

IOR3.jpg

Looks to be planing sideways very well!  

Seems the old IOR rule made for a boat that was more stable going sideways in a breeze than with the pointy end (without the rudder) aimed downwind.

- Stumbling

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1 minute ago, stumblingthunder said:

Looks to be planing sideways very well!  

Seems the old IOR rule made for a boat that was more stable going sideways in a breeze than with the pointy end (without the rudder) aimed downwind.

- Stumbling

75 SORC...I remember going from Isaacs to Stirrup....rail to rail to whole leg....the trick was to not try and recover from a roll, well not too much, just steer the course and follow the bow.....chewed through a lot of spinnaker halyards if they were not eased 6" every couple of hours  

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Happy days. I remember Harold Cudmore came out with us on Caiman, ex-Yena,  a pinched-stern Peterson 40 on a very windy day on the Solent.  Two reefs and a number four all the way down West to Salt Mead, then Harold calls for a kite after the mark.  "Harry, it can't be done!"  "Do it."  So up on deck goes the smallest heaviest thing we had, a sort of skinny 2.2 storm kite.  Unfortunately it wasn't - it was a full-size 1.5 runner that had been packed into the wrong bag.  Hats off to Harold, as he kept us more-or-less upright all the way up the Solent to West Ryde Middle.  The gybe off the Brambles was horrifying, with yours truly up in the pulpit up to my waist in water.  But never a severe crash.  After the next mark, Harold went below for a nap.  "I've had enough of this."

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25 minutes ago, SailBlueH2O said:

75 SORC...I remember going from Isaacs to Stirrup....rail to rail to whole leg....the trick was to not try and recover from a roll, well not too much, just steer the course and follow the bow.....chewed through a lot of spinnaker halyards if they were not eased 6" every couple of hours  

Rolling means fast, just as long as you don't have a recovery too often.

Brings back wonderful memories.   Sailing fast meant you knew where the edge was, and were comfortable being as close to it as possible.

- Stumbling

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Anyone know what happened to Smiling Bulldog, the C&C from Ithaca / Lake Ontario?  

I was too young when she was in her  heyday. I only sailed on it a couple times. I remember hearing a story about a epic finish at Levels, but no details. 

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18 hours ago, stumblingthunder said:

Rolling means fast, just as long as you don't have a recovery too often.

Brings back wonderful memories.   Sailing fast meant you knew where the edge was, and were comfortable being as close to it as possible.

- Stumbling

That was the real reason those IOR Booms were so short.  They only just made it over the rail,  so you could roll down hill going rail to rail & not dragging the boom in the water.

The kite pole on the other hand you had to let forward a bit to keep most of it dry!

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On 2/2/2019 at 9:42 AM, billy backstay said:

 

There was an upside down compass, on the overhead above my bunk, on the 65' Boomerang, that I ran for a couple years.  All I had to do when sleeping, was open my eyes for brief look-see, to determine if the person on watch steering, was on the proper course or not.  Never seen that before or since, but it was a great feature!!

Captains Quarters on the Ji Fung had that plus a rudder angle indicator and wind speed ......................

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28 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Artemis was a Peterson 48, or 43?  IIRC...

IOR Peterson 51. Arthur Emil owner. Built at Newport Offshoe 1982 or thereabouts. Aluminum. Glued and rivited or some weird thing. 

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27 minutes ago, Sail12m said:

IOR Peterson 51. Arthur Emil owner. Built at Newport Offshoe 1982 or thereabouts. Aluminum. Glued and rivited or some weird thing. 

 

I remember her from 83 and 84, when I was BN on the 65' Boomerang.  We were bottom of Class A, and she was at the top of B, IIRC??  I think Artemis was at The Clipper Cup in 84, when I was crew on new Frers 80, Boomerang......

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4 hours ago, billy backstay said:

...in 84, when I was crew on new Frers 80, Boomerang......

Was she in Cowes that year August time ?

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4 hours ago, Laser1 said:

Was she in Cowes that year August time ?

 

Possible but I doubt it.  I left Hawaii in June or July, IIRC and I doubt they could have got to Cowes by August.  After Clipper Cup, I moved back ashore and started an entirely different career, got married, had two daughters, and did not realize until decades later that my USCG 100 ton ticket had expired when they did not mail the second 5 year renewal form.  I did not keep in touch with any of my former mates from Boomerang, as I was going in a totally different direction, for the next 25 years.  To regain that Captains license now is momentous, and not worth the hassle...

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5 hours ago, billy backstay said:

Possible but I doubt it.  I left Hawaii in June or July, IIRC and I doubt they could have got to Cowes by August.  

