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Hi Guy's,

 

I have a question with respect to the foils the canoes use so would appreciate any help.

 

Centre Board, I have seen that some boards taper aft (Straight trailing edge) as you get towards the bottom & some taper forward (Straight leading edge), is there any benefit form one way or the other in Canoes? (I was looking at using an A Cat profile)

 

With the rudders, I see that they are stern hung on the newer boats, is this mostly due to the benefit of having the tiller further aft for manoeuvres or is the advantage of not having a surface penetrating foil not as great compared to the Nethercotts?

Thanks

 

Geoff

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I think with the rudder, getting your body further back in the bus is the major factor as bows get narrower, centreboard question is well above my iq, have used both and both work.

 

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Ah the old foil debate.... I have a straight leading edge on the daggerboard but no difference as far as I can tell with having a straight trailing edge... section is important, but not sure whats best, mine's a very conservative NACA 0010. cord is 220mm a bit wider than some but I've chopped 100mm (I think) off the bottom, 200mm cord seems good and those are run full depth. Rudder is transom hung, the theory with the cassette rudders was that the boat acted as an endplate but the pins always bent and it all ended up being heavier and more difficult to build, also as bret says we all sail much further back in the boats now. My rudder section is NACA0012, cord I think is 120mm but I would have to check that and it sticks some 600mm below the line of the bottom of the boat.

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Is converting a Nethercott to a transom rudder a worthwhile project? Beach launch is a bit of a faff, wading out worrying about losing both the rudder and the dagger. Seems a transom rudder casette could be a convenience upgrade. 

 

 

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The key trick is to put the rudder into the tru;k, but don’t push it down. This makes things pretty easy. You can actually steer a bit, and the whole mess will pop out if you ground or hit anything. Over the years I have found this as easy as anything else.

SHC

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5 hours ago, Steve Clark said:

The key trick is to put the rudder into the tru;k, but don’t push it down. This makes things pretty easy. You can actually steer a bit, and the whole mess will pop out if you ground or hit anything. Over the years I have found this as easy as anything else.

SHC

Thanks, will give that a try.

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ÏWife was watching beachfront bargain hunt, they were looking at houses on Dauphin Island and this boat was in it.

 

20180819_200506.jpg

 

Any ideas?

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3 hours ago, Dex Sawash said:

ÏWife was watching beachfront bargain hunt, they were looking at houses on Dauphin Island and this boat was in it.

 

20180819_200506.jpg

 

Any ideas?

Looks like a Waszp to me

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16 minutes ago, FishAintBiting said:

Blind??

Never seen a DC nor an IC?

Big hit to the head?

Some of each. 

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Another advantage of the trunk rudder is that you don't have to go nearly so far aft to put it in. If you are a "more substantial" sailor then the extra foot or so means the stern sinks a fair amount under you, which in turn means you don't need to be in such deep water to put it in or take it out.  Alternatively, if you put the rudder on before climbing on the boat, not having to go so far back makes it easier to keep the bow into the wind.

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On ‎8‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 1:17 PM, Harnser said:

Ah the old foil debate.... I have a straight leading edge on the daggerboard but no difference as far as I can tell with having a straight trailing edge... section is important, but not sure whats best, mine's a very conservative NACA 0010. cord is 220mm a bit wider than some but I've chopped 100mm (I think) off the bottom, 200mm cord seems good and those are run full depth. Rudder is transom hung, the theory with the cassette rudders was that the boat acted as an endplate but the pins always bent and it all ended up being heavier and more difficult to build, also as bret says we all sail much further back in the boats now. My rudder section is NACA0012, cord I think is 120mm but I would have to check that and it sticks some 600mm below the line of the bottom of the boat.

My rudder is 130mm cord (when I actually measured the CAD). For my next set I've a mind to have the max thickness straight and curve both leading and trailing edges as it tapers, that's if it ever gets off the CAD and into real world... Been playing with some bits in the garage, first time in about 3 years, looking at making some tubes for spars. Can't get any longer than a boom until the bedroom furniture is out, oh and the multiple washing machines etc....need to get a skip!

