stinky

DC Designs

Recommended Posts

Well done, finally on the water always a great feeling getting to that point.

How windy did it get? where you able load things up?

First impressions after the sail?

 

I'll be in a better position to answer how it goes once I race it this weekend. Basically it was just a quick sail to prove that the places I put the fittings worked and that everything was functional. It felt lively and twitchy in the 8-12knots, but then I haven't sailed an IC since October so I'm probably a bit rusty. It was a lot quiter through the water than 'Josie', and tacked and gybed smoothly (I was concerned about this with a new self tacker system and a more stern mounted rudder). I had the carriage a fair way back (mainly so I had a good view of everything incase something went wrong), so hard to guage how she was really slicing through the small waves.

Pete (building a flatpack himself) said that from the shore my launch looked a little rocky (hey, I'm out of practice) but the boat took off once I got sorted out... I hope to get some short video footage next week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well done, finally on the water always a great feeling getting to that point.

How windy did it get? where you able load things up?

First impressions after the sail?

 

I'll be in a better position to answer how it goes once I race it this weekend. Basically it was just a quick sail to prove that the places I put the fittings worked and that everything was functional. It felt lively and twitchy in the 8-12knots, but then I haven't sailed an IC since October so I'm probably a bit rusty. It was a lot quiter through the water than 'Josie', and tacked and gybed smoothly (I was concerned about this with a new self tacker system and a more stern mounted rudder). I had the carriage a fair way back (mainly so I had a good view of everything incase something went wrong), so hard to guage how she was really slicing through the small waves.

Pete (building a flatpack himself) said that from the shore my launch looked a little rocky (hey, I'm out of practice) but the boat took off once I got sorted out... I hope to get some short video footage next week.

 

 

So with 8-12knots you would have been fully hiking (sorry couldn't resist).

Serious question, how did the self taker work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well done, finally on the water always a great feeling getting to that point.

How windy did it get? where you able load things up?

First impressions after the sail?

 

I'll be in a better position to answer how it goes once I race it this weekend. Basically it was just a quick sail to prove that the places I put the fittings worked and that everything was functional. It felt lively and twitchy in the 8-12knots, but then I haven't sailed an IC since October so I'm probably a bit rusty. It was a lot quiter through the water than 'Josie', and tacked and gybed smoothly (I was concerned about this with a new self tacker system and a more stern mounted rudder). I had the carriage a fair way back (mainly so I had a good view of everything incase something went wrong), so hard to guage how she was really slicing through the small waves.

Pete (building a flatpack himself) said that from the shore my launch looked a little rocky (hey, I'm out of practice) but the boat took off once I got sorted out... I hope to get some short video footage next week.

 

 

So with 8-12knots you would have been fully hiking (sorry couldn't resist).

Serious question, how did the self taker work?

 

No problems, actually that is why I came in, I hadn't put toe straps on and I started needing them.

Self tacker worked really well, though when a jib is cut to fit it will need to be re-assessed (I just emailed Lindsay). It sat in position without needing any sort of traveller control upwind and the jib cleat on the boom worked very well (which really did surprise me). Tacking went okay, though I was careful and cracked the jib slightly before going into tacks (something I never did on 18 - which had a self tacker and an automatic control for jib position). The real test is racing though so I will give more detailed feedback this coming weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well done, finally on the water always a great feeling getting to that point.

How windy did it get? where you able load things up?

First impressions after the sail?

 

I'll be in a better position to answer how it goes once I race it this weekend. Basically it was just a quick sail to prove that the places I put the fittings worked and that everything was functional. It felt lively and twitchy in the 8-12knots, but then I haven't sailed an IC since October so I'm probably a bit rusty. It was a lot quiter through the water than 'Josie', and tacked and gybed smoothly (I was concerned about this with a new self tacker system and a more stern mounted rudder). I had the carriage a fair way back (mainly so I had a good view of everything incase something went wrong), so hard to guage how she was really slicing through the small waves.

Pete (building a flatpack himself) said that from the shore my launch looked a little rocky (hey, I'm out of practice) but the boat took off once I got sorted out... I hope to get some short video footage next week.

 

 

So with 8-12knots you would have been fully hiking (sorry couldn't resist).

Serious question, how did the self taker work?

 

No problems, actually that is why I came in, I hadn't put toe straps on and I started needing them.

Self tacker worked really well, though when a jib is cut to fit it will need to be re-assessed (I just emailed Lindsay). It sat in position without needing any sort of traveller control upwind and the jib cleat on the boom worked very well (which really did surprise me). Tacking went okay, though I was careful and cracked the jib slightly before going into tacks (something I never did on 18 - which had a self tacker and an automatic control for jib position). The real test is racing though so I will give more detailed feedback this coming weekend.

 

 

The deck's look very uncluttered, not an easy thing to achieve on a Canoe at times.

 

Dont forget to use the scales

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well done, finally on the water always a great feeling getting to that point.

How windy did it get? where you able load things up?

First impressions after the sail?

 

I'll be in a better position to answer how it goes once I race it this weekend. Basically it was just a quick sail to prove that the places I put the fittings worked and that everything was functional. It felt lively and twitchy in the 8-12knots, but then I haven't sailed an IC since October so I'm probably a bit rusty. It was a lot quiter through the water than 'Josie', and tacked and gybed smoothly (I was concerned about this with a new self tacker system and a more stern mounted rudder). I had the carriage a fair way back (mainly so I had a good view of everything incase something went wrong), so hard to guage how she was really slicing through the small waves.

Pete (building a flatpack himself) said that from the shore my launch looked a little rocky (hey, I'm out of practice) but the boat took off once I got sorted out... I hope to get some short video footage next week.

 

 

So with 8-12knots you would have been fully hiking (sorry couldn't resist).

Serious question, how did the self taker work?

 

 

 

No problems, actually that is why I came in, I hadn't put toe straps on and I started needing them.

Self tacker worked really well, though when a jib is cut to fit it will need to be re-assessed (I just emailed Lindsay). It sat in position without needing any sort of traveller control upwind and the jib cleat on the boom worked very well (which really did surprise me). Tacking went okay, though I was careful and cracked the jib slightly before going into tacks (something I never did on 18 - which had a self tacker and an automatic control for jib position). The real test is racing though so I will give more detailed feedback this coming weekend.

 

 

The deck's look very uncluttered, not an easy thing to achieve on a Canoe at times.

 

Dont forget to use the scales

 

With Pete as my witness we put it on the scales (complete with water still dripping from the seat (I forgot to drill drain holes in the footwells) - with everything on (Seat, boom, rudder, centreboard and all lines) except the mast we got 37kg.

