K9u20

Older well known IOR Boats

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12 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

Weird factoid.  I started my Marine Surveying apprenticeship with Eric Schiff, Danny's older brother. Eric did some time on M1.

I was on Deception at the time, when Aldora essentially killed off the Fast 50 class while it was still in diapers!

man those 50's were so pesky back then. i remember going to cabo in 92 or 93 and they were a tough bunch to shake. small world, i havent heard anything about danny in years. i still talk to bob bertik if you remember him, i know him and danny were really close.

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1 hour ago, Hitchhiker said:

some time on M1.

....or "1W", as it said when the bulb came off on the reef.

Fun boat.  Even with having to sign "the death waiver" 

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5 minutes ago, sledracr said:

....or "1W", as it said when the bulb came off on the reef.

Fun boat.  Even with having to sign "the death waiver" 

what was M1 ?

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11 minutes ago, bigrpowr said:

what was M1 ?

Ross 45. Possibly a better name would have been Suicide Squad.

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53 minutes ago, bigrpowr said:

what was M1 ?

Ross 45.  It's been through a number of rebuilds over the years, originally was tiller-steered.

 

M1-01.jpg

M1-02.jpg

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1 hour ago, sledracr said:

Ross 45.  It's been through a number of rebuilds over the years, originally was tiller-steered.

 

M1-01.jpg

M1-02.jpg

should prolly still be tiller steered. good looking boat.

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12 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

I remember Cookson's High Five pretty well. I think she was at the '94 Big Boat Series at the same time as Gaucho. My recollection is we were in the same division on Twin Flyer. Camouflage (Peterson 44?) was in that one too. 

One of the Bravura's (maybe the Frers 46?) was donated to Cal and became Golden Bear and was docked forever across from GGYC in the SF Harbor. I did some ocean racing aboard her, and I think that was the first time I spun coffee grinders which made no sense as I was about 130 pounds at the time.

Those were the days!   (I think this was from the 1990 BBS ... we ended up third in our division) 

IMG_0116.jpg

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13 hours ago, Former MDR Vandal 1 said:

The Bravura Two Tonner ended up in MDR.  She was built at Cookson in 1991.  I understand from the excellent RB sailing website that she was a sistership of Wings of Oracle.  https://rbsailing.blogspot.com/2017/05/wings-of-oracle-farr-two-tonner.html   I was told by extremely reliable sources she was built alongside Cookson’s High Five, an early, extremely successful IMS 40 footer.

I am not 100% certain, but I think the timeline after Irv’s ownership was something like this … the boat was donated to UC, Berkeley.  From there she was down in San Diego.  I think she was owned by Dennis Pennell and was Boat of the Year.  Subsequently she was sold to Marina del Rey.  Somewhere along the line she was converted from a tiller to a wheel.  She does Wednesday Nights and an occasional weekend race.  Here is a picture of her starting the last race of the 2019 Cal Race Week.

IMG955582.jpg

I was involved with her when she was donated.  She arrived with a fresh paint job after being chartered to the French Corum team for the Admirals Cup (there is a great picture of her broaching as CORUM)  The construction by Cookson was incredible.  Unfortunately I don't think she could compete at the level Irv wanted to be successful at ... thus the donation.

 One little interesting factoid seeing her MDR sail number.  Her original number was US-17.  Part of the gift agreement stipulated that the number would be retired upon the sale of the boat.  Apparently Larry Ellison had made an agreement with Irv to transfer the number for use on his new Sayonara.

She was fun to sail.   We even took her to Stockton racing the Delta Ditch one year.   That was an adventure! 

IMG_0055 (2).jpg

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16 hours ago, Ignatius J. Reilly said:

I was involved with her when she was donated.  She arrived with a fresh paint job after being chartered to the French Corum team for the Admirals Cup (there is a great picture of her broaching as CORUM)  The construction by Cookson was incredible.  Unfortunately I don't think she could compete at the level Irv wanted to be successful at ... thus the donation.

 One little interesting factoid seeing her MDR sail number.  Her original number was US-17.  Part of the gift agreement stipulated that the number would be retired upon the sale of the boat.  Apparently Larry Ellison had made an agreement with Irv to transfer the number for use on his new Sayonara.

