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K38BOB

DHF 2008 anyone, March 29 ?

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BAMA's DHF race fast approaches. Skippers meeting tonight at OYC. Daisy tribute and reminder stickers will be distributed. Who's in, what was good? what could be better? what are the stories?

Have a great and safe race!

www.sfbama.org

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Latest forecast looks............................"interesting".

 

 

***************************************************

- POINT ARENA TO POINT REYES TO 20 NM

- POINT REYES TO PIGEON POINT TO 20 NM

- PIGEON POINT TO POINT PINOS TO 20 NM

- POINT ARENA TO PIGEON POINT 20 TO 60 NM OFFSHORE-

 

.FRI NIGHT...NW WINDS 15 TO 25 KT...BECOMING N AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 3 TO 6 FT. NW SWELL 9 TO 10 FT. CHANCE OF SHOWERS.

 

.SAT...N WINDS 20 TO 30 KT. WIND WAVES 3 TO 7 FT. NW SWELL 10 FT.

 

.SUN...NW WINDS 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 3 TO 6 FT. NW SWELL 9 FT.

 

***************************************************

 

 

Cheers!!!

 

-MH

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Not going around the stinky rock this year due to a schedule conflict but will be going around the light bucket on a J looks like a wet/fast one!! :)

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Nice solid COLD 20 knots out there according to the buoy reports. Lots of North in it. Could be a quick reach-reach for the Multis.

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just looked at the exporatorium web cam, saw punk dolphin finishing followed closely by some J-??? and then Hodges. Looked like they all had 3/4 ozs up.

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Pterodactyl / Olson 40

 

1347 Crew Safe

 

Crew washed overboard, picked up by vessel "Rainbow"

 

1600 Coast Guard waiting to board Pterodactyl to place C.G. crewman for tow inshore, seas too rough for boarding

 

Skipper/crew phone numbers called, pushed to Coast Guard contact for follow-up and tracking.

 

1300 NOAA Weather 21 knots, gusts to 29 knots, 10 foot seas, 10 seconds

 

No more details

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1st Pics, not complete,

 

Pegasus, Open 50

First to Finish, Monohull, All boats

 

 

 

 

Lil' Bear, Corsair 31-

First to Finish, Multihulls

post-5460-1206838041_thumb.jpg

post-5460-1206838081_thumb.jpg

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I guess the call got made to the CG when Ray Lotto noticed the boat out of control a bit and spied a MOB pole nearby... CG responded lickety split. They've been apparently on pins and needles after the Daisy incident. Been inspecting vessels all over the place.

 

Busy day on the H20, Gitana heading out, VX40 ripping around the city front, the usual drama of the DH stinky rock, and someone in the drink during the Bullship. Just another calm day racing in SF...

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Did you say Gitana was out?? I though I'd seen this boat before somewhere....

yea yea we know you were one of the lucky ones

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Anybody have reliable wind instruments on their boat? We were getting 35-40 for a while approaching the farallones. But we're not at all sure that it is calibrated.

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All boats in by sunset. 85 boats entered. 20 retired. Olsen 40 lost crew but recovered by Rainbow.

cheers

bob

 

anyone back yet?

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Looked good come across the finish..congrats. How was it?

bob

 

Moonshine's in. Anyone else.

Dylan

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Mostly start pics, three (3) finish pics only, click here, because of recording finish times. Priorities.

Finish pics were taken by another gentleman on the race committee deck, forthcoming. My pics pale

in comparison to the photoboy * angle, the one w/Gitana going out of the bay, uhh, wow.

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bullship race too? seems early in the season - or is it always around now?

 

no pics?

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All boats in by sunset. 85 boats entered. 20 retired. Olsen 40 lost crew but recovered by Rainbow.

cheers

bob

 

 

Very glad this turned out OK

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Pegasus was fastest elapsed time.

Results to be posted www.sfbama.org

 

B)--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Trevor B @ Mar 30 2008, 07:40 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->Who won?

 

The rich guy with the paid crew, most likely.

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NCH, aA.. you taking notes??.... ;)

 

my girl went 3 for 3 with 2 rbi's (*no performance enhancers), is that the notes you were talking about?

 

 

jealous i couldn't make this years race

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Looked good come across the finish..congrats. How was it?

bob

 

 

Hey Bob,

We had a great time. It was a little windy out near the island. We had to do lots of sail changes. Moonshine is hard to keep on her feet up wind. It was a good day to try out all the gears. We used both reefs, all of our headsails and acouple kites.

 

Tulchi- we were seeing sustained 35-40+ apparent on our wind instrument. We are not sure of the calibration accuracy. We were having more issues with the wave conditions. Hard chines don't like chop.

 

Dylan

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Hard chines don't like chop.
Maybe mulit-chines don't.....?? Mirage and Starbuck seem to love those conditions. Glad to hear you pulled the trigger on the new ride, enjoy!

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Maybe mulit-chines don't.....?? Mirage and Starbuck seem to love those conditions. Glad to hear you pulled the trigger on the new ride, enjoy!

 

 

Maybe I should have said I can't make her go upwind very well. )

 

Its pretty well known that Moonshine is a poor upwind performer but makes up for it downwind.

 

I'm enjoying my time with Moonshine but have much to learn.

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QUOTE(Trevor B @ Mar 30 2008, 07:40 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Who won?

 

Preliminary Results are posted on the BAMA site , so ...

 

The DHF page has

 

Preliminary: Results Overall | Elapsed Time | Finish Time , ...

Division 1 | Division 2 | Division 3 | Division 4 | Division 5a | Division 5b | Division 6 | Division 7 | Division 8

Please report possible discrepancies in finish times so we can clear up the issues. Thank you in advance,

 

Preliminary Overall

Mooretician 89 Moore 24 Div 8

Absinthe 102 Moore 24 8 150 8

The Bar-ba-loot 62 Moore 24 8

Poopsie 182 Santa Cruz 27 Div 6

Motorcycle Irene 28137 Express 27 Div 4

Banditos 118 Moore 24 Div 8

Lynx 28349 Wyliecat 30 Div 6

Silkye 38003 Wylie 30 6

Strega 77 Express 27 Div 4

Wetsu 70 Express 27 Div 4

El Raton 28050 Express 27 Div 4 Preliminary: 30 minutes of Redress Granted for assisting Pterodactyl

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Tulchi- we were seeing sustained 35-40+ apparent on our wind instrument. We are not sure of the calibration accuracy. We were having more issues with the wave conditions. Hard chines don't like chop.

 

Dylan

 

lol. Dylan, I was on your boat. Now if anybody else has some #s I would be interested in hearing them.

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Preliminary Overall

Mooretician 89 Moore 24 Div 8

Absinthe 102 Moore 24 8 150 8

The Bar-ba-loot 62 Moore 24 8

Poopsie 182 Santa Cruz 27 Div 6

Motorcycle Irene 28137 Express 27 Div 4

Banditos 118 Moore 24 Div 8

Lynx 28349 Wyliecat 30 Div 6

Silkye 38003 Wylie 30 6

Strega 77 Express 27 Div 4

Wetsu 70 Express 27 Div 4

El Raton 28050 Express 27 Div 4 Preliminary: 30 minutes of Redress Granted for assisting Pterodactyl

 

Nice job Peter and Ro!

