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Hey there,

 

What do you think of a no-cabin NO-MASTPOST i550?

This would clear space up a bit under the deck...

 

I think it's ok to give it a try, moreover it's easy to install the post at any time later, with no re-build at all.

 

 

I like this ring frame idea, BP! I'd probably beef up the ply sections with a laminate of three 6mm sections, but maybe that's overkill (I'm not an engineer ;-).........

 

 

 

...perhaps a few layers of good ply,, clamps,,, and moosh a bunch of carbon between layers :)

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A ring frame. Like a Corsair Pulse?

 

I could break that too Tim. ;-)

 

And I need to stop breaking my boats and break somebody else's some more.

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Wess, the boat needs some TLC. Went out with the fam yesterday and the the keel issue is even worse. Took about an hour to finally get that bastid up. So I need to get serious about making some mods on that puppy, which may or may not include a Couchsurfer solution (involving a Saws-All and some serious sweating). Will keep you posted.

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Bummer. Have any boats had the same issue and what was the cause/solution?

 

I do fee your pain in my own way. Spent much more time working on boats this weekend than enjoying them though I did get out each day (Friday, Sat, Sun). Your glass work is too a much higher standard than my repairs were just done to (by me on rudder and bow... ugh!!). And don't get me started on electrical, mechanical, etc...

 

And I gotta get hauled and get the bottom painted. Dove the boat and wow what a mess. Me soooo tired...

 

Oddly the only thing that just keeps working and working, day after day and year after year and decade after... is the jetski. And it likes it when there is no breeze! Well, the Laser keeps going too but it likes at least some breeze!

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Some issues with other boats and they cut out the inner sleeve in the keelbox. I have gotten some advice on the i550 class site.

 

Were you the nitwit buzzing us on the jetski yesterday? :-)

 

My favorite was the guy who went by in an 18 foot powerboat who was angrily waving us off the river. I had to laugh out loud. My family goes back to the early 1800's on the Magothy, working the water and oyster trade, my great grandfather owned an operated a bugeye and worked on the river and Ches his entire life. Here's this yahoo with a gold chain somehow thinking his shitty little Trojan owned the river....tooo funny.

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Some issues with other boats and they cut out the inner sleeve in the keelbox. I have gotten some advice on the i550 class site.

 

Were you the nitwit buzzing us on the jetski yesterday? :-)

 

My favorite was the guy who went by in an 18 foot powerboat who was angrily waving us off the river. I had to laugh out loud. My family goes back to the early 1800's on the Magothy, working the water and oyster trade, my great grandfather owned an operated a bugeye and worked on the river and Ches his entire life. Here's this yahoo with a gold chain somehow thinking his shitty little Trojan owned the river....tooo funny.

Naw, we were the the old folks (just the wife and I) buzzing around in the Whaler with the SSA burgee on the bow and the beat up prop (don't tell the kids) from having hit a rock or crab-pot or something. Our way to have fun while the glass repair set-up on the bow (and rudder) of Lola. Let me know if you need help. I am generally better at breaking things than fixing them but am always happy to sit around, drink your beer and comment while you work.

 

The dual scissor jack (both sides) and bar through the keel head eye bolt will not work?

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Yes, the dually jack thing worked great, but only to a certain height (jack fully extended vertically. Then, half way up, we had an issue because the rest of the boards we had were too long to slip under the keel stopper at the top of the foil...finally found the wood we needed at PSA's scrap wood pile. No problem after that. Bent the crap out of a 1/2 stainless rod I was using though! And the whole foil/bulb structure only weighs 180 or less.

 

Biggest issue is the damn 3:1 system on the boom is too small and too little mechanical advantage. I need to use at least a 40mm fiddle and a bigger cleating block system.

 

what I have sucks, that's for sure.....

 

other i550 owners, what are y'all using to lift your keels up?

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Yes, the dually jack thing worked great, but only to a certain height (jack fully extended vertically. Then, half way up, we had an issue because the rest of the boards we had were too long to slip under the keel stopper at the top of the foil...finally found the wood we needed at PSA's scrap wood pile. No problem after that. Bent the crap out of a 1/2 stainless rod I was using though! And the whole foil/bulb structure only weighs 180 or less.

 

Biggest issue is the damn 4:1 system on the boom is too small and too little mechanical advantage. I need to use at least a 40mm fiddle and a bigger cleating block system.

 

what I have sucks, that's for sure.....

 

other i550 owners, what are y'all using to lift your keels up?

That's a LOT of friction! Sounds like you need to do some serious sanding.

 

I use a 4:1 off the main halyard. No problem... A little tip bend on the mast, but easy peesey. PDX #2 just grunts it up... #1 uses a modified 8' ladder with a winch under the top step... Overkil but effective.

 

Biggest difference is all the PDX boats have rectangular keel boxes (4" X ?") and the top 14" or whatever of keel that is inside the boat is 2"X?" And the sides are lined with Delrin shims... That shit is slippery and easy to machine so you get a tight fit yet it slides up and down like butter.

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BTW... The PDX crew has a race ready boat for sale... $15k on a trailer and ready to go with North sails... Just bring your family wagon and tow it home!