She was fun to sail.   We even took her to Stockton racing the Delta Ditch one year.   That was an adventure! 

IMG_0055 (2).jpg

 

I was on board once about 5 years ago.  Really great build quality. Clean, strong, top notch.  I also think it is a quick design.  It is a very late generation MKIII (a), so not a lot of the distortions that were characteristic of earlier era hulls.

I don’t know who or why they went to a wheel from a tiller; the picture you posted shows how clean and uncluttered the cockpit is with a tiller.

Somewhere along the various ownerships I think most, if not all, of the internal ballast was removed as she floats quite high on her lines.

The current ownership went up on the ISP last season.  I think the jury is out on whether this was helpful.  It is a slender rig and I think they only fly the bigger kites in 10 knots or less.

She is still a machine and really fun to race against …

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On 11/2/2020 at 6:36 PM, P_Wop said:

Gem was so called because she was so slow anyone could catch it.  Unkind, I know...

I remember Gem as a Greenish boat, or was that Imp?

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3 hours ago, dolphinmaster said:

Looks like 10.5 folks for the rail,  can you say railmeat and 1/2.

Nothing nefarious going on.  The boat likes to sail with 9 people.  For this event it had 10 ½ because:

*** The junior at the back of the boat sails Wednesdays with the boat.  He’s too young to travel to the away events like Yachting Cup or Long Beach Race Week, so he sits in for Cal Race Week.  Added bonus – if you have a junior on the boat for CRW, you get a bottle of rum.

*** The tenth person was a friend of the owner who was out visiting.  They used to sail with and against each other at Hudson River Community Sailing.  Rather than have a regular weekend crew person step off, the boat sailed with one extra.

Sailing with 10 ½ in a light air event was certainly disadvantageous, which is probably why the boat went into the last race tied on points, but losing the tie breaker.  Got lucky in the last race.

But this thread is about IOR boats like Bravura

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Came across this mag issue that was from 1983.  Enjoy the read and photos.  Some are recognizable IOR machines.  Others are great photos of sailboats.

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_1.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_2.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_3.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_4.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_5.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_6.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_7.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_8.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_9.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_10.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_11.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_12.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_13.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_14.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_15.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_16.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_17.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_18.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_19.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_20.jpg

American Photographer Sept 1983 Sailboats1024_21.jpg

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11 hours ago, Bill E Goat said:

More sail only makes the hole bigger doesn't make you go any faster, Impetuous 1979 Admirals Cup

 

Impetuous.jpg

I thought you had been around long enough to know that is not the point of a blooper. 

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In the right conditions a blooper is definitely faster.  Not much, a couple of ticks on the knotmeter at best.

We won our div and were 3rd overall in a Swiftsure in the mid 80s sometime.  In no small part due to a borrowed blooper.  The typical run home from the Bank to Race Rocks was reason enough and perhaps the only reason to have a blooper in PNW.

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I know this horse has been beaten but as the bow guy - the more sails to play with the merrier!

It was the only chance I got to occasionally trim a sail as the blooper halyard winch was next to the mast...

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1 hour ago, Liquid said:

I know this horse has been beaten but as the bow guy - the more sails to play with the merrier!

It was the only chance I got to occasionally trim a sail as the blooper halyard winch was next to the mast...

I do remember a fine comment from a bow guy on Williwaw in the Admiral's Cup, 1981 I think.  Dennis Conner was driving, and he loved double-head rigs, and sometimes triple-head with two staysails.  The aggrieved bowman back at the dock busily packing mountains of staysails splattered all over the foredeck: "The reason they call them bloody staysails is they should stay in the bloody bag."

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On 11/4/2020 at 4:32 PM, bigrpowr said:

should prolly still be tiller steered. good looking boat.

IOR boats by definition have tillers. It’s physically impossible to replicate a death defying IOR broach running directly down wind under a hideous tri-cut chute. The reaction time of the driver to pull the tiller up to his chin in a failed attempt to overcome the hydrodynamic flaws of the lumpy bumpy hull simply cannot be done with a wheel. Impossible. 

