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Don't want to hijack the thread but,...I am anxiously awaiting a reply on my inquiries on info and pictures of USA212 "half baked" that is or was for sale. Would like to know if any of you have any pictures of this boat?

 

-Cheers

 

is it a west coast boat? Bay area?

 

One of the hulls we infused in George's parents' basement was called Half Baked I think - he sold that to someone on the east coast with decks for finishing but I can't recall who bought it. It should have had a later sail number I think as Clockwork is US 232 I think, but that hull may have been finished well before mine.

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is it a west coast boat? Bay area?

 

One of the hulls we infused in George's parents' basement was called Half Baked I think - he sold that to someone on the east coast with decks for finishing but I can't recall who bought it. It should have had a later sail number I think as Clockwork is US 232 I think, but that hull may have been finished well before mine.

 

well, I'm way out of the loop, as to the east coast boys. I've only met Oliver Moore on a boat testing trip to the Bay area.

also out of the loop being lost in the great white north.

good luck chasing down your boat!

Kenny

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is it a west coast boat? Bay area?

 

One of the hulls we infused in George's parents' basement was called Half Baked I think - he sold that to someone on the east coast with decks for finishing but I can't recall who bought it. It should have had a later sail number I think as Clockwork is US 232 I think, but that hull may have been finished well before mine.

 

well, I'm way out of the loop, as to the east coast boys. I've only met Oliver Moore on a boat testing trip to the Bay area.

also out of the loop being lost in the great white north.

good luck chasing down your boat!

Kenny

 

 

It is on the east coast sail number 212 current owner is Paul Miller and I found out this evening is that it has been spoken for. So the search starts again, Im out of loop as well as I am in the now unfrozen mid west. Where there are no IC's.

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It is on the east coast sail number 212 current owner is Paul Miller and I found out this evening is that it has been spoken for. So the search starts again, Im out of loop as well as I am in the now unfrozen mid west. Where there are no IC's.

 

 

I'd sell you one of mine but it's in Annapolis at the moment, and the other one is in California.

 

 

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It is on the east coast sail number 212 current owner is Paul Miller and I found out this evening is that it has been spoken for. So the search starts again, Im out of loop as well as I am in the now unfrozen mid west. Where there are no IC's.

 

 

I'd sell you one of mine but it's in Annapolis at the moment, and the other one is in California.

 

 

 

have you thought about a new rules IC ?

in the west, Chris Maas can build you a most fabulous boat in varying degrees of completion to the SST design. same story from the eastern Brothers.

a great thing with these new boats is that they are so much easier to manhandle (or with the help of the better half) for loading, storing ...

the strangest thing is that the new boat beats me up so much less than the old boat, even though I seem to be capsizing much more at the moment.

cheers, Kenny

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It is on the east coast sail number 212 current owner is Paul Miller and I found out this evening is that it has been spoken for. So the search starts again, Im out of loop as well as I am in the now unfrozen mid west. Where there are no IC's.

I'd sell you one of mine but it's in Annapolis at the moment, and the other one is in California.

have you thought about a new rules IC ?

in the west, Chris Maas can build you a most fabulous boat in varying degrees of completion to the SST design. same story from the eastern Brothers.

a great thing with these new boats is that they are so much easier to manhandle (or with the help of the better half) for loading, storing ...

the strangest thing is that the new boat beats me up so much less than the old boat, even though I seem to be capsizing much more at the moment.

cheers, Kenny

 

 

I have thought of one of the new rules IC? Just recently obtained the line drawings of USA244 "Mayhem" which is tempting. My thought with USA 212 or an older IC would be this is going to be my 1st venture in the IC realm and as such a sub-1000.00 boat seemed(s) a safer bet. As the expense of building a boat and then ironing out teething issues while learning how to sail one fast seemed unreasonable. -Make sense- Down the road the AC is what I'd really be after! First learn how to sail one.

 

-So far I have to thank those for the amount of feedback and options here and elsewhere, its been helpful. Seems like a great class to get involved with.

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I saw a seat that was frame (here? elsewhere?) with a small sliding seat in it that centered itself during tack/jibes.

 

I tried a similar idea many decades ago on an over the hill IC, that before it broke (a lot of the boat actually broke at the same time :lol: ), and the few times I got it to work was pretty satisfying.

 

Hope you keep us curent on how it works for you. I think it's a cool idea. My hope with my project was that it would allow me to tack/jibe quickly and easily enough so I could play the shifts, have some tactical advantages, and have few more options available to keep her on her feet.

 

:)

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I see an issue with the centreing seat on frame type of sliding seat/plank. (Seat is Nth hemishere name, Plank is more common in Aust)

With the centreing seat it seems you have to place your backside on the seat when its centred then slide out to a hiking position.

My limited experience of sailing only one canoe part time over 4 years with a more conventional seat/plank is that I never put my weight on the seat/plank near the centre of the boat. All tacks and Gybes involved spending minimum time on the dance floor aft while sliding the seat/plank through, followed by a leap to place my weight as far outboard on the seat/plank as possible before the boat healed or slowed down. Any hesitation on a new rules narrow canoe causes stalling and often a capsize. I do not see how the self centreing seat on sliding frame could allow weight movement outboard anywhere near quickly enough.

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I have used this concept on my new boat Jet which was at the Alexander Palace Dinghy Show in London, pictures at http://www.intcanoe....ls.php?album=36. Jet is a Nethercott AC but the seat and carriage is actually built to fit in a new rules boat as well as it is only 750mm wide. It is work in progress but intention is to make shuffling around on the seat a lot easier for inland waters in particular particularly when you weigh over 90kg and need to respond to gusts and lulls quickly without walking the plank! Should also reduce the need for using copious amounts of a popular petroluem based lubricant up the wetsuit - very messy.

 

As Phil says, centring could be an issue but I have devised an elastic system which should put it in the right place after a tack. The main seat is now effectively sliding carbon outriggers which take all the load so the inner skin can be reduced. The space betweeen the beams is open at the ends making it much lighter but also allowing space on the deck when the seat is extended - useful on the AC to get more footspace for getting the kite up and down theoretically. There is some concern about the guillotine effect on ones legs but this will need to be checked out. A trampoline material between these open spaces would solve that problem and also against waves trying to wash you off. However being effectively beteween the beams means you can hide toestraps out of the way and also allows you to brace between the beams in the chop.

 

It is a work in progress and will need some work but I think the idea is worth persuing. Launch date is a week or so away.

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It is a work in progress and will need some work but I think the idea is worth persuing. Launch date is a week or so away.

 

Giving credit where credit is due, perhaps you could take a look at Doug Lord's sliding ballast "plank" used on his model boats. Basically, the design causes the ballast (batteries) to move outward on the "plank" as the plank is moved from side to side. When the plank is fully outboard, the battery pack is at the end of the plank. 37083d1257466184-design-challenge-trapwing-deck-ballast-12-22-tantra-heli-big-ungava-scow-012.jpg

 

God knows, I'm no Doug Lord fan, but if you rigged the "seat" on your plank to work like this, it would auto locate itself properly. The picture is pretty self explanatory.