I then weighed myself on the scales 65.5 in clothes so the scales are correct. So I'll weigh the mast, but given I still have to do some fairing and painting.... I'm pretty happy with that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Christian

 

How heavy "large" is the kit would it be feaible as an export to the uk?

 

If not what parts are key components and would these be easy to get fabricated by someone else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
with everything on (Seat, boom, rudder, centreboard and all lines) except the mast we got 37kg.

That's pretty damn impressive...I was expecting 50kg to be a bit aspirational - ie most boats two or three pounds over and very little lead about, but folks seem to be hitting the mark regularly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Christian

 

How heavy "large" is the kit would it be feaible as an export to the uk?

 

If not what parts are key components and would these be easy to get fabricated by someone else.

 

I had it delivered in stages as the moulds were being fabricated as I assembled the pieces for AUS31 - being that it was the first one. But since Geoff uses TNT I'm sure the kit could be transported fairly easily.

The largest key part is the 3 piece spine which glues together to form the integral part of the boat - each piece is about 1.7m long and between .1 -.8m deep by 11mm wide. Then the carriage rails are long but skinny, the only bit that would be super expensive is the mdf mould, but then I'm sure you could chat to Geoff about getting that cut locally. Best bet is to PM Geoff (Hurricane H on here) or get his email off my blog and have a chat to him about the boat pieces then get back to me about any questions with assembling it.

 

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
with everything on (Seat, boom, rudder, centreboard and all lines) except the mast we got 37kg.

That's pretty damn impressive...I was expecting 50kg to be a bit aspirational - ie most boats two or three pounds over and very little lead about, but folks seem to be hitting the mark regularly.

 

Actually when I saw 37kg I was a little nervous, I initially thought 'what have I forgotten' - but by the time I fair up the hull and put a top coat on, add toestraps and do some general tidy ups and put the mast in the weight I reckon I'll be at the 47-48 which was what we planned when we did the spreadsheet weights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
with everything on (Seat, boom, rudder, centreboard and all lines) except the mast we got 37kg.

That's pretty damn impressive...I was expecting 50kg to be a bit aspirational - ie most boats two or three pounds over and very little lead about, but folks seem to be hitting the mark regularly.

 

Actually when I saw 37kg I was a little nervous, I initially thought 'what have I forgotten' - but by the time I fair up the hull and put a top coat on, add toestraps and do some general tidy ups and put the mast in the weight I reckon I'll be at the 47-48 which was what we planned when we did the spreadsheet weights.

 

 

Really good effort coming out under 50kg, now where to bolt the lead onto :) I've heard someone say at the top of the mast is a great place for lead :P .

What are the "light" bits in the whole package, e.g. what does the seat and carriage... come wiegh in at individually are they the light bits or is it else where?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Really good effort coming out under 50kg, now where to bolt the lead onto :) I've heard someone say at the top of the mast is a great place for lead :P .

What are the "light" bits in the whole package, e.g. what does the seat and carriage... come wiegh in at individually are they the light bits or is it else where?

 

Tomorrow night I will seperate everything and give a breakdown of weights - as I'm curious myself (I hadn't weighed it since before I put the foredeck and dancefloor on as I didn't want to get annoyed if it was coming out heavy :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Really good effort coming out under 50kg, now where to bolt the lead onto :) I've heard someone say at the top of the mast is a great place for lead :P .

What are the "light" bits in the whole package, e.g. what does the seat and carriage... come wiegh in at individually are they the light bits or is it else where?

 

Tomorrow night I will seperate everything and give a breakdown of weights - as I'm curious myself (I hadn't weighed it since before I put the foredeck and dancefloor on as I didn't want to get annoyed if it was coming out heavy :unsure:

 

 

Good move, I weighed mine all through the build was doing really good until a vacuum issue struck which resulted in some unwanted weight gain (arrrrrh), I was running out of time to do anything about it so I had to just put up with it. At least I know where I can do better for the next boat and make some design changes to make the build easier.

 

I've started on my new plank finally so that will see about 4.5-5kg weight loss as well as the all along planned new other bits and peices I haven't got around to yet, should see me at or below the magical 50kg mark :).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Congratz. But why a gnav?

Gui, I think the best reason for going with a Gnav is that you can angle the forwaed bulkhead aft such that at gunwale level it is a straight line between the chain plates. I think this is structually more efficient than the conventional Veed bulkhead, but it means that you cannot have a vang foundation. So you give up a bit of cost, and possible sail shape on one tack for a stiffer hull.

Good job Christian!

SHC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think this is structually more efficient than the conventional Veed bulkhead,

Better for aero drag too I think. On the other hand I suspect you'd normally need lowers to control the bend it puts in the mast which would probably counteract most of the aero benefits. I can think of three possible kicker solutions for my next IC and I don't like any of them:-))

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think this is structually more efficient than the conventional Veed bulkhead,

Better for aero drag too I think. On the other hand I suspect you'd normally need lowers to control the bend it puts in the mast which would probably counteract most of the aero benefits. I can think of three possible kicker solutions for my next IC and I don't like any of them:-))

 

But you normally need lowers anyway to keep the bottom of the mast straight ( for deck-stepped masts )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[

 

Tomorrow night I will seperate everything and give a breakdown of weights - as I'm curious myself (I hadn't weighed it since before I put the foredeck and dancefloor on as I didn't want to get annoyed if it was coming out heavy :unsure:

 

 

My weight breakdown : post-2679-1238536055_thumb.jpg

 

Corrector weights go in the base of the carriage, so you get the advantage of more weight shifting fore and aft.

 

New version of rudder stock/tiller should be a bit lighter.

 

The big rotating stock idea was too stiff, the new transon hung rudder had a too long tiller, so I could only steer gentle curves. :(

 

The latest plan is for a secondary tiller further fwds, with yokes/connecting rod to the aft mounted rudder.

 

I'll expect I'll eventually get to the conventional rudder thru the deck in a cassette, but I can't do this in a week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could you not steer it using a complicated system of ropes and levers. Sort of like a rowing boat, but hand rather than foot steering... It could be fixed onto your sliding seat, and would add much needed complication back to the IC...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Could you not steer it using a complicated system of ropes and levers. Sort of like a rowing boat, but hand rather than foot steering... It could be fixed onto your sliding seat, and would add much needed complication back to the IC...