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5 hours ago, CaptainAhab said:

IOR boats by definition have tillers. It’s physically impossible to replicate a death defying IOR broach running directly down wind under a hideous tri-cut chute. The reaction time of the driver to pull the tiller up to his chin in a failed attempt to overcome the hydrodynamic flaws of the lumpy bumpy hull simply cannot be done with a wheel. Impossible. 

It's quite a workout to spin a wheel from lock to lock and maybe survive....

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On 11/3/2020 at 8:13 AM, sunseeker said:
On 11/3/2020 at 7:03 AM, longy said:

She had a lot of issues with deck hardware migrating towards the load

That’s a hysterical description, never heard that before. Keeping that for future use.

Not heard that one either..:P

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On 11/3/2020 at 4:02 PM, chuso007 said:

This just popped up on my Youtube recommendations:

"A short 12 minute 'glimpse' of the 3 1/2 years we spent restoring the former Whitbread Maxi 'Creighton's Naturally' also known as 'FCF Challenger' and 'Ocean Greyhound'. "

Pretty cool project...

Really nice interior mods, cant thinking I'd have spent the cash on a different donor hull though.

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11 minutes ago, mad said:

Really nice interior mods, cant thinking I'd have spent the cash on a different donor hull though.

Just curious...in that size range and price range, what would you think are better options?

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On 11/3/2020 at 6:35 PM, P_Wop said:
On 11/3/2020 at 5:48 PM, Former MDR Vandal 1 said:

The Bravura Two Tonner ended up in MDR.  She was built at Cookson in 1991.  I understand from the excellent RB sailing website that she was a sistership of Wings of Oracle.  https://rbsailing.blogspot.com/2017/05/wings-of-oracle-farr-two-tonner.html   I was told by extremely reliable sources she was built alongside Cookson’s High Five, an early, extremely successful IMS 40 footer.

An interesting nugget from the 1991 Wings of Oracle campaign.  She was completely funded by Oracle UK, and was launched and racing before Larry found out about it.  He threw a fit and demanded that the boat was to be sailed no more.  A royal battle ensued, and eventually the CEO of Oracle UK (Geoff ???) convinced Larry it was a good deal.

And the first page in a peculiar history was then writ.

I remember that AC and the following one, didn't Bravura become a Corum boat the next time round?

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I really hate that hard dodger.  I just cant get past it. 

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2 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I really hate that hard dodger.  I just cant get past it. 

They would probably throw in a chainsaw if you paid full ask.

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Or a Sawz all, not against a dodger but that belongs in the ugly dodger thread!  Off with it's head I say.

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On 11/4/2020 at 7:09 AM, Ignatius J. Reilly said:

I was involved with her when she was donated.  She arrived with a fresh paint job after being chartered to the French Corum team for the Admirals Cup (there is a great picture of her broaching as CORUM)  The construction by Cookson was incredible.  Unfortunately I don't think she could compete at the level Irv wanted to be successful at ... thus the donation.

 One little interesting factoid seeing her MDR sail number.  Her original number was US-17.  Part of the gift agreement stipulated that the number would be retired upon the sale of the boat.  Apparently Larry Ellison had made an agreement with Irv to transfer the number for use on his new Sayonara.

She was fun to sail.   We even took her to Stockton racing the Delta Ditch one year.   That was an adventure! 

IMG_0055 (2).jpg

Can remember her turning up and going in for the paint job, good times when the AC was in full flow.

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12 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I really hate that hard dodger.  I just cant get past it. 

It really is incredibly ugly. I feel like it’s probably nice in use though on that boat. 

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7 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

Everyone is below the layline.  Assuming a port rounding.

 

Good guess, but no. The red mark is not the weather mark. The weather mark is far out of the frame to windward.

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16 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Good guess, but no. The red mark is not the weather mark. The weather mark is far out of the frame to windward.

Sea state. 

Although I would think a flood current would be going left to right.  Given that the boats are sailing upwind would increase the chop and the water looks pretty flat for the amount of wind.  But I have no idea of the SF skyline for reference.