Reason for asking is I'm fairly sure I saw Boomerang get stuck between the chains of the Cowes chain ferry.  Must have been the '65  in 1983 then.

Foggy brain or could be figment of my imagination.  I was doing Swan Europeans with Pwop at the time and I'm sure I destroyed a few brain cells during that event :-)

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12 hours ago, Laser1 said:

Was she in Cowes that year August time ?

Nope. She went to SFO after the Kenwood Cup for the Big Boat Series in '84.

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2 hours ago, Laser1 said:

Reason for asking is I'm fairly sure I saw Boomerang get stuck between the chains of the Cowes chain ferry.  Must have been the '65  in 1983 then.

Foggy brain or could be figment of my imagination.  I was doing Swan Europeans with Pwop at the time and I'm sure I destroyed a few brain cells during that event :-)

She’s not the only one, think Morning Glory or Sagamore did that as well a decade or so later

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17 minutes ago, mad said:

Sagamore did that as well a decade or so later

Wait a minute ..... Sagamore, US big dark blue boat ?  Hmmm decade later .... did 6 consecutive CW 1994 --> 1999 and we always berthed in East Cowes.  The walk to the beer tent was easier than the walk back. 

Lol Mad filling in the lost brain cells.  Funny that.

 

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26 minutes ago, Laser1 said:

Wait a minute ..... Sagamore, US big dark blue boat ?  Hmmm decade later .... did 6 consecutive CW 1994 --> 1999 and we always berthed in East Cowes.  The walk to the beer tent was easier than the walk back. 

Lol Mad filling in the lost brain cells.  Funny that.

 

Yes, the big blue one. I can’t remember the name of the guy that used to run the boat at the moment. 

Not really filling in the lost brain cells, that era is a little bit fuzzy for me as well. :P

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3 hours ago, Laser1 said:

Reason for asking is I'm fairly sure I saw Boomerang get stuck between the chains of the Cowes chain ferry.  Must have been the '65  in 1983 then.

Foggy brain or could be figment of my imagination.  I was doing Swan Europeans with Pwop at the time and I'm sure I destroyed a few brain cells during that event :-)

 

No, I was running the 65' in 82 & 83, and we were based out of Stamford and Newport in the summer, then down to Ft. Lauderdale, and put up for sale, at the end of the season.  Then I left her to go work on the Frers 80, when we  went through the Panama Canal to Hawaii after '84 Newport to Bermuda race.  I think we made that trip in just over 3 weeks, IIRC....

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If we are going to take a walk down memory lane who else remembers Chris Law putting Longaborda on the mud at the entrance to StFYC at the Big Boat Series in SF? It would have been around 1991. My recollection is that were 22 guys on the end of the boom trying to get her off. That memory takes place through a lens of years and rum so maybe 15 guys in reality.

Speaking of which, a couple of years prior to that two big boys got into a t-bone on the Cityfront. Does anyone remember that? Maybe Blondie and Grand Illusion? Or Matador? the sound of the collision was heard miles away. Perhaps a failure to ease the leeward running backstay on the port tack maxi?

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30 minutes ago, sledracr said:

Blondie and Maverick.   It was particularly loud from Blondie's cockpit....

 

459080586_blondievsmaverick.jpg.30d1b189ee768f6ee4c7aa23a2b2f850.jpg

Jeez! That must have made a hell of mess and noise! 

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1 hour ago, mad said:

Jeez! That must have made a hell of mess and noise! 

Maverick's bow went about 5 feet into Blondie's cockpit, just in front of the wheel.  It was... "impressive", back at the dock, to watch the whole stern droop toward the water when Petey Frazier stood back there to evaluate the damage.  Somewhere I have a photo of Dave Ullman waving "hello" from the inside, through a hole that was almost as big as he is. 

Boat was originally thought to be a total loss but was eventually trucked to Soquel and a new stern built.  Sailing again as Pied Piper 2, last time I looked.

On Maverick's end, I think they lost about 5 pounds of bondo off the stem.

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2 minutes ago, sledracr said:

Sailing again as Pied Piper 2, last time I looked.

IIRC, it then went back to Blondie for a short stretch and ultimately became Nitemare.

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2 hours ago, sledracr said:

Blondie and Maverick.   It was particularly loud from Blondie's cockpit....