Just wait til you see it ;) ( and have a laugh ) But it might not stay on for long.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just as a quick straw poll, how long IS everyone's tillers? I think I'm going to end up with a stern bridle like Andy's so the position of this is determined by the length of the tiller.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just as a quick straw poll, how long IS everyone's tillers? I think I'm going to end up with a stern bridle like Andy's so the position of this is determined by the length of the tiller.

 

 

mine have varied between 400-600mm, I think the current one is 500mm but I'll measure it tonight when I do the weigh in of individual bits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think I'm going to end up with a stern bridle like Andy's ...

 

I didn't like the sheeting off the carriage on my Nethercott, so I changed it when I built my new seat and carriage. I decided to stay with centre boom sheeting and use a bridal forward of the carriage. By the time I worked out where to anchor the bridal on the deck, it ended up being anchored at the chain plates, partly because it was a convenient strong point so I didn't have to screw extra fittings to the deck. This means that now the sheeting system pulls forward as well as sideways, which sounds a bit weird, but it works fine. Of course I'm relying entirely on the vang for leach tension. The tail of the mainsheet is off the boom, and I'm not currently using a mainsheet cleat.

 

Having the back of the carriage clear of the sheeting system has made tacking much easier IMO. It also does away with those complicated systems that slide the blocks on the boom aft with the carriage movement, when they don't jam up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just as a quick straw poll, how long IS everyone's tillers? I think I'm going to end up with a stern bridle like Andy's so the position of this is determined by the length of the tiller.

 

About 450mm works give or take 50mm or so, not super critical in my view

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My long tiller was 1100mm, and so only about ±15 degrees steering before it got stuck with the bridle.

 

new secondary tiller is ~ 550mm.

 

Here's some funny pics of the new arrangement - works OK in the workshop. ;)

post-2679-1238614517_thumb.jpg

post-2679-1238614524_thumb.jpg

post-2679-1238614531_thumb.jpg

 

the aft bridle thing unloads the carriage from the sheet loads, and I'm used to using the on-boom ratchet block, so I like that .

 

I'm going to try the extensions bungied to the spreaders next - the swift solo style tiller /bungie thing works ok to keep the extensions fwds, but under the seat on a tack - be nice to get the extension over the seat ready to grab.

 

I like to do things differently, and to make it work better. ( the first part is easy.... )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My long tiller was 1100mm, and so only about ±15 degrees steering before it got stuck with the bridle.

 

new secondary tiller is ~ 550mm.

 

the aft bridle thing unloads the carriage from the sheet loads, and I'm used to using the on-boom ratchet block, so I like that .

 

I'm going to try the extensions bungied to the spreaders next - the swift solo style tiller /bungie thing works ok to keep the extensions fwds, but under the seat on a tack - be nice to get the extension over the seat ready to grab.

 

I like to do things differently, and to make it work better. ( the first part is easy.... )

 

This is the best April Fool's posting I have seen....

 

KP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My long tiller was 1100mm, and so only about ±15 degrees steering before it got stuck with the bridle.

 

new secondary tiller is ~ 550mm.

 

Here's some funny pics of the new arrangement - works OK in the workshop. ;)

post-2679-1238614517_thumb.jpg

post-2679-1238614524_thumb.jpg

post-2679-1238614531_thumb.jpg

 

the aft bridle thing unloads the carriage from the sheet loads, and I'm used to using the on-boom ratchet block, so I like that .

 

I'm going to try the extensions bungied to the spreaders next - the swift solo style tiller /bungie thing works ok to keep the extensions fwds, but under the seat on a tack - be nice to get the extension over the seat ready to grab.

 

I like to do things differently, and to make it work better. ( the first part is easy.... )

 

Very interesting, how do you go gybing and tacking in the windy stuff with the bridle, as I'm guessing you don't walk aronund the back of the boom with it? I find that in the hard conditions I am always looking for more realestate down aft to plant my knees/hands/feet/face on to get through the tacks and gybes - especially with decent waves around aswell (not sure if this is the best technique but it seems to work).

 

EDIT: Guess I got suckered in if it is a joke, but isn't it after 12pm - even in the UK?

 

Oh, I weighed the rudder/tiller extension last night - 2.5kg, plank is 8kg - I went to weigh the rest but got distraced by some tidying up of line I wanted to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Very interesting, how do you go gybing and tacking in the windy stuff with the bridle, as I'm guessing you don't walk aronund the back of the boom with it? I find that in the hard conditions I am always looking for more realestate down aft to plant my knees/hands/feet/face on to get through the tacks and gybes - especially with decent waves around aswell (not sure if this is the best technique but it seems to work).

 

EDIT: Guess I got suckered in if it is a joke, but isn't it after 12pm - even in the UK?

 

It might be a bit of a joke ( to everyone else ), but it is real, and I will report after testing this weekend.

 

It is the logical solution to some of my (self-induced) problems -

The tiller needs to swing at ±45 degrees ish

The rudder is hung over the back of the boat

the tiller has to be at least as far fwds as the bridle

the bridle limits the swing of a long tiller

I have a daggerboard blade and stock and tiller existing

I need to do the conversion in 5 days

 

So this is what we got.

 

It may also be useful learning experience for use in a Suicide 125 that would have similar problems.

 

 

With a bridle and a boom that almost reaches the transom, you can't get behind the boom!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy,

 

With the Suicide 125 you arnt going to have a carriage in the way therefore a centre mainsheet bridle would be acceptable as per most of the RSs.

When you created the underslung rudder with the large rotating drum, what were your reasons for not hanging the rudder through a plug with a sealed bearing, I thought the nethercotts had something similar, or does it not work too well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rotating drum has worked, or has been found workable, by at least three other Canoeists.

However it has been felt that it isn't slam dunk easy.

I think all of them have resorted to some form of bearing race around the perimeter of the drum.

I hate to pretend to know what Andy was thinking, but I think the major benefit he was seeking was recycling his existing rudder blade.

 

The "normal" canoe set up is a conventional spade rudder with a conventional shaft. The shaft is installed in a cassette that fits into a matching trunk in the hull. Thus the whole mess can be withdrawn out the top. All of this was worked out in the 1930s and has only been improved by using hot shit materials. It's a pretty good way to do it.

 

Other ideas, such as having the slot extend all the way to the back of the bus, allow the rudder to be kicked up as long as it is on centerline, work well, but require that the tiller be allowed to lift. This extra axis of rotation opens the door for a bit more slop in the steering gear which can be offensive.

 

In general, steering an IC is one of the nicest things, and I like to have as little play and or friction in the system as I can possibly get away with, so I keep it simple and try not to torque off the bolt heads!

