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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

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K9u20

Older well known IOR Boats

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The first Celebration WAS a sister to Firewater and were both 27.5 1 Ton's. They came the year after and were developments of Rogue's Roost, sailed by Bob Barton (then with Horizon Sails), a one-off which I think was Cook's first IOR boat. [ ... ] The story is that this design was the basis of the NY 36 by W.D. Schock.

Yes. The NY 36 was a development of Celebration & Firewater. Obviously with more furniture. And, of course, designed by committee (NYYC.) Still somewhat of a PHRF weapon to this day in light air. And they have damn decent pace in a blow, much to everyone's surprise back then.

 

One of my favorite races ever was the 1981 Whitney Series race 'round Santa Barbara Island on Tom's NY 36. On the 45-mile beat to the island the wind continued to build 'til we were deep reefed with a blade and hoping we didn't need to ditch more SA because we were at the bottom of the inventory. Steady high 20s with some gusts into the low 30s. By the time we raised the island it was around midnight and most of the crew was either sick or just freaked out. We were all wet and cold and tired and hungry. I remember Tom having shit fits that we didn't get the chute set in the 1-mile fetch to Sutil, at which point we would have to gybe in 30 knots, no moon. By the time it was ready to go up we were already 2/3 of the way there so I was pushing to hold the hoist 'til after the gybe. Schock thought about it and agreed.

 

So we blast around Sutil doing well above hull speed and throw up the heavy chute. No J/105 ever had anything on our boatspeed that night! (that's a joke, son) Almost immediately -- well within one minute -- we snagged some of the thick kelp which surrounds Santa Barbara and Sutil Islands. You guys who've been there know what I'm talkin' about. The effect was not entirely unlike Sammy Sosa picking up a baseball bat and taking a few warm-up swings except our keel was the grip of the "bat" and the kelp was Sammy's fists. Maybe it was the dark night and the wind noise but I never remember being slammed down harder or faster than that one. After we peeled ourselves off the back of the cabin trunk and the boat shook herself back upright, Tom did some chin-ups with the helm, we turned down and immediately took back off screamin' for Angel's Gate.

 

What made the crossing home that night especially memorable was that most of the crew was just done. They were like, "Fuck this shit; I'm going to bed." How they managed to sleep or even sit down there with all that noise and motion, I don't know. But they missed an epic sail into the dawn! It was just Tom and myself on deck, trading off steering and trim. The boat was very well-behaved for an IOR watermelon seed. And fast. Every hour or so a face would appear in the companionway and ask, "How's it goin'?" and before we could say, "It's OK but it wouldn't hurt to have an extra hand on deck..." they were all, "Good," and disappear back below.

 

As the dawn started to lighten the eastern sky the wind likewise started to lighten and slowly people started appearing on deck. Someone made a pot coffee. We had a short light-air tacking duel against a 50-footer to the RC finish boat. First over-all on that one! I remember precisely zero about the trip back to Newport.

__________

 

Another quick Bill Cook story. We were all impressed with Cook's attention to detail and accuracy of his calculations. When we launched Dewey Isdale's Hull #1 she floated dead nuts on her lines (slightly high as there were no sails or rig aboard yet.) Dead-nuts level. Tom Schock was shaking his head in disbelief, his lips drawing a thin straight line. "First time ever," was all he said.

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Murph!

Who's holding the bottle? Looks too old to be Tom Wilson.

And who's the stoner who looks like Keanu Reeves behind Murph?

Got to sail with Paul, SB-KH 2011. He has less hair now...

 

I have a great Murphy story about coming home from CORK one year.

That whole regatta was memorable for multiple reasons. Benji's Bistro in those college dorms... No details here because people have appearances to maintain these days...

 

I have NO IDEA what year that was!!! lol.gif

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We have just purchased the 1982 German Frers designed Charrua, now known as Sheqel. Also bought a bit of an upgrade project but she is very attractive. www.sheqel.co.ukpost-71058-0-04806800-1359359466_thumb.jpg

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1979 One Ton North Americans - Pendragon

 

It's amazing the boat was designed in '77 as a 3/4 tonner. Still a sexy looking boat to this day.

 

Thank you for sharing PMello - brings back great memories for me.

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The One Ton Cup is one of the most beautiful trophies of all time. Thanks for the memories, Paul!

 

While I guess that you refer to the IOR One-Ton-days, this is one of the oldest and major yachting trophies.

it is a pity that it now lies dusty on a shelf, when the sponsoring club had succeeded to keep it alive and strong for 95 years through astute moves between formats and classes.

10 years of retirement sounds enough.

May be we need some new and fresh ideas.

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The One Ton Cup is one of the most beautiful trophies of all time. Thanks for the memories, Paul!

 

While I guess that you refer to the IOR One-Ton-days, this is one of the oldest and major yachting trophies.

it is a pity that it now lies dusty on a shelf, when the sponsoring club had succeeded to keep it alive and strong for 95 years through astute moves between formats and classes.

10 years of retirement sounds enough.

May be we need some new and fresh ideas.

A little history of this is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Ton_Cup. It's fun to think that all our terminology about one-ton, half-ton, quarter, 3/4, 2-ton etc... are derived from a dinghy racing formula that expired over a hundred years ago. I still think the Cup is beatutiful, though. And heavy! Over 20 pounds of solid art nouveau silver.