Edit:  Just Googled Transamerica building and discovered it's on the opposite side of the bay than I thought.  That would explain it.

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Just now, 12 metre said:

Sea state. 

Although I would think a flood current would be going left to right.  Given that the boats are sailing upwind would increase the chop and the water looks pretty flat for the amount of wind.

You are on the right track. Current is going right to left.

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Everyone's headed for the city front early to get the current relief.

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3 minutes ago, See Level said:

Everyone's headed for the city front early to get the current relief.

True, but everyone would likely be headed that way anyway since it is also the way to the deep water if it were ebbing.

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58 minutes ago, sledracr said:

good breeze with no chop.   plus the current line.

The current line is a little misleading, but good breeze with no chop is true.

The bow guy is wearing jeans. If it were an ebb he would not wear jeans.

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Flood is darker/greener (and the air feels colder on the boat)   Ebb is brown. Not breezy enough to make the chop jump up, but still looks like flood.  Looks like they're way over/down by TI.  Dont want to go to the cityfront unless you can lay North Point.  If not, take a couple tacks up behind Alcatraz into the cone.  But I bet they had dudes that knew those tricks onboard that day. 

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13 minutes ago, some dude said:

Flood is darker/greener (and the air feels colder on the boat)   Ebb is brown. Not breezy enough to make the chop jump up, but still looks like flood.  Looks like they're way over/down by TI.  Dont want to go to the cityfront unless you can lay North Point.  If not, take a couple tacks up behind Alcatraz into the cone.  But I bet they had dudes that knew those tricks onboard that day. 

The cone works for the first two hours of flood. It doesn’t work for the last two hours of flood. When, precisely in between those, it stops paying is a subject of robust debate. 
 

For any given amount of breeze the water is flatter in flood and choppier in ebb. The bow guy is wearing jeans which means he doesn’t expect to get wet which means flood. 
 

 

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Pretty funny to read the conversation about "jeans" on the bow.   It would take some big Mr. Ebb to get him into foulies.     Being a donated boat, we didn't exactly have the big clothing budget of some other programs.   One year for the BBS we showed up at the starting line with white tyvex suits, blue sail-ties for belts and Avery stickers on our chest with the boat name.    They didn't last very long .... but for a few moments we looked pretty sharp! (and we got a good laugh out of it!)

Image4-4.thumb.jpg.431496f3f3b6ff4008076c4ac3c57b5b.jpg

Regarding the tide question ... SF Woody is correct.   When to use the "Cone of Alcatraz" is THE question on days like this.   It was my experience that if you were going to be coming into the cityfront south of Pier 39, the cone was most likely the best way to go.    Until you have done it, playing The Cone is hard to describe.   As we used to say .... you will hit the bow before you hit the bottom.   We would sail right up to the Alcatraz warning sign on the south end of the island.   Every boat length hiding from Mr. Flood generated big gains.   Then there was the choice to sail up the face of Alcatraz for a little bit more advantage.   

It has been thirty years ... but those were great days on the Bay!

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9 minutes ago, Ignatius J. Reilly said:

Pretty funny to read the conversation about "jeans" on the bow.   It would take some big Mr. Ebb to get him into foulies.     Being a donated boat, we didn't exactly have the big clothing budget of some other programs.   One year for the BBS we showed up at the starting line with white tyvex suits, blue sail-ties for belts and Avery stickers on our chest with the boat name.    They didn't last very long .... but for a few moments we looked pretty sharp! (and we got a good laugh out of it!)

Image4-4.thumb.jpg.431496f3f3b6ff4008076c4ac3c57b5b.jpg

Regarding the tide question ... SF Woody is correct.   When to use the "Cone of Alcatraz" is THE question on days like this.   It was my experience that if you were going to be coming into the cityfront south of Pier 39, the cone was most likely the best way to go.    Until you have done it, playing The Cone is hard to describe.   As we used to say .... you will hit the bow before you hit the bottom.   We would sail right up to the Alcatraz warning sign on the south end of the island.   Every boat length hiding from Mr. Flood generated big gains.   Then there was the choice to sail up the face of Alcatraz for a little bit more advantage.   