 

459080586_blondievsmaverick.jpg.30d1b189ee768f6ee4c7aa23a2b2f850.jpg

 

 

When I was a teenager, I raced on a well known local C&C 35, "Arrow", owed by Bruce Lockwood.  At the start of a race, I was winding in the Jenny, when "Not By Bread Alone," another well known local boat, T-boned us on the aluminum toe rail a foot or so from my winch.  Bent the metal toe rail and cracked the Fiberglass Topsides, down a good 2 feet. Local guys, Jon Day and Tyler Keys of Offshore Yacht Services repaired the damage.  But they could match the old faded white gelcoat, so painted a red stripe on diagonal thereon both sides,  similar to the stripes on Coast Guard cutters.  

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2 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

If we are going to take a walk down memory lane who else remembers Chris Law putting Longaborda on the mud at the entrance to StFYC at the Big Boat Series in SF? It would have been around 1991. My recollection is that were 22 guys on the end of the boom trying to get her off. That memory takes place through a lens of years and rum so maybe 15 guys in reality.

I was there - was on either Taxi Dancer or Alchemy (fuzzy memory syndrome). Bloody monster went aground at narrow part of entrance in line with the channel then rotated about 90 degrees to fully block the way in - 80 some feet of boat crossways in the deep part of a ~200 ft. wide entrance. Think they had their mainsheet winch base completely fail that day as well. Looked as if the casting was not sound. Never did learn if it came apart under load or if they intentionally pulled things apart - only saw it as we hovered nearby waiting for them to clear the path.

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1 hour ago, sledracr said:

Maverick's bow went about 5 feet into Blondie's cockpit, just in front of the wheel.  It was... "impressive", back at the dock, to watch the whole stern droop toward the water when Petey Frazier stood back there to evaluate the damage.  Somewhere I have a photo of Dave Ullman waving "hello" from the inside, through a hole that was almost as big as he is. 

Boat was originally thought to be a total loss but was eventually trucked to Soquel and a new stern built.  Sailing again as Pied Piper 2, last time I looked.

On Maverick's end, I think they lost about 5 pounds of bondo off the stem.

She became Nitemare for several years, then Warpath. Last I heard she was sitting in a shed in western Michigan without a keel.

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2 hours ago, tizak said:

I was there - was on either Taxi Dancer or Alchemy (fuzzy memory syndrome). Bloody monster went aground at narrow part of entrance in line with the channel then rotated about 90 degrees to fully block the way in - 80 some feet of boat crossways in the deep part of a ~200 ft. wide entrance. Think they had their mainsheet winch base completely fail that day as well. Looked as if the casting was not sound. Never did learn if it came apart under load or if they intentionally pulled things apart - only saw it as we hovered nearby waiting for them to clear the path.

Yes, that was the day the mainsheet winch came apart. I never heard any speculation that it was self inflicted, but that is intriguing. That evening Chris and I enjoyed one too many cocktails which ended sideways. A story that can never be told.

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3 hours ago, sledracr said:

Maverick's bow went about 5 feet into Blondie's cockpit, just in front of the wheel.  It was... "impressive", back at the dock, to watch the whole stern droop toward the water when Petey Frazier stood back there to evaluate the damage.  Somewhere I have a photo of Dave Ullman waving "hello" from the inside, through a hole that was almost as big as he is. 

Boat was originally thought to be a total loss but was eventually trucked to Soquel and a new stern built.  Sailing again as Pied Piper 2, last time I looked.

On Maverick's end, I think they lost about 5 pounds of bondo off the stem.

No wonder the bowman is running like fuck back to the end of the bus!! 

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So the winners were 1989: Mongoose. 1990 Taxi Dancer. 1991 Mirage. 1992 Mongoose again. So it was around that time.I remember because I had the dubious "pleasure" of holding the tiller on a J35, and that year doubled as our North Americans. Pre-black flag, pre-I flag. On Saturday we didn't get the last start going until around 7pm.

 

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3 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

 

When I was a teenager, I raced on a well known local C&C 35, "Arrow", owed by Bruce Lockwood.  At the start of a race, I was winding in the Jenny, when "Not By Bread Alone," another well known local boat, T-boned us on the aluminum toe rail a foot or so from my winch.  Bent the metal toe rail and cracked the Fiberglass Topsides, down a good 2 feet. Local guys, Jon Day and Tyler Keys of Offshore Yacht Services repaired the damage.  But they could match the old faded white gelcoat, so painted a red stripe on diagonal thereon both sides,  similar to the stripes on Coast Guard cutters.  

Matching new to old gel coat is never going to work never really works. Aluminium toerails are a pain at times, but they definitely suck up some impact!! Learnt that from a similar experience on a 40 footer, they missed the duck by 7 feet, but had enough time to bear away and gain another 3 knots of boatspeed! :P

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12 minutes ago, mad said:

No wonder the bowman is running like fuck back to the end of the bus!! 