 

Agree on a new use. How about the AC45 cats? As long as they have nothing to do with the AC circus.

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The One Ton Cup is one of the most beautiful trophies of all time. Thanks for the memories, Paul!

 

While I guess that you refer to the IOR One-Ton-days, this is one of the oldest and major yachting trophies.

it is a pity that it now lies dusty on a shelf, when the sponsoring club had succeeded to keep it alive and strong for 95 years through astute moves between formats and classes.

10 years of retirement sounds enough.

May be we need some new and fresh ideas.

A little history of this is here: http://en.wikipedia....iki/One_Ton_Cup. It's fun to think that all our terminology about one-ton, half-ton, quarter, 3/4, 2-ton etc... are derived from a dinghy racing formula that expired over a hundred years ago. I still think the Cup is beatutiful, though. And heavy! Over 20 pounds of solid art nouveau silver.

 

Agree on a new use. How about the AC45 cats? As long as they have nothing to do with the AC circus.

 

I suppose the AC45's are about the most competitive thing going right now. Something about Cats for the One Ton Cup that doesn't ring right. I would look toward the IRC to put levels in place, but there is too much subjectivity to the IRC Rule. You might as well have it in PHRF at that rate. Hmm, think, think, think...

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© Paul J Mello - More One Ton North Americans 1979. There are sailing shots too. It may take a while though.

 

post-50798-0-51269000-1359139814_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the left side, the first three guys are Rod, Johnny Mac and a young(er) Dave McCulley (My Hero). I assume the tall guy wearing sea boots is a young Kimo but I am ready to be corrected. Don't know the other guys.

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One Ton North Americans - Ida Lewis with Harbour Court in the background. Our Blujay (1960's) was anchored just about where the Hobie cat is

 

And you got a shot of Not By Bread Alone too! (The dark hull tied up to Indugence)

 

And when did NYYC take over Harborcourt?

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One Ton North Americans - Ida Lewis with Harbour Court in the background. Our Blujay (1960's) was anchored just about where the Hobie cat is

 

And you got a shot of Not By Bread Alone too! (The dark hull tied up to Indugence)

 

And when did NYYC take over Harborcourt?

 

Not until 1988, I'll answer my own question. The Harbor Court Mansion in the background was a private residence in 1979.

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One Ton North Americans - Ida Lewis with Harbour Court in the background. Our Blujay (1960's) was anchored just about where the Hobie cat is

 

Hey Oystercatcher 79' - the first of the 27 Oyster SJ41's ever built... she is still sailing around (was for sale in Holland for quite some time. Nice boats... have one...

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One Ton North Americans - Ida Lewis with Harbour Court in the background. Our Blujay (1960's) was anchored just about where the Hobie cat is

 

Hey Oystercatcher 79' - the first of the 27 Oyster SJ41's ever built... she is still sailing around (was for sale in Holland for quite some time. Nice boats... have one...

 

Hi halfton, 41ft was pretty big for a One Tonner back then, from the photo above it would seem that Oystercatcher paid for length through some pretty aggressive bumping around the stern sections? and perhaps with a smaller sail plan?

 

I've posted a feature and short history on Pendragon here - http://rbsailing.blogspot.co.nz/2013/01/pendragon-davidson-34.html - an amazing boat, and thanks to P Mello for use of his great photos.

 

It would be good to see racing for the One Ton Cup again, does anyone know where this trophy now lies? perhaps it could be used for the new 40 footers under the HPR rule?

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One Ton North Americans - Ida Lewis with Harbour Court in the background. Our Blujay (1960's) was anchored just about where the Hobie cat is

 

Hey Oystercatcher 79' - the first of the 27 Oyster SJ41's ever built... she is still sailing around (was for sale in Holland for quite some time. Nice boats... have one...

 

Hi halfton, 41ft was pretty big for a One Tonner back then, from the photo above it would seem that Oystercatcher paid for length through some pretty aggressive bumping around the stern sections? and perhaps with a smaller sail plan?

 

Stephen Jones was famous for his quite remarkable/different IOR hull designs: Odd Job the quarter, Supernova the 1/2 ton, SJ35 the 3/4 ton, hustler 36, SJ 41 the 39 ft one ton, ...

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Paul - Many thanks for posting the pictures - the US perspective is great.

 

Is there any sign yet of an association that gets this generation of One Tonners back on the water together in the same way the Halfs & Quarters are doing? Ok the costs of putting a neglected boat back into racing condition would not be insignificant, but I'd guess cheaper than a new IRC 40 or similar and you'd end up racing a boat with history & charisma in a friendly fleet that doesn't have to worry about obsolescence (which surely is a big draw for the 1/2 & 1/4 ton revival?)

 

Does anyone know the whereabouts of the Stephen Jones designed Rakau? Gorgeous looking boat (very different from Oystercatcher 79!) which I remember racing against when she was new in 81, I believe she was sold to France. Also Indulgence; (I remember her dropping her new rig in several pieces in the last race of the Lymington Spring Series while chasing Rakau!) she was still being raced when the OTC changed to 30.5' in 1984, I think by then under new ownership as Terrier, Graham Walker having moved on to the Admirals Cup. There was also a new Dubois One Tonner in the UK in 1981; originally Snowball then became Framboise, any sightings or pictures out there?