 

There is a complex relationship between the sheet points, the rudder placement, the tiller length and range of movement of the sliding seat carriage. It seems that you can't change one without effecting all the others.

The main sheet on the aft edge of the carriage is not the most convenient thing, but I think it balances out to be better than the other options I have seen or tried ( and I have tried a lot of them!)

But that doesn't mean that there isn't a better idea.

SHC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The lesson of todays race was 'humility' - sure I've built a great boat but it is no where near dialled in yet - more on the blog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My long tiller was 1100mm, and so only about ±15 degrees steering before it got stuck with the bridle.

 

new secondary tiller is ~ 550mm.

 

Here's some funny pics of the new arrangement - works OK in the workshop. ;)

post-2679-1238614517_thumb.jpg

post-2679-1238614524_thumb.jpg

post-2679-1238614531_thumb.jpg

 

the aft bridle thing unloads the carriage from the sheet loads, and I'm used to using the on-boom ratchet block, so I like that .

 

I'm going to try the extensions bungied to the spreaders next - the swift solo style tiller /bungie thing works ok to keep the extensions fwds, but under the seat on a tack - be nice to get the extension over the seat ready to grab.

 

I like to do things differently, and to make it work better. ( the first part is easy.... )

 

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but correct me if Im wrong. Would your linkage arrangement fall outside the rules as being an "outrigger", my thought is you would need to modify the linkages so they fit within the gunwhales.

 

What do others think? (better to bring it up sooner than later)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but correct me if Im wrong. Would your linkage arrangement fall outside the rules as being an "outrigger", my thought is you would need to modify the linkages so they fit within the gunwhales.

 

What do others think? (better to bring it up sooner than later)

 

Just my opinion, I think there are plenty of precedents for this type of steering arrangement on traditional sailing canoes. I also doubt that banning this arrangement would fall within the intent of the outrigger rule, which is to control ugly fixed appendages which would detract from a fair sheerline. If you think the arrangement looks particularly ugly, you might have a point. But it becomes a subjective issue. If I was a measurer, I would allow it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but correct me if Im wrong. Would your linkage arrangement fall outside the rules as being an "outrigger", my thought is you would need to modify the linkages so they fit within the gunwhales.

 

What do others think? (better to bring it up sooner than later)

 

Just my opinion, I think there are plenty of precedents for this type of steering arrangement on traditional sailing canoes. I also doubt that banning this arrangement would fall within the intent of the outrigger rule, which is to control ugly fixed appendages which would detract from a fair sheerline. If you think the arrangement looks particularly ugly, you might have a point. But it becomes a subjective issue. If I was a measurer, I would allow it.

 

Part of the out rigger rules was to prevent ugly (lethal) racks for lining up all the control line cleat so they are at a nice easy reach while hiking from the end of the seat.

 

Im divided in my thoughts at the moment. I hear what you say about traditional sailing canoe's, in my time with IC's anything the extends beyond the sheer falls under the outrigger rules as I understand it which in the case would require some tweaking of the links to achieve the same operation.

 

Im not trying to cause Andy to have to do more rework, just clarification if its good to go or not.

 

Steve whats your thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but correct me if Im wrong. Would your linkage arrangement fall outside the rules as being an "outrigger", my thought is you would need to modify the linkages so they fit within the gunwhales.

Why should it be treated any differently from the tiller extension?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but correct me if Im wrong. Would your linkage arrangement fall outside the rules as being an "outrigger", my thought is you would need to modify the linkages so they fit within the gunwhales.

Why should it be treated any differently from the tiller extension?

 

 

Because it isnt a tiller extension, I guess is the simple answer. (I need to think about it more, Im still undecided re "outrigger")

 

Another issue which could cause the linkages push other areas to fall outside the rules is

 

5 HULL

a) The overall length shall be not be greater than 5200mm or less than 4900mm. This measurement shall include any protective strip and shall exclude rudder and rudder fittings. However if the athwartships width of the rudder or hardware exceeds 50mm within 150mm of the bottom of the hull at the stern, the length shall be measured to the aftermost point of the rudder.

 

However this is dependant on the length of the linkage athwartship and the overall lenght of the hull + transom hung rudder.

 

Or maybe Im reading things into it... Its late, its been a long day, my brain is fried.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not so

13 e) Outriggers that extend beyond the sheer line for the

purpose of providing a rigging point, or modifying the

lead of a sheet, or for providing additional structure to

support the sailor other than the sliding seat or the

booms defined above are prohibited.

 

The drag links on the steering gear are not included in this prohibition

 

Furthe:

10 RUDDER

a) The rudder shall not project more than

1000mm from the underside of the hull when

fully lowered.

B) The rudder shall be attached so that it

cannot normally fall out of its housing and

when free of the hull and shall float.

c) The rudder shall be capable of being

raised or removed without the use of tools with the

canoe floating upright so as not to project below the

underside of the hull.

d) There are no restrictions on the design or

material of the rudder other than the

rules above.

 

Also given the traditional use of drag links in Canoe sailing ( this was a particularly amsrican system that involved the imfamous "cross head tiller" there is nothing illegal about what Andy is doing.

SHC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not so

<snip of information graven on stone tablets, presented while bushes burn ...>

SHC

 

And a booming voice from above quashed the doubters discussion and gave them a code to live by ....

 

It is so nice to have someone who can tell right from wrong definitively. I just love this thread.

 

--

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as the rules go ( ie spirit of the rules and the actual wording ) I think it complies.

 

 

The 'hardware' tiller arm/strut ' is outside the 150mm of the bottom of the transom, so no probs there.

 

It's not an outrigger as defined in the rules ( or in the real world either ;) )

 

 

And SHC says it's OK !!

 

The best bit is that it actually seems to work OK - I can now tack without getting stuck in irons.

 

more later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but correct me if Im wrong. Would your linkage arrangement fall outside the rules as being an "outrigger", my thought is you would need to modify the linkages so they fit within the gunwhales.

Why should it be treated any differently from the tiller extension?

 

 

Because it isnt a tiller extension, I guess is the simple answer. (I need to think about it more, Im still undecided re "outrigger")

 

Another issue which could cause the linkages push other areas to fall outside the rules is

 

5 HULL

a) The overall length shall be not be greater than 5200mm or less than 4900mm. This measurement shall include any protective strip and shall exclude rudder and rudder fittings. However if the athwartships width of the rudder or hardware exceeds 50mm within 150mm of the bottom of the hull at the stern, the length shall be measured to the aftermost point of the rudder.