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The USCG had some "Security Security" announcement this afternoon about a 40' sailing vessel named Pterodactyl adrift in the Monterey Bay Area this afternoon...

 

 

Here a note from the owner of Pterodactyl when I asked about his story:

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

lost the boat, last seen 37 29 W by 123 33 S heading 240M, boat wearing reefed main and #3 jib. The boat rounds up, tacks, goes on to "hove to" by tacking with jib aback, estimated speed 6 knots.

 

REWARD

 

All aboard safe. Nutty wave, giant.

talk to you soon, need to keep at it.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

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I'm 2500 miles away and know squat about the conditions, but being ex-USCGR I'll venture to thank them for the quick response. Would rather see them overreact than underreact. Glad all safe, sounds a bit hairy.

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feckin A!

 

1,2,3 overall ???

 

Moore 24s!

 

 

 

dayum..

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I'm 2500 miles away and know squat about the conditions, but being ex-USCGR I'll venture to thank them for the quick response. Would rather see them overreact than underreact. Glad all safe, sounds a bit hairy.

From the beach direct downwind of this race, it did not appear to be "30-40".. more like 15-20... but breeze can be UP outside in the gulf. And waves did not appear to be that large. It looked like another ordinary day in NorCal.

 

Sunday however.. the breeze was ON.. easily pegging over 25-30 with gusts to 35-40 on the sand with large drifts forming up over the HWY. And its was COLD.

 

The Gulf o' Farallones is never a place to get lazy... even a mild day turns nasty with the slightest mistake.

 

 

 

Very relieved to hear no one died.

 

 

PS.. I need a new annemometer at the house.. mine read "8".

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somewhere in the sunset district, fred sits in a lonely, cold, and dark fiberglass hull and weeps

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Sunday was a bit odd.

 

The wind built up pretty strong late in the afternoon and only seemed to continue building past 4pm.

 

Looking like the DH guys had the right day to make the trip. Glad everyone is OK and most seemed to have fun out in the cold windy rock pile adventure.

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The coordinates given earlier would have put the boat near the Pioneer Seamount. Wind is offshore here on the coast right now, so maybe there's hope for a salvage.

 

Sorry, I missed that story and cannot find it. What happened? Did they both fall overboard?

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From the beach direct downwind of this race, it did not appear to be "30-40".. more like 15-20... but breeze can be UP outside in the gulf. And waves did not appear to be that large. It looked like another ordinary day in NorCal.

 

Sunday however.. the breeze was ON.. easily pegging over 25-30 with gusts to 35-40 on the sand with large drifts forming up over the HWY. And its was COLD.

 

On Saturday it was much bigger outside than in the Bay. We ran into a band of strong north wind and breeze about 10 miles from the islands -- we went from "wow the #2 is the perfect sail for today, glad we put it up" to "holy crap we've got a reef in and the #3 up ... start digging downstairs for the #4" in about 15 minutes. Breeze died down again in the same spot on the way home, and then inside the Gate it was downright pleasant.

 

The stuff that hit the Bay Area on Sunday night is more or less the same stuff we had Saturday out in the Gulf. Strong, oddly cold stuff.

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On Saturday it was much bigger outside than in the Bay. We ran into a band of strong north wind and breeze about 10 miles from the islands -- we went from "wow the #2 is the perfect sail for today, glad we put it up" to "holy crap we've got a reef in and the #3 up ... start digging downstairs for the #4" in about 15 minutes. Breeze died down again in the same spot on the way home, and then inside the Gate it was downright pleasant.

 

The stuff that hit the Bay Area on Sunday night is more or less the same stuff we had Saturday out in the Gulf. Strong, oddly cold stuff.

My observations, above, were from Ocean Beach... well outside and more exposed than at the Gate.

 

How far out (past Mile Rock?, channel markers?, light bucket?) was it that you went looking for the no. 4?

 

 

 

Not to pick, but what ever was kicking up 12-27 miles out should have made landfall on the outer beaches by mid to late evening. But it was near calm Saturday evening in the Outer Sunset district.

 

Its possible that whatever pressure stalled just off shore.. and didn't kick up on land until early Sunday.

I'll have to find the wind charts and do some studying because I remember the chart from Friday showing isobars close together all the way up to and over the coastline.

 

This area never fails to surprise me.

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Ok so the lat38 page explains that both crew on the Olson 40 were washed off the boat neither were on tethers. They were recovered by a boat that doesn't appear to be listed in the DH race.

 

They were able to get an EPIRB on the olson 40 and the CG is tracking the boat.

 

 

I've done plenty of these races to think that I would no doubt have my full kit and be teathered to the boat in the conditions they had on Saturday. Now this could have lead to a whole other challenge two sailors being dragged behind their boat? Assuming the teathers are long enough to allow for full exit of the cockpit.

 

In light of recent accidents in our usual ocean racing -- Damit guys use your head make sure your teathered to your boats and have all your gear in order. Stuff happens out past the GG and things can go way wrong in an instant.

 

Sail safe!!!

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The way my boat was set up, if I was tethered to the hard points in the cockpit, I'd stay within the boat somewhere - but could end up hanging over the lifelines. It I was on the jacklines, I could easily be over the lifelines but would be past the transom. With the boat slowly spinning circles, and if I hadn't been injured, I might be able to get back onboard.

 

 

Are there better ways to run the jacklines? Maybe when shorthanded keep it on centerline only?

 

How nasty is it to pitchpole an Olsen 40?

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shoreside debriefs at RYC, with Express 27s showing up shortly after 4'ish(we were racing the 14 at BIg Dinghy) had a lot of folks with big grins, talking of big wind and waves at the island - but also a bit bummed that it was a 2 sail reach back into the lightship - kites went up there.

 

 

In typical conditions out there, should you expect a lift once you hit the lightship and so go ahead and set at the island?

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All the boats I've done ocean racing on have had a centerline cockpit jackline.

 

Then one running up each side for deck work.

 

A few sailors I've sailed with actually have two teather lengths either a single teather with two clips one on the end and one about half way. Halfway clip is ment to keep you in the boat no matter what.

 

I've actually gone with two seperate teathers a 6footer for deck work - then a 4 footer for cockpit work. Its over kill but I like knowing I won't be going anyplace if we take a wave. Which I've experienced and not only do they tend to surprise the hell out of you they are packing some serious power.

 

So I just ask that everyone doing the races outside the GG really think through their gear program. The Moore24 guys all tend to be a pretty salty bunch and have many years to sort out good systems on the boat etc. But lets be sure we check it - use it and have fun vs face possible loss of a good friend and fellow sailor etc.

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yep - that's what I'm asking. how can we learn from this one?

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In typical conditions out there, should you expect a lift once you hit the lightship and so go ahead and set at the island?

The lift happens.. but not always as far out as the lightship... depending, I've seen it not lift adequately for the spinnaker until you're near under Pt Bonita. Other times a kite can be set at the rocks. Also depends on how well you're boat reaches with a spinnaker.

 

Mostly (I think) it depends on the pressure and the amount of north in the breeze...

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The Moore24 guys all tend to be a pretty salty bunch ..

Altough I'm a novice Moore 24 guy.. I tend to be fairly loose with the jacklines.