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At our Winter Series in Holland (Colijnsplaat) there are 3 one-tonners competing: Pinta'92, Shamrock (X-1 ton from 1984 & ex-Euro) and Prince de Pétarcq (SJ41). One-ton revival already underway here... Also old 2-tonner Formidable can regularly be seen on the race course.

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I see theres a push on in Holland aswell to create a Dutch 1/4 ton class and they already have an event organised this year.

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I see theres a push on in Holland aswell to create a Dutch 1/4 ton class and they already have an event organised this year.

 

IOR is doing very well here...

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I see theres a push on in Holland aswell to create a Dutch 1/4 ton class and they already have an event organised this year.

 

IOR is doing very well here...

 

Seems to be a good revival in ior boats racing in irc around ireland & uk aswell. We have a good few old ior mini & quater tons sailing in various fleets around dublin & more to join by summer. The old 1 & 2 tons are well gone though and half tonners are falling away.

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Pendragon One Ton worlds crew. Skipper Rod Davis, John McLaurin, Dave McCulley, Byron Pratt, Curt Oetking, Kimo Worthington and Paul Murphy

Pendragon was Laurie Davidson's lightweight design that won the 3/4 worlds in 1978. IOR penalized the bee-gezus out of it. So instead of torturing the boat, to return it to 3/4 rating, Laurie turbo-charged it w/ long boom, longer pole. We were fast in light air, fast downwind. Didn't like the long, windy beats as much. Distance race was; Newport to Buzzards Bay Tower, to Noman's land, tip of Long Island THREE TIMES AROUND. We only ate sandwiches, I don't recall any cooking.

 

© Paul J Mello - More One Ton North Americans 1979. There are sailing shots too. It may take a while though.

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Stephen Jones was famous for his quite remarkable/different IOR hull designs

 

I think you are being generous and gracious.

 

Stephen Jones' IOR designs were all butt-ugly and meant to exploit the rule in the extreme. If you want to pinpoint when and where the IOR became "broken" and started its decline until it was eventually abandoned as a handicapping rule, look no further. Jones' designs epitomized the rate-low-go-slow school of thought and were about as ugly as Milgram's Cascade.

 

Congratulations at being good with a computer, Mr. Jones. I hope you're proud of your accomplishment.

 

To be fair, it took cheaterific owners to support that crap.

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I forgot about Dennis Posey's Firebrand. Probably the ugliest IOR boat I ever saw. These are just awesome Paul.

<hijack>

Speaking of awesome photos, what happened to those MBFS weekend 2 photos?

</hijack>

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I forgot about Dennis Posey's Firebrand. Probably the ugliest IOR boat I ever saw. These are just awesome Paul.

<hijack>

Speaking of awesome photos, what happened to those MBFS weekend 2 photos?

</hijack>

 

You Talkin to me? If so I need more info...

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These photos are fantastic, thanks so much for posting them Paul. Are the sailing shots all from the 1979 North Americans, or are some from the One Ton Cup itself? - I think the two regattas were pretty close together which might explain the European entries if they are from the NA's.

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I forgot about Dennis Posey's Firebrand. Probably the ugliest IOR boat I ever saw. These are just awesome Paul.

<hijack>

Speaking of awesome photos, what happened to those MBFS weekend 2 photos?

</hijack>

 

You Talkin to me? If so I need more info...

 

No, He's talkin' to me. I'll get them finished shortly. You can blame the delay on Sandy. Basement flooded and I need to get that machine hooked up again. I've been working on Day 3 shots - there are lot's. I need a new network card for that machine or something, it's not getting an internet connection via hardwire. The IT department (wifey) has spent hours trying to figure it out. It is driving us nuts and we are never home to work it out. There are some great shots, though.

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Stephen Jones was famous for his quite remarkable/different IOR hull designs

 

I think you are being generous and gracious.

 

Stephen Jones' IOR designs were all butt-ugly and meant to exploit the rule in the extreme. If you want to pinpoint when and where the IOR became "broken" and started its decline until it was eventually abandoned as a handicapping rule, look no further. Jones' designs epitomized the rate-low-go-slow school of thought and were about as ugly as Milgram's Cascade.

 

Congratulations at being good with a computer, Mr. Jones. I hope you're proud of your accomplishment.

 

To be fair, it took cheaterific owners to support that crap.

 

Crap? You ever sailed one?

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I forgot about Dennis Posey's Firebrand. Probably the ugliest IOR boat I ever saw. These are just awesome Paul.

<hijack>

Speaking of awesome photos, what happened to those MBFS weekend 2 photos?

</hijack>

 

You Talkin to me? If so I need more info...

 

No, He's talkin' to me. I'll get them finished shortly. You can blame the delay on Sandy. Basement flooded and I need to get that machine hooked up again. I've been working on Day 3 shots - there are lot's. I need a new network card for that machine or something, it's not getting an internet connection via hardwire. The IT department (wifey) has spent hours trying to figure it out. It is driving us nuts and we are never home to work it out. There are some great shots, though.

 

No rush and thanks for putting in the work. I'm sure they'll look fantastic.

 

The hits from Sandy just keep on comin'.

 

Back to your regularly scheduled programming!