 

However this is dependant on the length of the linkage athwartship and the overall lenght of the hull + transom hung rudder.

 

Or maybe Im reading things into it... Its late, its been a long day, my brain is fried.

 

Interesting point, depends on the height of the linkage above the bottom of the boat. Looks to be greater than 150 mm but not obvious from photos. I assume that even if linkages are ok according to Steve they must fall within the stated rules. Maybe they are not a part of the fittings refered to in the above rule, who knows! Another point which nobody picked up on was how to measure Andy's boat with a drum fitting holding the rudder. If the drum is a part of the fittings then applying the rules strictly would require the length of the boat to be measaured to the aftermost part of the rudder, and not the stern. Only relevent if the aftermost part of the rudder is a foot or more in front of the stern. Could we build an eighteen foot, or longer, boat and use this loophole? Or am I not understanding what is meant by fittings? Perhaps a definition would help, please.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Could we build an eighteen foot, or longer, boat and use this loophole?

I think you're looking too hard for loopholes... No measurer would pass it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Could we build an eighteen foot, or longer, boat and use this loophole?

I think you're looking too hard for loopholes... No measurer would pass it!

 

 

I'm not looking for loopholes, I'm looking for clarity. If the rules say one thing, then can a measurer go against then, even if the rule was not intended that way. All I want is an explanation as to how the rule can disallow such a design. I know that I'm being very pedantic, but if rule rules are to be taken seriously then they should say what they mean. In the UK whilst I was sailing IC the rules stated that boats should be to the drawn design (the Nethercot), and gave tolerances which were allowed for builders errors. A lot of tweaking went on, by me included, so that few boats were even attempting to get to the drawn design, but all were within tolerance, so they measured. They didn't attempt to follow the intent of the rules, they followed the words. Unless we get into the mind of the rule writer, then all we canb follow is the word. Such rules could be improved without making the rules the tighter. My guess is that the rule about measuring to the aft of the rudder was only intended to apply to stern hung rudders, but maybe i'm wrong, I really don't know. If this is the case then a simple change to wording would clarify the intent and application of the rule.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-2679-1239043844_thumb.jpg

Sailing back to the beach.

 

The twin extensions worked OK, but with some looping of the bungie around the ends of the extensions which wasn't nice.

Now changed so the bungie goes to the hounds, and down the mast, so the loop of loose bungie is away from the tiller extension ends.

The swift solo horn + bungie on the tiller got tangly with the aft bridle bits, and was made redundant by the mast attached bungies, so has been removed.

 

Tacking is now much easier, the boat sort of spins round, the battens pop progressively after i've hit the seat. It's stioll possible to get stuck in irons, but it's also easier to get sailing again.

The boat now feels moth-like - light, responsive, and the rig reacts the way it does in ( old-style ) moth.

 

Pointing is still excellent, I can outpoint everything else if needed, then once above them can return to speed mode and whizz past.

 

The sail is only 8.9 sq m, but still good in the light conditions so far experienced.

 

I'm sure there are many sailing canoes using yoke steering ( maybe not ICs though ;) ) , but it must have ben done before in ICs ( everything else has!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "50mm within 100mm of the bottom corner of the hull" is intended to prevent using transom hung rudders that fair into the hull surface in such a way as to circumvent the Max LOA. This is based almost exactly on the A Class Catamaran rules which have been doing good service for more than 40 years. Andy assures us that the drag link arm is more than 150mm above the lower corner of the stern and it is clearly not intended to have a hydrodynamic effect.

 

It also is pretty clearly not an outrigger, at least as we have defined them in the rules. It is not a rigging point and anytime it deflects a sheet, Andy is tipping over!

 

So I think the rule is doing exactly what it is supposed to do. That is to allow experiments with different steering configurations but preventing abuse of the overall length limit.

 

The thought that someone might build a 6 meter long boat but insist that the overall length to be measured to the trailing edge of an inboard rudder by making their cassette 55mm wide is interesting. Frankly it never occurred to me. Maybe because I think the +/- 45 degree pointy stern rule would render the attempt pretty challenging. I'm not sure you could fair the hull without cold fusion. Unless you were to argue that the stern profile and the maximum length LOA were somehow independent of each other. Which starts demanding rhetorical skills that are beyond me.

 

We went through a long and very open review process on these rules. I think they do the job they are asked to do. But if you have a issues, send me a PM and I will start the process of bricking up the loopholes.

 

SHC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Next time I'll read the rules properly before opening my trap :). Had I done so I would have agreed that the linkages are not adding structure to support the sailor or providing a rigging point or modifying the lead of a sheet.

 

And next time I'll make sure I'm at least half awake and havent spent they day frying my brain at work :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
post-2679-1239043844_thumb.jpg

Sailing back to the beach.

 

 

 

I'm sure there are many sailing canoes using yoke steering ( maybe not ICs though ;) ) , but it must have ben done before in ICs ( everything else has!)

 

Defiant(K23) tried an American style cross head tiller and steering yoke arrangement sometime in the early 50s. Still with through the hull rudder. Don't know of any other UK ICs that tried one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy,

 

What about leading the tiller extension through a nylon ring connected to the end of the seat with shockcord.

If you run the shockcord from the carriage out to the windward end of the plank, then turned it back to the leeward end of the plank and then had it exit the plank on the aft edge and tied to the ring, when the seat is out to windward it will tension the leeward ring holding the tiller extension in. When you tack, as the seat is slid through the middle the elastic would slacken reducing any tendancy for the rings to prevent the steering command. Once the seat was fully across your new leeward extension would be pulled in tight and the windward extension would have enough slack for you to steer without having to work against the elastic.

