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...boat building perfection...

 

Thanks Hayden! There are lots of flaws that a picture doesn't show though.

 

post-16686-1243734369_thumb.jpg

 

It is really nice to be sailing the IC again. I'm doing maybe eight knots upwind here in seven - eight knots of wind. God these things are cool.

 

What surprises me is that I always sail the boat perfectly flat until the instant a picture is taken. Strange.

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What surprises me is that I always sail the boat perfectly flat until the instant a picture is taken. Strange.

 

Funny thing that about photos, I have the same problem not one of me sailing flat :), or maybe I need to learn how to sail better.

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Chris,

 

It looks like you are sailing level to me (within a degree or two...) As best I can tell, the picture is crooked, and there is some mast bend.

 

I suspect that your flaws are comparable to my best work! I'm looking forward to seeing Angle of Attack for myself later this summer. I may be in serious trouble if you ever let me try her out. I never had a chance to sail String Theory, and I am worried that sailing your new weapon might trigger my boatbuilding addiction. Deirdre is still recovering from the last build.....

 

Great work!

 

John

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"Angle of Attack " I had to check myself because I thought it was dyslexia kicking in again, but it's "Angel of Attack"

Looks pretty pretty.

SHC

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Chris,

 

It looks like you are sailing level to me (within a degree or two...) As best I can tell, the picture is crooked, and there is some mast bend.

 

I suspect that your flaws are comparable to my best work! I'm looking forward to seeing Angle of Attack for myself later this summer. I may be in serious trouble if you ever let me try her out. I never had a chance to sail String Theory, and I am worried that sailing your new weapon might trigger my boatbuilding addiction. Deirdre is still recovering from the last build.....

 

Great work!

 

John

 

Thanks John. But you misspelled "Angel", a common mistake.

 

I like the crooked camera defense. That is exactly what happens.

 

I'm sure you don't need a boat that is any faster than Mayhem. She's a beauty. And how many races have you won in the last year? Pretty much all of them, right?

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Chris,

 

It looks like you are sailing level to me (within a degree or two...) As best I can tell, the picture is crooked, and there is some mast bend.

 

I suspect that your flaws are comparable to my best work! I'm looking forward to seeing Angle of Attack for myself later this summer. I may be in serious trouble if you ever let me try her out. I never had a chance to sail String Theory, and I am worried that sailing your new weapon might trigger my boatbuilding addiction. Deirdre is still recovering from the last build.....

 

Great work!

 

John

 

Thanks John. But you misspelled "Angel", a common mistake.

 

I like the crooked camera defense. That is exactly what happens.

 

I'm sure you don't need a boat that is any faster than Mayhem. She's a beauty. And how many races have you won in the last year? Pretty much all of them, right?

 

 

 

 

Did I misspell Angel, or just miss read it.....

 

The scores from the Mid Winters & Sugar Is. would tell otherwise. When the wind gets up to get every one out to the end of the seat things get very interesting with plenty of individuals taking bullets. Mayhem does appear to drift faster than most, but light air sailing is not what IC's are all about.

 

I'm very happy with Mayhem. It is just that your boats are VERY seductive!

 

The lower shrouds are now off the mast. With luck, the mast support will not suffer, and the simplification of the rig will reduce the friction in the rig tension tackle. The first test is next weekend at the Ottawa Skiff Grand Prix.....

 

Who ever comes in 3rd gets to write it up!

 

John K

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Thanks Hayden! There are lots of flaws that a picture doesn't show though.

 

post-16686-1243734369_thumb.jpg

 

It is really nice to be sailing the IC again. I'm doing maybe eight knots upwind here in seven - eight knots of wind. God these things are cool.

 

What surprises me is that I always sail the boat perfectly flat until the instant a picture is taken. Strange.

 

"Angel" looks awesome Chris, can't wait to see it for real. And for all of you complaining about not being photogenic enough, I have yet to be photographed while going fast in a Canoe. I do occasionally get going quite quickly but, from looking at pictures of me sailing, you would never know it.

 

For my records/archives/canoesletter's purposes is "Angel of Attack" USA 245? I think she is but I am not certain.

 

Willy

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After two heats of the Australian Championships at Toukley, Hayden is leading with two bullets, Phil Stevo second, Alex third.

Conditions 5-13 knots.

More detail to follow.

Geoff Harman

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After two heats of the Australian Championships at Toukley, Hayden is leading with two bullets, Phil Stevo second, Alex third.

Conditions 5-13 knots.

More detail to follow.

Geoff Harman

 

The ICAA nationals are held in conjunction with the Toukley Brass Monkey regatta about 65 boats of varying sizes, the IC's are the 5th and last start, after a long walk out through the shallows and weed the water enventually clears up or gets deep that we get racing clear from weed, with dead flat water :).

 

H1.

Start was in about 10kts deepending which on which end of the line you starts, half the fleet started at the pin end on time while the other half started late at the boat end. after a short while it proved being late at the boat was the way to go. The winds where shifting around enough that big gains and losses could be made. Miracle Drug worked the shifts nicely to round the top mark with siezable lead, Josie rounded in 2nd with "The Log" 3rd. Alex sailing Josie whats Phil on The log ride a gust down to him lack of practise on Alex's behalf allow Phil to roll over the top with ease. At the same time Miracle Drug was dunted by the fact he couldn't see the bottom mark because of the mass of sail ahead, all the time think how the hell am I going to get through this mess at the bottom mark. After some weaving through the slower boats ahead somehow Miracle Drug Managed to get around the bottom mark cleanly (stilll not sure how it happened so easily in the end). The Log and Josie had made some ground up on the reaches while riding down on a gust. The next work allowed Miracle drug to open lead out which has held to the finish. Josie made ground back up on The Log but lost it again on the run and followed Phil home for 3rd. Mal Smith Sailing "The Wanning Planker" a Nethercott showed he is certainly coming to grips with sailing a canoe finishing 4th across the line. Its good to see some new faces out on the race track with Julian Clements (Junior) and Geoff Carne learning the ropes of Canoe sailing.

 

H2. Nearly all the fleet started at the boat this time round although the jury was out until the last 40seconds or so as to which was the favoured end and tack to start on, in the end the boat end was the place to be after abit of a drag from the start Miracle Drug and Josie again showed their heels to the rest of the fleet uphill in the winds of about 10kts. The wind didn't hold as strong dropping off to about 5kts and stayed their for most of the rst of the race with a gusts of about 10kts. Miracle Drug's lead at the top mark was much less than in H1. and Joise had "The Log" bearing down his neck on the first reach but was determined this time to not get rolled. The log slipped past Josie on the second reach and held his dominance until the last short work to the finish Alex sailed a near perfect finishing kick until his bow cross the line in second place until he collected the finishing bouy after penalty turns he crossed the line in 3rd place behind The log. Miracle Drug spent the races watching The Log and Josie get bigger and bigger on the down wind legs at the same time trying to weave a path through the slower boats. The wanning planker proved H1. was no fluke with a really solid 4th place.

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Some updates from GER 78 (still needs a name and a descision in which color it ist going to be painted....)

 

After i managed to transport the massive crate Steve has build for transport safety (6,3m x 1m x 1 m; ca. 300 kgs total weight) to Berlin, unpacked it, puzzled it all together, builded a trolley, i had the impression that i need to learn to sail canoe again. Not so much because the boat is more unstable, but every movement i had to do is a bit different from the movements i used to make on my "old" canoe. So my boat handling on the first trips was horrible.

 

The best way to learn to manage a new boat is to race it in difficult conditions - and thats what i did: an IC regatta on the Steinhuder meer with wind from 0kts - 25kts and a yardstick regatta on the Wannsee (in Berlin) only up to 20 kts but very shifty.

 

The regatta results were lousy (compared to what i could have done with the boat i'm used to sail), i lost two kilos of weight and have some bumps and bruises on nearly all parts of my body but:

Everything did hold together.

GER 78 was very quick upwind as soon as i could sit outside - i could point higher and go remarkably faster than the Nethercots

She goes through the waves like a warm knife through Butter, nearly without spray, without claping, when she sticks the bow into a wave she goes through without slowing down.

Downwind in a breeze she sticked her bow quite often into the short high chop on the steinhuder meer with water running over the front, but she didnt slow down much and never tried to pitchpole. In flater water it was no problem to keep her bow up and the mast step dry.