LOL...he was the one saying "we can make it ! "...actually by the wake you can see "red" was bearing away hard trying to duck

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Slight thread drift.

Youse guys who sailed on Maxis BITD, what number of crew did those boats require for delivery trips and other such non- powered up sailing?

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49 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Slight thread drift.

Youse guys who sailed on Maxis BITD, what number of crew did those boats require for delivery trips and other such non- powered up sailing?

Long deliveries were generally 7 or 8.  Two watches of 3 or 4.  All hands on deck for things like a heavy air gybe, but generally reduced the sailplan pretty early.  Dacron sails only.

Also all hands on deck for the mid-Atlantic or Equator crossing party.

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1 hour ago, SailBlueH2O said:

LOL...he was the one saying "we can make it ! "...actually by the wake you can see "red" was bearing away hard trying to duck

There seemed to be a lodge meeting going on in the cockpit at the time so a crash tack would have worked if the guy on the helm hadn't had the headlights in his eyes.  Choke city, who was driving?

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7 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Long deliveries were generally 7 or 8.  Two watches of 3 or 4.  All hands on deck for things like a heavy air gybe, but generally reduced the sailplan pretty early.  Dacron sails only.

Also all hands on deck for the mid-Atlantic or Equator crossing party.

And sometimes all hands for the skipper's birthday party.  I had 4 birthdays in a row in the Atlantic in late May, Caribbean to Europe.  

I have horrid memories of one hung-over morning after, going to brush my teeth only to find that my ever-loving crew had squeezed out all my toothpaste and back-filled the tube with Preparation H.  I was well into the scrub before the foul taste and evil green-brown froth in my mouth alerted me that something was seriously wrong.

Massive laughter on deck.

Bastards.

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On 1/14/2019 at 12:55 PM, sledracr said:

Saw her last July, tied up in front of someone's house in Port Ludlow, WA.  Looked to be in decent shape.

jubilation.thumb.jpg.a0c800bca4688221c4187fed69e4e9eb.jpg

 

Where is Longy?  Same paint job on Jubie when we on Secret Love, the bright red Peterson 45, got “tapped” by Jubie during prestart maneuvers on WLIS. Jubie was trying to steer inside us and missed, denting SL stainless toe rail track Starboard side aft. 

I was below in the centerline nav station of SL and got rocked off the seat, popped up out of the deck hatch just fwd of the helm (twin wheels? If memory serves) to see the aftermath.  Jubie is aluminum and wasn’t damaged at all. Later after the race alongside Indian Harbor YC, Longy unbolted the bent track that took most of the hit and tossed it in the drink. SL had a minor ding in the FG rail.

I was working at Banks Sails that summer, mid ‘80s (fuzzy memory) when Longy came in to get some sails fixed after SORC, sailing up from FL to Newport, inviting us to go racing on SL. He was headed with the boat to Europe for Sardinia Cup eventually. 

Longy can relate the details of the time Secret Love got grief from the San Francisco Pilots when Lowell North steered her under the bow of a big ship, taking a short cut during BBS. 

Saw Longy again a few years later in Naples, Italy on a white Baltic 55 also called Secret Love. 

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On 1/14/2019 at 6:55 PM, sledracr said:

Saw her last July, tied up in front of someone's house in Port Ludlow, WA.  Looked to be in decent shape.

jubilation.thumb.jpg.a0c800bca4688221c4187fed69e4e9eb.jpg

 

Prototype of First 53 ??

 

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6 hours ago, Frumious Bandersnatch said:

Longy can relate the details of the time Secret Love got grief from the San Francisco Pilots when Lowell North steered her under the bow of a big ship, taking a short cut during BBS.

That was 1983. Secret Love earned her very own paragraph in the Sailing Instructions the following year.

BBS seems to have a penchant for that. I was sailing with Larry Klein (RIP) in the 1994 BBS when that tragedy took place which gave rise to the "K" flag. My parents were watching from the race deck, and... let's simply say that day was bad.

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   Ship incident was 1982, IIRC. We only raced BBS twice, boat was donated to USN after Sardine Cup '84. Jubie went into us 6" on deck, about 18" down the topsides. Luckily I'd towed the brand new "Brooke Ann" ( in Fl, just launched for SORC) back to the shipyard after the shaft gland spun down & locked the shaft preventing her from motoring, so Hieneman (?sp) owned me a favor. We fixed the damage right there at the YC. They had a big crowd power lunching there every day, parking lot full of expensive cars. We did all the grinding at lunch, all cars had a THICK layer of grp dust on them. Somehow, never heard a complaint.  Aluminum track on the rail, tho, so a bit softer than ss. And it was the start, we were both over early & circling back to the pin. Jube thought she could turn inside us, as she was 1/2 a length to weather. This was 1984.