 

Just a thought !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kenny, at the Home for the Nautically Insane, prepares to test some 1/8" PBO that has been out in the weather for the last seven months. It broke at 2500lbs. Interestingly, if the splice was tapered it broke at 3000lbs and always at the end of the splice not at the thimble or the end that turned around a 6mm shackle pin. The weathered stuff was about 25% weaker than fresh rope that had never seen sunlight. Still plenty strong for an IC shroud. Kenny will try it first on his mast.

post-16686-1239494228_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenny, at the Home for the Nautically Insane, prepares to test some 1/8" PBO that has been out in the weather for the last seven months. It broke at 2500lbs. Interestingly, if the splice was tapered it broke at 3000lbs and always at the end of the splice not at the thimble or the end that turned around a 6mm shackle pin. The weathered stuff was about 25% weaker than fresh rope that had never seen sunlight. Still plenty strong for an IC shroud. Kenny will try it first on his mast.

post-16686-1239494228_thumb.jpg

No safety goggles? :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenny, at the Home for the Nautically Insane, prepares to test some 1/8" PBO that has been out in the weather for the last seven months. It broke at 2500lbs. Interestingly, if the splice was tapered it broke at 3000lbs and always at the end of the splice not at the thimble or the end that turned around a 6mm shackle pin. The weathered stuff was about 25% weaker than fresh rope that had never seen sunlight. Still plenty strong for an IC shroud. Kenny will try it first on his mast.

post-16686-1239494228_thumb.jpg

No safety goggles? :blink:

 

Nice boat collection. Where farm meets water...I detect a theme here...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenny, at the Home for the Nautically Insane, prepares to test some 1/8" PBO that has been out in the weather for the last seven months. It broke at 2500lbs. Interestingly, if the splice was tapered it broke at 3000lbs and always at the end of the splice not at the thimble or the end that turned around a 6mm shackle pin. The weathered stuff was about 25% weaker than fresh rope that had never seen sunlight. Still plenty strong for an IC shroud. Kenny will try it first on his mast.

post-16686-1239494228_thumb.jpg

No safety goggles? :blink:

 

we didn't have safety when I started out in the world, so I never got in the habit! the glasses that I do use are reading glasses, just took them off here so I could see where the camera was to smile. actually, on the test pull I hid behind that fuel tank, and Chris hid behind a mobile bunker, reading the gauge with binoculars! taper your splices boys!

cheers, Kenny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So assuming that the UV degradation procedes linearly, after 20 months of UV exposure the shroud is down to 1500 pounds breaking strength. Is 1500 pounds a good design point? What about abrasion durability?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenny, at the Home for the Nautically Insane, prepares to test some 1/8" PBO that has been out in the weather for the last seven months. It broke at 2500lbs. Interestingly, if the splice was tapered it broke at 3000lbs and always at the end of the splice not at the thimble or the end that turned around a 6mm shackle pin. The weathered stuff was about 25% weaker than fresh rope that had never seen sunlight. Still plenty strong for an IC shroud. Kenny will try it first on his mast.

post-16686-1239494228_thumb.jpg

No safety goggles? :blink:

 

actually, on the test pull I hid behind that fuel tank, and Chris hid behind a mobile bunker, reading the gauge with binoculars! taper your splices boys!

cheers, Kenny

 

Administrative controls. Nice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenny, at the Home for the Nautically Insane, prepares to test some 1/8" PBO that has been out in the weather for the last seven months. It broke at 2500lbs. Interestingly, if the splice was tapered it broke at 3000lbs and always at the end of the splice not at the thimble or the end that turned around a 6mm shackle pin. The weathered stuff was about 25% weaker than fresh rope that had never seen sunlight. Still plenty strong for an IC shroud. Kenny will try it first on his mast.

post-16686-1239494228_thumb.jpg

No safety goggles? :blink:

 

we didn't have safety when I started out in the world, so I never got in the habit! the glasses that I do use are reading glasses, just took them off here so I could see where the camera was to smile. actually, on the test pull I hid behind that fuel tank, and Chris hid behind a mobile bunker, reading the gauge with binoculars! taper your splices boys!

cheers, Kenny

 

The problem with braided PBO is creep, or at least that's what I found when I used it. Eventually it will set, but not until all the purchase in your adjustable shroud tackle has been used up and you can't get them tight any more. Every time you go sailing you just pull on more and more shroud tension as it creeps, until you hit the end. They loosen up again when you derig the boat. 1/8" might be better than the stuff I used, which was bigger.

 

It is excellent for rigging up shrouds on the fly though - just some T-terminal loops and you are good to go. I think Anders used my old set at a regatta after his loaner boat shroud gave up on NoGo55 - just spliced them to length and voila.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all. I'll also using PBO shrouds but I've got 4mm (what ever that is in the other funny system) so I'm looking forward to suggestions on what works. Keep 'em coming.

 

Also, I'm trying to do a deck layout to figure out where to put stuff and what fittings to buy. Does anyone use a purchase system for the fore & aft adjustment on the carriage or do you just slide it to where you want it and let friction do the rest. I have two 2m lengths of Ronstan T track and 4* 49'er wing slides for my system but don't know if I need to lock it in place with a rope and cleats. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi all. I'll also using PBO shrouds but I've got 4mm (what ever that is in the other funny system) so I'm looking forward to suggestions on what works. Keep 'em coming.

 

Also, I'm trying to do a deck layout to figure out where to put stuff and what fittings to buy. Does anyone use a purchase system for the fore & aft adjustment on the carriage or do you just slide it to where you want it and let friction do the rest. I have two 2m lengths of Ronstan T track and 4* 49'er wing slides for my system but don't know if I need to lock it in place with a rope and cleats. Thanks

 

I've only needed to hold it back incase of a big nose dive otherwise friction with sheet tension and crew weight on the plank tends to do the job 90% of the time. Sheet tension tends to pull it forward, however there are some systems that use the main sheet to pull it back and some puchase to pull it forward. Its all a personal thing really.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The problem with braided PBO is creep, or at least that's what I found when I used it. Eventually it will set, but not until all the purchase in your adjustable shroud tackle has been used up and you can't get them tight any more. Every time you go sailing you just pull on more and more shroud tension as it creeps, until you hit the end. They loosen up again when you derig the boat. 1/8" might be better than the stuff I used, which was bigger.

 

It is excellent for rigging up shrouds on the fly though - just some T-terminal loops and you are good to go. I think Anders used my old set at a regatta after his loaner boat shroud gave up on NoGo55 - just spliced them to length and voila.

 

The loads on an IC may be higher but we used braided vectran on an I14 for the main shrouds with success.

 

You have to make the shrouds 50 mm or so short initially, then put in a throw-away extender until the initial stretch is over. With the pictured loading bench you might be able to pre-stretch them off the boat.

 

My interpretation was that once the splices settled in, it did not stretch any more. Of course, there is lots of travel in the 14 system to allow rake, etc.

 

Size was "one bigger than wire" for the same stretch according to the design engineer.

 

It seemed to work.

 

KP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been using 1/8" PBO for years now. super easy to splice, NO creeping or stretching are my experience. an obvious massive weight saving over wire, no worries of kinking. since recently cornering the market on 1/8 PBO, I'm quite willing to change shrouds once or twice a season, as it is so easy, and not much line on our IC's. I leave the rig up in the sunlight all season too.

my favorite thing about this stuff is that no one seems to like it, and most people say it won't work. as one who is guaranteed to do the opposite of an authority figure's decree, I find this rope irresistible! I have previously tested to destruction, on the boat. it took five years for the rig to drop. really cool, powering upwind, then crunncchh! hey, the rig just fell over! helps to be deck stepped!