With nearly no wind i had no better boat speed than the nethercots, but i think there is some room for improvement, but not so much compared to what happens in 9+ kts.

 

After all it was lots of adrenalin and very promising when thinking of how it can be when my tacks go smooth, i manage to keep the mast in the air and i can use some of my concentration for tackticks (not only for keeping the boat running).

 

Roger

 

IC GER 78 and GER 68

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Hi

 

I have been following the developement in the IC class the last years and I am concidering building a developement IC. Being a boatbuilder by profession I am aware of the risk of being to optimistic in estimating time consumption so I am inclined to go for plywood if it is a competetive design. Is there any designs available that is considered competetive?

 

Regards,

 

Hasse Malmsten

www.malmstenboats.nu

www.24mr.se

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Yes, there are competitive designs built in plywood. Several are documented in this thread.

SHC

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Hi

 

I have been following the developement in the IC class the last years and I am concidering building a developement IC. Being a boatbuilder by profession I am aware of the risk of being to optimistic in estimating time consumption so I am inclined to go for plywood if it is a competetive design. Is there any designs available that is considered competetive?

 

Regards,

 

Hasse Malmsten

www.malmstenboats.nu

www.24mr.se

 

To elaborate on what Dad said,

There are several competitive plywood development boats already on the water. Phil Stevenson's "21st Century Hollow Log" was constructed using his tortured ply technique. Roger Regitz's GER 78 was made by Steve Clark using a similar technique. Probably the design that is easiest to reproduce is Geoff Harman's Flatpack construction method. All these method's are well documented and a PM to any one of these people can get you all the information you need to produce a perfectly competitive plywood development boat.

 

best,

 

Willy

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Hi

 

I have been following the developement in the IC class the last years and I am concidering building a developement IC. Being a boatbuilder by profession I am aware of the risk of being to optimistic in estimating time consumption so I am inclined to go for plywood if it is a competetive design. Is there any designs available that is considered competetive?

 

Regards,

 

Hasse Malmsten

www.malmstenboats.nu

www.24mr.se

 

The designs built by Phil Stephenson & Steve Clark are certainly competitive. The flat pack has not been seen up north yet, and it generates a foam cored boat. GER 78 built by Steve Clark has a bow design similar to Phil’s 21st Century Hollow Log with the stern of String Theory designed by Chris Maas. Phil’s boat is very narrow forward, and the hull was designed around having an un-stayed mast.

 

As Steve said, check out the earlier posts in this thread & earlier threads that lead up to the 2008 IC Worlds in January of that year.

 

Best

 

John K.

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More on the Aust Nationals.

Hayden continued to win, taking all 7 Races. In winds from 5 to maybe 20 he is markedly faster than everyone upwind. Second best was between Josie and the Log, pretty even on the scores until I got a little extra upwind speed on the last day to edge Alex out.

Only once were we able to get back near Hayden downwind and that relied on a new breeze compressing the whole regatta fleet, making mark rounding with cats and lasers etc very interesting. Mostly I managed to halve his lead downwind and edge past Alex if he was ahead upwind.

Christian and Peter had lots of teething issues with their new Flat Pack boats, rig, rudder, fittings going wrong. Showed several hints of potential though with some fast downwind runs.

Mal Smith won the Nethercotts.

Re the Log: mast with diamonds and forestay is much better controlled, flatter sail and stiffer mast combo is great improvement on McCrae status, but area is down to 9.25sqm now. At least its still going fast downwind. No immediate plans for any changes.

Potential builders should see my canoe blog for link to construction site. I can advise on a stayed version if interested.

We were blessed with three glorious winters days with good sailing winds and a great club of efficient volunteers doing a wonderful job, Thanks Toukley SC.

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Looks like like Phil beat me to it. However,

 

Unofficial update on the Austrailian Nationals at Toukley:

 

After successfully completing a 7 race series, Hayden Virtue was first, Phil Stevenson second, and Alex Kalin was third. I manage 4th overall and First Nethercott. The Handicap prize went to 5th overall, Frank Raisin (Nethercott). I'll leave it to others to fill in the race details, except to say that the last race was particularly exciting, with the wind sometimes well over 20 knots and the cold water, I remember the cold water.

 

My impression is that the new rules boats are significantly faster overall than the Nethercotts. While I managed consistantly good placings, Hayden usually finished ahead of me somewhere over the horizon, with Alex and Phil hot on his tail. The two new Flat Packs, built by Christian and Pete, were plagued with gear and system failure, which is typical for new launchings, so their results did not reflect their potential. Upwind I was barely able to hold off Christian, but my boat is fully sorted whilst Christian was sailing with the jib backwinding the main (self tacker problem), and other tuning issues. Downwind, particulary on reaches, Christian was able to make up 50 to 100m or more on a leg of the course. Hayden's boat upwind was just awsome, higher and much faster than anyone else. By the top mark he was clear out of sight, so I can't give any impressions of his downwind speed. Phil's una rigged boat is still very fast downwind, but does seem to suffer a bit upwind compared to Hayden, although Phil and Alex (on Josie) had a close tusstle for second and third placings. Compared to my old Nethercott, Phils is sailing significantly higher and faster. Consequently, I didn't see much of Phil or Alex after the start either.

 

Mal.

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I thought the famous quote from Steve was "because anything else is like kissing your sister...."? Well... one of his many lines; I still laugh when I think about the absolute classic he said to Willy and Dave at McCrae :P

 

What happened to Jethrow? Didn't get the boat quite done in time?

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I thought the famous quote from Steve was "because anything else is like kissing your sister...."? Well... one of his many lines; I still laugh when I think about the absolute classic he said to Willy and Dave at McCrae :P

 

What happened to Jethrow? Didn't get the boat quite done in time?

 

No, we told him to turn up and he'd get a good idea of where (and where not) to put fittings - but we didn't see him.

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That's a pity. I was looking forward to seeing how the 'super log' would go - the boat looks pretty good (well not quite Chris Maas' good, but for a DIY job...).

 

Sorry about the teething issues with the flatpack too Christian... I'm sure you know these things take time and you were under the hammer a bit to get both boats done. Still 5th is respectable for a boat that's only sailed a couple of times.

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That's a pity. I was looking forward to seeing how the 'super log' would go - the boat looks pretty good (well not quite Chris Maas' good, but for a DIY job...).

 

Sorry about the teething issues with the flatpack too Christian... I'm sure you know these things take time and you were under the hammer a bit to get both boats done. Still 5th is respectable for a boat that's only sailed a couple of times.

 

Cheers, I put a little bit of a spiel on my blog - hopefully next regatta i can at least be in a position to put some pressure on Hayden (probably the Single handed regatta in October)

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Some updates from GER 78 (still needs a name .. )

 

...

 

How about Roger&Me?

 

See You down at the Club.

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For now (judging by the learning curve you described in your post), it sounds like you could go with 'Roger Over', and then move on to something more poetic...

 

:lol:

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For now (judging by the learning curve you described in your post), it sounds like you could go with 'Roger Over', and then move on to something more poetic...

 

:lol:

 

i hope this phase will end soon - so that i can go the poetic way directly ...

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Hi Guys

 

Yeah, I just wasn't even close to being ready. I'm also flat broke and looking for a job so that has tended to stall things a bit. I'm scrounging around under Dad's garage for all my bits of left over carbon from various projects to see me through to the end and I think I'll just get there. Looks like I'll be using my tax refund (which should pay for a whole new boat) to buy the last of the fittings needed then some testing in frigid winter waters. There is a line of people wanting to take the boat for a sail and an even bigger group that just wants to be there with videos when I go for my first sail. :D

 

Photo's will be posted of course...

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Some updates from GER 78 (still needs a name and a descision in which color it ist going to be painted....)

 

After i managed to transport the massive crate Steve has build for transport safety (6,3m x 1m x 1 m; ca. 300 kgs total weight) to Berlin, unpacked it, puzzled it all together, builded a trolley, i had the impression that i need to learn to sail canoe again. Not so much because the boat is more unstable, but every movement i had to do is a bit different from the movements i used to make on my "old" canoe. So my boat handling on the first trips was horrible.