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These photos are fantastic, thanks so much for posting them Paul. Are the sailing shots all from the 1979 North Americans, or are some from the One Ton Cup itself? - I think the two regattas were pretty close together which might explain the European entries if they are from the NA's.

 

Your right! Some are from August and some are from September. I wish I had taken some notes back then.

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One Ton North Americans - Ida Lewis with Harbour Court in the background. Our Blujay (1960's) was anchored just about where the Hobie cat is

 

Hey Oystercatcher 79' - the first of the 27 Oyster SJ41's ever built... she is still sailing around (was for sale in Holland for quite some time. Nice boats... have one...

 

Hi halfton, 41ft was pretty big for a One Tonner back then, from the photo above it would seem that Oystercatcher paid for length through some pretty aggressive bumping around the stern sections? and perhaps with a smaller sail plan?

 

I've posted a feature and short history on Pendragon here - http://rbsailing.blo...avidson-34.html - an amazing boat, and thanks to P Mello for use of his great photos.

 

It would be good to see racing for the One Ton Cup again, does anyone know where this trophy now lies? perhaps it could be used for the new 40 footers under the HPR rule?

 

Actually there was no bumping of the stern per se on Jones designs. What he did was take advantage of the fact that IOR “averaged” AOCG and AOCP. By having a very flat stern buttocks line, raised well above the waterline, it created a large AOCP that “intersected” the waterline plane well forward of the AGS. When combined with an average AOCG, it made the rated length quite a bit shorter than the distance between FGS and AGS. Brilliant idea actually. This worked well with his “big boat” concept.

 

While he may have come up with this idea via a computer, I don’t know if computers were used for this sort of thing back in 1972 when he designed Odd Job – my gut feeling is that it was by his understanding of the geometry at play in IOR.

 

On a slightly different note, I get tired of hearing people complaining about “bumping” on IOR boats. IMHO I don’t think any designer put rating bumps on any new design – creases and folds yes, bumps no. Bumping was a process used primarily to optimize an existing boats rating or get it to rate at a certain level.

 

BTW, while some may consider Jones designs ugly, I used to think they were pretty cool looking – huge brutes.

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Crap? You ever sailed one?

You got me.

 

The answer is no, I have never sailed one.

 

That does not make them any better-looking.

If they were any good, why didn't any other designer adopt any part of the design?

 

Steve Jones was no Peterson or Farr. You can put any amount of spin on it you like, those boats are outliers -- ugly outliers. Of course "ugly" is my opinion. The fact that they lie well outside any standard deviation is, well... right in front of your eyes.

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BTW, while some may consider Jones designs ugly, I used to think they were pretty cool looking – huge brutes.

 

hand_raising.jpg

Me!

I "consider Jones designs ugly."

 

I will admit a rather morbid fascination with them when they came out, but I would never confuse that fascination with desire.

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On a slightly different note, I get tired of hearing people complaining about “bumping” on IOR boats. IMHO I don’t think any designer put rating bumps on any new design – creases and folds yes, bumps no. Bumping was a process used primarily to optimize an existing boats rating or get it to rate at a certain level.

 

Perhaps it was a regional thing, but in SoCal there is no question that new boats were splashed with.... let's call them "discontinuous curves"... at measurement points. Clever designers figured out how to make the shape flow from point to point. Less clever designers ended up with shape that looked like the hills of scotland. But even the new boats, in many cases, had distortions.

 

You're right, "adding" bumps was a popular rating-optimizing game. I spent more than my share of time fairing in carefully-applied blobs of microballoon/epoxy mixtures. But make no mistake, those exact measurement points were a focus of the designer's attention long before the boat hit the water. I remember, in particular, the designer telling us where to go "extra heavy" on a cold-molded 41-footer while it was still upside-down on the shop floor..... ymmv.

 

Oh, and BTW, it wasn't just bumps. When "Scandalous" (aluminum 50-footer) was launched, it rated significantly higher than S&S had predicted. The "fix" was to pull it out of the water, cut off the stern (16 feet, if I recall correctly) and "try again" with a different after-girth shape entirely.

 

Ah, the good old days... <grin>

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I agree with “discontinuous curves”, but I doubt you would see “bumps” on the lines plan or loftings.

 

I don’t know if I would consider Jones’ designs as outliers. Yes, his bow and stern treatments were unusual, but when you look at the ``meat and potatoes`` of his designs (i.e. sail area, displacement, mid-section shape, etc.) you would find them similar to most moderate displacement IOR boats of that era. A bit beamier though and some of his early designs had pronounced tumblehome, as did other designers at the time such as Mull.

 

Why didn`t Peterson/Farr copy Jones. Obviously because Jones designs weren`t overly successful. I never said his ratings tricks produced world beaters, I just thought they were interesting manipulations of the rule. Smokey Bear finished second to Waverider at the Half Ton Worlds in 78. That is about it as far as world championships go, but that is better than most designers can say.

 

Avert your eyes SE, here a couple of Jones designs I found on the internet, Tumblehome II (half ton) and Dream Machine (2 ton). Not a bulbed bow on Tumblehome, just another rating trick. Say what you will, at least he was original with his IOR designs.

post-12572-0-10266400-1359674587_thumb.jpg

post-12572-0-96722400-1359674655_thumb.jpg

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I'm going to go with Somebody Else on that first one.... "Tumblehome" is one butt-ugly boat. Sorry.