 

--

Bill

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To hit pretty much the opposite end of the curve, currently for sale in the UK is the umpteen greats grandmother of the modern ICs... I wish I had the money (which probably won't be megabucks) and more importantly the place to keep her...

 

More here...

post-60-126938260939_thumb.jpg

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It is a work in progress and will need some work but I think the idea is worth persuing. Launch date is a week or so away.

 

Giving credit where credit is due, perhaps you could take a look at Doug Lord's sliding ballast "plank" used on his model boats. Basically, the design causes the ballast (batteries) to move outward on the "plank" as the plank is moved from side to side. When the plank is fully outboard, the battery pack is at the end of the plank. 37083d1257466184-design-challenge-trapwing-deck-ballast-12-22-tantra-heli-big-ungava-scow-012.jpg

 

God knows, I'm no Doug Lord fan, but if you rigged the "seat" on your plank to work like this, it would auto locate itself properly. The picture is pretty self explanatory.

 

--

Bill

 

 

Right.........thanks for the input. No, not a fan of old Doug myself franklyunsure.gif

 

I see a number of problems with this.

 

1. No chance of getting my lardy arse on the version shown in the photo without significant weight and height loss.

 

2. A scaled up version of this would require presummably a small to medium sized car battery - the prospect if this dangling between the rails is simply terrifying and would bring the tears to your eyes if it caught you in the gonads which is a distinct possibility I would suggest.

 

3. Electric devices not a good idea on a boat of this size as a short circuit would probably weld said gonads to the carbon

 

4. Electric devices are outlawed on dinghies.

 

Other than that cracking idea.wink.gif

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Right.........thanks for the input. No, not a fan of old Doug myself franklyunsure.gif

 

I see a number of problems with this.

 

1. No chance of getting my lardy arse on the version shown in the photo without significant weight and height loss.

 

2. A scaled up version of this would require presummably a small to medium sized car battery - the prospect if this dangling between the rails is simply terrifying and would bring the tears to your eyes if it caught you in the gonads which is a distinct possibility I would suggest.

 

3. Electric devices not a good idea on a boat of this size as a short circuit would probably weld said gonads to the carbon

 

4. Electric devices are outlawed on dinghies.

 

Other than that cracking idea.wink.gif

 

Steven:

 

You have missed the point entirely. You saw one of Doug's Rube Goldberg complexity extravaganzas, and I was trying to get you to see a tiny mechanical part of it.

 

If you look at the sliding mechanical attachment of the battery pack to the "plank", you will see a single block at the outboard end, with a line going from a centerpoint fixed attachment on the boat around the block, and then attaching to the seat pan (battery pack in this toy). If the seat pan slides on rails on top of the plank, this will cause the seat to be pulled progressively outward as the plank is extended normally - by hand and and then with your legs.

 

Completing the picture, add the same line and block on the other side and you have a system that will automatically center the seat as the plank is centered, and move the seat outboard as the plank is moved is either direction. Pretty simple and functional actually. There is no bungee cord necessary, and no tension or elastic loading incurred in seat location at any point, so a lot of the problematic issues talked about earlier are not in play.

 

If you would like a line diagram, I'm sure one could be done. Like most of Doug's bizarre schemes, there is a little part of it that shows promise.

 

I went and got Doug snarky mad at me for posting a link to his "property" for you. I got a pissy PM from him because of this, even though I credited him.

 

--

Bill

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It's all interesting, and I look forward to hearing how it works on the water, but I just can't see how useful a self centreing plank is going to be. Like Phil said,

I never put my weight on the seat/plank near the centre of the boat. All tacks and Gybes involved spending minimum time on the dance floor aft while sliding the seat/plank through, followed by a leap to place my weight as far outboard on the seat/plank as possible before the boat healed or slowed down. Any hesitation on a new rules narrow canoe causes stalling and often a capsize. I do not see how the self centreing seat on sliding frame could allow weight movement outboard anywhere near quickly enough.

 

And it's not just the new boats, I sailed the Nethercott's I had like this and even the AC I played with for half a season (this was even more demanding of plank placement, as I needed to keep it all the way to windward to help balance as I popped and dropped the kite). I also find that I don't 'flick' the plank across until the last second in a tack, as flicking it across to early can touch the other end in the water and halt the boat(or just lock it in irons).

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Right.........thanks for the input. No, not a fan of old Doug myself franklyunsure.gif

 

I see a number of problems with this.

 

1. No chance of getting my lardy arse on the version shown in the photo without significant weight and height loss.

 

2. A scaled up version of this would require presummably a small to medium sized car battery - the prospect if this dangling between the rails is simply terrifying and would bring the tears to your eyes if it caught you in the gonads which is a distinct possibility I would suggest.

 

3. Electric devices not a good idea on a boat of this size as a short circuit would probably weld said gonads to the carbon

 

4. Electric devices are outlawed on dinghies.

 

Other than that cracking idea.wink.gif

 

Steven:

 

You have missed the point entirely. You saw one of Doug's Rube Goldberg complexity extravaganzas, and I was trying to get you to see a tiny mechanical part of it.

 

If you look at the sliding mechanical attachment of the battery pack to the "plank", you will see a single block at the outboard end, with a line going from a centerpoint fixed attachment on the boat around the block, and then attaching to the seat pan (battery pack in this toy). If the seat pan slides on rails on top of the plank, this will cause the seat to be pulled progressively outward as the plank is extended normally - by hand and and then with your legs.

 

Completing the picture, add the same line and block on the other side and you have a system that will automatically center the seat as the plank is centered, and move the seat outboard as the plank is moved is either direction. Pretty simple and functional actually. There is no bungee cord necessary, and no tension or elastic loading incurred in seat location at any point, so a lot of the problematic issues talked about earlier are not in play.

 

If you would like a line diagram, I'm sure one could be done. Like most of Doug's bizarre schemes, there is a little part of it that shows promise.

 

I went and got Doug snarky mad at me for posting a link to his "property" for you. I got a pissy PM from him because of this, even though I credited him.

 

--

Bill

 

Firstly let make that the one and only DL quote or reference in this thread we have enough people doing great things in this class/thread (note doing not talking as DL did over and over) end of that please.....

 

I just don't see a great advantage in the system I see one main issue, your target zone to place your but is the sliding pan whereas the conventional plank you have the full surface area to aim for. I know I dont hit the same small area of the plank each time I tack or gybe and when things go a little or a lot pear shaped having to be particular about where to aim for I think isnt the way to go. Time will tell and each to their own, Im sticking with what works and what works well... I have no need to reinvent this "wheel". It is an interesting system but not one I see myself employing.....

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Right.........thanks for the input. No, not a fan of old Doug myself franklyunsure.gif

 

I see a number of problems with this.