 

The best way to learn to manage a new boat is to race it in difficult conditions - and thats what i did: an IC regatta on the Steinhuder meer with wind from 0kts - 25kts and a yardstick regatta on the Wannsee (in Berlin) only up to 20 kts but very shifty.

 

The regatta results were lousy (compared to what i could have done with the boat i'm used to sail), i lost two kilos of weight and have some bumps and bruises on nearly all parts of my body but:

Everything did hold together.

GER 78 was very quick upwind as soon as i could sit outside - i could point higher and go remarkably faster than the Nethercots

She goes through the waves like a warm knife through Butter, nearly without spray, without claping, when she sticks the bow into a wave she goes through without slowing down.

Downwind in a breeze she sticked her bow quite often into the short high chop on the steinhuder meer with water running over the front, but she didnt slow down much and never tried to pitchpole. In flater water it was no problem to keep her bow up and the mast step dry.

With nearly no wind i had no better boat speed than the nethercots, but i think there is some room for improvement, but not so much compared to what happens in 9+ kts.

 

After all it was lots of adrenalin and very promising when thinking of how it can be when my tacks go smooth, i manage to keep the mast in the air and i can use some of my concentration for tackticks (not only for keeping the boat running).

 

Roger

 

IC GER 78 and GER 68

 

Roger, sound like you are having some fun with the new boat, those upwind rides in flat water are pretty awesome.

 

Hi Guys

 

Yeah, I just wasn't even close to being ready. I'm also flat broke and looking for a job so that has tended to stall things a bit. I'm scrounging around under Dad's garage for all my bits of left over carbon from various projects to see me through to the end and I think I'll just get there. Looks like I'll be using my tax refund (which should pay for a whole new boat) to buy the last of the fittings needed then some testing in frigid winter waters. There is a line of people wanting to take the boat for a sail and an even bigger group that just wants to be there with videos when I go for my first sail. :D

 

Photo's will be posted of course...

 

Look forward to the photo's. I was in your position around this time last year, no money and a boat that I wanted (needed) to build.

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My impressions from the nationals are:

 

Phil's changes to his rig has helped his upwind speed with no real noticable difference to downwind performance, although the conditions really made it difficult to judge 100% if he had lost any of his blistering speed downwind as often he was able to ride down with some pressure while I was sitting with what felt like at the time next to no wind, it would be really interesting to be able to match up with Phil on a long run to see what differences his changes are, as I haven't made any changes to Miracle Drug other than adding some signwriting and redesigning the kickup rudder neither of which make the boat sail faster. I was using the same main from the 2008 Worlds a new jib which is the same as the old one but with a zip luff (only reason for the new jib was the other one got creased badly in my trailer :( ).

 

While Phils changes to "The Log" has improved his upwind performance, Miracle Drug still has the legs to lead around the top mark consistantly with a breathing space. I think this is a combination of a good hull shape and the well sorted rig from Twist of Fate. I didn't get to sail half as much as I wanted since the last nationals but thank fully I had been able to get a few races under my belt just prior to the nationals so I could relearn how to sail again.

 

The Flatpacks needed alot of sorting and finishing which is the most obvious statement of all time, a few ideas they tried didn't work as they hoped with some tinkering they should become competitive boats in the right conditions. One thing they tried and I had also was the kick up rudder we have all decided they arent worth the trouble, to many things to go wrong compared to a conventional IC cassette rudder system, I had a 9mm solid Titanium pin bend and lock up the whole system which made returning to shore in 15knots over a long shallow rather nerve racking. The Flatpack should be able to convert back without a major cut and shut, Miracle Drug however will need some good thought put in so its not a huge job and/or add heaps of weight.

 

Alex on Josie sailed well considering he has done next to no sailing for some time, if he had some more time on the water leading up then maybe second could have just been his.

 

The biggest improver for me was Mal Smith on "The wanning planker" a Nethercott he is really looking comfortable at the end of the seat, hopefully the Kitchen get built asap so he can start on a New Rules boat. The next improver was Frank who finished his first race in over 15knots and didn't swim he was also probarly the happiest of us all at the end of the series with his efforts and I hear is after some new sails for next season.

 

The junior of our fleet was Julian who for a first time out at an IC nationals and had not really being able to get much time on the water all season (busted boat early in the season that took forever to get repaired) did a really good job getting around the course with only a few swims and in at times tricky conditions, with hopefully a full season under his belt come the next nationals he should be fighting for to be the first Nethercott, unless he cant wait anylonger for a new rules boat.

 

Toukley was a great place to sail, tricky to get in and out of at times but the flat water made it worth while. Going uphill in at least 20knots of wind with waves only about 150mm high sailing a new rules IC was brilliant it would have be good to have a gps on the boat at the time just to find out later how fast I was really going, as it was moving.

 

No major changes are planned for Miracle Drug, a new rudder system and maybe relocate a few fittings and if time and money allow strip her back finish filling and fairing the hull and new paint job. I will be building a new Hiking plank for next season and finishing off a new boom so I can get closer to the min weight as Miracle Drug at moment is 56+kg its a matter of time and some warmer weather as this winter I wont be building in my living room again :).

 

ICU2

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The Flatpacks did get off to a less than auspicious start, but AUS31 did finish the first 4 races it ever started so there are some small consolations. Next week I'm heading back into the shed with the beast to address a few issues:

  • Converting the kick up rudder back to a cassette - as Hayden pointed out this should be pretty simple
  • Beefing up my rudder axle - chatting to Geoff about this
  • fitting cleats to go to a conventional jib sheeting system
  • moving the centreboard forward
  • remove a couple of sharp bits in the boat that don't need to be there
  • fair my flares so they conform to the rules

 

Once this is done I want to hit the water again and sort out this rig now that I have the softer battens.

The worst thing about the above work is that the kick up rudder and self tacker were my suggestions to Geoff for the Flatpack and were added as updates to the original plans - silly me. The good news is that the Flatpack spine has a huge built in area for locating the daggerboard slot and its currently in the most aft position - so it is just a case of router a new slot and fill in the old one (other builders just have to learn from me and put their board in the right spot first time around :rolleyes: )

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The Flatpacks did get off to a less than auspicious start, but AUS31 did finish the first 4 races it ever started so there are some small consolations. Next week I'm heading back into the shed with the beast to address a few issues:

  • Converting the kick up rudder back to a cassette - as Hayden pointed out this should be pretty simple
  • Beefing up my rudder axle - chatting to Geoff about this
  • fitting cleats to go to a conventional jib sheeting system
  • moving the centreboard forward
  • remove a couple of sharp bits in the boat that don't need to be there
  • fair my flares so they conform to the rules

 

Once this is done I want to hit the water again and sort out this rig now that I have the softer battens.

The worst thing about the above work is that the kick up rudder and self tacker were my suggestions to Geoff for the Flatpack and were added as updates to the original plans - silly me. The good news is that the Flatpack spine has a huge built in area for locating the daggerboard slot and its currently in the most aft position - so it is just a case of router a new slot and fill in the old one (other builders just have to learn from me and put their board in the right spot first time around :rolleyes: )

 

I was thinking the centre case move was going to be a big job until I read to the end of your post, few good forsight there.

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The experience of the flatpacks reminds me of Mcrae and all the teething problems I had on Scarlett O'Hara. Untried boats at a major event is rarely fast! Glad to say the "things to do/modify" list is pretty short these days, and reducing. Sailing Scarlett in winds above 20knots is still a challenge, but the purchase of a new drysuit to cope with the cold water in the spring made life more comfortable!

Roger - glad to hear you have launched your new boat - are you and Peter Ullman planning to go to the Europa Cup in Sweden in August? It would be great to compare the different designs.

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The Flatpacks did get off to a less than auspicious start, but AUS31 did finish the first 4 races it ever started so there are some small consolations. Next week I'm heading back into the shed with the beast to address a few issues:

  • Converting the kick up rudder back to a cassette - as Hayden pointed out this should be pretty simple
  • Beefing up my rudder axle - chatting to Geoff about this
  • fitting cleats to go to a conventional jib sheeting system
  • moving the centreboard forward
  • remove a couple of sharp bits in the boat that don't need to be there
  • fair my flares so they conform to the rules

 

Once this is done I want to hit the water again and sort out this rig now that I have the softer battens.