 

It reminds me of the guy's chest in Alien, just before the creature bursts out of it..

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Crap? You ever sailed one?

You got me.

 

The answer is no, I have never sailed one.

 

That does not make them any better-looking.

If they were any good, why didn't any other designer adopt any part of the design?

 

Steve Jones was no Peterson or Farr. You can put any amount of spin on it you like, those boats are outliers -- ugly outliers. Of course "ugly" is my opinion. The fact that they lie well outside any standard deviation is, well... right in front of your eyes.

Some other designers tried to go the same direction at the time, with much less success. In particular a character in Italy named Mino Simeone. I sailed his Geronimo in the 82 Two Ton Cup in Porto Cervo. Mostly 2-tonners were around 42-43 feet. That thing was over 50 feet long, and in its cradle on the hard stood at least two feet higher than all the others . Looked like a flippin aircraft carrier.

 

And sailed like one too. DFL in every race.

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post-32003-0-75864200-1359677576_thumb.jpg

Great pictures Paul.

Special Edition. The lead sled. Suffered in light air. At 40' she was long for a One Tonner.

tantonyachtdesign.blogspot.com

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Pendragon One Ton worlds crew. Skipper Rod Davis, John McLaurin, Dave McCulley, Byron Pratt, Curt Oetking, Kimo Worthington and Paul Murphy

Pendragon was Laurie Davidson's lightweight design that won the 3/4 worlds in 1978. IOR penalized the bee-gezus out of it. So instead of torturing the boat, to return it to 3/4 rating, Laurie turbo-charged it w/ long boom, longer pole. We were fast in light air, fast downwind. Didn't like the long, windy beats as much. Distance race was; Newport to Buzzards Bay Tower, to Noman's land, tip of Long Island THREE TIMES AROUND. We only ate sandwiches, I don't recall any cooking.

 

© Paul J Mello - More One Ton North Americans 1979. There are sailing shots too. It may take a while though.

Three times around, I think not. That's the short course (roughly) for the ILYC distance race.

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Hollows too. Remember the VHA station? A lot of 70's IOR boats had them to an extreme to shorten the waterline against the actual "length". And bow down attitude static for that reason. I/was not a an IOR expert by any means but I knew you had to do something that were a little odd (making the boat go foward) getting it to rate.

 

We had a C&C 38 Mk II in our area that came from the factory (about hull #40) and they changed the mold. The boat was rated about 2' above it's IOR rating. I told the owner that the VHA is out of whack. The owner told C&C and they will fix it. Fix it how? I said. They'll "fix" it. A couple weeks later I see its in the yard with big triangle pieces cut into it where the VHA should be - but well under the waterline. We tried to race the boat that way but but it was "stuck" to the water except in a hurricane. The owner sold as a cruising boat after a year as it was too painful to race.

 

Holy Smokes 12 Meter: "Dream Machine"? Where did you find that picture? That as after it was cruiseafied. It was an okay race boat but it's lines were distorted at best. I think it was 44 or 45 feet not a 2 tonner. Scary, but I probably have the IOR cert. in my files somewhere.

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Yes, I recall a story about some of the Hustler 32s at the 78 Half Ton Worlds where they had to take a grinder to the skeg because it came out of the mold a touch too wide. This caused the rating to balloon well past the half ton level, so they thinned it out a bit to get the boats back to their designed rating. As a result they were ineligible for the production boat prize. You had to be very careful to make sure the skeg fell inside the 5% buttock line. I`m not sure why such drastic surgery was required for the C&C 38 unless it wasn`t designed properly to begin with.

 

The Dream Machine photo I found recently on the internet. It looks like she is for sale in Thailand. I always wondered what happened to her. I have to say she looks a lot better without the bumblebee paint job on the stern. She was 44 feet, but I`m pretty certain she was a 2 ton. Jones designs were always long for their rating. Check out the photo of Oystercatcher 79 posted above from the 78 OT North Americans – 41 footer that rated One Ton (27.5 ft at the time) while most One Tons of that era were 35-38 feet LOA. One more recent photo of Dream Machine on the hard, plus one of her cruisified interior - humungous down below.

 

Maxx, you might be interested in some of the above photos of Not By Bread Alone, which I believe I is a Cooper built Ganbare 35. She had quite a long and competitive career back East. My understanding is that she was refitted with a Brit Chance designed keel that greatly enhanced performance.

post-12572-0-12621600-1359688726_thumb.jpg

post-12572-0-88672500-1359689136_thumb.jpg

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Yes, I recall a story about some of the Hustler 32s at the 78 Half Ton Worlds where they had to take a grinder to the skeg

 

Heh

 

My favorite "dockside rating adjustment" was at the 1981 (?) big boat series. Two shiny new Davidson 44s showed up to race, Quamichan and Heatwave. Davidson thought he had found a hole in the rule, by separating "the aft corner of the deck" from "the top of the transom: - there were two "corners" on each side, and the way Davidson figured it the distance between them was pretty much free "L".

 

Measurer walked the dock and disagreed. Said that the would be rated something like a foot higher than they expected if that second "corner" was used as a measurement point. Discussion lasted until well after dark and then, late in the evening, a chainsaw was found (literally) and the shape of the transom was "adjusted" on these two gorgeous brand-new custom boats. A little duct-tape and, presto, good to go.