 

Reason being is that a tether short enough to keep me on deck of such a small boat is not going to let me stand up completely, either.

I use the dual length tether with Wichards (lovehate) set to short while driving or doing pit. Go long when forward and at the mast.

 

I run a jackline down each side.. and I don't get up on my feet much.. keep a low center of gravity.

 

That said I haven't done much upwind work in 25 knots on the Moore.. not yet, anyway.. just a couple hundred miles downwind in 25+.

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How far out (past Mile Rock?, channel markers?, light bucket?) was it that you went looking for the no. 4?

 

Quite a ways: 10ish miles from SE Farallone Island, so that's Lightbucket + 4ish miles. We were happy with the #2 up at the Lightbucket.

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The way my boat was set up, if I was tethered to the hard points in the cockpit, I'd stay within the boat somewhere - but could end up hanging over the lifelines. It I was on the jacklines, I could easily be over the lifelines but would be past the transom. With the boat slowly spinning circles, and if I hadn't been injured, I might be able to get back onboard.

Are there better ways to run the jacklines? Maybe when shorthanded keep it on centerline only?

 

How nasty is it to pitchpole an Olsen 40?

 

You shouldn't run your jacklines all the way to the transom. Your jacklines should terminate far enough forward that you wouldn't be dragging behind the boat if you went over while clipped into a jackline. You should have solid attachment points -- not jacklines -- for clipping in aft of the companionway.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This post in memory of Harvey Shlasky

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Yep - had both of those. Was wondering if one should just go with a centerline jack when shorthanded. Things aren't happening fast (crew maneuver wise) anyway, so it might reduce the tendency to get tossed over the lifeline. I had the hard points in the cockpit. You could get well into the cabin before unhooking.

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I used jacklines only on the J-35, solo. Less clipping and unclipping meant I was clipped in more often.. it also helped simplify the spaghetti tangles with the tether...

 

I remember how pissed off I was when trying to clear a fouled kite and spin net about 800 miles off the coast.. I'm trying to stand on the pulpit for reach but the tether is just "this much" too short.. Dammit!.. I clip to the ring on the pulpit.. hmm... safe? Not.

Didn't matter, in the time it took me to sort it, the kite had wrapped another two times and it wound up being a 45 minute cleanup..

One that looked, at first, like it meant a climb up the mast...

 

 

I also did not like bending down to get to a floor mounted ring for a hard tether point in the cockpit. Really hard on the spine.

I'd mount them on the deck rather than cockpit floor, if I did it again.

 

I am not too fussed about being dragged behind the boat due to long tether, (but I haven't been dragged behind the boat yet either).. a better solution (for me) is to have a means to climb back on. A step, a loop of line, or rolled rope ladder bagged and ready to deploy off the back..

 

So much of this depends on personal style, cockpit design, etc.

 

I'm sure I'll have different ideas about it all after another few hundred miles.

 

PS.

I carry MOB pole and strobe when sailing solo, too.

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You are sailing solo and pitched overboard, suspended by your tether hopefully alongside or not too far behind a boat going 6 knots. You're wearing full foulies and boots and your inflatable has activated. How will you get back on board?

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How will you get back on board?

Any way possible?

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easy!

s.

..preferably from the lee side so you don't get your hair wet.

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I used jacklines only on the J-35, solo. Less clipping and unclipping meant I was clipped in more often.. it also helped simplify the spaghetti tangles with the tether...

 

I remember how pissed off I was when trying to clear a fouled kite and spin net about 800 miles off the coast.. I'm trying to stand on the pulpit for reach but the tether is just "this much" too short.. Dammit!.. I clip to the ring on the pulpit.. hmm... safe? Not.

Didn't matter, in the time it took me to sort it, the kite had wrapped another two times and it wound up being a 45 minute cleanup..

One that looked, at first, like it meant a climb up the mast...

I also did not like bending down to get to a floor mounted ring for a hard tether point in the cockpit. Really hard on the spine.

I'd mount them on the deck rather than cockpit floor, if I did it again.

 

I am not too fussed about being dragged behind the boat due to long tether, (but I haven't been dragged behind the boat yet either).. a better solution (for me) is to have a means to climb back on. A step, a loop of line, or rolled rope ladder bagged and ready to deploy off the back..

 

So much of this depends on personal style, cockpit design, etc.

 

I'm sure I'll have different ideas about it all after another few hundred miles.

 

PS.

I carry MOB pole and strobe when sailing solo, too.

 

If you had been dragged behind the boat you would probably not have been able to write that post...

 

Seriously, this is very very dangerous, and it is very unlikely you will survive this, especially if you are by yourself.

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I've been pulled behind a sailboat on a rope tow doing about 6, lots of fun in hot weather. In full gear, in the cold - no way I'm strong enough to move forward. But half hanging over the side maybe.

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wait till she broaches because your drag would have rounded her up
Not if the autopilot is at the helm!

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If you had been dragged behind the boat you would probably not have been able to write that post...

 

Seriously, this is very very dangerous, and it is very unlikely you will survive this, especially if you are by yourself.

Which is why I haven't worn a PFD sailing solo in a very long time.

Whats the point? To die slowly?

 

 

The bottomline is "don't go overboard".

 

But if it happens, you need a plan to get back on board.. even with a 6 ft tether attached to a harness up at your chin you have less than a couple feet to reach the transom (at worst)... I am thinking that in this worst case scenario you will FIND the strength to close that small gap. Whats your choice?

 

Do you think that by terminating the jack lines 4 ft or more forward that you will elminate that scneario? What if you need to climb up that backstay aways to unfoul a radar refelctor or some such... You unclip from the jackline and attach to what? The pushpit?

 

I'm sorry but all these "rules of thumb" do not cover EVERY scenario.

 

Now.. If you fall in along side you can grab a hold of gunnel/rail and work you way back to a stanchion.

Hand over hand back to where you have a means to climb back on.

 

So?

If you are in this situation are you gonna give up because some guy on SA says its not possible to pull your self back on board?

 

 

Of course another option is to have the personal MOB puck, like the NKE autopilot setups.

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You don't want to be dragged behind the boat for any length of time at all. You'll flush drown in under a minute. Terminate the jacklines at least a tether's length forward of the stern. It makes it easier (but less sporting) to poke the MOB with the boat pole while he/she is banging against the topsides. Use hardpoints in the cockpit that are numerous and convenient.

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You don't want to be dragged behind the boat for any length of time at all.

I wonder what a 210 lb drogue would do to a Moore's upwind trim?

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From the beach direct downwind of this race, it did not appear to be "30-40".. more like 15-20... but breeze can be UP outside in the gulf. And waves did not appear to be that large. It looked like another ordinary day in NorCal.

 

Sunday however.. the breeze was ON.. easily pegging over 25-30 with gusts to 35-40 on the sand with large drifts forming up over the HWY. And its was COLD.

 

The Gulf o' Farallones is never a place to get lazy... even a mild day turns nasty with the slightest mistake.

Very relieved to hear no one died.

 

PS.. I need a new annemometer at the house.. mine read "8".