The worst thing about the above work is that the kick up rudder and self tacker were my suggestions to Geoff for the Flatpack and were added as updates to the original plans - silly me. The good news is that the Flatpack spine has a huge built in area for locating the daggerboard slot and its currently in the most aft position - so it is just a case of router a new slot and fill in the old one (other builders just have to learn from me and put their board in the right spot first time around :rolleyes: )

 

So curious minds want to know......

How far back of the mast is is too far back for the DB?

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The Flatpacks did get off to a less than auspicious start, but AUS31 did finish the first 4 races it ever started so there are some small consolations. Next week I'm heading back into the shed with the beast to address a few issues:

  • Converting the kick up rudder back to a cassette - as Hayden pointed out this should be pretty simple
  • Beefing up my rudder axle - chatting to Geoff about this
  • fitting cleats to go to a conventional jib sheeting system
  • moving the centreboard forward
  • remove a couple of sharp bits in the boat that don't need to be there
  • fair my flares so they conform to the rules

 

Once this is done I want to hit the water again and sort out this rig now that I have the softer battens.

The worst thing about the above work is that the kick up rudder and self tacker were my suggestions to Geoff for the Flatpack and were added as updates to the original plans - silly me. The good news is that the Flatpack spine has a huge built in area for locating the daggerboard slot and its currently in the most aft position - so it is just a case of router a new slot and fill in the old one (other builders just have to learn from me and put their board in the right spot first time around :rolleyes: )

 

So curious minds want to know......

How far back of the mast is is too far back for the DB?

 

457mm to the front of the centreboard seems a little to far - this decision is based on my finding it hard to get the boat to go into a tack, but am finding it reasonably easy to bear away. However Geoff is looking into whether it needs to be moved at all. Honestly I believe most of the speed problems will take care of themselves when I get a jib system on that works better and I better set up my spreaders.

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The Flatpacks did get off to a less than auspicious start, but AUS31 did finish the first 4 races it ever started so there are some small consolations. Next week I'm heading back into the shed with the beast to address a few issues:

  • Converting the kick up rudder back to a cassette - as Hayden pointed out this should be pretty simple
  • Beefing up my rudder axle - chatting to Geoff about this
  • fitting cleats to go to a conventional jib sheeting system
  • moving the centreboard forward
  • remove a couple of sharp bits in the boat that don't need to be there
  • fair my flares so they conform to the rules

 

Once this is done I want to hit the water again and sort out this rig now that I have the softer battens.

The worst thing about the above work is that the kick up rudder and self tacker were my suggestions to Geoff for the Flatpack and were added as updates to the original plans - silly me. The good news is that the Flatpack spine has a huge built in area for locating the daggerboard slot and its currently in the most aft position - so it is just a case of router a new slot and fill in the old one (other builders just have to learn from me and put their board in the right spot first time around :rolleyes: )

 

So curious minds want to know......

How far back of the mast is is too far back for the DB?

 

457mm to the front of the centreboard seems a little to far - this decision is based on my finding it hard to get the boat to go into a tack, but am finding it reasonably easy to bear away. However Geoff is looking into whether it needs to be moved at all. Honestly I believe most of the speed problems will take care of themselves when I get a jib system on that works better and I better set up my spreaders.

 

 

C.

 

Back when I first got into the class 10" - 12" or 250 - 300 mm seemed to be the norm. Bill Beaver showed the way moving the daggerboard back so that the boat would have neutral hem in a gust, allowing the boat to accelerate and not stagger in the puffs. I'm very happy at around 14" 350 mm now. 450 mm is farther back than I have seen, but I agree that sorting the jib should be the first task.

 

John K.

Still sorting out Mayhem.....

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John K.

Still sorting out Mayhem.....

 

JK

 

I saw in another thread you would be back next year with some stronger parts, what let go?

 

H.

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Thought it was about time we had some on water IC porn from down under, shots taken from the recent Australian Champs pitty our photographer couldn't get out in a boat on the last day when it was blowing around 20kts give or take 5 at times, but still some good pics where taken. Copies of all photos will be mailed out to all competitors in due course.

 

post-21278-1244691470_thumb.jpg

1st place

 

post-21278-1244691794_thumb.jpg

2nd place

 

post-21278-1244691684_thumb.jpg

3rd place

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More from the OZ Champs

 

post-21278-1244692153_thumb.jpg

Flatpack in action

 

post-21278-1244692229_thumb.jpg

Some roundings where interesting to say the least, somehow this one turned out fine.

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The experience of the flatpacks reminds me of Mcrae and all the teething problems I had on Scarlett O'Hara. Untried boats at a major event is rarely fast! Glad to say the "things to do/modify" list is pretty short these days, and reducing. Sailing Scarlett in winds above 20knots is still a challenge, but the purchase of a new drysuit to cope with the cold water in the spring made life more comfortable!

Roger - glad to hear you have launched your new boat - are you and Peter Ullman planning to go to the Europa Cup in Sweden in August? It would be great to compare the different designs.

 

Phil - i have no information about Peter and for me its still unsure - i would like to come, but i might have some overlapping with other important dates. What about you and Travemuende Week in Juli? travemuende is a four days professional managed regatta on a fantastic venue and its participating in one of the biggest dinghy racing events worldwide.

 

Roger

IC GER 78 and GER 68

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John K.

Still sorting out Mayhem.....

 

JK

 

I saw in another thread you would be back next year with some stronger parts, what let go?

 

H.

 

 

A picture speaks a thousand words.

 

Even Steve Clark had to say that he had never seen this failure before. I must have a conversation with the engineer.....

 

I will be back on the water soon enough!

 

John K

Mayhem Sailing Team

post-17857-1244932988_thumb.jpg

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John K.

Still sorting out Mayhem.....

 

JK

 

I saw in another thread you would be back next year with some stronger parts, what let go?

 

H.

 

 

A picture speaks a thousand words.

 

Even Steve Clark had to say that he had never seen this failure before. I must have a conversation with the engineer.....

 

I will be back on the water soon enough!

 

John K

Mayhem Sailing Team

 

Wow, i haven't seen that before - next question is how did you do that (asks someone with almost the same carriage)

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John K.

Still sorting out Mayhem.....

 

JK

 

I saw in another thread you would be back next year with some stronger parts, what let go?

 

H.

 

 

A picture speaks a thousand words.

 

Even Steve Clark had to say that he had never seen this failure before. I must have a conversation with the engineer.....

 

I will be back on the water soon enough!

 

John K

Mayhem Sailing Team

 

Ouch it certainly does, have you cleaned it up at all or was that how it finished up after letting go. What tack where you on when it parted company Im guessing Straboard. I've found I had to beef up all my parts for the carraige and rails, at first they where ok but when you add the load of the main sheet helm and then digging the end of the seat into a wave things just flexed too much and even sailing upwind in big seas (not digging in the seat) was loading the carriage up enough it was letting me know its getting to its limit. Had yours given any warning at all?

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Wow, i haven't seen that before - next question is how did you do that (asks someone with almost the same carriage)

 

The pathology report is leaning toward a shear failure of the side panel of the seat carriage in compression. There was a "sound" while loafing during the start sequence on port tack that I ignored after looking to see that the rig was looking good. I tacked to starboard, & started the race. I sailed out to the layline with Oliver & Willy & tacked onto port. That lasted about 20 seconds before the loud "BOOM" sent Johnny swimming. I'm not sure what was louder, my seat carriage failing, or Steve's Mast earlier in the day.

 

It is clear that I relied on the material on the inside / bottom of the seat carriage to bond the side panels to the large diagonal gussets on the front & back ends, and I did not have enough material wrapping around the outside of the core to do the same job. It looks like it just peeled off. It should be an easy repair, but I will need to mimic the repair on the starboard side as well. That can not be too long for this world if left un-attended.

 

Best

 

John K

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The pathology report is leaning toward a shear failure of the side panel of the seat carriage in compression. There was a "sound" while loafing during the start sequence on port tack that I ignored after looking to see that the rig was looking good. I tacked to starboard, & started the race. I sailed out to the layline with Oliver & Willy & tacked onto port. That lasted about 20 seconds before the loud "BOOM" sent Johnny swimming. I'm not sure what was louder, my seat carriage failing, or Steve's Mast earlier in the day.