It has been thirty years ... but those were great days on the Bay!

Ah yes, the reverse cone. Whether to take that one last hitch to port to sail into the relief on the up current side. Always a difficult one but particularly difficult when you are leading. What to do if you tack and the next two boats don’t? Cover knowing you will be in bad current? Split hoping you are in better current? 

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1 hour ago, Ignatius J. Reilly said:

Pretty funny to read the conversation about "jeans" on the bow.   It would take some big Mr. Ebb to get him into foulies.     Being a donated boat, we didn't exactly have the big clothing budget of some other programs.   One year for the BBS we showed up at the starting line with white tyvex suits, blue sail-ties for belts and Avery stickers on our chest with the boat name.    They didn't last very long .... but for a few moments we looked pretty sharp! (and we got a good laugh out of it!)

Image4-4.thumb.jpg.431496f3f3b6ff4008076c4ac3c57b5b.jpg

Regarding the tide question ... SF Woody is correct.   When to use the "Cone of Alcatraz" is THE question on days like this.   It was my experience that if you were going to be coming into the cityfront south of Pier 39, the cone was most likely the best way to go.    Until you have done it, playing The Cone is hard to describe.   As we used to say .... you will hit the bow before you hit the bottom.   We would sail right up to the Alcatraz warning sign on the south end of the island.   Every boat length hiding from Mr. Flood generated big gains.   Then there was the choice to sail up the face of Alcatraz for a little bit more advantage.   

It has been thirty years ... but those were great days on the Bay!

Yep!  The play for the cone is quite mysterious.  But even if the timing if off, you have to go that way at least long enough to lay North Point.  Small breeze big water under there if you don't. 

And BTW a J105 going all the up into the cone to the Keep Out-Federal Prison sign hits at the keel about a boatlength before the bow would hit.  Learned the hard way.  Left a piece of lead there to mark the spot.  

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2 minutes ago, some dude said:

And BTW a J105 going all the up into the cone to the Keep Out-Federal Prison sign hits at the keel about a boatlength before the bow would hit.  Learned the hard way.  Left a piece of lead there to mark the spot.  

Thanks. That could come in handy. 

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13 minutes ago, some dude said:

Left a piece of lead there to mark the spot.  

lmao.  bookend for the piece of lead left to mark "audacious rock" on the beat out of hurricane gulch?

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1 hour ago, sledracr said:

lmao.  bookend for the piece of lead left to mark "audacious rock" on the beat out of hurricane gulch?

Indeed.  Very similar experience.  That kind of impact may twist the whole fin of the IOR boat, but not the J boat.  YMMV

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1 hour ago, sledracr said:

lmao.  bookend for the piece of lead left to mark "audacious rock" on the beat out of hurricane gulch?

Do you mind if I ask where is that rock? Specifically?

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14 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Do you mind if I ask where is that rock? Specifically?

Just SW of Pt Fermin. Right on the layline to the bouy. 400 miles south of you

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Just now, some dude said:

Just SW of Pt Fermin. Right on the layline to the bouy. 400 miles south of you

Aha! We have a Hurricane Gulch here as well (off Sausalito), and I had never heard of a rock. Thanks!

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12 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Aha! We have a Hurricane Gulch here as well (off Sausalito), and I had never heard of a rock. Thanks!

No worries!  The San Pedro one is not as hurricane-ish but breezy for So Cal

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4 hours ago, some dude said:

No worries!  The San Pedro one is not as hurricane-ish but breezy for So Cal

but it does exist, i remember one specific knock down there.. scared the shit out of me.

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Hoping someone here may have some info: the picture below is most likely for where this beautiful boat (a German Frers 3/4 tonner) was with it's 2nd owner (not 100% sure, yet most likely 2nd owner not first);  F7554 as her sailing number, operated from Port Vendres (the 1st and/or 2nd owner member of the GYC (very likely being: Gruissan Yacht Club).

Any info is welcomed :) We try to make the info complete (also on histoiredeshalves (http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/Trois Quart/Trois Quart tonner Liste.htm)). (this boat is a sister ship to La Rafolie who also sailed from this area (F7440))

Thank you!
 