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There were plenty of designers exploring the far corners of IOR in an effort to gain an edge or discover a new loophole or new shape of speed. Stephen Jones was only one of them. Some of the "Light Brigade" -- Paul Whiting and Laurie Davidson, for example -- shoved out a few heavily distorted butts.

 

As has been pointed out here and in other threads, one of the big focuses in designing an IOR boat was to try and design in a discrepancy between measured/calculated length "L" and the actual sailing length of the boat in the water. The big trade-off was between sailing length and wave-making resistance/turbulence. If the added resistance was not offset by the faster potential from waterline then it was a failure. More fiddling was done with the measurements from which "L" was derived than probably all the rest of the fiddling with IOR combined.

 

At it's heart the IOR was a very simple VPP. The Measured Rating was simply IOR_MkIII.png with some additional weighting to length and sail area, plus correctors for draft and freeboard. Of course, the devil is in the details; Length, SA, Beam and Depth are heavily calculated dimensions; there is nothing straight-forward or easy about deriving them.

 

The RATING was the Measured Rating with factors for Engine and Propeller, Center of Gravity, and Movable Appendages.

 

The basic formula was quite good at taking the basics and allowing designers to explore corners with simple trade-offs:

  • longer length versus less sail area;
  • lighter weight versus less sail area;
  • and so on

The distortion masters leaned heavily in the direction of length versus SA; the Light Brigade leaned more in the direction of lightness versus SA. Both were more effective in some conditions and less effective in others but in general, any trade-off resulting in less SA meant that for the most part, the boat was not going to be a light-air flyer.

 

When Pendragon pulled off the double, it was a perfect storm: a heavy-air 3/4 Ton Cup, followed by a light-air 1 Ton Cup. When everybody is going hull-speed and half the time they're reefed, you go long in length and short on SA. No brainer. When no one is getting up to hull speed, you go short and pile on sail area. Again: no brainer. In both championships she was the right tool for the job. (By the way, Pendragon is pretty tortured aft.)

 

And in the end, any measurement or development rule -- this is especially true if most racing is W/L sausages -- is going to land pretty much in the same place: boats optimized for going to windward in 8-12 knots true wind. That's where your time is spent; that's the average conditions; that's what the odds favor. Whenever I hear an outlier boat complain, "Well, we didn't really get our conditions," all I can think is, "No duh you didn't get your conditions; you knew that when you bought a screwy boat." By the time the IOR was dropped you had a fleet of boats which were very good at beating in moderate conditions and quite fairly rated against each other.

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Yes, I recall a story about some of the Hustler 32s at the 78 Half Ton Worlds where they had to take a grinder to the skeg because it came out of the mold a touch too wide. This caused the rating to balloon well past the half ton level, so they thinned it out a bit to get the boats back to their designed rating. As a result they were ineligible for the production boat prize. You had to be very careful to make sure the skeg fell inside the 5% buttock line. I`m not sure why such drastic surgery was required for the C&C 38 unless it wasn`t designed properly to begin with.

 

The Dream Machine photo I found recently on the internet. It looks like she is for sale in Thailand. I always wondered what happened to her. I have to say she looks a lot better without the bumblebee paint job on the stern. She was 44 feet, but I`m pretty certain she was a 2 ton. Jones designs were always long for their rating. Check out the photo of Oystercatcher 79 posted above from the 78 OT North Americans – 41 footer that rated One Ton (27.5 ft at the time) while most One Tons of that era were 35-38 feet LOA. One more recent photo of Dream Machine on the hard, plus one of her cruisified interior - humungous down below.

 

Maxx, you might be interested in some of the above photos of Not By Bread Alone, which I believe I is a Cooper built Ganbare 35. She had quite a long and competitive career back East. My understanding is that she was refitted with a Brit Chance designed keel that greatly enhanced performance.

 

That is right, Bread had a Chance keel, which made her go closer to the wind than anything we had seen previously. When she tacked on your lee bow, you were toast.

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I'm co-organizing the Half Ton Classics cups in Europe since 2003, and must say the Stephen Jones designs (Supernovas, SJ30's, Hustler 32's) very often are not just competing for fun, but for the prizes as well. In 2009 the Hustler 32 Hullabaloo XV was 2nd overall... ahead of many later generation halftonners. When I found a 1980 SJ41 for sale in England 4 years ago I did not hesitate for a second. What a boat!

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Stephen Jones? Computer? Clearly you don't know him!

 

Yes, he did some really ugly boats, for rating reasons, but has done plenty of sweet lookers too. Starlight 35 & 39 for example. Rakau. Have a look around.

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Contemporary picture of Tumblehome 2 at the 1978 Half Ton Cup (borrowed from the excellent Histoire des Halfs website) Striking looking beast!

 

post-73936-0-05413800-1359723718_thumb.jpg

 

Behind her is the '77 Peterson 'Country Girl' K 5577 and also the '78 Berret Matchmaker 3 K 5261 which restored as Chimp won the last Half Ton Classic Cup in 2011

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Contemporary picture of Tumblehome 2 at the 1978 Half Ton Cup (borrowed from the excellent Histoire des Halfs website) Striking looking beast!