 

It is clear that I relied on the material on the inside / bottom of the seat carriage to bond the side panels to the large diagonal gussets on the front & back ends, and I did not have enough material wrapping around the outside of the core to do the same job. It looks like it just peeled off. It should be an easy repair, but I will need to mimic the repair on the starboard side as well. That can not be too long for this world if left un-attended.

 

Best

 

John K

 

OK glad it didn't happen when I was sailing it in Florida, but sorry to hear it. Funny how it's the highly loaded parts that always seem to break!

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Karl,

 

It is a really good thing that it did not fail while you were sailing Mayhem in Sarasota. I am very thankful to the Nepean Sailing Club Crash Boat. With the main sheet & jib sheets as well as the seat all free floating, sailing in – self rescue was not a real possibility. Those guys did a great job.

 

The carriage is a 2.5 kg part that is designed to take 775 kg of static load. It just goes to prove that the dynamic loads on the carriage are poorly understood, and that they are substantial. The only safe thing to do is to design the part to be strong in all directions. The good news is that a little bit of the black stuff goes a long way in increasing the strength of the part.

 

Further inspection last night revealed that the outside skin that bonds the starboard side panel to the fore & aft gussets has begun to fail as well. The really good news is that the seat suffered no damage at all. That could have ruined my summer! It really looks like the bottom of the side panels started to move laterally, and on the port side it basically peeled off and the secondary bond of the side panel to the uni that was an integral lamination of the seat rails failed. Once the bottom of the corner tape began to fail, it just tore through the remaining material. To answer Haydn's question; the photo taken is as the part failed, prior to any repair.

 

Best

 

John

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Some Pics of me and GER 78 on the Wannsee

post-23256-1244985632_thumb.jpg

 

looks as slim as it is

 

post-23256-1244985689_thumb.jpg

looks like i have to work on the jib trim

 

 

Roger

IC GER 78 and GER 68

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Karl,

 

It is a really good thing that it did not fail while you were sailing Mayhem in Sarasota. I am very thankful to the Nepean Sailing Club Crash Boat. With the main sheet & jib sheets as well as the seat all free floating, sailing in – self rescue was not a real possibility. Those guys did a great job.

 

The carriage is a 2.5 kg part that is designed to take 775 kg of static load. It just goes to prove that the dynamic loads on the carriage are poorly understood, and that they are substantial. The only safe thing to do is to design the part to be strong in all directions. The good news is that a little bit of the black stuff goes a long way in increasing the strength of the part.

 

Further inspection last night revealed that the outside skin that bonds the starboard side panel to the fore & aft gussets has begun to fail as well. The really good news is that the seat suffered no damage at all. That could have ruined my summer! It really looks like the bottom of the side panels started to move laterally, and on the port side it basically peeled off and the secondary bond of the side panel to the uni that was an integral lamination of the seat rails failed. Once the bottom of the corner tape began to fail, it just tore through the remaining material. To answer Haydn's question; the photo taken is as the part failed, prior to any repair.

 

Best

 

John

 

I had the misfortune to peel Bill's carriage off Rapa Nui at one point - from the end of the seat of course.

 

Mayhem's carriage was creaking a bit in Florida after the tacks but I couldn't see anything moving. Certainly the racking loads spreading the feet apart must be humongous when you plug into a wave - perhaps an X brace from corner to corner under the carriage would go a long way - could be two pieces of low-stretch on a spanish windlass like the one I ran across under the front of Rapa Nui's carriage to keep it spreading for worlds in 2005 - that piece of line is still there, doing its job I think.

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Karl,

 

It is a really good thing that it did not fail while you were sailing Mayhem in Sarasota. I am very thankful to the Nepean Sailing Club Crash Boat. With the main sheet & jib sheets as well as the seat all free floating, sailing in – self rescue was not a real possibility. Those guys did a great job.

 

The carriage is a 2.5 kg part that is designed to take 775 kg of static load. It just goes to prove that the dynamic loads on the carriage are poorly understood, and that they are substantial. The only safe thing to do is to design the part to be strong in all directions. The good news is that a little bit of the black stuff goes a long way in increasing the strength of the part.

 

Further inspection last night revealed that the outside skin that bonds the starboard side panel to the fore & aft gussets has begun to fail as well. The really good news is that the seat suffered no damage at all. That could have ruined my summer! It really looks like the bottom of the side panels started to move laterally, and on the port side it basically peeled off and the secondary bond of the side panel to the uni that was an integral lamination of the seat rails failed. Once the bottom of the corner tape began to fail, it just tore through the remaining material. To answer Haydn's question; the photo taken is as the part failed, prior to any repair.

 

Best

 

John

 

I had the misfortune to peel Bill's carriage off Rapa Nui at one point - from the end of the seat of course.

 

Mayhem's carriage was creaking a bit in Florida after the tacks but I couldn't see anything moving. Certainly the racking loads spreading the feet apart must be humongous when you plug into a wave - perhaps an X brace from corner to corner under the carriage would go a long way - could be two pieces of low-stretch on a spanish windlass like the one I ran across under the front of Rapa Nui's carriage to keep it spreading for worlds in 2005 - that piece of line is still there, doing its job I think.

 

Not to diminish the racking loads when hitting a wave but I think that the culprit at the moment of failure was the substantial side loads generated by my weight in the seat while the boat was heeled pushing the whole mess down to leeward. For the racking loads, I am going to stick with the large diagonal gussets, and the solid seat carriage pan that is bonded to all four sides. I will be adding much more substantial material at the bottom corners. A shorter seat carriage would help as well, but my creaky knees like the leg room that a taller seat & carriage provide. A painted Carriage would have helped me find the fatigue cracks earlier

 

 

 

John

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Karl,

 

It is a really good thing that it did not fail while you were sailing Mayhem in Sarasota. I am very thankful to the Nepean Sailing Club Crash Boat. With the main sheet & jib sheets as well as the seat all free floating, sailing in – self rescue was not a real possibility. Those guys did a great job.

 

The carriage is a 2.5 kg part that is designed to take 775 kg of static load. It just goes to prove that the dynamic loads on the carriage are poorly understood, and that they are substantial. The only safe thing to do is to design the part to be strong in all directions. The good news is that a little bit of the black stuff goes a long way in increasing the strength of the part.

 

Further inspection last night revealed that the outside skin that bonds the starboard side panel to the fore & aft gussets has begun to fail as well. The really good news is that the seat suffered no damage at all. That could have ruined my summer! It really looks like the bottom of the side panels started to move laterally, and on the port side it basically peeled off and the secondary bond of the side panel to the uni that was an integral lamination of the seat rails failed. Once the bottom of the corner tape began to fail, it just tore through the remaining material. To answer Haydn's question; the photo taken is as the part failed, prior to any repair.

 

Best

 

John

 

I had the misfortune to peel Bill's carriage off Rapa Nui at one point - from the end of the seat of course.

 

Mayhem's carriage was creaking a bit in Florida after the tacks but I couldn't see anything moving. Certainly the racking loads spreading the feet apart must be humongous when you plug into a wave - perhaps an X brace from corner to corner under the carriage would go a long way - could be two pieces of low-stretch on a spanish windlass like the one I ran across under the front of Rapa Nui's carriage to keep it spreading for worlds in 2005 - that piece of line is still there, doing its job I think.

 

Not to diminish the racking loads when hitting a wave but I think that the culprit at the moment of failure was the substantial side loads generated by my weight in the seat while the boat was heeled pushing the whole mess down to leeward. For the racking loads, I am going to stick with the large diagonal gussets, and the solid seat carriage pan that is bonded to all four sides. I will be adding much more substantial material at the bottom corners. A shorter seat carriage would help as well, but my creaky knees like the leg room that a taller seat & carriage provide. A painted Carriage would have helped me find the fatigue cracks earlier

 

 

 

John

 

Interesting. I suppose it does all pile up on the leeward side when heeled over. Sort of a vertical version of what I was referring to. Should be easy enough to fix; looks like it left the remainder of the carriage mostly intact.

 

KW

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Some Pics of me and GER 78 on the Wannsee

post-23256-1244985632_thumb.jpg

 

looks as slim as it is

 

post-23256-1244985689_thumb.jpg

looks like i have to work on the jib trim

 

 

Roger

IC GER 78 and GER 68

 

Looking good Roger

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Some Pics of me and GER 78 on the Wannsee

post-23256-1244985632_thumb.jpg

 

looks as slim as it is

 

post-23256-1244985689_thumb.jpg

looks like i have to work on the jib trim

 

 

Roger

IC GER 78 and GER 68

 

Looking good Roger

 

all credits for the boat go to Steve !

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Karl,

 

It is a really good thing that it did not fail while you were sailing Mayhem in Sarasota. I am very thankful to the Nepean Sailing Club Crash Boat. With the main sheet & jib sheets as well as the seat all free floating, sailing in – self rescue was not a real possibility. Those guys did a great job.

 

The carriage is a 2.5 kg part that is designed to take 775 kg of static load. It just goes to prove that the dynamic loads on the carriage are poorly understood, and that they are substantial. The only safe thing to do is to design the part to be strong in all directions. The good news is that a little bit of the black stuff goes a long way in increasing the strength of the part.

 

Further inspection last night revealed that the outside skin that bonds the starboard side panel to the fore & aft gussets has begun to fail as well. The really good news is that the seat suffered no damage at all. That could have ruined my summer! It really looks like the bottom of the side panels started to move laterally, and on the port side it basically peeled off and the secondary bond of the side panel to the uni that was an integral lamination of the seat rails failed. Once the bottom of the corner tape began to fail, it just tore through the remaining material. To answer Haydn's question; the photo taken is as the part failed, prior to any repair.

 

Best

 

John

 

I had the misfortune to peel Bill's carriage off Rapa Nui at one point - from the end of the seat of course.

 

Mayhem's carriage was creaking a bit in Florida after the tacks but I couldn't see anything moving. Certainly the racking loads spreading the feet apart must be humongous when you plug into a wave - perhaps an X brace from corner to corner under the carriage would go a long way - could be two pieces of low-stretch on a spanish windlass like the one I ran across under the front of Rapa Nui's carriage to keep it spreading for worlds in 2005 - that piece of line is still there, doing its job I think.

 

Not to diminish the racking loads when hitting a wave but I think that the culprit at the moment of failure was the substantial side loads generated by my weight in the seat while the boat was heeled pushing the whole mess down to leeward. For the racking loads, I am going to stick with the large diagonal gussets, and the solid seat carriage pan that is bonded to all four sides. I will be adding much more substantial material at the bottom corners. A shorter seat carriage would help as well, but my creaky knees like the leg room that a taller seat & carriage provide. A painted Carriage would have helped me find the fatigue cracks earlier

 

 

 

John

 

Interesting. I suppose it does all pile up on the leeward side when heeled over. Sort of a vertical version of what I was referring to. Should be easy enough to fix; looks like it left the remainder of the carriage mostly intact.

 

KW

 

John from memory your the 'c' of your carraige rails face outward which is opposite to all the rails Ive seen to date, would this then result in the force created when heeled to be loading up the windward side of the carriage putting the part of the carriage that fails into a prying action? rather than compression or tension, whats your thoughts?

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That lasted about 20 seconds before the loud "BOOM" sent Johnny swimming. I'm not sure what was louder, my seat carriage failing, or Steve's Mast earlier in the day.

 

Steve's Mast?

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John from memory your the 'c' of your carraige rails face outward which is opposite to all the rails Ive seen to date, would this then result in the force created when heeled to be loading up the windward side of the carriage putting the part of the carriage that fails into a prying action? rather than compression or tension, whats your thoughts?

 

 

H,

 

You get the Gold Star!

 

It was the windward side (in compression at the time of failure) that was captured by the tracks on the boat. I now think that it just peeled off, and the bottom of the side panel started to break away from the diagonal gusset first. The other load case that contributed to this failure is the shock load when the seat hits the end of the tether during a tack.

 

Repairs are going along. I have a full plate right now.

 

Best

 

John

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A heap of IC pictures including the 2009 IC Australian Nationals IC Photos

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hey Cats,

I've finally done the fabrication and it is time for sailing! I have been painting and re-rigging the hull/carriage/seat combo I got from Chris Maas. you guys know it as SST. it is the other boat we were testing on San Francisco Bay last vs. String Theory. I managed to make a quick job into a complex personal thrashing.

 

went for the first test ride today. nice 12-20 knots. got all rigged up got new Zhik duds on, timed the gust/lull thing, hauled on a bit more downhaul and rrripp. OH DEAR ! I kinda ripped the tack out of my sweet main. so I got wet to my knees, boat is still dry. leaving the shore solo was probably going to be a bit of a shitshow anyway, I guess. the sailing bit would have been really good though !

here's some fotos...

Attached thumbnail(s)

post-25613-1245726030_thumb.jpg

post-25613-1245726043_thumb.jpg

post-25613-1245726053_thumb.jpg

post-25613-1245726066_thumb.jpg

post-25613-1245726080_thumb.jpg

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hey Cats,

I've finally done the fabrication and it is time for sailing! I have been painting and re-rigging the hull/carriage/seat combo I got from Chris Maas. you guys know it as SST. it is the other boat we were testing on San Francisco Bay last vs. String Theory. I managed to make a quick job into a complex personal thrashing.

 

went for the first test ride today. nice 12-20 knots. got all rigged up got new Zhik duds on, timed the gust/lull thing, hauled on a bit more downhaul and rrripp. OH DEAR ! I kinda ripped the tack out of my sweet main. so I got wet to my knees, boat is still dry. leaving the shore solo was probably going to be a bit of a shitshow anyway, I guess. the sailing bit would have been really good though !

here's some fotos...

Attached thumbnail(s)

 

looking good Kenny, can't wait to see that thing race at Sugar. That seat caraige (I can't spell that) looks like it goes REALLY far back. That also looks like a Graham Herbert's sail, am I right?

 

best,

 

Willy

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hey Cats,

I've finally done the fabrication and it is time for sailing! I have been painting and re-rigging the hull/carriage/seat combo I got from Chris Maas. you guys know it as SST. it is the other boat we were testing on San Francisco Bay last vs. String Theory. I managed to make a quick job into a complex personal thrashing.

 

went for the first test ride today. nice 12-20 knots. got all rigged up got new Zhik duds on, timed the gust/lull thing, hauled on a bit more downhaul and rrripp. OH DEAR ! I kinda ripped the tack out of my sweet main. so I got wet to my knees, boat is still dry. leaving the shore solo was probably going to be a bit of a shitshow anyway, I guess. the sailing bit would have been really good though !

here's some fotos...

Attached thumbnail(s)

 

looking good Kenny, can't wait to see that thing race at Sugar. That seat caraige (I can't spell that) looks like it goes REALLY far back. That also looks like a Graham Herbert's sail, am I right?

 

best,

 

Willy

I've mostly tried to mimic Chris' original rigging, since it was superb. yeah, I can't wait to be out on the seat, carriage all the way aft, absolutely blasting! that is my lovely Graham Herbert main that I surgically removed the tack patch from. it is getting fixed.

the high mod VanDusen mast takes a HELL of a lot of downhaul to bend, even for a reduced luff curve. I know it is easier to sail with though, from last fall's test rides in SF. less teabaggery.

cheers, Kenny

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hey Cats,

I've finally done the fabrication and it is time for sailing! I have been painting and re-rigging the hull/carriage/seat combo I got from Chris Maas. you guys know it as SST. it is the other boat we were testing on San Francisco Bay last vs. String Theory. I managed to make a quick job into a complex personal thrashing.

 

went for the first test ride today. nice 12-20 knots. got all rigged up got new Zhik duds on, timed the gust/lull thing, hauled on a bit more downhaul and rrripp. OH DEAR ! I kinda ripped the tack out of my sweet main. so I got wet to my knees, boat is still dry. leaving the shore solo was probably going to be a bit of a shitshow anyway, I guess. the sailing bit would have been really good though !

here's some fotos...

Attached thumbnail(s)

 

Great looking boat

 

Can I ask, what is the advantage in moving the pivot for the gooseneck further aft rather than just having it close to the rear face of the mast?.

 

Ian

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I would imagine its to avoid the boom squashing the cunningham control line, and also give a nice fixation for the cunningham block rather than tying it off on the gooseneck.

 

One other point is that the kicker attaches to the hull on the same plane as the gooseneck so that you dont get the kicker trying to pull the boom out.

 

It certainly looks very nice. I'm normally a fan of yellow but I have to say I thought Chris's boat looked awesome in white.

