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Gouvernail

Invitation 16

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This fellow came to the Laserforum.org looking for advice. I have copied his question below. I have also sent him to this thread for answers. Maybe somebody can post something before he gets here>>>

 

Here is the fellow's question:

 

Hi

 

I have a Bombardier Invitation 16', which seems very similar to the Laser. There are no Invitation forums on the net.

 

I'm fairly new to sailing( 3 years), and new to this style of boat. I have a couple of questions hopefully someone can answer. All the boats I've sailed before had a halyard for raising the main, which allowed for easy rigging and then hoisting the main on the water. This boat has a sleeved sail which is fitted over the mast before it is stepped. I'm wondering what techniques you use for 1. Keeping the sail from flapping while rigging/stepping the mast? and 2. How do you shorten/reef sail if you find yourself in sudden bad weather?

 

I had heard that some people wrap the sail around the mast a few times, step the mast, and then fit the boom and outhaul the sail once pointed head-to-wind on the water. Has anyone tried this? Does it work?

Can you safely leave the sail fitted to the mast while the boat is moored?

 

Boat Details:

 

Hull 16' Beam 5'

Mast 22'

Sleeved Sail with simple Cunningham through a deck cleat at the step

2 block Boom Vang

Loose Footed with simple outhaul and boom cleat

Center mainsheet with stern traveler

daggerboard

 

Hope someone can help me..

 

Thanks

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This fellow came to the Laserforum.org looking for advice. I have copied his question below. I have also sent him to this thread for answers. Maybe somebody can post something before he gets here>>>

 

Here is the fellow's question:

 

Hi

 

I have a Bombardier Invitation 16', which seems very similar to the Laser. There are no Invitation forums on the net.

 

I'm fairly new to sailing( 3 years), and new to this style of boat. I have a couple of questions hopefully someone can answer. All the boats I've sailed before had a halyard for raising the main, which allowed for easy rigging and then hoisting the main on the water. This boat has a sleeved sail which is fitted over the mast before it is stepped. I'm wondering what techniques you use for 1. Keeping the sail from flapping while rigging/stepping the mast? and 2. How do you shorten/reef sail if you find yourself in sudden bad weather?

 

I had heard that some people wrap the sail around the mast a few times, step the mast, and then fit the boom and outhaul the sail once pointed head-to-wind on the water. Has anyone tried this? Does it work?

Can you safely leave the sail fitted to the mast while the boat is moored?

 

Boat Details:

 

Hull 16' Beam 5'

Mast 22'

Sleeved Sail with simple Cunningham through a deck cleat at the step

2 block Boom Vang

Loose Footed with simple outhaul and boom cleat

Center mainsheet with stern traveler

daggerboard

 

Hope someone can help me..

 

Thanks

 

I've sailed the Invitation many years ago (20?). You are right, it is much like a Laser (intentionally). There is a smaller version as well - the Invitation was aimed at making two-up sailing comfortable in a Laser-like boat.

 

Generally, since these boats were dry sailed and pretty recreational, reefing and heavy wind management was never is an issue for most owners. You can do the "wrap the mast thing" with limited success - since the Invitation has horizontal battens you can't wrap much before trouble starts. There really is no way to retain the wraps as well easily, so your reefing can come undone at the worst time.

 

The real world scenatio is this: more wind, more weight hiking.

 

No one leave the sails up, and mooring is NOT suggested. Like a Laser it takes ten minutes to rig, so just do things right and you'll end up happier. Your boat and sails will last longer. Get or make a dolly and a rack for the mast parts & boom.

 

Hope this helps.

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Re your INVITATION 16

My family had one in the late 70's and 80's as well as a Bombardier 3.8

The boats were built by Bombardier near Montreal

There was a smaller version known as the Bombardier 3.8(LOA 12'6"; Disp 123 lbs; SA 60 sq ft) I could accomodate 1 adult or t jr sailers

To correct the previous posts, there were no battens is either boats sails. This made furling the sail on the mast very easy. We used to leave our boat in the water on a mooring for days with the sail wrapped around the mast. The boat could be sailed quite effectivly with the sail "reefed" in this manner. The boats were supplied with exceptionally long outhauls for this, however, the sail wanted to "untwist".

The invitaion was a very fast boat with 90 sq ft of sail and almost 15' of waterline. The cocpit was large and could accomodate two adults or one adult and 2 jr sailers.

 

The rigging was very simple and almost a copy of the laser. Most of the blocks and fittings came from the same supplier

 

Put the mast together, slide the sail slever over the mast and wrap it up. now stant the mast up, and put it in the mast support in the deck.

 

Main Sheet. Rig the traveler with the small block with brommel hook on the traveler line. Attach the large block to the brommel hook on the traveler block. Start the mainsheet on the fiddle block on the boom, around the block on the traveller block, back around the boom block, forward to the mid boom block and end at the cockpit swivel block with cam cleat.

(Some booms had an eye strap midway between the two blocks to support the mainsheet).Same as a Laser

 

Cunningham - Attach the cunningham to the gooseneck fitting just above the boom pin, Reeve it through the tack and then to one of the deck faileads at the mast base then then to one of the jam cleats. (the reason for attatching the cunning ham to the gooseneck is to give you a secure attachment between the mast and the boat, not solely relying on the sail sleeve)

(same as a Laser)

 

Outhaul - start at the small silver jam cleat on the boom, through one of the fairleads on the end of the boom, throught the clew, back to the other fairlead and then forward to the fairlead on the front of the boom, down to the other fairlead at the mast base and then finish at the corresponding jam cleat. (a little different than a Laser)

 

There is a dealer of used boats near Midland ON, who has a fairly complete library of manuals for many older boats, including those by Bombardier. Contact Richard at Quiet Waters, Waubashene ON (www.sailboatsales.com)

 

Good Luck

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