      The YC was very proper, had launch service out to the moorings, & the launch driver kids would bang off a morning 12 g in the cannon every morning at eight. This disturbed my sleep so I made off with the cannon one night. A couple of days after I returned it, the little bastards snuck out to the mooring I was on, placed the cannon directly over my berth & fired it off.  They almost dropped it into the drink they were giggling so hard getting back into the launch.

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Longy, I remember that.  I was fast asleep on the Farr 59 Orlanda right next to you.  When that gun went off I banged my head on the deckhead so hard.  Happy days.  And Jubes raced Cowes Week the following year, with Bob Fisher aboard too.  Good boat, good owner, good program.

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16 hours ago, Frumious Bandersnatch said:

Where is Longy?  Same paint job on Jubie when we on Secret Love, the bright red Peterson 45, got “tapped” by Jubie during prestart maneuvers on WLIS. Jubie was trying to steer inside us and missed, denting SL stainless toe rail track Starboard side aft. 

I was below in the centerline nav station of SL and got rocked off the seat, popped up out of the deck hatch just fwd of the helm (twin wheels? If memory serves) to see the aftermath.  Jubie is aluminum and wasn’t damaged at all. Later after the race alongside Indian Harbor YC, Longy unbolted the bent track that took most of the hit and tossed it in the drink. SL had a minor ding in the FG rail.

I was working at Banks Sails that summer, mid ‘80s (fuzzy memory) when Longy came in to get some sails fixed after SORC, sailing up from FL to Newport, inviting us to go racing on SL. He was headed with the boat to Europe for Sardinia Cup eventually. 

Longy can relate the details of the time Secret Love got grief from the San Francisco Pilots when Lowell North steered her under the bow of a big ship, taking a short cut during BBS. 

Saw Longy again a few years later in Naples, Italy on a white Baltic 55 also called Secret Love. 

Jubilation was composite built by Eric Goetz. Saw her under construction in Bristol. 

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16 hours ago, Frumious Bandersnatch said:

Longy can relate the details of the time Secret Love got grief from the San Francisco Pilots when Lowell North steered her under the bow of a big ship, taking a short cut during BBS. 

i seem to recall reading somewhere that Secret Love crossed by something like 18 ft? 

If so, assuming the commercial vessel was only moving at 10 kts, then if Secret Love had arrived one second later, she would have been but a smudge of paint on the bow of that vessel.

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I'm sure most remember this.

What happens when one of those idiot maneuvers goes wrong.

 

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1 hour ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Latitude 38 says 1983.  Good chance they were smoking dope though.

OK, '83 it was - long time ago. The crossing got overblown by a couple of factors. First, the Coast guard was looking for a case to set the precedents, and the pilot of the car carrier followed thru and filed charges. 2nd, Lat 38 took the incident to yellow journalism heights, filling many pages for many months, & made quite a few false claims along the way. Crossing distance was around 150'. There were a lot of telephoto distorted pic's that made things look closer, and one that 38 claimed was SL was actually of Annabelle Lee (?? some Pet 48) which was actually still mid span of the GG bridge. It was no short cut. We saw the ship come under the bridge & were taking constant bearings on her, all bearings indicated we were crossing ahead. What threw us off was the ship was turning to stbd as she traveled from the gate past Chrissy fields, so she was hunting us. Ship went down the city front, only ship I've ever seen do that. Contrary to rumors, we were completely ready to jibe around & reverse course if we got seriously worried.

  One of the quotes from the hearing, by L North "we could not have impeded the progress of the ship even if she had hit us".

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Speaking of the Canada's Cup. Whatever happened to Agape? Other than getting it's butt kicked. I believe in 1978.

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11 hours ago, longy said:

L North "we could not have impeded the progress of the ship even if she had hit us".

^^^ that made me laugh.  I can totally picture him saying that, with his "I'm an engineer, this is indisputable" voice...

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On 2/10/2019 at 8:50 AM, SF Woody Sailor said:

BBS seems to have a penchant for that. I was sailing with Larry Klein (RIP) in the 1994 BBS when that tragedy took place which gave rise to the "K" flag. My parents were watching from the race deck, and... let's simply say that day was bad.

Was there when Larry Klein was lost. We'd finished for the day, were easing up to the dock and noticed fire trucks in the parking lot and EMTs rolling a loaded gurney along the dock. Turned a good day into a sad event when we learned the details - several on the boat knew Larry and were quite shaken.

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We wuz on Stbd tack, it's a broad reach across the top of the bay. Jib top or reaching spi, depending on the tide direction.

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