Brugues==lovefool==pollux==earlymorningsunrise--F7554.jpg

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Something that has intrigued me for decades is how some designers - Frers, Stephens, Rhodes - had a "feminine" quality in the look of their boats while others - the Maestro in particular - had a "masculine" look to their designs.

While easy to see I've never been able to determine what it is that gives them those qualities. Whatever it is, it's subtle - or a lot of subtle differences.

For example - the transom of the pictured boat could have been drawn by Scott Kaufmann but the overall boat no.

Anybody have any observations on this?

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On 1/2/2021 at 6:25 PM, mad said:

Not heard that one either..:P

"Yield vectoring"

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15 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Something that has intrigued me for decades is how some designers - Frers, Stephens, Rhodes - had a "feminine" quality in the look of their boats while others - the Maestro in particular - had a "masculine" look to their designs.

While easy to see I've never been able to determine what it is that gives them those qualities. Whatever it is, it's subtle - or a lot of subtle differences.

For example - the transom of the pictured boat could have been drawn by Scott Kaufmann but the overall boat no.

Anybody have any observations on this?

Lots of subtle differences I would  say.                                                                                                                                                                          

Actually this has been for me a question for decades: 40+ years ago I was actively racing and was lucky enough to sail first on an early lightweight flyer (enthusing) which despite very significant successes did not attract much owners' attention.

Although we were convinced that "classic" designs were becoming obsolete, the attraction of a full-on campaign had us next on a Frers design of similar size. she proved able to - a number of times - fend-off the light weights while dominating all other medium-displacements ....... and enlighting owners' eyes.

How Frers had been able to extract such good performance from a pure classic look was and remains a mistery to me. Sound principles then faired into a beautiful look while always keeping a close attention at the "rule" idiosyncracies  ???

Refinement.

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5 hours ago, moody frog said:

How Frers had been able to extract such good performance from a pure classic look was and remains a mistery to me. Sound principles then faired into a beautiful look while always keeping a close attention at the "rule" idiosyncracies  ???

I have a hunch that the success of Frers had a key factor in common with that of S&S: an ability consistently to attract clients who brought both big money and high skill.  That ensured that whatever the boat's capabilities, they would be exploited to the max.  In my theory, the beautiful looks are part of that package, a visual status symbol both for those wealthy owners and for crew who wanted a ride on the best-looking boats.

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I 100% agree on comments about German Frers Jr.  Just a genius at designing beautiful yachts that went very well indeed.

Here's my 1979 Fastnet ride, the very first Il Moro.  Glorious boat.

 

Il_Moro.jpg

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1 hour ago, P_Wop said:

I 100% agree on comments about German Frers Jr.  Just a genius at designing beautiful yachts that went very well indeed.

Here's my 1979 Fastnet ride, the very first Il Moro.  Glorious boat.

 

Il_Moro.jpg

J, what made her Glorious? R

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1 hour ago, dolphinmaster said:

J, what made her Glorious? R

Good question.

Apart from being drop dead lovely to look at, she was beautifully built in cold-moulded timber by Sangermani (but may have been Becconcini or Ambrosini, I can't remember).  Although only 68 feet, she had a huge masthead rig which made her very potent in the predominantly light-air Med.  But she could be reefed down and set tiny headsails as needed, as we discovered in that bloody Fastnet. 

One of the first fully flush-decked big IOR racers, she was an eye-opener when launched in 76.  Replacing the big heavy 2-spreader Hood spar in 79 for the largest Stearn 3-spreader bendy rig built up to that day only made her better.  Timmy "twinstay" Stearn and John Marshall drove her in Cowes Week that year.  I have more photos somewhere.

Now well restored and still racing in the Med, as in the recent pic.

Happy days.

Alamy image:

Imperia, Italy. 9th Sep, 2016. The yacht Il Moro di Venezia" sailing Stock  Photo - Alamy

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8 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Good question.