I love it! :lol:

K

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My current rig leaves me about .6m2 short on sail area. I'm thinking of fitting a taller jib to gain some area back and ending up with a jib of around 2.8m2.

I'm sure this has been tried in the past. Anyone have any thoughts or experiences to relate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gentlemen,

Canoesletters have been mailed out. Anyone who did not receive one feel free to PM me or John Kells who handles the mailing list. Non Americans should contact the head of their national body. (GBR - Alan, AUS/NZL - Christian, SWE - Ola, GER - Archie).

 

Thanks,

Willy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gentlemen,

Canoesletters have been mailed out. Anyone who did not receive one feel free to PM me or John Kells who handles the mailing list. Non Americans should contact the head of their national body. (GBR - Alan, AUS/NZL - Christian, SWE - Ola, GER - Archie).

 

Thanks,

Willy

 

Cheer Mate, and a good job too - Aussie and Kiwi copies have been forwarded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My current rig leaves me about .6m2 short on sail area. I'm thinking of fitting a taller jib to gain some area back and ending up with a jib of around 2.8m2.

I'm sure this has been tried in the past. Anyone have any thoughts or experiences to relate?

 

 

I've been using very tall jibs since AUS018, I'll email you some pics and sail plan stuff so you can see how it stood up on mine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been using very tall jibs since AUS018, I'll email you some pics and sail plan stuff so you can see how it stood up on mine

 

Great, thanks. I remember looking at your jib at the Worlds. The leach was closer to the mast than what is typical in most ICs, more like the I14. That's pretty much what I was thinking of doing.

Have you ever compared the tall jib's performance to a shorter luff one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been using very tall jibs since AUS018, I'll email you some pics and sail plan stuff so you can see how it stood up on mine

 

Great, thanks. I remember looking at your jib at the Worlds. The leach was closer to the mast than what is typical in most ICs, more like the I14. That's pretty much what I was thinking of doing.

Have you ever compared the tall jib's performance to a shorter luff one?

 

No, I haven't switched a short jib for a long one to compare - as i kind of went down this path from the first set of sails I got for an IC back in 2005 before the UK Worlds.

 

The i14 look is pretty much the way we've gone with most of the rigs down under - the 3 main sailmakes on IC's are Irwin, Tru-Flo and Alexander which highlights the skiff (and i14) background of the sails.

 

I'll get those pics sent tonight

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My last email on this topic was very brief, I was in a bit of a rush at the time, here is a more detailed account of what I was trying to say -

 

The spring addition of the North American International Canoesletter has been mailed out. Anyone who did not receive a copy feel free to PM myself or John Kells who handles the mailing list. Non Americans should contact the head of their national body (UK - Alan, AUS/NZL - Christian, SWE - Ola, GER - Archie, POL - Mikey). If you are one of the many canoers who finds themselves obsessed with construction and design this is the newsletter for you. It contains write ups from many of the foremost canoe builders in the world as well as a few bits on technological advances. Also, a full copy of the 2009 racing schedule can be found within. Thank you to everyone who contributed to the newsletter, it makes my life as an editor much easier. Special thanks to John Kells for all his help in the role of editor squared.

 

In other news my sister Tommy has taken over management of the US site and is working on archiving old newsletters.

 

Thanks,

 

Willy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pics of the new sail ...

post-2679-1240512822_thumb.jpg

post-2679-1240512837_thumb.jpg

post-2679-1240512844_thumb.jpg

see the mainsheet bridle here:

post-2679-1240512852_thumb.jpg

 

Inland championships this weekend, so we'll see how it does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy,

Having seen your set up I can only conclude that you go under the boom. If this is so I am surprised, the times I have attempted to amend my tacking procedure by going under the boom I have found myself with significantly less brain cells than I started with. How does it work for you?

 

Willy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I wonder why you don't move the bridle the rest of the way aft. Why not sheet off the end of the boom and get still more space.

But the sail does look nice in the dramatic light.

SHC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to go under the boom ( never got used to the standy up thing )

 

Bridle might be better more aft, but the deck gets very narrow - maybe need some bigger shelf thing.

 

Nice summery light, but it won't last - rain tomorrow in wales

 

time to get on the ferry

 

post-2679-1240597349_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Guys

 

Technically I've now had my boat wet!

 

I'd decided that I wasn't sure where the boat would trim so I took it down to the club to see if it would float. In the photo I reckon the bow is about 30mm too high from where I expected it to float but once the rig, seat and carriage is in it should be somewhere near right (where I'm standing is about the furthest forward the seat can go). It actually made a pretty good stand up paddle board! I needed to be this far forward to paddle upwind into the 15 knot headwind. Any further back and the nose would blow off. I didn't have a centerboard or rudder so this is to be expected. Now I can't wait to sail the thing...

 

post-26260-1240635587_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cat rigged. Modified moth type sail/rig with full cambers but zippers in the sleeve to fulfill the rules about removing the sail without de-rigging. I have the sail but nothing to hoist it on yet :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Guys

 

Technically I've now had my boat wet!

 

I'd decided that I wasn't sure where the boat would trim so I took it down to the club to see if it would float. In the photo I reckon the bow is about 30mm too high from where I expected it to float but once the rig, seat and carriage is in it should be somewhere near right (where I'm standing is about the furthest forward the seat can go). It actually made a pretty good stand up paddle board! I needed to be this far forward to paddle upwind into the 15 knot headwind. Any further back and the nose would blow off. I didn't have a centerboard or rudder so this is to be expected. Now I can't wait to sail the thing...

 

post-26260-1240635587_thumb.jpg

 

Jethrow,

 

It looks like it floats just fine. Do you have any images that show off the underwater profile?

 

I am curious about the step in the deck in front of the daggerboard trunk. it looks like it would provide additional stiffness between the chainplates, but it is a discontinuity in the strucure at near the point of greatest torsion.

 

I'm looking forward to seeing more. How are the other components comming along? Seat, Cariage, Blades....?

 

Great work!

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi John

 

I've just gone back through my photos and realised I don't have any of the bottom shape, I'll see what I can organise. The little mid-deck is a function of my choice to re-cycle another mast I have which didn't make it all the way to the floor and a mast step that has a concave in the bottom. I did add more structure but also more weight. I haven't weighted the hull yet at this stage but previously it was 21 Kg's without the decking. I think I'm still under the 30Kg mark at the moment but only just. I'm hoping that the carbon double bias wrapped around the inside of the hull will make up for the discontinuity.