 

1. No chance of getting my lardy arse on the version shown in the photo without significant weight and height loss.

 

2. A scaled up version of this would require presummably a small to medium sized car battery - the prospect if this dangling between the rails is simply terrifying and would bring the tears to your eyes if it caught you in the gonads which is a distinct possibility I would suggest.

 

3. Electric devices not a good idea on a boat of this size as a short circuit would probably weld said gonads to the carbon

 

4. Electric devices are outlawed on dinghies.

 

Other than that cracking idea.wink.gif

 

Steven:

 

You have missed the point entirely. You saw one of Doug's Rube Goldberg complexity extravaganzas, and I was trying to get you to see a tiny mechanical part of it.

 

If you look at the sliding mechanical attachment of the battery pack to the "plank", you will see a single block at the outboard end, with a line going from a centerpoint fixed attachment on the boat around the block, and then attaching to the seat pan (battery pack in this toy). If the seat pan slides on rails on top of the plank, this will cause the seat to be pulled progressively outward as the plank is extended normally - by hand and and then with your legs.

 

Completing the picture, add the same line and block on the other side and you have a system that will automatically center the seat as the plank is centered, and move the seat outboard as the plank is moved is either direction. Pretty simple and functional actually. There is no bungee cord necessary, and no tension or elastic loading incurred in seat location at any point, so a lot of the problematic issues talked about earlier are not in play.

 

If you would like a line diagram, I'm sure one could be done. Like most of Doug's bizarre schemes, there is a little part of it that shows promise.

 

I went and got Doug snarky mad at me for posting a link to his "property" for you. I got a pissy PM from him because of this, even though I credited him.

 

--

Bill

 

 

OK - fair enough.

 

I think that is unecessary and there would be too much friction. The only point of this design is for shuffling up and down the plank quickly which is an issue when you are heavier than the norm and sail in conditions where getting in and out quickly is important. To this end the seat needs to move quickly and the self centering is only needed after a tack. Have played with it over the weekend and got it to go into the centre whenever weight is removed so should be in right place when the frame is pulled over to the new windward side.

 

But hey, if it doesn't work I'll stick a top skin or trampoline on it so no big deal.

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Steve,

My now deceased uncle many years ago sailed VJs in Sydney. These used a sliding plank made of timber and a lot of crews used to wear wommen's nylon nickers outside their sailing shorts so they could slide up and down the varnished plank without friction. I took this on and used modern lycra bike pants over the wet suit. These combined with a clean top surface and the full length twin toe strap webbing made sliding up and down the IC seat easy.

I just do not see that there is a problem worthy of your magnificent contraption.

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To hit pretty much the opposite end of the curve, currently for sale in the UK is the umpteen greats grandmother of the modern ICs... I wish I had the money (which probably won't be megabucks) and more importantly the place to keep her...

 

More here...

 

Oh man! How cool is that? I hope the UK ICer's can find a way to keep that Canoe for posterity. They say that Canoe was built in 1887, one year after the Canoes in North America began competing for this trophy at Sugar Island in Ontario.

 

 

Sailing Canoes have been racing for it pretty much every year since, except for a break for WW1. Uffa Fox won it in 1933. I don't know if any Brits have managed to win it since. C'mon over and try!

post-16686-126988154623_thumb.jpg

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Steve,

My now deceased uncle many years ago sailed VJs in Sydney. These used a sliding plank made of timber and a lot of crews used to wear wommen's nylon nickers outside their sailing shorts so they could slide up and down the varnished plank without friction. I took this on and used modern lycra bike pants over the wet suit. These combined with a clean top surface and the full length twin toe strap webbing made sliding up and down the IC seat easy.

I just do not see that there is a problem worthy of your magnificent contraption.

 

I agree with Phil on this...

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To hit pretty much the opposite end of the curve, currently for sale in the UK is the umpteen greats grandmother of the modern ICs... I wish I had the money (which probably won't be megabucks) and more importantly the place to keep her...

 

More here...

 

Oh man! How cool is that? I hope the UK ICer's can find a way to keep that Canoe for posterity. They say that Canoe was built in 1887, one year after the Canoes in North America began competing for this trophy at Sugar Island in Ontario.

 

 

Sailing Canoes have been racing for it pretty much every year since, except for a break for WW1. Uffa Fox won it in 1933. I don't know if any Brits have managed to win it since. C'mon over and try!

 

 

Wow! I know of one Aussie who would love to have a crack at it, winning it is a different story. Sugar Island is a must for me one day....

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To hit pretty much the opposite end of the curve, currently for sale in the UK is the umpteen greats grandmother of the modern ICs... I wish I had the money (which probably won't be megabucks) and more importantly the place to keep her...

 

More here...

 

Oh man! How cool is that? I hope the UK ICer's can find a way to keep that Canoe for posterity. They say that Canoe was built in 1887, one year after the Canoes in North America began competing for this trophy at Sugar Island in Ontario.

 

 

Sailing Canoes have been racing for it pretty much every year since, except for a break for WW1. Uffa Fox won it in 1933. I don't know if any Brits have managed to win it since. C'mon over and try!

 

 

Wow! I know of one Aussie who would love to have a crack at it, winning it is a different story. Sugar Island is a must for me one day....

 

Yea, Sugar Island is an amazing place, warm, clear, fresh water. Race week usually sees at least some good breeze and the place is beautiful. The IC's have, through the American Canoe Association, their own island where they have raced for over a hundred years. You'll be in NA for the NA's, might as well stay on for another regatta.

 

All IC's should get to Sugar at least once in their life.

post-16686-12699183255_thumb.jpg

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To hit pretty much the opposite end of the curve, currently for sale in the UK is the umpteen greats grandmother of the modern ICs... I wish I had the money (which probably won't be megabucks) and more importantly the place to keep her...

 

More here...

 

Oh man! How cool is that? I hope the UK ICer's can find a way to keep that Canoe for posterity. They say that Canoe was built in 1887, one year after the Canoes in North America began competing for this trophy at Sugar Island in Ontario.

 

 

Sailing Canoes have been racing for it pretty much every year since, except for a break for WW1. Uffa Fox won it in 1933. I don't know if any Brits have managed to win it since. C'mon over and try!

 

 

Wow! I know of one Aussie who would love to have a crack at it, winning it is a different story. Sugar Island is a must for me one day....

 

Yea, Sugar Island is an amazing place, warm, clear, fresh water. Race week usually sees at least some good breeze and the place is beautiful. The IC's have, through the American Canoe Association, their own island where they have raced for over a hundred years. You'll be in NA for the NA's, might as well stay on for another regatta.

 

All IC's should get to Sugar at least once in their life.

 

Sailing to the boat museum in Clayton may have been one of the more memorable things I've done from sugar...pulling our boats up on their ramp to see a couple of 1630s with brass plate centerboards launching from the same ramp, like the past 100 years hadn't happened. They have some cool canoes in that museum and a lot more besides.