 

I'm still interested to hear how Mr Paterson is getting on with his tiller linkages, anyone got any news, Andy where have you gone? are you too busy building a Suicide (sorry Atkin 1.25).

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You get an automatic increase in the fullness of the main when reaching and running, haul in the main and it gets flatter again for going uphill. :blink:

 

Ian McP

 

hey Cats,

I've finally done the fabrication and it is time for sailing! I have been painting and re-rigging the hull/carriage/seat combo I got from Chris Maas. you guys know it as SST. it is the other boat we were testing on San Francisco Bay last vs. String Theory. I managed to make a quick job into a complex personal thrashing.

 

went for the first test ride today. nice 12-20 knots. got all rigged up got new Zhik duds on, timed the gust/lull thing, hauled on a bit more downhaul and rrripp. OH DEAR ! I kinda ripped the tack out of my sweet main. so I got wet to my knees, boat is still dry. leaving the shore solo was probably going to be a bit of a shitshow anyway, I guess. the sailing bit would have been really good though !

here's some fotos...

Attached thumbnail(s)

 

Great looking boat

 

Can I ask, what is the advantage in moving the pivot for the gooseneck further aft rather than just having it close to the rear face of the mast?.

 

Ian

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I'm still interested to hear how Mr Paterson is getting on with his tiller linkages, anyone got any news, Andy where have you gone? are you too busy building a Suicide (sorry Atkin 1.25).

 

I'm still here but.... injured ( a cycling at 0mph incident 2 weeks ago )

post-2679-1245948947_thumb.jpg

Not actually me, but it looks the same. No surgery, just to let it heal with a bump on top of the shoulder, maybe snip the end of the bone off later.

6 weeks and apparently I get full movement and strength back.

So I'm a bit limited for sailing and working ( left hand is ok - as far as left hands are - , and the right arm is Ok from the elbow down, which is not much use for the majority of sailing, shaping, sanding or most boat buildy tasks.)

And I missed the UK IC Nationals - Congrats to Phil Robin / Scarlett O'Hara the new UK IC Champion.

 

The TT rudder linkage works fine - I just doesn't notice it. The main bridle moved back helps too to stop the tanglyuppy with my heels or the tiller.

The bungee to the extensions works nicely, keeping the lee one in and forward, ready to grab in the tack/gybe.

The monster square head main works OK too.

I feel that the bolt-rope sail is not as fast or pointy upwind - it's just about the same as the other boats instaed of a noticeable pointing advantage.

( and Phil Robin seems just a bit faster ).

 

Andy

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Nasty injury Andy, hope it gets better soon.

 

So whats the next plan for TT? a new luff tube sail with camber inducers ?

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On the up side, collar bones heal very well and ofthen without need for surgery. I've been told that broken collar bones are the most common injury for children and that they heal by themselves quickly. It doesn't change the fact that it sucks big time when you get winnged. My son broke his playing soccer and then I had to put up with a rabbid soccer player that couldn't play for six months. I think my hell was worse than his. :unsure:

 

Best of luck on a speedy recovery. I've done the 0 mph roll before but so far it has been into bushes and flower beds.

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Nasty injury Andy, hope it gets better soon.

 

So whats the next ....

 

Perhaps training wheels? I've been microseconds from failing to unclip SPD pedals while stopped dead and just avoided falling like a chainsaw cut tree. I admire pursuit riders more and more for their ability to stop dead for incredible periods, and wish I had better balance. Crappy break at a crappy time why doesn't shit like this happen during the off season?

 

--

Bill

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the bowman on one of the other 18's in Brisbane did the same thing, but managed to fall over a gutter and break his fermur (cant spell) on the corner of the gutter. (week before the start of the season)

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the bowman on one of the other 18's in Brisbane did the same thing, but managed to fall over a gutter and break his fermur (cant spell) on the corner of the gutter. (week before the start of the season)

I quit doing lots of downhill mountainbiking because of endlessly blowing up shoulders. if you wreck the other side too, then you can have that old school athlete sloping shoulders look! pulling on a mainsheet, overhand and underhand makes a pretty good recovery regime for later on.

hope you can get on the water soon!

cheers, Kenny

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Finally, a DC topic that I know tons about. I can park a road bike for minutes on end. The trick is to turn your bars 30 degrees so the bar end on the side where your pedal is forward is closest. Then you can push and release, push and release on the forward pedal and the bike moves just a little bit forward and back. You stand up while doing this.

 

Those pursuit bikes have no freewheel which enables a backwards push on the pedals. Makes standing still much easier.

 

Heal up Andy, I know your pain.

 

Back to more important things - thanks to ICYuteMovement and the Clark family I had my first but not last IC sail yesterday. I rate it:

 

post-32376-1246291918_thumb.jpg

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My wife has been training for the Seattle to Portland ride, which is 2 centuries in two days. So she's out training on Saturday with a nice 60 mile ride, and while avoiding a nice older couple out for a stroll on the Burke-Gilman trail, is knocked into the vertical supports of a bridge by a 225 pound woman wobbling down the trail trying to pass said older couple at maybe 5 mph. Lorrie slows down to avoid her, but like a homing pidgeon, said fatty (without a helmet I might add) wobbles into my spouse, who is doing about 2 mph by this time. This strategy does not work. Fatty falls over (gravity is a bitch, no?) and squishes wife into bridge. Road (bridge?) rash results. I get call, as alien bump surfaces on wife's forarm. A TRIP TO THE THE EMERGENCY ROOM!!!

 

No Breaks, thank god.

 

And then there's the tale of me winding upside down in a tree at the end of the Harvard Wellesely bike race. Bracing.

 

Heal Andy. Heal as fast as you can!

 

Paul

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Thanks for all your get well messages B):rolleyes:

 

I can now move my arm all round OK, but it still hurts when there's any load on it.

Two handed planing or fairing board work is all wobbly, so I'm having to do small stuff ( and jobs at home )

At least it's sunny.

Might get back on the bike this weekend - but NO CLIP-IN PEDALS :angry:

 

Sailing is still a couple of weeks off probably.

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I took AoA out in a little more breeze today, 12-15 gusts to 18kts. Most systems other than me are working well though the gyber cassette is not giving me the full 3 degrees advertised even though it works perfectly in the laboratory. It may be that the pivot point is too far forward or maybe the cassette is distorting under load.

 

One thing that made a big difference was putting a little grease on the rudder bearings. Now the steering's not so jerky and I can tell that I have a touch of lee helm. Not something that seems like a particularly good thing maybe but I think I will declare it so. Either that or sail with a little more rake.

 

A week of racing with some of you guys at Sugar Island in a few weeks should answer a lot of questions.

 

post-16686-1246583736_thumb.jpg

 

post-16686-1246583693_thumb.jpg

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Asbo's first sail

Newest IC to the UK fleet is Alan Powell's Asbo, built to Alan's own design.

Asbo finally hit the water during the UK Nationals at Stone 20th-23rd June - usual teething problems but boat declared fast.

Alan is a bit busy at present but will no doubt chip in on the forum in due course.

Pics Courtesy of Peter McLaren.

 

Ian McP

GBR253

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post-15958-1246621592_thumb.jpg

post-15958-1246621609_thumb.jpg

post-15958-1246621646_thumb.jpg

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Asbo's first sail

Newest IC to the UK fleet is Alan Powell's Asbo, built to Alan's own design.

Asbo finally hit the water during the UK Nationals at Stone 20th-23rd June - usual teething problems but boat declared fast.

Alan is a bit busy at present but will no doubt chip in on the forum in due course.

Pics Courtesy of Peter McLaren.

 

Ian McP

GBR253

oh, boy! lots of new yellow boats! I'm so glad about the new lighter and skinnier rule. when I move the old boat's parts around, everything feels way too heavy ! these new boats are definitely better for old men.

might get my boat wet this weekend after a recent sail repair. will try to get someone to shoot fotos.

Can 39 off to a late start.

cheers, Kenny

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Gentlemen,

The 2009 summer edition of the International Canoesletter has been mailed. It contains a NOR for Nationals and Sugar Island where we should be getting some critical mass attending. As always anyone who did not receive a Canoesletter can feel free to PM myself or John Kells and we will do our best to add you to the mailing list.