Apart from being drop dead lovely to look at, she was beautifully built in cold-moulded timber by Sangermani (but may have been Becconcini or Ambrosini, I can't remember).  Although only 68 feet, she had a huge masthead rig which made her very potent in the predominantly light-air Med.  But she could be reefed down and set tiny headsails as needed, as we discovered in that bloody Fastnet. 

One of the first fully flush-decked big IOR racers, she was an eye-opener when launched in 76.  Replacing the big heavy 2-spreader Hood spar in 79 for the largest Stearn 3-spreader bendy rig built up to that day only made her better.  Timmy "twinstay" Stearn and John Marshall drove her in Cowes Week that year.  I have more photos somewhere.

Now well restored and still racing in the Med, as in the recent pic.

Happy days.

Alamy image:

Imperia, Italy. 9th Sep, 2016. The yacht Il Moro di Venezia" sailing Stock  Photo - Alamy

"Carlini "

Who else for Raul ?  Adriatico rules .......

My first sight of her,:when she entered Groves & Guttridge marina, before the '77 Fastnet. I had never see any boat that beautiful, neat and impressive ... Phantom, Grampus, Gitana VI, suddenly looked "just standard"

Luck was with me, that day: there on deck was a guy from Palermo I had sailed a one-tonner with a year before .... I could step  foot on deck and "feel" what a mighty thoroughbred she was - even when tied up.

 

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In the fairly light air beat down and out of the Solent in the 79 Fastnet, when we finally settled down Raul pointed behind us and said it was good to see Tenacious behind us.  I replied that it wasn't Tenacious, it was Kialoa.

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2 hours ago, P_Wop said:

In the fairly light air beat down and out of the Solent in the 79 Fastnet, when we finally settled down Raul pointed behind us and said it was good to see Tenacious behind us.  I replied that it wasn't Tenacious, it was Kialoa.

Nice!

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On 1/12/2021 at 9:42 AM, TwoLegged said:

I have a hunch that the success of Frers had a key factor in common with that of S&S: an ability consistently to attract clients who brought both big money and high skill.  That ensured that whatever the boat's capabilities, they would be exploited to the max.  In my theory, the beautiful looks are part of that package, a visual status symbol both for those wealthy owners and for crew who wanted a ride on the best-looking boats.

I did the 1991 PH-Mac on a Frers 52 or 53', I think it was the old Bumblebee.  Upwind after the start blowing 5-7.  When the occasional 10 kt puff hit, the boat lit up.  I spent five weeks literally at the North Pole in '87 and have never been as cold as I was in that aluminum can rounding cove.  Three in the morning and you get out of your bunk to warm up on deck?

On the motor to the start, the owner who I had never sailed with (plenty since then). remarked that if he had all the money in the world, he'd still want to be exactly where he was.   He's gone now but I remind myself of that when things seem tough.  Sailboat races are never tough.

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7 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

I did the 1991 PH-Mac on a Frers 52 or 53', I think it was the old Bumblebee.  Upwind after the start blowing 5-7.  When the occasional 10 kt puff hit, the boat lit up.  I spent five weeks literally at the North Pole in '87 and have never been as cold as I was in that aluminum can rounding cove.  Three in the morning and you get out of your bunk to warm up on deck?

On the motor to the start, the owner who I had never sailed with (plenty since then). remarked that if he had all the money in the world, he'd still want to be exactly where he was.   He's gone now but I remind myself of that when things seem tough.  Sailboat races are never tough.

Sweet memories! You seem to have recovered from that mishap with the start gun. Thanks God.

  

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14 minutes ago, LordBooster said:

Sweet memories! You seem to have recovered from that mishap with the start gun. Thanks God.

  

I've done my share of RC but don't recall any start gun issues.  Please fill me in.

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7 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

I've done my share of RC but don't recall any start gun issues.  Please fill me in.

Sorry, flare gun!

  On 12/21/2020 at 11:03 PM, LordBooster said:

Well, you are probably correct. I have no tested that trick, only snus. Snus (roughly chewing tobacco) works good in a breeze, cigar probably not. Probably the reason my light air speed...

If it's that light, watch how the smoke flows when I shoot myself with the flare gun.