 

My limited recall from writing down things like DNF's with VHF trans. times, other events, getting a handle on estimated finish times, ...:

 

03 29 1300 NOAA report 21 knots, gusts to 29 knots, 10 foot seas, 10 seconds (Gulf of Farallones, rec'ed on VHF Chan 2)

 

NOAA's National Data Buoy Center: Station 46026 - SAN FRANCISCO - 18NM West of San Francisco, CA

Anemometer height: 5 m above site elevation (5m = 16.4ft)

 

MM DD TIME (PDT) DIR WSPD GST WVHT ft DPD sec APD sec MWD PRES in PTDY in ATMP °F WTMP °F DEWP °F SAL psu VIS mi TIDE ft

03 29 5:50 pm NNW 19.4 23.3 9.8 10 6.6 WNW 29.96 -0.03 48.6 48.9 - - - -

03 29 4:50 pm NNW 19.4 23.3 9.2 9 6.5 WNW 29.97 -0.03 48.4 48.9 - - - -

03 29 3:50 pm NNW 19.4 23.3 9.5 9 6.5 WNW 29.97 -0.03 48.0 48.9 - - - -

03 29 2:50 pm NNW 19.4 23.3 10.2 9 6.7 WNW 29.99 -0.03 48.0 48.9 - - - -

03 29 1:50 pm NNW 19.4 23.3 10.5 10 6.7 WNW 30.00 -0.02 47.7 48.9 - - - -

03 29 12:50 pm NNW 21.4 25.3 10.2 9 6.7 NW 30.01 +0.00 47.3 48.9 - - - -

 

MM DD TIME(PDT) WVHT ft SwH ft SwP sec SwD WWH ft WWP sec WWD STEEPNESS APD sec

03 29 5:00 pm 9.2 6.6 9.1 WNW 6.2 7.7 WNW AVERAGE 6.5

03 29 4:00 pm 9.5 6.2 9.1 WNW 7.2 6.7 WNW AVERAGE 6.5

03 29 3:00 pm 10.2 7.9 9.1 WNW 6.2 7.1 WNW STEEP 6.7

03 29 2:00 pm 10.5 7.2 10.0 WNW 7.9 5.3 WNW AVERAGE 6.7

03 29 1:00 pm 10.2 8.2 9.1 NW 6.2 5.0 WNW STEEP 6.7

 

Above is cut-paste of data from NOAA text data, and NOAA graph below. Difference in wind speed at the mast head, wind shear, or wind gradient, difference in wind speed in the vertical component, at the mast head, could results in over 30 knots with wind surface friction.

 

I'm not a weather guy, open to upgrades.

post-5460-1207017821_thumb.jpg

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We did both the DBH Lightship and the DBH Farallones.

 

At it's max there was more wind in the Farallones race then the Lightship. The max didn't happen until we got a 3 to 5 miles from the island. At it's height, it was 25 to 30 at the light ship, and I suspect that for the Farallones we saw 30 to 35.

 

The breeze definitely built up the further out you went, and that was true going both ways--meaning the breeze didn't follow us in. The other difference between both days was that the wave where bigger in the Farallones race but spaced further apart.

 

As far as I'm concerned you should clip in and close the hatch. Where you clip in and how is a matter of preference.

 

jp

 

My limited recall from writing down things like DNF's with VHF trans. times, other events, getting a handle on estimated finish times, ...:

 

03 29 1300 NOAA report 21 knots, gusts to 29 knots, 10 foot seas, 10 seconds (Gulf of Farallones, rec'ed on VHF Chan 2)

 

NOAA's National Data Buoy Center: Station 46026 - SAN FRANCISCO - 18NM West of San Francisco, CA

Anemometer height: 5 m above site elevation (5m = 16.4ft)

 

MM DD TIME (PDT) DIR WSPD GST WVHT ft DPD sec APD sec MWD PRES in PTDY in ATMP °F WTMP °F DEWP °F SAL psu VIS mi TIDE ft

03 29 5:50 pm NNW 19.4 23.3 9.8 10 6.6 WNW 29.96 -0.03 48.6 48.9 - - - -

03 29 4:50 pm NNW 19.4 23.3 9.2 9 6.5 WNW 29.97 -0.03 48.4 48.9 - - - -

03 29 3:50 pm NNW 19.4 23.3 9.5 9 6.5 WNW 29.97 -0.03 48.0 48.9 - - - -

03 29 2:50 pm NNW 19.4 23.3 10.2 9 6.7 WNW 29.99 -0.03 48.0 48.9 - - - -

03 29 1:50 pm NNW 19.4 23.3 10.5 10 6.7 WNW 30.00 -0.02 47.7 48.9 - - - -

03 29 12:50 pm NNW 21.4 25.3 10.2 9 6.7 NW 30.01 +0.00 47.3 48.9 - - - -

 

MM DD TIME(PDT) WVHT ft SwH ft SwP sec SwD WWH ft WWP sec WWD STEEPNESS APD sec

03 29 5:00 pm 9.2 6.6 9.1 WNW 6.2 7.7 WNW AVERAGE 6.5

03 29 4:00 pm 9.5 6.2 9.1 WNW 7.2 6.7 WNW AVERAGE 6.5

03 29 3:00 pm 10.2 7.9 9.1 WNW 6.2 7.1 WNW STEEP 6.7

03 29 2:00 pm 10.5 7.2 10.0 WNW 7.9 5.3 WNW AVERAGE 6.7

03 29 1:00 pm 10.2 8.2 9.1 NW 6.2 5.0 WNW STEEP 6.7

 

Above is cut-paste of data from NOAA text data, and NOAA graph below. Difference in wind speed at the mast head, wind shear, or wind gradient, difference in wind speed in the vertical component, at the mast head, could results in over 30 knots with wind surface friction.

 

I'm not a weather guy, open to upgrades.

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Which is why I haven't worn a PFD sailing solo in a very long time.

Whats the point? To die slowly?

The bottomline is "don't go overboard".

 

But if it happens, you need a plan to get back on board.. even with a 6 ft tether attached to a harness up at your chin you have less than a couple feet to reach the transom (at worst)... I am thinking that in this worst case scenario you will FIND the strength to close that small gap. Whats your choice?

 

Do you think that by terminating the jack lines 4 ft or more forward that you will elminate that scneario? What if you need to climb up that backstay aways to unfoul a radar refelctor or some such... You unclip from the jackline and attach to what? The pushpit?

 

I'm sorry but all these "rules of thumb" do not cover EVERY scenario.

 

Now.. If you fall in along side you can grab a hold of gunnel/rail and work you way back to a stanchion.

Hand over hand back to where you have a means to climb back on.

 

So?

If you are in this situation are you gonna give up because some guy on SA says its not possible to pull your self back on board?

Of course another option is to have the personal MOB puck, like the NKE autopilot setups.

 

I honestly think you have no clue. Here is a suggestion: on a nice day in the harbor put on your foul weather gear. Make sure there is a swim ladder or something like that. Jump in and try to climb on your boat. You will find it very hard, if not impossible. Then imagine your boat is moving (fast) you have waves, cold water, you are exhausted form sailing in the rough weather, are a bit disoriented and hurt from the fall. Pretty tough.

Don't brag about not wearing a pdf, or not giving up because a guy on SA told you. This is serious shit and you could die.

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I honestly think you have no clue. Here is a suggestion: on a nice day in the harbor put on your foul weather gear. Make sure there is a swim ladder or something like that. Jump in and try to climb on your boat. You will find it very hard, if not impossible. Then imagine your boat is moving (fast) you have waves, cold water, you are exhausted form sailing in the rough weather, are a bit disoriented and hurt from the fall. Pretty tough.

Don't brag about not wearing a pdf, or not giving up because a guy on SA told you. This is serious shit and you could die.

 

There was a double handed farralones race a few years ago where a J/29 broached and lost somebody over the transom but still attached by the tether (terminated on an aft cleat). The remaining crew couldn't round up the boat, didn't have any winch handles to winch the COB back onboard, and the guy on the end of the tether died.

 

Gotta say, terminate your tether so you can't go off the back of the boat. Tack's right, you can't drag behind a boat for any length of time at speed, you drown at about 2-2.5 knots.

 

Karen Thorndike did a solo circumnav and she had dedicated tethers around the boat, at the right length for each station. You could hook into the next station while still attached to the previous one, then unclip the previous one. Most of them were on the centerline.

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i once saw redboat lose his hair comb over the side - he did not have a lanyard attached to it. that was just aweful!

 

s.

 

Damn, I didn't think you noticed.

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I honestly think you have no clue. Here is a suggestion: on a nice day in the harbor put on your foul weather gear. Make sure there is a swim ladder or something like that. Jump in and try to climb on your boat. You will find it very hard, if not impossible. Then imagine your boat is moving (fast) you have waves, cold water, you are exhausted form sailing in the rough weather, are a bit disoriented and hurt from the fall. Pretty tough.

Don't brag about not wearing a pdf, or not giving up because a guy on SA told you. This is serious shit and you could die.

There's a phrase I use often.

 

"The more you learn the more you realize you don't know."

(and I am referring to myself as much as anybody)

 

FWIW, I've tried all manner of things.. including boom surfing while on my way to the Channel Islands. Sometimes I thank my lucky stars that I am still around.

 

Still, I have a few open ocean miles solo, and I've learned that many if these rules of thumb come up short in practical use.

 

If people feel strong about 4' rule I can respect that... but consider I've climbed a 46' mast solo in open water, I've dove my hull in open water, (a couple of times)... there are so many "scenarios" that they can not ALL be covered.

So "personally" I've opted (in the past) to allow as much room as possible in my "clip in" plan.. and I spent a 15 day stretch ALWAYS clipped into it.

 

My current boat has jacklines terminated at 4'+... I have not adjusted.. maybe another couple hundred miles (hopefully this june)

 

PFD? I'm not "bragging".. among the SSS sailors on SF Bay, there's a fairly common train of thought, (not universally held, of course).. when solo in open ocean, a PFD is of no value. Rather, you wear a harness and remain clipped in 24/7

If you go over, unclipped, you are dead.

End of story.

 

 

 

French Cowboy, Slackwater.. thanks for the weather reports.

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A slight deviation from topic...JD you heard the two upstanding lads that caused all the ruckus at the Zoo file suit against the City Last week.. the same day the younger of the brothers was arrested for stealing

gaming controls from a Target in San Leandro???So much for learning a lesson... :huh:

Yeah.. Ms. Dirge clued me in.

 

feckers are likely gonna get several hundred grand from the city..

 

I'd like to meet their "parents".

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Yeah.. Ms. Dirge clued me in.

 

feckers are likely gonna get several hundred grand from the city..

 

I'd like to meet their "parents".

 

 

We'll be seeing them in the news again. Hopfully they don't kill anyone in the future driving drunk- on drugs etc.

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There was a double handed farralones race a few years ago where a J/29 broached and lost somebody over the transom but still attached by the tether (terminated on an aft cleat). The remaining crew couldn't round up the boat, didn't have any winch handles to winch the COB back onboard, and the guy on the end of the tether died.

 

Gotta say, terminate your tether so you can't go off the back of the boat. Tack's right, you can't drag behind a boat for any length of time at speed, you drown at about 2-2.5 knots.

Its been a while since I read the J29 account.. but lets say your memory is correct.

They were DH as I recall.

 

I don't recall if the COB had a head injury, was incapacitated, or what.

I read this post and immediately think that the LEAST of the worries was that the jackline allowed him to go over.

 

 

..sailing in the Gulf o' Farallones? And they have no winch handle?

..the boat has broached and they can't round it up further?

didn't think to cut the kite halyard.. guy.. sheet?

release the mainsheet?

 

didn't throw the guy all the seat cushions to get him floating higher?

 

So many "what ifs"...

 

 

And if I recall, a good swimmer can make 2.5 knots.. not that you could do that in full gear.. but if you shove the tether under your armpit, turn your body sideways, turn head back towards the wake, you can get your head out of the water and buy time for your crew to get to work on bringing you in...

If the COB is unconcious, SOL on that...

 

I carry a separat 4:1 block and tackle for the express purpose of pulling dead weight out of the water.

 

But thanks for reminding me.. the crew an I have some brushing up to do on our response drills.

 

 

I'm not saying its gonna be easy.. but we should at least be prepared to do EVERYthing we can to save a life.

 

My own opinion is that too many people take the jacklines for granted, they take the PFD for granted, the EPIRB, etc.. etc.. Our abundance of safety gear, I think, lulls even the most experienced into complaceny.

NOTHING takes the pace of conservative boat handling and non-panicked response.

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On that block and tackle - on the express we had a 4:1 on the babystay - it had snap shackles top and bottom to be able to quickly become a MOB hoisting aid. Even in the event of a nasty knockdown, where all winch handles fled the coop, assuming the mast was still in the boat, the tackle would be right there at the ready, as long as there was still one able bodied person onboard to operate it.

 

I suppose you could rig up some sort of boarding device on each transom corner with a tackle, but those quick release rope ladders seem to make more sense.

 

Maybe a hand rail down the transom?

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Maybe a hand rail down the transom?

This is where an open transom mod looks awfully sensible!

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yep - was thinking the same thing.

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Its been a while since I read the J29 account.. but lets say your memory is correct.

They were DH as I recall.

 

Copied from: http://www.ussailing.org/safety/Rescues/19..._Farallones.htm

 

 

Doublehanded Farallones Race - tragedy and triumph

 

The Doublehanded Farallones Race has long been one of the most grueling events on the Northern California racing calendar. In its 20-year history, it has also become the most infamous race on possibly the entire West Coast. Held early in the year and thus subject to late winter storms and extreme conditions, this race has claimed six lives since its first running in 1979. The sixth occurred on March 27, despite valiant efforts by a co-crewman and Coast Guard rescuers.

 

Only through the quick actions of two other boats in another, unrelated rescue was that toll not higher.

 

For most of the race, Harvey Shlasky and crewman Mark Van Selst were doing well aboard Shlasky's Berkeley-based J/29 White Lightning. In their second year racing the Double Farallones together, they'd won their start, were the first boat in their division out the Gate and, in a building wind and swell, had a fast passage to the only 'turning mark' in the race, Southeast Farallon Island. They even had the thrill of passing a pod of whales spouting.

 

By the time they were homeward bound, White Lightning, under double-reefed main and #3 jib, was broad reaching before northwesterly winds in excess of 30 knots and surfing down 12 to 14-ft swells, some of which were breaking. "We were aware the conditions were dangerous," says Van Selst. "But we were feeling very good, very dialed in. The boat was pretty much in control."

 

The 'fatal' wave, says Selst, did not appear to be larger, faster or steeper than any of its predecessors. As he had been doing for two hours, Mark dumped the main to ease the helm and prepared to take it back in as Harvey steered down the face. The next thing he knew, he was underwater. The time was about 4:30 p.m., and the boat was at the entrance to the shipping channel, about 5 miles from the Golden Gate.

 

"I don't remember leaving the boat at all," recalls Mark. "In fact, for a moment I didn't even realize I was in the water. My next thought was, 'Don't swim until you know which way is up.'"

 

Van Selst didn't have to worry about swimming. A moment later, he was jerked through the water as the broached boat regained her feet and started dragging the two sailors through the water by their harnesses. Both Shlasky and Van Selst were wearing 'automatic' inflatable SOSpenders vests, which double as harnesses, and both men had been clipped onto jacklines since sailing out of the Bay. When the boat went over, Mark's was clipped to the high-side (port) jackline; Shalsky to the low-side jackline. Mark went out under the leeward lifelines. Luckily, his strap had taken a wrap around the starboard primary, which brought him up on the low side of the boat only inches from the rail. Harvey was behind the boat, being dragged face-first through the water.

 

As with many extreme situations, Mark could not put a time frame on the sequence of events that happened next. Other witnesses estimate the following took place over about 20 minutes.

 

Only when he surfaced next to the boat did Mark realize what had happened. He dragged himself through the upper and lower lifelines and started to climb the steeply angled cockpit to release the windward-cleated jibsheet. (The mainsheet had been released when they broached.) "But I found now the harness was pulling me down," says Mark. He looked around to discover that the harness was wrapped around the lower lifeline, where he'd climbed through. "My immediate thought was to unclip and reclip," he says. "But that didn't last long. I fully expected the boat to broach again." So, laboriously, he climbed back out through the upper and lower lifelines and back aboard under the lowers - at some point surprised to find that part of his awkwardness was due to his SOSpenders PFD that had automatically inflated. He finally got to the windward side and released the cleated jib.

 

It was only then that Mark realized Shlasky was in trouble. He looked back to see the 51-year-old software developer being submarined through the water, "just like somebody who won't let go of a waterski rope," says Mark. Van Selst said Harvey was trying to say something to him, but it kept getting lost in the wind. He also noticed that Shlasky's life vest hadn't inflated.

 

Mark knew he had to work fast, but he was shocked to find the cockpit almost completely empty - no lines, no winch handles, no nothing. Further complicating factors included a partially jammed rudder and a broken boom.

 

He blew the entire bank of rope clutches on the boat – which included the main halyard - to try to slow it down, but the high wind only plastered the top part of the main against the shrouds and White Lightning kept on going. He tried to jam the tiller hard over to bring the boat head-to-wind, but without a boom, the howling wind and waves just pushed the bow down again. Motoring was out of the question, as the boat's outboard was strapped down below in the cabin.

 

In between trying to slow down, Mark recovered a lazy sheet, tied it to Harvey's tether and tried to get him closer to the boat - or at least get his face out of the water. It was a difficult process without a winch handle, but he managed to muscle Shlasky in a little bit. From then on, it was a matter of "steer, steer, do something, steer. . . ." He got several more lines around Harvey's tether, including the yellow polypro line from

 

the Lifesling, which he'd opened for just that purpose. By the time he got the now unconscious Shlasky "about eye level with the transom", the cockpit was a spider web of lines. Mark was just planning to run forward to grab a spare halyard to get Harvey aboard when he realized he was surrounded by other boats.

 

Mark recalled that the Olson 34 Razzberries had been sailing just to leeward of White Lightning when the broach happened. Now he saw that they had dropped their sails and were standing by under power. He also saw the Pilot Boat, which had been inbound, and two Coast Guard rescue boats hovering close by. (Razzberries had called the Coasties.) One of the Coast Guard boats with two rescue swimmers at the ready came up behind White Lightning and - it being too rough to come alongside - shouted to Mark to pull up all trailing lines. That accomplished, "They started yelling at me to lower Harvey back to them," says Van Selst, a 31-year-old associate psychology professor at San Jose State.

 

"I looked around for a line to do that, but they were all being used for other things," says Mark. "So the next thing I did was probably the weirdest thing I've ever done in my life - everything I'd ever read or been taught says to stay with the boat, but I knew this transfer had to be done quickly - so I unclipped Harvey." Van Selst never saw the recovery; he was too busy trying to get the boat under control and get it home. Witnesses say the Coast Guardsmen yanked Shlasky from the water and instantly began CPR as the boat raced back to its base at Station Golden Gate. Unfortunately, Harvey Shlasky could not be revived. He was airlifted to Marin General Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

 

 

 

-MH

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"I looked around for a line to do that, but they were all being used for other things," says Mark. "So the next thing I did was probably the weirdest thing I've ever done in my life - everything I'd ever read or been taught says to stay with the boat, but I knew this transfer had to be done quickly - so I unclipped Harvey." Van Selst never saw the recovery; he was too busy trying to get the boat under control and get it home. Witnesses say the Coast Guardsmen yanked Shlasky from the water and instantly began CPR as the boat raced back to its base at Station Golden Gate. Unfortunately, Harvey Shlasky could not be revived. He was airlifted to Marin General Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

-MH

Thanks for that.

 

if Schlaskey's life vest had activated.. or if he'd had a foamie on, instead..

if he'd had that 4:1 handy..

if he'd have released Shlasky earlier..

Thrown the MOB gear (more floatation) to him at a safer distance from the out of control boat..

radioed Razzberries for assistance...

 

20 minutes.. seems like so much time to deal.. and yet its gone like seconds.

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Its been a while since I read the J29 account.. but lets say your memory is correct.

They were DH as I recall.

 

I don't recall if the COB had a head injury, was incapacitated, or what.

I read this post and immediately think that the LEAST of the worries was that the jackline allowed him to go over.

..sailing in the Gulf o' Farallones? And they have no winch handle?

..the boat has broached and they can't round it up further?

didn't think to cut the kite halyard.. guy.. sheet?

release the mainsheet?

 

didn't throw the guy all the seat cushions to get him floating higher?

 

So many "what ifs"...

And if I recall, a good swimmer can make 2.5 knots.. not that you could do that in full gear.. but if you shove the tether under your armpit, turn your body sideways, turn head back towards the wake, you can get your head out of the water and buy time for your crew to get to work on bringing you in...

If the COB is unconcious, SOL on that...

 

I carry a separat 4:1 block and tackle for the express purpose of pulling dead weight out of the water.

 

But thanks for reminding me.. the crew an I have some brushing up to do on our response drills.

I'm not saying its gonna be easy.. but we should at least be prepared to do EVERYthing we can to save a life.

 

My own opinion is that too many people take the jacklines for granted, they take the PFD for granted, the EPIRB, etc.. etc.. Our abundance of safety gear, I think, lulls even the most experienced into complaceny.

NOTHING takes the pace of conservative boat handling and non-panicked response.

 

Dirge -- its clear you have never done this race before. If you have maybe never experienced the sort of conditions that makes it famous. For one I can't think of a race boat that packs cushins for this sort of race.

 

I've seen race boats with no main and tiny jib surfing waves between the Farallons and the GG. Swimming isn't even an option unless of course your thinking treading water so you can breath.

 

The only think I could ever come up with that might offer a chance when your at the end of your tether dragging behind a boat that can't be stopped or slowed enough to allow you back aboard is if there are fellow racers close by and aware of the problem and you simply cut your self loose to be picked up by another race boat which is standing by.

 

If no race boats are standing by then you hope to god that the boat rounds up and stays parked long enough for you to get back to the boat and back on board. Otherwise your only chance is for someone to winch you back to the boat.

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Dirge -- its clear you have never done this race before. If you have maybe never experienced the sort of conditions that makes it famous. For one I can't think of a race boat that packs cushins for this sort of race.

c'mon.. "seat cushions" = throwables... required by rules.

 

I have 2-4 on board... depending...

 

I've sailed this course a number of times.. and my purpose in this thread is to throw out ideas.. think out loud.

 

Analyze for critical thinking errors all you want..

Better it be done here than wait until one of us faces the conditons and/or a slight variation.

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c'mon.. "seat cushions" = throwables... required by rules.

 

I have 2-4 on board... depending...

 

I've sailed this course a number of times.. and my purpose in this thread is to throw out ideas.. think out loud.

 

Analyze for critical thinking errors all you want..

Better it be done here than wait until one of us faces the conditons and/or a slight variation.

 

 

Ok Fair enough - have you ever dragged someone behind your boat on purpose? Its an eye opener. For one you realize very quickly that the sailboat rudder isn't really designed to counter the force of a dragging body behind the boat the faster your moving the harder it gets to get helm response. Also even 2-3 knots boat speed the dragee in a bathing suit almost needs to hang on to their trunks to keep from loosing them. Add heavy fouleweather gear - harness boots and the drag/load they experience is very high all they will be able to do is either attempt to shed gear in an effort to be a little more slippery and less heavy or simply concentrate on getting air when they can.

 

A sailboat in big waves and 25+ knots of wind under bare poles no flapping sails can probably do 2+ knots add a flapping sail even a doused main thats grabbing air and the boat could easily push 3+ knots.

 

I'm not even sure a warm young strong crew with a proper winch handle and decent line could easily winch fully geared up crew back aboard a moving boat. Make it someone that just got dunked that was tired and cold to start with and the chances of them even being able to haul a fully geared person back into a stopped boat in rough water would be difficult if not impossible.

 

Which leads back to if you do double handed events like this you should have more than just a pick up crew but an experienced friend that knows the boat and the tools available along with having talked through such possiblities and what actions can be taken to get people back in the boat etc.

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The J29 MOB report was pretty sobering. Thanks for posting it again

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I'm not even sure a warm young strong crew with a proper winch handle and decent line could easily winch fully geared up crew back aboard a moving boat. Make it someone that just got dunked that was tired and cold to start with and the chances of them even being able to haul a fully geared person back into a stopped boat in rough water would be difficult if not impossible.

I never said any of this is "easy"

 

Meet me at RYC.. me and a crewmate will be doing just that before the summer distance race.. lifting dead weight. 200lbs of dead dirge out of the water and into his own Moore. Using the gear on board the Moore.

 

We'll see what it takes.. k?

 

Again.. I'm not harping on anybody having done something wrong here.. I'm throwing ideas out there.

 

I like to do dry runs.. helps clear the thought process for the real event.

Hopefully, we never see the real event to deal with.

 

 

FWIW.. I agree with Solo.. the auto inflates are not my cup of tea.

 

 

 

 

 

...

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I never said any of this is "easy"

 

Meet me at RYC.. me and a crewmate will be doing just that before the summer distance race.. lifting dead weight. 200lbs of dead dirge out of the water and into his own Moore. Using the gear on board the Moore.

 

We'll see what it takes.. k?

 

Again.. I'm not harping on anybody having done something wrong here.. I'm throwing ideas out there.

 

I like to do dry runs.. helps clear the thought process for the real event.

Hopefully, we never see the real event to deal with.

FWIW.. I agree with Solo.. the auto inflates are not my cup of tea.

...

 

 

I'm not a fan of the auto inflate either- which is why I don't have one. I agree with solo too they can really get in the way and even become a major snag getting back on the boat in that spit second things might be just right to do so.

 

I don't plan on doing any ocean racing for a while but I have plans to run the wife through MOB drills on the bay this spring given we have the E28 and are doing more double handed stuff on it.

 

Let us know when you plan on the MOB trial run over at RYC I'll try to be there as any experience in this will be good you never know when some little thing is either a major snag or could be a major bonus for getting someone back to the boat etc.

 

I'll need to loose a few more lbs to fit in my wetsuit so might need to pass on being the body. LOL

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A couple frames from the 2006 Crewed Lightship...The boat in question began with a knockdown near Pt Bonita. They traversed almpost to Mile rocks before recovering...

doesn't anybody know how to "heave-to"?

 

Even a panic "faux" "heave to" slows the boat.. dump that main ALL the way, trim the jib in as needed.. helm down HARD. Keeps the nose up... balances easily.

The boat will make very little headway... and creates a "slick" to lee of the boat.

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I have to go rig my mast..

 

Keep this thread alive.. if it saves one more life.. or one more boat.. or if one more person learns something, me included..

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doesn't anybody know how to "heave-to"?

 

Even a panic "faux" "heave to" slows the boat.. dump that main ALL the way, trim the jib in as needed.. helm down HARD. Keeps the nose up... balances easily.

The boat will make very little headway... and creates a "slick" to lee of the boat.

 

 

I think all of this is something where we need to experience what the boat will do and not do in various combinations which goes back to knowning your boat and having a wide range of experience regarding what it will do in various conditions etc.

 

LOL I would be very curious to see what the lighter and common race boats do or if they can even do so with a bit of a sail mess etc in heavy conditions. Some boats might come around and park fairly easy others might be just as dysfunctional going sideways taking a beating etc but hard to say till you try it.

 

I know the the Express 27 you can intentionally lay it over with the kite up mast on the water and the boat will park and be fairly stable in rough water but we weren't in the shorter steeper stuff right out by the gate in that case. We didn't have a man over board but we wanted to get the kite down and the intentional laydown worked fairly well.

 

There could be a few different ways to get each boat to park in a resonably stable manner to recover crew etc. Just takes trial and error to sort it out.

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ah, here we are getting somewhere. i once inflated my vest that has integral harness. it popped up and jammed my head up. my neck had no freedom. then i thought of how i would accomplish clawing my way in the boat with that thing in the way. i'd probably have to poke it once i was near the hull or it'd be just in the way. the lower part of the harness was at my lower rib level. i think the inflatable would be comfortable floating in the water, but it would interfere with any efforts to get me back onboard. since then i've been very keen of finding a foamie one instead and wear it.

 

how about a rolled up ladder on the stern with quick release tag bouncing at about water level? at least it gives you an option.

 

Even a 4' loop of webbing draped from the aft stanchions would give you a place to put a foot in and lift yourself aboard.

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On that block and tackle - on the express we had a 4:1 on the babystay - it had snap shackles top and bottom to be able to quickly become a MOB hoisting aid. Even in the event of a nasty knockdown, where all winch handles fled the coop, assuming the mast was still in the boat, the tackle would be right there at the ready, as long as there was still one able bodied person onboard to operate it.

 

I suppose you could rig up some sort of boarding device on each transom corner with a tackle, but those quick release rope ladders seem to make more sense.

 

Maybe a hand rail down the transom?

Save the plastic thingys that hold the cans together in 6-packs. Zip-tie a few of those together and run them off the back of the boat. Handy too, for making a big tarp like thingy to keep stuff from blowing out the back of a pick up.

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I have done this race many many times. I have been there when lives and boats were lost. I have to say this was the second most dangerous I have been on after the 98' Race (we turned around then). The worst part was that the shit hit the fan when it was relativly benign and the islands seemed so very close. It was manageable to slog through for a short distance however I would have turned around and gone home had it been like that at point Bonita. We had to turn 90 degrees several times to go up over breaking waves and had one break across the boat to weather of the islands. Very scary. Some people cut way way to close to the Island- does anyone know where the O-40 was wiped out?

M

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I have done this race many many times. I have been there when lives and boats were lost. I have to say this was the second most dangerous I have been on after the 98' Race (we turned around then). The worst part was that the shit hit the fan when it was relativly benign and the islands seemed so very close. It was manageable to slog through for a short distance however I would have turned around and gone home had it been like that at point Bonita. We had to turn 90 degrees several times to go up over breaking waves and had one break across the boat to weather of the islands. Very scary. Some people cut way way to close to the Island- does anyone know where the O-40 was wiped out?

M

 

 

Thank you for the reality check; it got rough. Your view (wisdom) above is appreciated. ~18 boats (?) retired before finishing, DNF.

 

 

You asked where. Pterodactyl rounded the Farallones. The incident was approximately 5 miles, ~xx minutes on the way back to SF. Rainbow transmitted to the Coast Guard their latitude.longitude on VHF 22. The partial position notes from VHF 22 are with the DHF.Race.Log ; the race log is not here.

 

 

Latitude 38 (link):

"Olson 40 Pterodactyl. ... said they were five miles east of the Farallones when both — who were not clipped in — were washed overboard by what he described as a "freak wave." The two were in the water for a short time, according to de Faymoreau, before being rescued by Clifford Shaw on his Crowther 36 Rainbow."

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Sail Magazine editor blog on DHF and Gitana 13 (gee, even those guys thought it was rough!).

Way to go Cliff!. Skipper not a believer in tethers..not even a couple days post launch.

bob

 

http://sailmagazine.blogspot.com/2008/03/s...y-swimming.html

 

Suddenly Swimming

 

I don't know why, but the Doublehanded Farallones Race produces more "adventures" than any other event on the California coast.

 

Well, a windy ocean, a narrow Golden Gate Strait, some pretty big currents and doing it in the springtime certainly factor in. We saw 30 knots out there over the weekend--Gitana 13 started for Yokohama because that's the breeze they wanted, but then the guys didn't like the sea state at all--and 30 knots is not uncommon in the springtime in the Gulf of the Farallones. And when it blows for a while you get your 10-15 foot seas and an occasional sneaker.

 

Having been around the Southeast Farallon a few times (or more), and being unable to remember a time when I ever clicked in with a harness, I reckon I won't be preaching to anyone what a good idea it is to do just that. But I suspect that two people by the names of Luc de Faymoreau and Disun Den Daas are recent converts to the concept.

 

They were pitched out of their boat and . . .

 

[Luc has checked in with a must-read comment, and he's not so sure about this harness thing. Find Comment at bottom. Thank you, Luc.]

 

. . . yep, just like that, there they were, swimming in the Pacific Ocean about five miles returned from the island and 20 miles out of the Gate. There had been a moment when something sneaked up on them, and they lost control (Luc: "We were SNAPPED off the boat in a violent motion, what I call a pitchpole/broach")and thus lost contact with one Olson 40 named Pterodactyl.

 

Fortunately, Clifford Shaw was nearby. He saw Pterodactyl go down and around and turn into the wind, then sail away looking not quite right. He went to investigate, and almost before the fear of death could set in, Faymoreau and Den Daas were aboard Shaw's Crowther 36 catamaran, Rainbow. They set out chasing Pterodactyl and were soon joined by the Coast Guard, which had been alerted when another boat encountered a crew-less Olson 40 and MOB gear in the water. It was too rough to transfer anyone aboard, however, and in the next scene we find our Samaritan Shaw donating his EPIRB to the cause. It was tossed into the cockpit of Pterodactyl.

 

Darkness fell.

 

At last report, boat awol out there somewhere. Sailors safe. An aerial search on Monday by a stalwart volunteer turned up nothing. (EPIRB presumably ejected from cockpit, much like sailors.)

 

Luc, if Pterodactyl beats Gitana to Japan, the beers are on me.

 

Okay, that's it. Don't overlook Luc's comment below, and if you want a good April Fool's read, I recommend clicking into Scuttlebutt Europe, pour l'exemple:

 

—Kimball

 

Posted by SAIL Magazine at

1 comments:

Luc said...

although the obvious lesson from this incident is to wear tethers, it is not clear that we would have survived any better had we been tethered. The reason I say this is because I do suspect this was a sneaker wave. We were not dropped off the boat, nor slid off the deck. we were on a large wave of unusual steepness, I remember saying to my buddy Disun, "hey, look at this one". He, eating an apple did not have time for any response because we were SNAPPED off the boat in a violent motion, (what I call a pitchpole/broach)which may have resulted in broken bones, back, or some other related injury, had we been wearing tethers. Disun commented that we had become complacent, the hard part of the race was over, and we were enjoying what an O-40 does best, surfing and playing in the waves on the way home.

 

Earlier, changing sails, and later reefing the main, we also did not have tethers, but we were focused on the task, planned our moves, and succeeded. The boat had a reefed main and a #3 jib. the wind was 25 to 30 knots true, and the waves were large, but not particularly scary huge.

 

any of you that race and have tried wearing a harness know that getting tangled in lines and hooked on winches and other hardware is so unworkable that we usually don't wear them. Maybe that's foolish, I don't know. I did hear that a guy was dragged until he drowned wearing a harness in a previous Double Handed Farallones Race.

As far as the swim was concerned, I think a wet suit and backpack with fins would have been more useful than a PFD. around here, cold is the biggest survival problem. A custom wetsuit would be the way to go, one that could float you face up, a pair of small fins, and one of those James Bond launching grappling hooks and we could have been back aboard.

 

Luc de Faymoreau

Pteradactyl

 

March 31, 2008 10:06 PM

 

 

 

Ok so the lat38 page explains that both crew on the Olson 40 were washed off the boat neither were on tethers. They were recovered by a boat that doesn't appear to be listed in the DH race.

 

They were able to get an EPIRB on the olson 40 and the CG is tracking the boat.

I've done plenty of these races to think that I would no doubt have my full kit and be teathered to the boat in the conditions they had on Saturday. Now this could have lead to a whole other challenge two sailors being dragged behind their boat? Assuming the teathers are long enough to allow for full exit of the cockpit.

 

In light of recent accidents in our usual ocean racing -- Damit guys use your head make sure your teathered to your boats and have all your gear in order. Stuff happens out past the GG and things can go way wrong in an instant.

 

Sail safe!!!

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