 

post-73936-0-05413800-1359723718_thumb.jpg

 

Behind her is the '77 Peterson 'Country Girl' K 5577 and also the '78 Berret Matchmaker 3 K 5261 which restored as Chimp won the last Half Ton Classic Cup in 2011

 

Tumblehome....crikey, that brings back memories. I crewed a couple of times on her when owned by Jock Smith in a couple of East coast Eaora regatta's (was it called Eaora then?). Cannot remember how I got to know Jock. Must have been through Michael Spear, crewed on Moonboots his Contessa 35 a few seasons and then on Big Boots, Contessa/Peterson 39 later. To long ago to remember if we got any result on Tumblehome.

 

Great topic by the way, brings back great memories. (I side with the team that like Idi Amin's Oyster 41, awsome boat (to see) when it was new and still is)

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Contemporary picture of Tumblehome 2 at the 1978 Half Ton Cup (borrowed from the excellent Histoire des Halfs website) Striking looking beast!

 

post-73936-0-05413800-1359723718_thumb.jpg

 

Behind her is the '77 Peterson 'Country Girl' K 5577 and also the '78 Berret Matchmaker 3 K 5261 which restored as Chimp won the last Half Ton Classic Cup in 2011

 

Tumblehome....crikey, that brings back memories. I crewed a couple of times on her when owned by Jock Smith in a couple of East coast Eaora regatta's (was it called Eaora then?). Cannot remember how I got to know Jock. Must have been through Michael Spear, crewed on Moonboots his Contessa 35 a few seasons and then on Big Boots, Contessa/Peterson 39 later. To long ago to remember if we got any result on Tumblehome.

 

Great topic by the way, brings back great memories. (I side with the team that like Idi Amin's Oyster 41, awsome boat (to see) when it was new and still is)

 

Tumblehome finished up 37th in the 1978 series, but looked to have had her moments in race 1 (14th) and race 4 (10th), but 41st in the short offshore and retired from the long one. A Seahorse comment at the time noted she was 34ft long(!) and might have done better with more breeze. But as someone else has said here, pitching for one set of conditions is rarely successful.

 

Apart from often tortured sterns the interesting aspect to some of the Jones boats was the kink (for want of a better word) in the bow profile - haven't worked out what the trick was here (12 metre or Somebody Else might be able to help), but presumably a way of closing up the FGS and FIGS, and grabbing some extra waterline length while they're at it. Jim Young modified Heatwave (One Tonner) along the same lines so the rationale must have been reasonably compelling, at least in theory.

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I think that what Jones was doing was trying to get a bit longer waterline in relation to rated length. With the bow of a typical IOR boat, the FOC would intersect the waterline slightly forward of the bow stem. With Jones bow, imagine the kink is not there. The FOC would still intersect the waterline at the same place it would in a normal design. But below the kink, the bow extends forward, so the bow stem at the waterline is forward of FOC

 

In theory, you should get additional unrated sailing length. I doubt if it worked that well in practise since you need volume as well as length in order to push the bow wave a bit further forward and the bow shape below the kink is fairly fine, so not much additional volume. The minimal additional sailing length probably didn`t compensate for the additional wetted surface IMHO. But still, an interesting manipulation of the rule.

 

Like I alluded to before, you didn't really need a computer to manipulate rated length under IOR, just an understanding of the geometry involved.

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I believe that the former Bull Frog is in San Diego with a very fresh paint job....

 

 

 

1983 called and they want their Penguin Blocks back.

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More One Ton North Americans - Hot Flash at the dock and sailing...

 

That's Eileen from Goetz Boats refinishing the cabin house. She was one sassy hell-on-wheels boat builder. I used to lust after her Carmen Ghia.........

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I forgot about Dennis Posey's Firebrand.

 

I was wondering if that was Dennis'. The Wilmington DE bit threw me off.

In those days every boat hailed from either Wilmington or Dover, De. Tax Man is wise to it now.

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"1983 called and they want their Penguin Blocks back." (exomo)

 

They probably are still on board...

 

They are.

 

That's funny!

 

I remember when sparcraft, hulse spars, penguin blocks, and b&g were all bought and consolidated into imi. Wonder how that worked out? I think there were some other small companies bought also. Maybe lewmar, and barient?

 

Did a major restoration on a 1986 vintage race boat a few years ago, and all those companies were represented in the hardware aboard. All still worked, to some degree. Was a heyday for performance yacht development.

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Wasn't Buzz Boettscher behind Penguin? I remember hearing something to the effect that Buzz told Monte he would race on Bullfrog as long as his gear was on the boat. Wonder if that's still in effect? <lol>

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"1983 called and they want their Penguin Blocks back." (exomo)

 

They probably are still on board...

 

They are.

 

That's funny!

 

I remember when sparcraft, hulse spars, penguin blocks, and b&g were all bought and consolidated into imi. Wonder how that worked out? I think there were some other small companies bought also. Maybe lewmar, and barient?

 

Did a major restoration on a 1986 vintage race boat a few years ago, and all those companies were represented in the hardware aboard. All still worked, to some degree. Was a heyday for performance yacht development.

 

Everything collapsed following Raul Gardini's death and the implied impact to the companies he funded, including IMI

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Hot Flash before the hull bumping and red paint job! If that boat could talk...