 

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On 1/11/2021 at 10:50 AM, EarlyMorningSunrise said:

Hoping someone here may have some info: the picture below is most likely for where this beautiful boat (a German Frers 3/4 tonner) was with it's 2nd owner (not 100% sure, yet most likely 2nd owner not first);  F7554 as her sailing number, operated from Port Vendres (the 1st and/or 2nd owner member of the GYC (very likely being: Gruissan Yacht Club).

Any info is welcomed :) We try to make the info complete (also on histoiredeshalves (http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/Trois Quart/Trois Quart tonner Liste.htm)). (this boat is a sister ship to La Rafolie who also sailed from this area (F7440))

Thank you!
 

Brugues==lovefool==pollux==earlymorningsunrise--F7554.jpg

Cirrus 33, designed by German Frers and built in Spain, Taylor boatyard, around 1977-79. Derived from Samsara, a cold molded prototype from Souters in Cowes which finished third on the 3/4 Ton Cup in 1977 and second in her class on the infamous 1979 Fastnet. 

Very nice boat, very sturdy and heavy. I was an IOR measurer back then and I found that the keels were not the same size; one of them had a twist of a full degree from top to bottom, which caused some funny results on beats. 

https://sailboat.guide/cirrus-34-ton-frers

I did a Med campaign on one of these, including the Med International Championship in Palma. We also won the Godo Cup, a well-known event in Spain. Not too fast but very reliable. Genoa winches were recessed into the cockpit, which meant that the only way to sheet hard was to press the knees against the cockpit side - very painful after several tacks. Somewhat acrobatic on runs in a heavy sea but controllable, although the tiller was rather short to compensate for the small cockpit. 

A nice boat. 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, kotick said:

Cirrus 33, designed by German Frers and built in Spain, Taylor boatyard, around 1977-79. Derived from Samsara, a cold molded prototype from Souters in Cowes which finished third on the 3/4 Ton Cup in 1977 and second in her class on the infamous 1979 Fastnet. 

Very nice boat, very sturdy and heavy. I was an IOR measurer back then and I found that the keels were not the same size; one of them had a twist of a full degree from top to bottom, which caused some funny results on beats. 

https://sailboat.guide/cirrus-34-ton-frers

I did a Med campaign on one of these, including the Med International Championship in Palma. We also won the Godo Cup, a well-known event in Spain. Not too fast but very reliable. Genoa winches were recessed into the cockpit, which meant that the only way to sheet hard was to press the knees against the cockpit side - very painful after several tacks. Somewhat acrobatic on runs in a heavy sea but controllable, although the tiller was rather short to compensate for the small cockpit. 

A nice boat. 

 

 

Pretty good summary Thanks !

Just one little correction:

While close to Samsara the Taylor 33 is not a derivative as is most often believed.                                                                              Actually I believe  the Taylor was designed prior to Samsara: T 33 series production started early 77 at the latest, while Samsara development spread from November '76 to Spring '77 - she was quickly built and launched End May or early June.

The main design concept difference was in the purpose, as a cruiser-racer the T 33 had more displacement through a deeper body, while  Sam was designed as a pure one-off tonner.

Differences ... but the T 33 still performed very well against the contemporary production boats , Contention 33 , UFO 34, Kalik 33 ... the only T33s in the 3/4 Ton cup were  Spanish Navy run and their results reflected crew work more than boat performance.

Still, I would better enjoy a cruise on a T33  :rolleyes:

 

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6 hours ago, Whinging Pom said:

I vividly remember doing the 1985 Channel Race on Samsara.  Hydraulic oil and vomit everywhere ...

I remember that one too, but for a different reason.  The occupant of the lower bunk had used my seaboot as a conveniently nearby receptacle.  It's a less than joyful feeling when you discover this while getting into your gear for the 0400 watch change.

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47 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

I remember that one too, but for a different reason.  The occupant of the lower bunk had used my seaboot as a conveniently nearby receptacle.  It's a less than joyful feeling when you discover this while getting into your gear for the 0400 watch change.

Reminds me of my Dad's WW2 Navy story about always setting yourself up in upper sleeping hammocks so as not to be a catch basin for seasickness ejecta from above.

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