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To hit pretty much the opposite end of the curve, currently for sale in the UK is the umpteen greats grandmother of the modern ICs... I wish I had the money (which probably won't be megabucks) and more importantly the place to keep her...

 

More here...

 

Oh man! How cool is that? I hope the UK ICer's can find a way to keep that Canoe for posterity. They say that Canoe was built in 1887, one year after the Canoes in North America began competing for this trophy at Sugar Island in Ontario.

 

 

Sailing Canoes have been racing for it pretty much every year since, except for a break for WW1. Uffa Fox won it in 1933. I don't know if any Brits have managed to win it since. C'mon over and try!

 

 

Wow! I know of one Aussie who would love to have a crack at it, winning it is a different story. Sugar Island is a must for me one day....

 

Yea, Sugar Island is an amazing place, warm, clear, fresh water. Race week usually sees at least some good breeze and the place is beautiful. The IC's have, through the American Canoe Association, their own island where they have raced for over a hundred years. You'll be in NA for the NA's, might as well stay on for another regatta.

 

All IC's should get to Sugar at least once in their life.

 

Sugar Island is definitely one I want to do - maybe the worlds after germany (which should be in North America somewhere I reckon) should have a schedule that allows us travellers to do both regattas? B)

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I too have been thinking about doing the sugar Island regatta, not too sure how to go about it, so if we could do this the same year as a worlds perhaps that might make sense? Do we have anyone looking at the worlds venue after Germany? I know Dell was thinking of putting forward san fran but have not heard anything else since Oz. If it was a west coast regatta I am not sure it would make it easier to get the boats to sugar Island. Any suggestions?

Alistair

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Half Baked as built by Paul Miller. Lots of interesting ideas with thoughtful reasons behind them but a bit short on the finiosh details. Thus the name.

Other ICs can be had.

I can give you a choice of several without too much sweat. Not as cheap as half baked, but probably more sorted and normal.

PM me.

SHC

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Sailing to the boat museum in Clayton may have been one of the more memorable things I've done from sugar...pulling our boats up on their ramp to see a couple of 1630s with brass plate centerboards launching from the same ramp, like the past 100 years hadn't happened. They have some cool canoes in that museum and a lot more besides.

 

Cool canoes indeed. Check out the sliding seat on this baby.

post-16686-126996642295_thumb.jpg

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Sugar Island,

 

Sugar Island has often served as a post worlds gathering place for IC sailors. I remember after the 2002 Bristol Worlds many of the West Coast/Canadian Canoers stopped off at the Island for encampment week before continuing on their way back home. Canoes started sailing at Sugar in the late 19th century and, as Chris mentioned, they have been sailed there pretty much ever since. There is a saying that every North American canoer worth his salt has his name somewhere on one of those trophies. Some of my favorite childhood memories are from Sugar. And, based on more recent experience, I have to say that it is absolutely one the best places I have ever sailed. The water is beautiful, the breeze is consistent and steady, and the launching situation is probably one of the best in the entire world.

 

Many people not from this country have expressed interest in coming to Sugar over the years and I am all for it. Obviously the best way to go about it would be to make a stop at Sugar after a North American Worlds.

 

For Europeans I can see two sensible approaches: 1) After the worlds reserve a spot on a trailer heading back east, make a stop at sugar, and then save on container costs by shipping the boat from the right coast instead of the left. Though this only ends up being less expensive if enough people commit to fill the container. 2) Simply catch a ride back east, make a stop at Sugar, and arrange the charter of an American boat.

 

For Aussies I feel that only option 2 makes financial sense. I haven't thought of any other ideas but I keep thinking and I'll let people know if I come up with something.

 

That being said in my opinion spending a week on that island is worth spending a buck or two. Anyone with the means and the motivation should try to get to Sugar at least once in their life. That island really is awfully special. The event this year runs from July 25th-August 1st. Contact John Kells for further information.

 

Best,

 

Willy

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Sailing to the boat museum in Clayton may have been one of the more memorable things I've done from sugar...pulling our boats up on their ramp to see a couple of 1630s with brass plate centerboards launching from the same ramp, like the past 100 years hadn't happened. They have some cool canoes in that museum and a lot more besides.

 

Cool canoes indeed. Check out the sliding seat on this baby.

 

Is there any problems with Hopeless Security (whoops I mean Homeland) / US Customs sailing across? You are leaving a Canadian departure at Sugar Island to a US destination. I've always wondered about how things were handled around there since the whole river there is a mishmash of boats going like kicked-over anthill. Do you have to phone ahead anywhere?

 

--

Bill

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Is there any problems with Hopeless Security (whoops I mean Homeland) / US Customs sailing across? You are leaving a Canadian departure at Sugar Island to a US destination. I've always wondered about how things were handled around there since the whole river there is a mishmash of boats going like kicked-over anthill. Do you have to phone ahead anywhere?

 

--

Bill

 

We get to the Island from Misty Isles Lodge. They have space to leave your car and trailer for the week and run a water taxi. Pass through customs on the road so no issues there.

 

Best,

 

Willy

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Yah I must be remembering incorrectly - Now that I think back, I'm sure we sailed to Gananoque instead.

 

 

Sailing to the boat museum in Clayton may have been one of the more memorable things I've done from sugar...pulling our boats up on their ramp to see a couple of 1630s with brass plate centerboards launching from the same ramp, like the past 100 years hadn't happened. They have some cool canoes in that museum and a lot more besides.

 

Cool canoes indeed. Check out the sliding seat on this baby.

 

Is there any problems with Hopeless Security (whoops I mean Homeland) / US Customs sailing across? You are leaving a Canadian departure at Sugar Island to a US destination. I've always wondered about how things were handled around there since the whole river there is a mishmash of boats going like kicked-over anthill. Do you have to phone ahead anywhere?

 

--

Bill

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I don't know what the protocol is like now. But in the past we didn't have to pay attention to it.

We sailed from Sugar to Clayton, landed walked around talked to people and sailed home at the end of the day.

People who were more thoughtful, and who were doing a longer term visit had an idea where the customs offices were and did declare their entry. I recall Jared Wells saying that he sailed from his home in Alexandria Bay to Gananoque, tipped his boat over, swam into the customs, declared, jumped into the water, swam out to his boat and continued to Sugar Island.

 

I am pretty sure that when we sailed to Clayton I didn't even have a wallet with me, so it would have been pretty tough to do anything requiring IDs etc. I think it is still possible to be this casual, but I don't think you would ever get an official opinion that this is the case.

 

SHC

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I had a similar issue back in the 90's when I was sailing I-14's out of Toronto. We were doing a regatta up the St Lawrence Seaway somewhere and I was living in Canada on an Australian passport. We were clearly going to be sailing a large part of the reaches in US waters and at the time they were quite strict on non-Canadians crossing the border. When I brought this issue up with the race committee they chatted for a while and then said, with a big grin, "If you capsize or break something, swim to the Canadian side" :P Good times...