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17 minutes ago, Harnser said:

My rudder is 130mm cord (when I actually measured the CAD). For my next set I've a mind to have the max thickness straight and curve both leading and trailing edges as it tapers, that's if it ever gets off the CAD and into real world... Been playing with some bits in the garage, first time in about 3 years, looking at making some tubes for spars. Can't get any longer than a boom until the bedroom furniture is out, oh and the multiple washing machines etc....need to get a skip!

That'll cost you now the council have put the charges up on the tips.. 60,000 less visits to the tip this year since they did that.. more dumped rubbish..

 

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On 3/11/2017 at 8:33 AM, Steve Clark said:

I have used 2.5 and 3mm rod. Swedging the ends is the tricky bit. As a rule of thumb, you can drop one size when converting from 1x19 cable. The metal area is almost the same. You get the advantage of less construction related stretch, but it is nnot as profound as if you maintain the diameter when you substitute the rod for cable. Dyeform is not as dense as rod and has less construction creep than 1x19, so I would not suggest the same size reduction formula. I maintain the same diameter and realize less stretch.

SHC

Hi Steve

When you are using rod rigging is this SS or Carbon? I am thinking of going down the carbon route for the new machete but am a bit anxious about it. My main issue is if I get flung off the boat and go through the rigging, I am to sure about the rigging holding up to this. Some contender guys went down this path a few years ago and thought is was the greatest thing since slice bread. But the word I am getting back from the c-tech guy is they have all gone back to SS rigging again as the contender has a minimum weight on the mast and the Carbon rigging was making them carry to much corrector weight.

 Do you have any thoughts on this?

 

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Sorry to butt in. 

Been used on a fair few i14s worldwide now To good effect and great reliability. I understand it’s pretty widely used in 12ft skiffs down under also. 

Basically, as long as it’s under tension you can hit it with a hammer - big wipeouts no problem to the rod, only the sailor. Terminated correctly and with correct spreader end treatments you are good for whatever you would spec same diameter of dyform at a quarter of the weight and probs better windage. If you build the rigging yourself you can come in price neutral to dyform. 

The issue comes with rigging and transporting, where you can snap it fairly easily when not under tension if snagging on stuff when rigging up. Some hide it up the mast while travelling, others put it in a circular box.

Important not to let it get too hot, abrade it, or bend it toghter than a certain radius of around 200mm. 

I have a fair bit ie over 100m each of c tech 2.5mm and 3mm in the Uk, having bought MOQ from c tech a while back If you are interested.

Dan 

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Another question to post in regards to rigging- Going through the photos some have lowers other do not. What are peoples thoughts on this?

I was told just the other day by a local sailor that the goose neck fitting can be fitted to the king post (with a bit or re-inforcing added first), I I go down this path why would I need the lowers?

I am days away from pulling the trigger and ordering a new mast So am curious to peoples ideas and opinions before I order.

Thanks for the offer Dan I am in Aus and the shipping may be killer!

I am keen for the carbon rigging, will see what the masses think here. 

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I needed to add lowers to my mast which has the goose neck on the stump as the bottom of the mast was panting in gusts. if you initially go without them have a plan where you can add them on latter.

 

 

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23 minutes ago, scottmax said:

Another question to post in regards to rigging- Going through the photos some have lowers other do not. What are peoples thoughts on this?

I was told just the other day by a local sailor that the goose neck fitting can be fitted to the king post (with a bit or re-inforcing added first), I I go down this path why would I need the lowers?

I am days away from pulling the trigger and ordering a new mast So am curious to peoples ideas and opinions before I order.

Thanks for the offer Dan I am in Aus and the shipping may be killer!

I am keen for the carbon rigging, will see what the masses think here. 

Aha cool well you may be able to sniff some out thru 12ft Guys without buying hundreds of metres. Cheers.

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Do the carbon rods get terminals at the spreaders or is there some clever fitting to create a minimum radius bend there?

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2 minutes ago, Dex Sawash said:

Do the carbon rods get terminals at the spreaders or is there some clever fitting to create a minimum radius bend there?