 

If she could talk she probably would have said "fuck" A LOT. Just like her owners!

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Pendragon One Ton worlds crew. Skipper Rod Davis, John McLaurin, Dave McCulley, Byron Pratt, Curt Oetking, Kimo Worthington and Paul Murphy

Pendragon was Laurie Davidson's lightweight design that won the 3/4 worlds in 1978. IOR penalized the bee-gezus out of it. So instead of torturing the boat, to return it to 3/4 rating, Laurie turbo-charged it w/ long boom, longer pole. We were fast in light air, fast downwind. Didn't like the long, windy beats as much. Distance race was; Newport to Buzzards Bay Tower, to Noman's land, tip of Long Island THREE TIMES AROUND. We only ate sandwiches, I don't recall any cooking.

 

© Paul J Mello - More One Ton North Americans 1979. There are sailing shots too. It may take a while though.

Three times around, I think not. That's the short course (roughly) for the ILYC distance race.

The race was pretty long, approx. 245 miles. Up to Buzzard's Bay, out to Noman's Land (offshore of the Vineyard, down to L.Island, 3x around. About 80 miles p/lap.

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© Paul J Mello - More One Ton North Americans 1979. There are sailing shots too. It may take a while though.

 

post-50798-0-51269000-1359139814_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the left side, the first three guys are Rod, Johnny Mac and a young(er) Dave McCulley (My Hero). I assume the tall guy wearing sea boots is a young Kimo but I am ready to be corrected. Don't know the other guys.

Rod, John, Dave, Byron Pratt, Curt Oetking, Kimo Worthington (behind in shadows) Paul Murphy

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Great photo of Pendragon with her centreboard out Paul. Will add it to my Pendragon post.

 

And you have a new and grateful audience for your travel-lift shots! Fascinating massaging of the stern on Oystercatcher and an ultra fine entry to the bow. Keel shape looks pretty basic. That slight upward flare in the topsides just before the transom is interesting, a way of artificially increasing freeboard aft v freeboard aft inner I guess and I suppose that somehow helped the complicated maths around the stern.

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Paul - any more pictures of the boats ashore would definitely have a keen audience - back in the day when Seahorse gave a decent report on any series it was always the photos of boats in their cradles, close ups of foils etc that allowed a comparison of different approaches that were the most interesting to a young student of yacht design.

 

Richard, from your earlier comment do you have a scan of the Seahorse report from the '78 half tons?

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Paul - any more pictures of the boats ashore would definitely have a keen audience - back in the day when Seahorse gave a decent report on any series it was always the photos of boats in their cradles, close ups of foils etc that allowed a comparison of different approaches that were the most interesting to a young student of yacht design.

 

This! +10

 

That particular angle of Oystercatcher 79 really shows the mastectomy nature of raping the after girth stations.

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These photos are gold Paul, thanks again. Haven't come across many of Downtown before, other than an ad in a local magazine of her in seatrials in NZ before being shipped to the US. First of Farr's One Tonners to go back to a keel after Export Lion and others.

 

Paul - any more pictures of the boats ashore would definitely have a keen audience - back in the day when Seahorse gave a decent report on any series it was always the photos of boats in their cradles, close ups of foils etc that allowed a comparison of different approaches that were the most interesting to a young student of yacht design.

 

Richard, from your earlier comment do you have a scan of the Seahorse report from the '78 half tons?

 

Ian, only have it in pdf but the article ends up too big to attach in full, here's one page that kept it under the 1MB limit (not great quality but will have a go at printing and scanning later). Like you say, the Seahorse reports were quite indepth, and of course there was so much variation between the boats that they had quite a lot to talk about back then!

 

Arch Angel and another trophy to ???

 

This might be Graham Walker of Indulgence? receiving the White Horse Trophy which they awarded to the winner of the final long distance race.

Seahorse Sept_Oct 1978 HTC extract 2.pdf

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Richard - Cheers for posting that, my collection of Seahorse starts around 1979 with a few from earlier so I've very little on this era of change & development before things started to settle a bit. What's really frustrating is Poole was home & I was there watching them on the water but didn't take any pictures!

 

The Supernova 'Smiffy' was the local hero which started my fascination with what Stephen Jones was doing, contrasting totally with where Davidson & Farr were coming from.

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There was an email sent out last year on the half ton class mailing list, It was a scanned copy of the report from the 1981 half ton worlds. Was a good read with old pics of the little details on some of the boats. Ive deleted the email but maybe someone else from the ht class on here has a copy

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I have Seahorse covering most of the ton cups, AC, SORC etc from 79 onwards so would have the '81 somewhere, will try and dig it out and scan one evening.

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Here's a couple more pages re 1978 (which magically came out at 0.99MB!)

 

Memories !!

 

Anke was a smallish Joubert-Nivelt (incidentally owned by Bernard Moureau a myriad-boats owner from the '64 Bermuda Race to his latest Gaia in the Commodore's Cup 2010 and including Diva) and did pretty well in the HTC.

 

Crazy Horse was one of the many Berret in '78, part keel/part centreboard, that one centreboard and belonging to the '77 Class V Fastnet winner on a Shamrock.

 

IIRC Cardiac Blues (to the '77 Oesophage Boogie crew) was centreboard too (should know ... as I hitchhiked Cowes-Dinard on her !)

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