 

Jethrow

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I don't know what the protocol is like now. But in the past we didn't have to pay attention to it.

We sailed from Sugar to Clayton, landed walked around talked to people and sailed home at the end of the day.

People who were more thoughtful, and who were doing a longer term visit had an idea where the customs offices were and did declare their entry. I recall Jared Wells saying that he sailed from his home in Alexandria Bay to Gananoque, tipped his boat over, swam into the customs, declared, jumped into the water, swam out to his boat and continued to Sugar Island.

 

I am pretty sure that when we sailed to Clayton I didn't even have a wallet with me, so it would have been pretty tough to do anything requiring IDs etc. I think it is still possible to be this casual, but I don't think you would ever get an official opinion that this is the case.

 

SHC

 

I for one would be glad to see common sense continue to prevail in a world gone mad. There is no fundamental need for idiotic border security between Canada and the US - it's like setting up a Berlin Wall between your kitchen and dining room. We are basically one family, and the borders create more trouble than they are worth.

 

I was hoping for Steve's answer, but afraid Dick Cheney disease had infected folks. Paranoia they destroy ya. The Kinks had it right.

 

I'm going to try again to get out to Sugar Island in August this year. Made it to Gan last year! Maybe I'll break some laws and sail to Clayton.

 

--

Bill

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Carbon fibre on ply hull bottom - on an IC.

 

Consider a completely flat bottomed IC hull with appropriate rocker and a very sharp entry bow - hull made from ply. Aware that people apply the magic black stuff to stiffen critical areas. Would one apply the C/F on the inside of such a hull - or on the outside? Does it matter? Any thoughts?

 

JT HI

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A completly flat ply bottom presents a structual and stiffness problem. Ply gives better properties if its curved.

Skinning inside makes it easier to finish smooth outside and relies on the fibre to take tension loads and the ply to take compression loads which it is slightly better at.

Carbon skins are not optimal because they are so much stiffer than the ply. In deflection the carbon takes most of the loads and reaches failure before the ply has bent enough to even take much load at all. Kevlar is a better material to match with stiffness of plywood, but unfortunately we do not seem to be able to buy appropriate weight kevlar cloth anymore.

I have skinned 2mm ply moth decks inside with 75gsm kevlar and never cracked one. When I built the Holllow Log from 3mm Ocumme I could only get heavy kevlar so used mostly 200gsm carbon inside the hull and some heavier kevlar under the deck. After 4 years its not cracked. In all cases I use frequent foam bulkheads to distribute loads between deck and hull, see IC blog below.

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JT HI

Here are some photos of a design I did that is essentially a flat bottomed canoe that has been rolled up a bit.

The topsides and bottom are taped together at an expanded angle and then the bow and stern closed and the beams pulled in. This gives the bottom a bit of arch which stiffens things significantly.

Just like Phil says.

 

Some fiber on the plywood does seem to help quite a bit. I put 70 s/m^2 ( 1.7 oz/yd^2) Kevlar on the inside of most of the harder working 3mm plywood I use and it seems to add more durability than you would expect. $ oz or lighter glass on the outside also makes things tougher. Carbon is great for the seams and so forth, but does not seem to do enough to stiffen 3mm plywood all by itself. If you have to add frames etc ( often in the form of foam bulkheads, it seems that the Kevlar is more than enough.

Hollow Threat

post-738-127056247021_thumb.jpg

General view

post-738-127056240483_thumb.jpg

Bow view

post-738-127056242209_thumb.jpg

Stern view

 

I have only built this design in 1/4 scale to prove that it works and for Bill to play with in the pool.

I have it on CAD so if you want, I can send you the DXF file and you can take it from there.

Send a PM if interested.

SHC

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Ditto to what Steve and Phil said above. I used Carbon in the inner skin of the hull and kevlar for the inner deck, mainly because I had the appropriate kevlar in the garage.

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Hi Folks,

I’m currently fitting a compression strut vang or gnav to my IC. Stainless gooseneck fitting onto the carbon mast tube.

Question 1 – do I need special pop-rivets? I was going to use standard Monel rivets but notice that a lot of the mail-order Chandlers in the UK are selling "pops" especially for Carbon masts. What makes them so expensive and different and are they needed?

Q.2 – Is an anti-corrosion barrier paste required?

Q.3 – Anyone tried an off-cut from of a chunky carbon/Kevlar carbon tiller extension tube for the strut, will it be strong enough?

All help and suggestions welcome.

 

Ian McPherson

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Ian,

Q1. I dislike the idea of rivetting to carbon tube in principle. Drilling holes cuts fibre and rivetting adds stresses in diferent directions, as well as crushing the laminate.

Glueing fittings on is much better, especially if they are nice neat , light carbon. Unfortunatley glueing on shiney stainless or greasy nylon is not easy. All the carbon spar failures I see are awhere they have had fittings rivetted on. I would guess the most carbon consience and carbon experienced class in the world would be the moths and you would unlikely find a single pop rivet aoungst them. Try a couple of vertical carbon plates bonded on the top of the boom spaced to take the compression tube, and a simple pin through the three, all sounds simple. Add a bit of extra laminate under the plates to spread the downward loads.

Q2. I do not think so as the carbon will not corrode like aluminium. But do not attach aluminium fittings as they will corrode very quickly with or without paste.

Q3. Depends on its length and how agressive you use the vang. Maybe some other canoe people have experience with similar geometry.

Phil S

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Hi Folks,

I’m currently fitting a compression strut vang or gnav to my IC. Stainless gooseneck fitting onto the carbon mast tube.

Question 1 – do I need special pop-rivets? I was going to use standard Monel rivets but notice that a lot of the mail-order Chandlers in the UK are selling "pops" especially for Carbon masts. What makes them so expensive and different and are they needed?

Q.2 – Is an anti-corrosion barrier paste required?

Q.3 – Anyone tried an off-cut from of a chunky carbon/Kevlar carbon tiller extension tube for the strut, will it be strong enough?

All help and suggestions welcome.

 

Ian McPherson

 

Ian I've had gnavs on my last 2 IC's (and I won't use them again unless I have centreboard clearance issues, but thats another story) - I've always put a polyurethane mix between the alloy and the carbon and used monel rivets.

 

However, I'm looking around at a new mast at the moment and have seen that several spar makes now make carbon goosenecks (http://www.c-tech.co.nz/shop/Class+Products/International+Canoe/IC+carbon+goose-neck+fitting.html, and CST-568 http://www.cstcomposites.com/dinghy_accessories.htm) which would be much better on the mast than the alloy rivet on fittings.

 

The strut needs to be pretty stiff, I'd suggest just buying a small piece of HM Carbon from a supplier and using it rather than tiller extensions.

 

Have fun

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Only when there is no other choice.

 

Mechanical fasteners in carbon are always problematic.