200mm long piece of 5mm vectran rope and heat shrink fed over the rod before ends terminated, then wetted out and rubber heat shrink over the top. Some rig tension applied whilst it dries. 

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On 4/23/2019 at 1:01 PM, scottmax said:

... goose neck fitting can be fitted to the king post (with a bit or re-inforcing added first), I I go down this path why would I need the lowers?

Depends on the spar. I think I may have been the first person to have a stump rig in the UK, and my mast was significantly reinforced up to the spreaders, tapering off to just below the hounds. It was a lighter basic tube than just about all though. I have a theory that the ideal mast would be tapered to close to the spreaders, but I never put it in action. 

 

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With a stump that has the goose neck on it then it depends on mast stiffness and set up as to if you need lowers... mine's hog stepped so needs lowers (or in the old days we would have used a strut)

How are people terminating carbon rod rigging? I've seen it done by glueing the rod into a SS swage end fitting....interested but nervous to use it...

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You can either splice an eye in vectran around a stainless eye, then laminate onto end of rod and heatshrink. 

More more recently people have been glueing into 5mm thk c plate with a slot cut in it. Works a charm!

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So is it Ok to use carbon rod on a boat where you let the shrouds off downwind and there is no easy way to stop the boom from hitting the shrouds on gybes?

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Presumably you could use vectran for the last couple of feet so the boom doesn't hit carbon rod.

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On 4/25/2019 at 5:43 PM, chrishampe said:

So is it Ok to use carbon rod on a boat where you let the shrouds off downwind and there is no easy way to stop the boom from hitting the shrouds on gybes?

This is a good question, I would be interested to hearing the answer from any skiff guys who have been using this rigging for the last few seasons. I was worried about my fat arse hitting the rigging and really never gave this a thought but the point load would be far higher from a boom through the gybe than my body weight.

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Like I say you can fall into it at pace no issue if it’s under tension.  Round boom should be no issue even if slack ish, my boom clashes slightly with lowers but a local vectran sleeve as jimc says would be belt and braces if you were worried.

But yep speak to 12ft Guys, my understanding is also that they don’t baby their boats like us European types, and have more rigs to neglect :-). 

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A 12 guy in Brisbane sells the carbon rigging, I believe he makes it up if you can give him a length. He had done some of the C plate terminals.

Carbon Chandlery is the website. He won the 12 nationals or inters last year so it's going OK.

He is a composite engineer I think and can do all you tubes inc mast as well.

 

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I have seen the ends done with vecrtran eye splice and SS thimble. (A sydney 12ft skiff) Carbon rod is slid into the vectran tail and glued with heatshrink covering. The vectran needs to be wax free for best gluing which is different to the normal chandlery supply. Not tried it myself. A lot of failures in moth class so carbon rigging is rare now. Too much impact and bending while rigging.

 

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Wife wants me to buy a pop-up camper which means I would need to sort out a cartopping method to put my Nethercott on top of the closed up camper (about 4' off the ground and much easier than putting it on my SUV roof)

Thinking maybe inverted boat with rear of seat carriage tracks on a cross bar and a tee shaped stubby "mast" to support the forward part by putting the load on the mast step.

The mast step should be strong that way, right? The ply is doubled at the deck overhang around the partner so that shouldn't have a problem with any unexpected side loads incurred, I would hope.

 

20190521-191439.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Hmmm, I don't know, if you put it on upside down all those pine needles or whatever they are might fall out! ;):D

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All jokes aside, I always had mine upright as it just seemed that everything fit in better and I could keep more systems attached.

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I agree that transporting right side up is the way to go. Prior owner of my IC sent me a picture showing the boat upright on car roof rack.

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What we 'Strayans use.

The camper trailer we have has large dampers that need no winch or ropes.

Edited by knobblyoldjimbo

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Posting this here well;
2019 IC North American's will be held September 14-15 at Savin Hill Yacht Club in Boston. Will post further details, photos, results etc. as they become available.

Also, I'm working on revamping the North American class site, specifically the boats for sale section. If anyone has a used one they'd be willing to move PM me. Furthermore if anyone has ICs in North America and is sailing them and I don't know about it, also please PM me. I do most of my communication with the class via mass email. And there may be some people I'm not reaching. Or not. Who knows.

Been sailing Bagheera out of SHYC the past two months with a buddy that I sold Red Shift to. We're having all kinds of fun.

Also to respond to another question - no mold was ever pulled off Bagheera. However there is not unwillingness to do so. Dad, Dave, and I have been chatting about it off and on. What we'd want to make it worthwhile is interest from enough people in pulling a hull out of the mold to make the mold worth it before we get it cut. Enough people in our neck of the woods have expressed interest in building themself a boat that we may need to seriously consider it. The more people who commit, the more the cost of the mold goes down, etc. If enough people lined up, Dave would maybe even maybe be willing to move the molds into his shop and crank out some pieces real fast. That's another discussion though

Best,

Willy

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Europeans recently finished. Highly photogenic venue.  There are some video reports, which I believe may only be accessible for the next week.  Those and reports linked from here:

http://www.intcanoe.org/en/2019europa.php

Lots of good high quality on the water video. I remember when I was first writing sailboat web sites I struggled for any kind of photos at all. That was I suppose 22 years ago now!

Jim C

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All the videos are available to watch Free for 7 days from when they are uploaded to www.vrsport.tv after this time you will need to subscribe to watch them. There are now videos from three days of racing and a lay day video featuring a tech talk about the evolution of the Morrison designs. The last sailing video is due to go up tomorrow and I believe there will be another video comparing the String theory, Dragonfly and Morrison designs.

This is a bit different to how vrsport used to run, But it does mean that as a class association we no longer have to pay them quite as much money to come and film our events. Of course they would be more willing to spend their own money to come and film us if we can generate them more subscribers. 

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Update on the Europa Cup Videos

 

We have been given permission from VRSport.tv to upload the videos to our own Vimeo / Facebook pages. I will begin uploading these later this week. I also have the Pwllheli worlds video to upload. Will post links here when done.

I think some of this years footage is the best footage of international canoe sailing I've seen.

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I’ve been having problems with the seat retaining system, can someone help?

current problem is on a new rules boat with a Steve Clark (US) seat. How to I retain the seat without the line jamming and where does the line go?

On my other new rules the line attaches above the seat to a bridele and connects to the seat to a saddle on the flat back side of the wedge shape. In this configuration it ALWAYS jams on the carriage or gets caught unless you are very careful when tacking and throwing the seat across.

On my Nethercott, the seat retainer connects through an eyelet on the underside of the wedge shape in the centre and this works with that carriage, but it won’t work easily with my carriage on the new rules boat with the SC symmetrical seat. There isn’t an6 clearance on this carriage, and the seat doesn’t have an eyelet in it or anywhere to attach to, I have been just ty8ng the line to the main sheet block saddle and a hole in the centre of the foot strap, but this is less than ideal and catches all the time, just like on the other boat...

Is there a better way? And can you explain it it words here?

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Use a dynemma line small enough that it doesn’t cause the seat to bind in the carriage.  I think 3 mm is what was probably there.

SHC

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Thanks Chris and Steve, I will build that sort of recess into the next carriage, and in the meantime I’ll sort something with Dyneema,  and maybe a recessing tool

I suppose it goes to the centre of the seat, an eyelet or something, the seat currently doesn’t have a hole or anything, I didn’t build it.

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On MCR I used the 3mm dyneema. It attached to the outer face of the seat, through a grommet in the carriage and out the other side to the other outer face.It was tensioned so that the seat couldn't exceed Bmax but because of triangulation it was only tight when at Bmax. While sliding it was loose enough to not interfere.

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A reinforced hole in the center of the seat works. Just make sure the edges are rounded. Some people tie a stopper knot at the right place. I use a small clam cleat.

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Tether May have been fixed to the seat by a hole in the heel cup, or two holes with a spectra loop.  Done it so many ways I don’t recall.  The hole in the seat carriage may even be off center so a single hole in the seat could be used. There isn’t a heel cup at mid span.  Another way to keep the tether from fucking up is to put a bungee take up on it.  Can be done under the carriage. Requires a bushing .

That vintage seat and carriage has plenty of clearance between the bottom of the seat and the center of the carriage.

SHC

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Had several personal IC milestones last weekend.

1. Checked in with RC before racing and didn't hit the boat.

2. Sailed through the line.

3. Finished a race.

4. Not last before rating adjustment (beat a Flying Scot and a Prindle 18 boat for boat)

 

While we're talking about seats, does my seat style have a name?

20190824-112810.jpg

 

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On 5/22/2019 at 9:27 AM, Dex Sawash said:

Wife wants me to buy a pop-up camper which means I would need to sort out a cartopping method to put my Nethercott on top of the closed up camper (about 4' off the ground and much easier than putting it on my SUV roof)

Thinking maybe inverted boat with rear of seat carriage tracks on a cross bar and a tee shaped stubby "mast" to support the forward part by putting the load on the mast step.

The mast step should be strong that way, right? The ply is doubled at the deck overhang around the partner so that shouldn't have a problem with any unexpected side loads incurred, I would hope.

 

20190521-191439.jpg

 

 

 

 

We have a camper with hinged floor, up and over. It has a steel cage that hinges to the side. Was going to put a tinnie on it.

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9 hours ago, knobblyoldjimbo said:

We have a camper with hinged floor, up and over. It has a steel cage that hinges to the side. Was going to put a tinnie on it.

Assuming there's a launching trolley/dolly/whatever you call it I would be inclined to make brackets to fasten that securely to the trailer and then have the boat right way up on that.

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If you had to call it anything, it might be “Clark mk2.”  In 1984 I changed the seat design to have a tighter radius and more vertical depth than my early seats.  The goal was to get a bit more clearance over the waves and have a stiffer seat for the same reason.

I don’t have the numbers off the top of my head, but it’s pretty close to what I still use.  The San Francisco fleet made a mold for seats with still a bit more curvature.  The English still use pretty flat seats.

I also designed the heavy aluminum seat carriages that could be adjusted fore and aft, not necessarily on the fly, but as a general tuning thing.  The class minimum weight was pretty easy to hit, so making the carriage bomb proof was a good way to concentrate weight right where you want it.  I thought it was a great idea and ordered six of them. Then the bill came and then  holy fuck we’re not doing that again.

SHC

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Mike and me sneaking in a quick sail yesterday in advance of racing this weekend. The days getting shorter is a real bitch, but it is what it is.

Too much rake on 258 right?

IC SHYC 2.jpg

IC SHYC.jpg

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Mike wins the NAs - the first guy to ever successfully defend that trophy. He and I had a bunch of good battles, but he was definitely the most consistent. Couldn't quite catch him.

Pictures and some video to follow.

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Hypothetically, could someone ask about plans/timing for future major events without getting appointed national event tsar?

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@Dex Sawash yes. Class organization and schedule of events North America was one of the topics of the fleet meeting held over the weekend. Minutes will be shared this week, along with a rundown of upcoming events. Better communication of upcoming events is one of the goals going forward for the fleet and class officers. Furthermore a better effort will be made going forward to keep the schedule portion of the North American class website (http://intcanoe.com/) up to date.

Best,

Willy

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Mean while in a shed in rural Australia another IC is being built 90% complete the fun task of paint prep and paint left to do. Only 2 weeks until the OZ nationals no time to waste....

71078191_1537558039718034_1811344638238261248_n.jpg

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17 hours ago, ICU2 said:

Mean while in a shed in rural Australia another IC is being built 90% complete the fun task of paint prep and paint left to do. Only 2 weeks until the OZ nationals no time to waste....

71078191_1537558039718034_1811344638238261248_n.jpg

Nice that it also levitates!

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1 hour ago, Ned said:

I like the negative weight on the scale.  

I wish... they are only 25 kg scales so they are nearly full circle.... 

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Mike's new IC making progress.

Also a somewhat up-to-date list of used boats for sale available on the US site here: http://intcanoe.com/boats-for-sale/

Could be of interest to anyone who's been kicking around ways to go fast on the cheap and also gain cheap entry into a really fun class.

Best,
Willy
IC USA 258 "Bagheera"
 

Mike's IC.jpg

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On 2/1/2020 at 2:20 PM, chrishampe said:

Is it coming to play at the next worlds?

That's the plan.

Much of the class conversation has moved to FB/Google Groups, but thought I'd post this here as well:

2020 US East Coast Championships
July 11-12, 2020
North Shore Yacht Club, Port Washington, NY
Race Area: Manhasset Bay

North Shore Yacht Club, which is what eventually grew out of the New York Canoe Club in the 1800s, is celebrating its 150th anniversary (or something) in 2020. As such they are looking to re-connect with their roots and thus have invited the IC class to their club for a regatta on Manhasset Bay, one of the earliest homes of canoe sailing in the United States.

All competitors will be housed by club members. Meals (at least some) will be provided. Race committee, safety boats, and spectator boats also provided by the club. Loaner boats will be available. Also likely to award the Steve Lysak "Hangover Cup" at the event, as it seems like an appropriate opportunity to pay homage to our much-loved fallen comrade.

Contact me if you plan to attend so we can sort out your housing. Looks like a good one. Further details to follow.

Also planning to organize a clinic/mess about day on the day before, Friday the 10th.

Contact me if interested.

Mike's boat progresses, as does Dad's Crazy Ivan. There is also a strip planked boat being built further south. Chris has designed a Maas 5 that Geoff is building down under. There are also plans to build at least 2 new Maas hulls prior to the upcoming Worlds. And Hayden has finished his boat and it looks great.

Good stuff for the class heading into this season.

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I keep trying to post pictures of Mike Costello's new boat, but some sort of new feature designed to block the posting of hardcore pornography keeps blocking the posts...

DRC

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Fresh content: 

We also spent a lot of time this weekend discussing the merits/pitfalls of larger vs. smaller dagger boards. Much of the conversation revolves around the ability to "go slow fast." That is, when one is lit up like below, the standard Clark dagger boards likely offer far too much side force and results in one consistently having to dump leech to keep boat flat and moving fast. This is solved by aggressively reefing the board in anything more 7-8 knots. So, why not just make a smaller board? Well, there are those critical moments where the extra amount of side force really saves you - trying to hold your lane at the start. Trying desperately to barely make the windward mark that you under stood. Trying not to stall out after a rather bad light air tack. These are the times when the large board pays for itself.

That said, the times when you find yourself going upwind in decent breeze without the board reefed enough does hurt you. It can begin to feel like the boat is being knocked over in the puffs rather than shooting forward like it should.

Consequently believe the plan is for Mike to go with a smaller board this "season" while I stick with the old model. We'll see what happens.

 

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I've got a less tall car than I had so I can rooftop my Nethercott without help now. Any experience with bow forward or stern forward? Boat is sitting on 150 pound rated kayak saddles. Will lay up a glass transverse bunk for the front (of boat) saddle as it point-loads more than I like it to.

 

20200703-064755.jpg

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I used to put the trolley (dolly to you? ) up first, take the wheels off then pick the bow up and push her onto the cradles, so always well supported. The aluminium trolley was a very good Christmas present to myself... 

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I laid up bolsters on my hull and glassed in an aluminum tube as an axle. Plug in a PVC tongue and dolly wheels when you get where you're going and you are good to go. Used the same system on an Xterra.

IMG_2280.jpeg

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4 hours ago, Dex Sawash said:

 Any experience with bow forward or stern forward? 

Stern first worked for me in 1975...

image.png.005b3ff60ec1cc4757fe234b9ba78908.png

 

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Pointy end forward always. Bet that stern first arrangement cost you a couple of MPG's. Easier to tie down with the rudder fittings though. I have always trusted straps alone. I thought I knew cars but I don't know what that one is. Not a B-210. Old Datsun? Enlighten me. 

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54 minutes ago, Lifesave said:

 I thought I knew cars but I don't know what that one is. Not a B-210. Old Datsun? Enlighten me. 

I am stumped too, maybe the double hip gills are bumper stickers. 

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Bow first IMO. Two straps should be just about all you need. If on is after of carriage to stop the boat gradually sliding aft you're fine. If you want to tie the bow down, there ought to be a way to make little loops on the front of the car and tie from there to the fitting where your forestay goes. Then tie after to your rudder trunk. But again, with racks and straps you ought to be fine.

Furthermore Dave is definitely right - if bow first is more hydrodynamic it stands to reason that it's more aerodynamic too! Therefor, bow first is the way to go!

Best,
Willy

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On 7/3/2020 at 2:34 PM, Lifesave said:

Pointy end forward always. Bet that stern first arrangement cost you a couple of MPG's. Easier to tie down with the rudder fittings though. I have always trusted straps alone. I thought I knew cars but I don't know what that one is. Not a B-210. Old Datsun? Enlighten me. 

1972 Datsun 1200. I was theorizing blunt end forward, fine end aft would work best. 

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1 hour ago, Alan Crawford said:

probably didn’t realize until he got to his destination that something was missing. 

I once found a Laser sail on the Kingston bypass, and picked it up and took it home. I traced the owner via his club, and informed him I had it before he noticed it was missing!

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Some media from a very fun weekend of canoe sailing RI for the some of the New England contingent. Distance race was fun but challenging. Mess about in boats day, due to more favorable conditions, was even more fun. Both days led to some good footage:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/HEPd8jDYohSApyTt8

Best,
Willy

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On 6/15/2020 at 6:08 AM, Willy Clark said:

Fresh content: 

We also spent a lot of time this weekend discussing the merits/pitfalls of larger vs. smaller dagger boards. Much of the conversation revolves around the ability to "go slow fast." That is, when one is lit up like below, the standard Clark dagger boards likely offer far too much side force and results in one consistently having to dump leech to keep boat flat and moving fast. This is solved by aggressively reefing the board in anything more 7-8 knots. So, why not just make a smaller board? Well, there are those critical moments where the extra amount of side force really saves you - trying to hold your lane at the start. Trying desperately to barely make the windward mark that you under stood. Trying not to stall out after a rather bad light air tack. These are the times when the large board pays for itself.

That said, the times when you find yourself going upwind in decent breeze without the board reefed enough does hurt you. It can begin to feel like the boat is being knocked over in the puffs rather than shooting forward like it should.

Consequently believe the plan is for Mike to go with a smaller board this "season" while I stick with the old model. We'll see what happens.

 

Hence the continued re-invention of gybing-boards.

 

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After not being able to get on here because I forgot my password and the reset email wasn't being sent to me, the link finally came through :)..

Here is my latest ride, so far sails nice however I've not been able to sail against another boat (any boat) because of COVID lock down / restrictions. Really looking forward to sailing with another boat one day soon especially an IC.

Elevation 6.jpg

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On 8/20/2020 at 1:55 AM, ICU2 said:

After not being able to get on here because I forgot my password and the reset email wasn't being sent to me, the link finally came through :)..

Here is my latest ride, so far sails nice however I've not been able to sail against another boat (any boat) because of COVID lock down / restrictions. Really looking forward to sailing with another boat one day soon especially an IC.

Elevation 6.jpg

Nice! Got any more pictures?

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Breeze was up this day around 25 knots... only the second outing..

Elevation 5.jpg

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13 hours ago, Chris Maas said:

I usually ease into the new boat trials. Not you! Anything break?

 

I went out in 10-12 knots it built up gradually while I was out the was a bit on at times. I was having too much fun it was when I got back home and looked at the weather station on the lake it was 20-23 gusting 27 I thought yep that's why I was holding on extra tight on some of the reaches. Touch wood so far so good nothing broken. My first sail was in only around 5 knots.

I'm using the plank and carriage we built for the 2014 Worlds boom, mast and foils are off my Nethercott from 2008 that I also used on my lat two new rule boats, its really only the hull that had to be tested.

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Some photos from racing this weekend: https://photos.app.goo.gl/Ue99JwWyonfWEt6C8

Small event due to COVID but awesome racing. It came down to the last race. Mike edged me at the leeward mark and hung on the rest of the way. Top 3 was an absolute fist fight all weekend. Great competition. Just gotta grow the fleet some more.

Best,
Willy

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