 

In other news I busted up my carraige a little bit while sailing yesterday in Marion in aggressive conditions. I think it happened when I dug the bow and left the boat by flying through the air at high velocity. When I left the boat the carraige was all the way back, when I got back to it it was all the way forward. Thankfully it looks like a very easy fix.

 

pictures soon,

 

best,

 

Willy

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Very Nice Canoesletter.

 

Paul

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Results of the first day of racing from US Nationals at Ram Island

 

Race 1:

244- John Kells, Mayhem

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

 

Race 2:

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

244- John Kells, Mayhem

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

 

Race 3:

244- John Kells, Mayhem

240- Oliver Moore, Unlce Walter

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

 

Race 4:

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

244- John Kells, Mayhem

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

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Results of the first day of racing from US Nationals at Ram Island

 

Race 1:

244- John Kells, Mayhem

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

 

Race 2:

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

244- John Kells, Mayhem

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

 

Race 3:

244- John Kells, Mayhem

240- Oliver Moore, Unlce Walter

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

 

Race 4:

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

244- John Kells, Mayhem

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

 

What happened to Bill & big G?

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Results of the first day of racing from US Nationals at Ram Island

 

Race 1:

244- John Kells, Mayhem

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

 

Race 2:

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

244- John Kells, Mayhem

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

 

Race 3:

244- John Kells, Mayhem

240- Oliver Moore, Unlce Walter

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

 

Race 4:

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

244- John Kells, Mayhem

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

 

What happened to Bill & big G?

 

Bill is on his way up as we speak, should be arriving in around an hour. George unfortunately could not make it, he got roped into being an expert witness for a trial. We also expect to be joined by little brother David on sunday.

 

best,

 

Willy

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Day 2 results

 

Race 1:

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

244- John Kells, Mayhem

239- Steve Clark, Wonk

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

230- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

219- DAve Gilliland, Rapa Nui

226- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

241 DNF- Willy Clark, Kaito

216 DNS- Bill Beaver, Lust Puppet

92 DNS- Dave Clark, Alice

 

Race 2:

244- John Kells, Mayhem

216- Bill Beaver, Lust Puppet

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

239 DNS- Steve Clark, Wonk

230 DNF- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

226 DNF- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

92 DNS- Dave Clark, Alice

 

Race 3:

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

216- Bill Beaver, Lust Puppet

244- John Kells, Mayhem

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

239 DNS- Steve Clark, Wonk

230 DNS- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

226 DNS- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

92 DNS- David Clark, Alice

 

Race 4:

244- John Kells, Mayhem

216- Bill Beaver, Lust Puppet

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

239 DNS- Steve Clark, Wonk

230 DNS- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

226 DNS- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

92 DNS- Dave Clark, Alice

 

Race 5:

240- Oliver Moore, Uncle Walter

244- John Kells, Mayhem

216- Bill Beaver, Lust Puppet

200- Rocky Geyer, Zydeco

241- Willy Clark, Kaito

219- Dave Gilliland, Rapa Nui

202- Chris Moore, Matilda

239 DNS- Steve Clark

230 DNS- Sam Moore, Blue Meanie

226 DNS- Jared Hourihan, Red Shift

92 DNS- Dave Clark, Alice

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Current standings:

 

John Kells- 15 points

Oliver Moore- 15 points

Rocky Geyer- 46 points

Willy Clark- 49 points

Chris Moore- 50 points

Steve Clark- 63 points

Dave Gilliland- 64 points

Bill Beaver- 69 points

Sam Moore- 83 points

Jared Hourihan- 90 points

David Clark- 108 points

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Current standings:

 

John Kells- 15 points

Oliver Moore- 15 points

Rocky Geyer- 46 points

Willy Clark- 49 points

Chris Moore- 50 points

Steve Clark- 63 points

Dave Gilliland- 64 points

Bill Beaver- 69 points

Sam Moore- 83 points

Jared Hourihan- 90 points

David Clark- 108 points

 

Well, looks like the 120 year old design/designer (LP/Bill) are doing OK.

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Final Results:

 

1st John Kells, 17 points

2nd Oliver Moore, 20 points

3rd Willy Clark, 53 points

4th Rocky Geyer, 65 points

5th Chris Moore, 65 points

6th Bill Beaver, 68 points

7th Steve Clark, 71 points

8th Dave Gilliland, 99 points

9th Sam Moore, 109 points

10th Jared Hourihan, 119 points

11th Dave Clark, lots of points since he missed the regatta but he won his rowing event, so thats cool.

 

Willy is in charge of the regatta report since he finished 3rd, so feel free to send him harassing emails and PMs. Pix and video will be up on the site in the next day or so.

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Final Results:

 

1st John Kells, 17 points

2nd Oliver Moore, 20 points

3rd Willy Clark, 53 points

4th Rocky Geyer, 65 points

5th Chris Moore, 65 points

6th Bill Beaver, 68 points

7th Steve Clark, 71 points

8th Dave Gilliland, 99 points

9th Sam Moore, 109 points

10th Jared Hourihan, 119 points

11th Dave Clark, lots of points since he missed the regatta but he won his rowing event, so thats cool.

 

Willy is in charge of the regatta report since he finished 3rd, so feel free to send him harassing emails and PMs. Pix and video will be up on the site in the next day or so.

 

hey Cats, glad you had a decent sized fleet and sounds like good racing !

I sailed my new Maas boat (Can 39) for the last week and raced a good regatta this weekend, as a very rusty guy.

I've got to download to Chris first, but Mine Gott ! the new boat is a quantum leap in many areas. going to have to get a bigger quiver for all the new tricks. the door is wide open to a new realm of dinghy sailing!

 

cheers, Kenny

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Thanks to everyone who worked to put nationals together, been a while since any IC sailing but it was a blast! Looking forward to some pictures, although based on the amount of time spent upside down its unlikely there will be any of me sailing.

 

Congrats to John, Oliver and Willy. Great sailing!

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What no photos!!

No pictures, then it did not happen.

 

:D

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What no photos!!

No pictures, then it did not happen.

 

:D

 

Photos from the event are already available on the Canoe Facebook group and should presently be uploaded to the website. I was ecstatic to see that there are a few of me actually sailing fast. As possibly the least photogenic canoe sailor of all time, this is of great personal significance to me. The video is also available on Facebook and the website. Excellent regatta with some great racing. I hope we do even better at Sugar Island which is fast approaching. I will be providing a regatta report in the near future (why did I have to go and finish third, clearly I did not hit Converse point hard enough).

 

best,

 

Willy

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Final Results:

 

1st John Kells, 17 points

2nd Oliver Moore, 20 points

3rd Willy Clark, 53 points

4th Rocky Geyer, 65 points

5th Chris Moore, 65 points

6th Bill Beaver, 68 points

7th Steve Clark, 71 points

8th Dave Gilliland, 99 points

9th Sam Moore, 109 points

10th Jared Hourihan, 119 points

11th Dave Clark, lots of points since he missed the regatta but he won his rowing event, so thats cool.

 

Willy is in charge of the regatta report since he finished 3rd, so feel free to send him harassing emails and PMs. Pix and video will be up on the site in the next day or so.

 

Great to see all those familiar names.

Hope to see you all in October.

 

Heineken HPDO 2009

Great Racing

Great Friends

Great Beer

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Final Results:

 

1st John Kells, 17 points

2nd Oliver Moore, 20 points

3rd Willy Clark, 53 points

4th Rocky Geyer, 65 points

5th Chris Moore, 65 points

6th Bill Beaver, 68 points

7th Steve Clark, 71 points

8th Dave Gilliland, 99 points

9th Sam Moore, 109 points

10th Jared Hourihan, 119 points

11th Dave Clark, lots of points since he missed the regatta but he won his rowing event, so thats cool.

 

Willy is in charge of the regatta report since he finished 3rd, so feel free to send him harassing emails and PMs. Pix and video will be up on the site in the next day or so.

 

Great to see all those familiar names.

Hope to see you all in October.

 

Heineken HPDO 2009

Great Racing

Great Friends

Great Beer

 

 

 

 

I've kind of liked how this thread had been kept on topic so I can follow the canoe guys. I understand the need to pimp your regatta, but you've already got a thread going and these "pimp it everywhere" posts have kind of crossed the line to over the top. It's a great regatta. People from my club are coming. Enough already.

 

Let's keep this great thread alive and on topic.

 

--

Bill

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