Most spar building and hardware is based on metal fabrication protocol and is gradually being revised for composites, but it takes time. So off the shelf stuff "works" but in many ways isn't the right answer.

Most people who are concerned about doing things like this the "best way" add patches of 50-100% of wall thickness where parts will be mechanically fastened.

SHC

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Only when there is no other choice.

 

Mechanical fasteners in carbon are always problematic.

Most spar building and hardware is based on metal fabrication protocol and is gradually being revised for composites, but it takes time. So off the shelf stuff "works" but in many ways isn't the right answer.

Most people who are concerned about doing things like this the "best way" add patches of 50-100% of wall thickness where parts will be mechanically fastened.

SHC

 

Seems like a carbon gooseneck would be pretty easy to compression mold - like an A-cat but beefier.

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Thanks gents one and all.

I guess I was being a bit lazy, I had a old Riley stainless gooseneck lying around and I thought I'd save some time by using that.

One carbon job in the first stage of build as I type. Boom end of the gnav already layed up.

 

Happy sailing.

 

Ian McP

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Thanks gents one and all.

I guess I was being a bit lazy, I had a old Riley stainless gooseneck lying around and I thought I'd save some time by using that.

One carbon job in the first stage of build as I type. Boom end of the gnav already layed up.

 

Happy sailing.

 

Ian McP

 

The aluminum rivets aren't strong enough and they corrode like crazy.

 

Masts always seem to break where the rivet holes are.

 

It is pretty easy to mold up something on the mast; I'll see if I can dig up some photos.

post-7499-127100747117_thumb.jpg

post-7499-127100748613_thumb.jpg

post-7499-127100750437_thumb.jpg

post-7499-127100751515_thumb.jpg

 

KW

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ATG,

 

NICE WORK!

 

I was going to post a photo of the composite gooseneck that replaced the original cast aluminum mast mount on Mayhem, but your example is much better.

 

JK

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ATG,

 

NICE WORK!

 

I was going to post a photo of the composite gooseneck that replaced the original cast aluminum mast mount on Mayhem, but your example is much better.

 

JK

 

Thanks JK. Hope all is well there.

 

I cheated - the photos are actually a moth spreader/prodder fitting. But you could do the same for a canoe gooseneck and just wrap it on with tow.

 

Looking forward to joining you guys again at some point whenever I can find my "back to the future" mode.

 

Karl

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ATG,

 

NICE WORK!

 

I was going to post a photo of the composite gooseneck that replaced the original cast aluminum mast mount on Mayhem, but your example is much better.

 

JK

 

Thanks JK. Hope all is well there.

 

I cheated - the photos are actually a moth spreader/prodder fitting. But you could do the same for a canoe gooseneck and just wrap it on with tow.

 

Looking forward to joining you guys again at some point whenever I can find my "back to the future" mode.

 

Karl

 

 

It would be great to have you back at some point sooner than later.... new rules boats are just awesome boats you would love them.

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ATG,

 

NICE WORK!

 

I was going to post a photo of the composite gooseneck that replaced the original cast aluminum mast mount on Mayhem, but your example is much better.

 

JK

 

Thanks JK. Hope all is well there.

 

I cheated - the photos are actually a moth spreader/prodder fitting. But you could do the same for a canoe gooseneck and just wrap it on with tow.

 

Looking forward to joining you guys again at some point whenever I can find my "back to the future" mode.

 

Karl

 

 

It would be great to have you back at some point sooner than later.... new rules boats are just awesome boats you would love them.

 

No dinero at the moment and I have only sailed the last one I built three times, so hard to justify just now as we are in the midst of freethinking moth foil control systems. Maybe when Bill comes with a hull shape that will entice me. Or I'll work something out with Chris.

 

K

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Yup.

med_gallery_8603_259_1875006.jpg

 

 

Looks great, more pics please :)

 

Watch this space, insurance is coming through so I will be starting my new ride very soon...

 

 

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how many kg does a Riley gooseneck weigh ? ... nearly 1/ 3 of total boom weight i would guess ;)

 

I've just looked a Riley's web site. WOW, I see what you mean, some serious stainless fabrication going on there :blink:

I was planning on using a 29er type fitting (just the satinless band and toggle) - weight 90gms/3.25ozs) and I should have added it was for my Nethercott which also has .... an ali boom. :o

 

Anyways, no worries, the community spoke I listened and a carbon fitting is almost finished. :)

 

Ian McP

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Riley fitting can be held in place with hose clamps.

 

A fairly elegant hole free solution

SHC

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elegant?

 

about as elegant as a exhaust pipe 'U' bolt

 

I'm thinkin a very practical hole free solution !

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Riley fitting can be held in place with hose clamps.

 

A fairly elegant hole free solution

SHC

 

Now that's one to keep in the back of the mind.

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elegant?

 

about as elegant as a exhaust pipe 'U' bolt

 

I'm thinkin a very practical hole free solution !

 

No goo, easily removable with a screwdriver, gets you sailing instantly. Pretty elegant. Gui is holding his moth wingbars on with super clamps. I have a number of cleats held on my racks with hose clamps also; when you aren't sure what the final configuration is and you want to try something out for awhile, the hose clamp is very nice.

 

Be sure to use the marine ones as the slotted version will do a cheese grater on your tube as they cinch up.

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Yup.

med_gallery_8603_259_1875006.jpg

Hey, that's my boat !

oh wait, mine is yellow, and in the shop.

that is a Maas canoe I believe. I wonder how E C is doing with his?

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Killer,

Says it goes in the shop on Sat.

 

thanks Del, I'll have to send a little homecoming piece to try and help out.

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The glacial speed of my build has started to ramp up a bit now that she's back home. Now have foredeck on so she's starting to look like a canoe.

 

Cheers

post-18083-127163198732_thumb.jpg

post-18083-127163200283_thumb.jpg

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The glacial speed of my build has started to ramp up a bit now that she's back home. Now have foredeck on so she's starting to look like a canoe.

 

Cheers

 

wow! looking good!

I'm only building a trailer, although may possibly be the World's Best Canoe Trailer, but it is progressing at an embarrassingly slow pace. probably slower than you!

it is based on the Russian Doll Concept. I intend to win the Trailer Building Worlds with it, then make a fortune selling the plans, retiring with multiple suggestible babes.

cheers, Kenny

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The glacial speed of my build has started to ramp up a bit now that she's back home. Now have foredeck on so she's starting to look like a canoe.

 

Cheers

 

I probably haven't been paying attention. What design is that? Looks like a Flatpack?

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The glacial speed of my build has started to ramp up a bit now that she's back home. Now have foredeck on so she's starting to look like a canoe.

 

Cheers

 

I probably haven't been paying attention. What design is that? Looks like a Flatpack?

Hey Nutter

It's actually based on the lines from lust puppet squashed and flattened out to fit the new rules. I built a male mould and stitch & glued her together. The theory is ply and glass and carbon where it counts. Time will tell or it may blow apart spectacularly - but I'm having fun putting her together!

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Pardo,

Good to see progress again.

I would like to see a diagonal BH between the mast step and the chainplates. Lots of tension between keel and CP, lots of compression between mast step and CP. Good place for your carbon contribution. Any tension in the skin in that area will result in distortion at minimum.

Phil S

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IC Midwinters Results:

 

Only just realized that I never posted these.

 

1st Oliver Moore - Uncle Walter

2nd John Kells - Mayhem

3rd Willy Clark - Kaito

4th David Clark - Wonk

5th Steve Clark - Alice

6th Bill Beaver - Lust Puppet

7th Don Brennan - PITA

8th Lee Creekmore - Prospector

 

Hudson Harr was also around the race course sailing both his new Canoe "Sock Puppet" and a new Bladerider.

 

I do not have the race by race result as they were blown away in the winds of day 3 (Seriously it blew so hard John couldn't get out of his tent for fear of it blowing away along with all of his belongings).

 

What I can tell you is John was pretty much in charge of day 1 with Oliver stealing the last race (race 4) from him. In day 2 I was actually able to get into the mix and disrupt what at certain times over the last few seasons has seemed like a John vs Oliver match race. I somehow was in John's way more often than Oliver's and Ollie was able to skate away with a two point win. The forever jovial canoe class was also quick to point out that me winning the last race of day 2 broke a four year winless streak involving many broken toes and many inventive curse words. As previously stated day 3 was blown out so Oliver's lead stood.

 

We were pleased to welcome Don Brennan and Lee Creekmore, the founding members of a fast growing Gulf Coast fleet. In an effort to support the movement the class announced that next years midwinters will be held in Mobile Bay Alabama, an excellent canoe venue.

 

Lastly brother David committed one of the classic blunders. Having borrowed Bill's moth to go and muck around after racing had concluded, Dave's first words after coming off the water were "Bill I'm really sorry." There was actually nothing wrong with the boat but all within earshot flinched violently. For all future boat borrowers, never begin a sentence with "I'm sorry" unless there really is something to be sorry about.

 

We had a very nice two days of sailing. Sarasota Sailing Squadron really is a great venue and the people who put on the event every year once again did a good job. It'll be a shame to miss it next year but it can't be helped.

 

Best,

 

Willy

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Pardo,

Good to see progress again.

I would like to see a diagonal BH between the mast step and the chainplates. Lots of tension between keel and CP, lots of compression between mast step and CP. Good place for your carbon contribution. Any tension in the skin in that area will result in distortion at minimum.

Phil S

Cheers Phil

 

Definitely. Am thinking of wrapping some unis around a 19mmd4s cedar for that particular job instead of a BH. There will be a BH between the CPs as well but I reckon overkill in this one area will be a good investment.

 

Pardo

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Hi

Got a question for Chris, how did the carbon jib track go? Can see it on the attached photo

Thanks

Alistairpost-20243-127202553353_thumb.jpg

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Hey Alistair,

 

It does the job. The pictures show the curve at the outboard ends that the traveler needs to make to encourage the car to go all the way out. You can also see the uhmw molds that I squish the carbon tow into.

 

The only downside that I see to these things is that you are limited in how much you can adjust the car athwartships. That's okay for me since I don't adjust it anyway.

 

 

post-16686-127204825793_thumb.jpgpost-16686-127204831003_thumb.jpg

Hi

Got a question for Chris, how did the carbon jib track go? Can see it on the attached photo

Thanks

Alistairpost-20243-127202553353_thumb.jpg

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When considering converting the Log to sloop I contemplated on how to make such a track.

In place of Chris' mold I planned pulling wetted tows into a 10mm ID polyethylene pipe which could then be bent to the desired shape, and carved off after curing of the resin. (or maybe just left on). With planning the travelling block for the jib sheet could be threaded on and the track end plates molded with the same tows and cure.

I had contemplated a full downward arc at constant radius from the forestay but Chris' gentle W curve provides the correct arc in the load areas plus space for a conventional foredeck, clever again Chris.

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OK, so all this carbon costs money. I threw the old girl (USA 168 "Rising Sun") in the water the other day and she sailed sweetly...and I hate to give her up... but she's up for sale, for a song, and she works nicely. But only because I can't do this with her:

med_gallery_8603_259_646171.jpg

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The Magic Science of Centre of Effort and Centre of Lateral Resistance.

 

Maybe it is not a magic science but it sure helps to get it correct. With the CE located of course forward of the CLR, some texts suggest a space between the two of 8 to 10 percent of waterline length is the go -

 

The relation ship between CE and CLR is all important - so what thoughts are there concerning this vital relationship.

 

Are there any IC numbers, facts or examples to be shared?

 

JT HI

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The text book "lead" of 8-10% is based on boats which heal over. As the CoE is 1/3 up the rig it ends up out to leeward, and the CLR ends up out to windward as its some distance down the keel. So traditional lead(the heavy stuff) ballasted boats have a "lead" where the rig is forward, so that the force vectors align when healed.

 

Moths heal to windward and its now common for fin cases to be maybe up to a foot further forward than they were 10 years ago, the "lead" is negative because relative to balasted boats the reverse applies.

 

For canoes and other dinghies which sail best dead upright there should be no "lead", except maybe just a touch of CoG aft of the CLR to allow for slight easing of the main leach when up range, so as not to generate lee helm. A little weather helm in the lighter winds is acceptible.

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To my mind the whole lee/weather helm business is largely irrelevant on boats with widely separated rudders and boards. On an old leadmine with the rudder attached to the keel then yes, move the rig forward/back you get lee helm and weather helm where the rudder needs to be offset to keep the boat on track, which is a bad thing. But as soon as you have two widely separated foils of decent shape then moving the rig forward and back doesn't (until extremes) require you to offset the steering to stay in a straight line, all it does is to change the balance of load between centreboard and rudder. And most of what people mistake for weather helm is actually just the sideload on the rudder pulling back... Then of course most modern hulls are very asymmetric fore and aft and thus are very heel sensitive so two degrees of heel steers the boat more than pulling the mast a foot further back or forward at the tip... Doesn't mean board position, mast rake etc aren't vital tuning parameters, just means its nothing to do with weather/lee helm! So no, I don't believe the raltionship between CE/CLR is all important because the CLR is just to do with the distribution of side load between board and rudder and probably everything between both foils equally loaded to rudder running without sideload is equally valid...

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The Magic Science of Centre of Effort and Centre of Lateral Resistance.

 

Maybe it is not a magic science but it sure helps to get it correct. With the CE located of course forward of the CLR, some texts suggest a space between the two of 8 to 10 percent of waterline length is the go -

 

The relation ship between CE and CLR is all important - so what thoughts are there concerning this vital relationship.

 

Are there any IC numbers, facts or examples to be shared?

 

JT HI

 

Best bet is a larger trunk that will allow you to move the board around (in a cassette) fore and aft so you can see what you like. At the 2005 Worlds, Anders was moving his around quite a lot - further aft if I recall correctly. When Bill and Ted both sailed NoGo55s, Bill ran his way back, and Ted was way at the front of the trunk, which was something like 18" long. It makes a large difference in how much load the rudder foil takes. But how much the rudder foil should take probably depends upon your rudder.

 

K

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Best bet is a larger trunk that will allow you to move the board around (in a cassette) fore and aft so you can see what you like. At the 2005 Worlds, Anders was moving his around quite a lot - further aft if I recall correctly. When Bill and Ted both sailed NoGo55s, Bill ran his way back, and Ted was way at the front of the trunk, which was something like 18" long. It makes a large difference in how much load the rudder foil takes. But how much the rudder foil should take probably depends upon your rudder.

 

K

 

This is something I wish I had done when I was building "Kaito." Over the past couple of seasons I feel I have done a pretty good job of ironing out all the errors I made when I built USA 241 back in the Spring/Summer of 2007. However, there is still one thing I think I got wrong, the dagger board placement. The very odd thing about Kaito is that when the skipper loses control of the tiller, or falls out of the boat, or some other catastrophe occurs, the boat does not automatically head up like most do. Kaito instead bears away at a rather frightening speed. I have come to the conclusion that this happens because I put the dagger board trunk too far aft.

 

One thing that has begun to alleviate this issue was switching to a gybing board. I finally got the gybing board really working at midwinters and not only did the boat not bear away nearly as much, I felt like there was a significant increase in its' performance. However, that may have been due more to me not sailing like an idiot than any change in the boat.

 

Best,

 

Willy

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Following the tradition of keeping this on the first page, here is a photo taken by a friend of ours. It's me finishing the last race of our season (a few months ago now). I really like it, it's pretty laid back and a nice sunny day, pretty much what sailing is all about.

 

post-26260-127630251917_thumb.jpg

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Nice photo Jethrow! How's the Magic Carpet Ride been going? I'm guessing that photo was after the round the island race up at BYRA.

 

Just out of curiosity, how do you find tacking and gybing with your mainsheet setup?

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Yes, this was the Lion Island Marathon day. Not my best result but heaps of fun. The 7 mile (?) light air square run really hurt.

 

I don't know if you can see it in the photo but the mainsheet is on a bridle in the stern and travels forward along the boom to a ratchet just behind the gooseneck. I actually like it like this as it's easy to remember "Front hand power, Back hand steer" when it gets really hairy:lol:. It's only a 2:1 sheet so not a lot to pull in for gybing. I'm not sure but I think not having a jib is more of a deal when gybing than the mainsheet system.

 

How's the log going? I'm going to have to pull my finger out this summer and come to some regattas.

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The Log's been sitting quite lonely in my parent's shed of late - I have a few weeks off coming up and I plan to go out for a blast at least once during that period, and I may attend to it's TLC needs during that period also. The navy life kinda destroyed my sailing plans this summer, otherwise I would have probably been at the Lion Island Marathon to keep you company - as an ex-spiral sailor I know BYRA reasonably well.

 

I plan to have it out a fair bit come August down in Melbourne (I have a 6 month posting down there starting July), but adding to that I've just bought yet another moth for Belmont, so there's a chance it might just get used for cross-training or something similar.

 

With the mainsheet setup, you don't find it a bit awkward to throw the plank with the tiller in front of you? I'm only asking because I'm contemplating potential experiments to try on the Log.

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Hi Jon

 

When going through the tack I follow the tiller extension through the boat then pass it behind me as I spin to toss the seat. The extension can pass under the boom and just behind the mast & mainsheet. I tack and gybe facing forward crouched behind the carriage so my tiller hand is behind me and I toss the seat with my front mainsheet hand.

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Fair enough, thought that's how you did it. On the log, I've got mid-boom sheeting as per a moth so I still have to flick the extension behind the boom. That has led to me swimming on gybes a couple of times as it takes a bit of getting used to - on a moth it's easier because you at least have something to land on on the other side... I'll keep it in mind, but I'm not sure the slightly slimmer aft end on the log would work with the end-boom setup.

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Jon,

To document my gybing technique for the Hollow Log:

1. Pass extension behind your back and hold it with the front hand.

2. Move in while pulling extension for bear away,

3. Face forward and with old back hand throw seat across, without letting go the mainsheet, and get you back side onto the seat a moment before the boom swings over and the sail sets. A bit like a foiling moth gybe where you go under the boom while its still on the old side of the boat.

4. Now you already have the tiller in your new aft hand and you do not have to swap hands at the critical momment. Once you get to know how much mainsheet to let out on the new gybe you are off at full pace straight away. If not the seat dips to windward or there is a bit of a wobble to leeward.

 

It took some practice but after a while it becomes most natural.

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I worked out how to gybe it eventually phil, but it in a blow it is still a bit hairy and I still find it is a long way to reach forward to grab the blocks to throw the boom. Not going to change anything yet, just thinking of potential improvements/tweaks to suit my style.

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Following the tradition of keeping this on the first page, here is a photo taken by a friend of ours. It's me finishing the last race of our season (a few months ago now). I really like it, it's pretty laid back and a nice sunny day, pretty much what sailing is all about.

 

post-26260-127630251917_thumb.jpg

 

post-23256-127651693733_thumb.jpg

 

thats a picture of me on the other side of the world - but shows the same spirit.

 

Roger

IC GER 68 + 78

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Following the tradition of keeping this on the first page, here is a photo taken by a friend of ours. It's me finishing the last race of our season (a few months ago now). I really like it, it's pretty laid back and a nice sunny day, pretty much what sailing is all about.

 

post-26260-127630251917_thumb.jpg

 

post-23256-127651693733_thumb.jpg

 

thats a picture of me on the other side of the world - but shows the same spirit.

 

Roger

IC GER 68 + 78

 

hey, the Richmond NA's were great! great to meet some IC Brothers I've not met and sail in Sun,Wind and waves!

Hayden, I'm trying to contact you and your better half. an email for me is agtfree1@hotmail.com

cheers Kenny

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David is building a new IC. The shop is occupied with C-Cat stuff right now so he's slowly building parts. Construction will begin in earnest when the C-Class thing is done.

 

Best,

 

Willy

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David is building a new IC. The shop is occupied with C-Cat stuff right now so he's slowly building parts. Construction will begin in earnest when the C-Class thing is done.

 

Best,

 

Willy

 

That's good news Willy, but not nearly enough information. Like what's the design? Construction method? Any unusual features?

 

David's port tack start in the last race of the NA's was a bold and glorious thing. Imagine how dangerous he'll be in a new boat.

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I have a couple of IC questions, I know the class rule states that sail area cant exceed 10sqm, what is the average jib/main split? (wondering on the average main sail area really). And what loft is making the best IC sails stateside? Thanks.

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