 

As for the rest, the seat will be finished in a day or so, the carriage is just started and I'll begin on the foils towards the end of the week

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys, update about the website

 

Thing one: I got the galleries on the US site (intcanoe.us) up and running again and I have re-uploaded all the pictures which were stuck in the back end. Id love it if folks could head over there and take a look and spend some time commenting and IDing the pics, especially the boat construction ones. A little bit of a blurb about whatever strange Rube Goldbergian things are pictured would be great. I will be adding any useful info left in the comment fields into the photo info itself as well. Remember, one of the reasons that we have this website is to attract interest from potential new sailors so while *we* all know that picture X is from Karl's workshop or the Lab of Luxury or whatever it still would help to have it be labeled as such. Go be amusing and illuminating people! The boat construction pics have been re-organized into "Project (Builder)" ie "Mayhem (John Kells)". There are a few albums of construction pics which may be attributed to the wrong builder/sailor, specifically a file which was labeled Phil Robin/Scarlett Ohara but that may have been a misdirected upload, if so PLEASE let me know. You need to be a registered user to comment on the pics but if you have info to share and are not registered just shoot me an email thru the contact us section or to internationalcanoes AT gmail DOT com or PM me here on SA. It also seems to be the case that pics CANNOT be uploaded from the front end of the site. Im still not sure what is going on with that but the battle royal with Joomla will commence after I finish finals. At the moment everything needs to be uploaded from the back end, so if there are any pics you would like to be posted on the site (and we really need new pics people!) send 'em along to me and Ill upload them. Somehow we have no pictures at all from the AUS worlds or the UK worlds or the Bristol worlds.

 

Thing two: Willy and I brainstormed for a while and updated the fleet info pages with information which may be wildly inaccurate or out of date. Please please please check it out and help me get it current. Id like to have a complete list of all the ICs in the US thru that page, regardless of whether they're still sailed much or not. Hell we put Rising Sun in the list just for kicks. We would like this page to help potential sailors find ICers in their area so we put up the rough location of each boat, ie Rhode Island or Annapolis. If you are on the list and you DO NOT want your general location to be listed please let me know. On the other hand if you would like to be contacted by fledgelings let me know and we will work out what contact info to add to your listing. IMPORTANT: I am NOT going to make ANYBODIES contact info available without their permission. I am trying to walk the line between making ourselves available and respecting privacy. Ah the joys of the internets!

 

Im crossposting this to the international site and the intcanoe.us forums, sorry about the spamming.

 

Tommy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other thing:

I have moved things around in the forums, so there are now new parent threads for the upcoming regattas on the east coast for the summer 2009 season. One for Ottawa, one for the Nationals, one for Sugar. (Im going to add the west coast ones later today) That is the place to go if you are looking for a ride, looking to borrow a boat, interested in camping with us, etc. It is also one of the places where regatta results will be posted during and after each event.

Tommy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Canoesletter archives are now up on the website, www.intcanoe.us, going back to the 1980's. They are filed under IC documents/past canoesletters. You DO need to sign in in order to view the documents page.

Enjoy!

Tommy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gentlemen,

Bristol Yacht club is attempting to revamp it's dinghy racing program and the Canoes are going to be jumping on that bandwagon. The yacht club will be running a Tuesday night dinghy racing series this summer. We will be sharing starts with a number of other dinghies and be racing outside the mooring field in Bristol Harbor. Anyone interested should PM me and I will get you a copy of the registration form. The fee is $30 if you get it in the Bristol Yacht Club before May 20th. If not there is a $10 late fee. This will be an excellent way to get us out on the water consistently.

 

Also Nationals will be held this year on Ram Island from July 10-12. We've been there two years in a row and it has been a blast. Hope to see you all there. Check the site for more details.

 

Best,

Willy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also Nationals will be held this year on Ram Island from July 10-12. We've been there two years in a row and it has been a blast. Hope to see you all there. Check the site for more details.

 

Best,

Willy

 

Cool, Aussie Nationals this year at at Toukley over the June Long Weekend (part of the Brass Monkey Regatta), we're calling them the IC(y) Nationals - should have a few reports on how the racing was coming out about the same time.

Really interested in how the IC's go in the Europa Cup in Sweden in July as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cool, Aussie Nationals this year at at Toukley over the June Long Weekend (part of the Brass Monkey Regatta), we're calling them the IC(y) Nationals - should have a few reports on how the racing was coming out about the same time.

Really interested in how the IC's go in the Europa Cup in Sweden in July as well.

 

It would also be cool if I got regatta reports from each country's national championship to put in the Canoesletter. I don't want reports of every single regatta world wide, after all it is the North American Canoesletter. However, it useful and educational to keep track of each nations current champion. For regatta reports I am attempting to adopt the British method of having the third place finisher from each regatta write the report. However, a certain un-named party (OLIVER MOORE!!!!!!!!) is making this difficult at least as far as the midwinters are concerned.

 

Hope to see a lot of New Englanders out on Tuesday nights,

Hope to see everyone at Nationals,

 

Best,

 

Willy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AUS31 'Flatpack' now all painted and cleaned up has weighed in (unofficially as it gets measured next month) at 48kg - I am absolutely stoked!

post-9663-1241921902_thumb.jpg

post-9663-1241921926_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AUS31 'Flatpack' now all painted and cleaned up has weighed in (unofficially as it gets measured next month) at 48kg - I am absolutely stoked!

Good job!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AUS31 'Flatpack' now all painted and cleaned up has weighed in (unofficially as it gets measured next month) at 48kg - I am absolutely stoked!

 

Well done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is now video of the 2008 US Nationals up on www.intcanoe.us.

 

The captions are tiny, so in case anyone is interested, the music is the White Stripes, Icky Thump for day 1 and Dick Dale, Miserlou and Warren Zevon, Boom Boom Mancini for day 2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AUS 32 finally has it's first coat of primer. The hull is rough as, but I am out of time if I want to make the nationals. As it is I will be lucky to sail it more than once before we pack up and head to Sydney, so it will be... ahem, interesting to say the least. :rolleyes: I am looking forward to my first sail of a new rules IC though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

***HELP NEEDED***

I need to get a set of lowers on my mast ASAP (nationals next weekend); should I just knock up something like the Josie style lowers, or is there a better/more efficient system?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites