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tall_paul78

Wave Bye Bye

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Horie -san is not a kook, I think he's just into beating. He's a veteran solo ocean crosser, in fact he once crossed the Pacific in a buoy with a mast, it's now on display at the Shin-Nishinomiya yacht harbor. I could probably get a picture of it if anyone is interested......

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I'm interested but I have no friggin idea what you're talking about.

 

Aside: where'd you come up with Tall Paul anyway? That name holds some pretty sacred ground around SE Asia (may he rest in peace).

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I'm interested but I have no friggin idea what you're talking about.

 

At a guess hes drivelling on about Kenichi Horie - the famed Japanese short handed / solo sailor and fully fledged nutter :blink:

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I'm interested but I have no friggin idea what you're talking about.

 

Aside: where'd you come up with Tall Paul anyway? That name holds some pretty sacred ground around SE Asia (may he rest in peace).

 

I'm tall, and my name is Paul.....simple! I'm not aware of anyone in SE Asia of that name, but am always interested in learning new things.

 

Two of his boats are on display here: Mermaid I ( the one made from recycled aluminum) and is out in front of the club on a cement pedestal. I had a chance to go inside it while it was still floating, it's unbelievably narrow. The buoy is inside the building floating in a pool. It holds the record for the shortest sailing craft to cross the Pacific. It MUST be seen to be believed.

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This is too easy.

 

 

pics or it didn't happen

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I'm tall, and my name is Paul.....simple! I'm not aware of anyone in SE Asia of that name, but am always interested in learning new things.

 

Two of his boats are on display here: Mermaid I ( the one made from recycled aluminum) and is out in front of the club on a cement pedestal. I had a chance to go inside it while it was still floating, it's unbelievably narrow. The buoy is inside the building floating in a pool. It holds the record for the shortest sailing craft to cross the Pacific. It MUST be seen to be believed.

 

Sounds reasonable - thanks. It's just that a chill went through my spine when I saw your handle... "He's back!!"

 

SA-ers in SE Asia will know exactly who I mean. Great guy and sadly missed.

 

Oh ya, and like MSG says: pics bro!!

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*nominee for the pointless post of the day*

 

f'in newbies...how bout let's contribute, or at least baselessly slander someone, huh?

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Totally. This dude has a good track record for pulling off kooky projects, and he knows how to manage these sort of things. He'll be fine.

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Kenichi Horie is the real deal, and stands shoulder to shoulder with the giants of single handed sailing.

 

Ed is being a dick here, and is also very late to learn of this project (the Suntory Mermaid II), which has been in the works and the non-sailing press for almost a year or more.

 

Mr. Horie is to be admired for his seamanship, accomplishments, and innovative spirit, not mocked because he doesn't conform to someone's narrow-minded ideas about sailing.

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Hey ED, some ignorance about the sport of single handed sailing is sort of dripping off of the "Wave Bye Bye" story. I for one vote you take it down for a rewrite.

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Hey ED, some ignorance about the sport of single handed sailing is sort of dripping off of the "Wave Bye Bye" story. I for one vote you take it down for a rewrite.

 

Ditto

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congratulations, kenichi!

 

from the NY Times

Boat, Moved Only by Waves, Sails to a Seafaring First

 

By JOHN J. GEOGHEGAN

Published: July 8, 2008

Correction Appended

 

The Suntory Mermaid II successfully completed late Friday night a 4,350 mile trip from Honolulu, Hawaii, to the Kii Channel off the east coast of Japan, marking the longest known voyage by a wave-powered boa

The journey was undertaken by a Japanese team to demonstrate that an environmentally sensitive propulsion system powered exclusively by waves can operate in real-world conditions.

 

The bow-mounted mechanism, which harnesses wave power to provide a dolphinlike tail kick from two independently mounted flippers, was designed and built by Dr. Yutaka Terao of the department of naval architecture and ocean engineering at the Tokai University School of Marine Science and Technology in Japan.

 

The design team originally estimated that the 31-foot-long, three-ton catamaran would average three to four knots and arrive off the east coast of Japan about 60 days after its departure on March 16. But, unusually good weather and calm seas resulted in the boat traveling an average of only 1.5 knots and the Mermaid’s maiden voyage ended up taking 111 days. Nevertheless, Dr. Terao and his team were satisfied with the result.

 

“We were able to prove that our propulsion system delivers a 7,000-kilometer voyage,” Dr. Terao said in an e-mail interview from Japan. “And we can easily improve the speed. In fact, the improvements have already started.”

 

Kenichi Horie, the ecologically minded sailor who captained the Mermaid, has set two world records for piloting environmentally sensitive boats, the first in 1993 for the longest distance traveled in a human-powered pedal boat, 4,660 nautical miles, the second in 1996 for the fastest Pacific crossing in a solar-powered boat, 148 days.

 

At a dockside celebration on Sunday at Shin Nishinomiya Yacht Harbor, Mr. Horie told the gathering: “The time has come for us to shift from fossil fuels. I hope this voyage will increase awareness and interest in natural energy.”

 

Mr. Horie, 69, appeared energetic if noticeably thinner after his three and a half months at sea.

 

“I had some food left, so I could have enjoyed the trip a bit longer,” he said with a smile. “But I think I’ll save it for the next voyage.”

http://www.worldrecordsacademy.org/travel/...Horie_80303.htm

link with pics and interesting vid

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Horie -san is not a kook, I think he's just into beating. He's a veteran solo ocean crosser, in fact he once crossed the Pacific in a buoy with a mast, it's now on display at the Shin-Nishinomiya yacht harbor. I could probably get a picture of it if anyone is interested......

 

I've been to that Yacht club and seen that boat. It sits in a little pool in the front lobby. Amazing how small the boat is....

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Whoa! Cool.

 

RESPECT!

 

"Mr. Horie, 69, appeared energetic if noticeably thinner after his three and a half months at sea."

 

Give that man an Asahi and a katsu rice.

 

asahi.gif

 

Katsu%20Kare%20(Japanese%20Pork%20Cutlet%20with%20Curry%20Sauce).jpg

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