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Wess, the boat needs some TLC. Went out with the fam yesterday and the the keel issue is even worse. Took about an hour to finally get that bastid up. So I need to get serious about making some mods on that puppy, which may or may not include a Couchsurfer solution (involving a Saws-All and some serious sweating). Will keep you posted.

 

 

...renovations are daunting,, but once you make that first cut**, and get a smell of wood,, you realize the work is a lot cleaner and simpler than doing full-on composite work.... basically, simple carpentry plus some epoxy.

 

....it's -possible- I might have made a mold of my keel-trunk, has a tapered slot built-in,, requires 1'' plastic shaped to fit.

 

 

....**......https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dK9eLe8EQps

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Yes, the dually jack thing worked great, but only to a certain height (jack fully extended vertically. Then, half way up, we had an issue because the rest of the boards we had were too long to slip under the keel stopper at the top of the foil...finally found the wood we needed at PSA's scrap wood pile. No problem after that. Bent the crap out of a 1/2 stainless rod I was using though! And the whole foil/bulb structure only weighs 180 or less.

 

Biggest issue is the damn 3:1 system on the boom is too small and too little mechanical advantage. I need to use at least a 40mm fiddle and a bigger cleating block system.

 

what I have sucks, that's for sure.....

 

other i550 owners, what are y'all using to lift your keels up?

So it sounds like this was not like the others where once it moved an inch it was easy... just needed to "break it loose" kinda thing. Sounds like now it was fighting the full height of the jacks when being lifted straight up. I will try to call you later but if so I gotta wonder (go back to that long email string) that its getting wedged for/aft in the keel box with the head of the keel pushed forward at the top and the back/fin pushed aft at the bottom. Remember the trick we use with the boom as a lever arm does not pull straight up. There is an easy way to test this theory and easily resolve it when in the water if this is the case. Gotta run but will call later. Chow.

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Yes, the dually jack thing worked great, but only to a certain height (jack fully extended vertically. Then, half way up, we had an issue because the rest of the boards we had were too long to slip under the keel stopper at the top of the foil...finally found the wood we needed at PSA's scrap wood pile. No problem after that. Bent the crap out of a 1/2 stainless rod I was using though! And the whole foil/bulb structure only weighs 180 or less.

 

Biggest issue is the damn 4:1 system on the boom is too small and too little mechanical advantage. I need to use at least a 40mm fiddle and a bigger cleating block system.

 

what I have sucks, that's for sure.....

 

other i550 owners, what are y'all using to lift your keels up?

That's a LOT of friction! Sounds like you need to do some serious sanding.

 

I use a 4:1 off the main halyard. No problem... A little tip bend on the mast, but easy peesey. PDX #2 just grunts it up... #1 uses a modified 8' ladder with a winch under the top step... Overkil but effective.

 

Biggest difference is all the PDX boats have rectangular keel boxes (4" X ?") and the top 14" or whatever of keel that is inside the boat is 2"X?" And the sides are lined with Delrin shims... That shit is slippery and easy to machine so you get a tight fit yet it slides up and down like butter.

 

 

Good stuff, THANKS TeamGlad!

 

Wess, the boat needs some TLC. Went out with the fam yesterday and the the keel issue is even worse. Took about an hour to finally get that bastid up. So I need to get serious about making some mods on that puppy, which may or may not include a Couchsurfer solution (involving a Saws-All and some serious sweating). Will keep you posted.

 

 

...renovations are daunting,, but once you make that first cut**, and get a smell of wood,, you realize the work is a lot cleaner and simpler than doing full-on composite work.... basically, simple carpentry plus some epoxy.

 

....it's -possible- I might have made a mold of my keel-trunk, has a tapered slot built-in,, requires 1'' plastic shaped to fit.

 

 

....**......https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dK9eLe8EQps

 

 

Thanks for the moral support, couch! I might have to wait until Baltimore temps moderate a bit ;-)

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Yes, the dually jack thing worked great, but only to a certain height (jack fully extended vertically. Then, half way up, we had an issue because the rest of the boards we had were too long to slip under the keel stopper at the top of the foil...finally found the wood we needed at PSA's scrap wood pile. No problem after that. Bent the crap out of a 1/2 stainless rod I was using though! And the whole foil/bulb structure only weighs 180 or less.

 

Biggest issue is the damn 3:1 system on the boom is too small and too little mechanical advantage. I need to use at least a 40mm fiddle and a bigger cleating block system.

 

what I have sucks, that's for sure.....

 

other i550 owners, what are y'all using to lift your keels up?

Viper 640 (about the same keel weight or maybe even slightly more) uses a 4:1 tackle that attaches to a line that goes to the hounds (sits with a bungee a little above the boom when not in use) but it sounds like you have some serious binding going on - the keel is light enough that you can pretty much lift it straight by hand if it wasn't stuck

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Wess, the boat needs some TLC. Went out with the fam yesterday and the the keel issue is even worse. Took about an hour to finally get that bastid up. So I need to get serious about making some mods on that puppy, which may or may not include a Couchsurfer solution (involving a Saws-All and some serious sweating). Will keep you posted.

 

 

...renovations are daunting,, but once you make that first cut**, and get a smell of wood,, you realize the work is a lot cleaner and simpler than doing full-on composite work.... basically, simple carpentry plus some epoxy.

 

....it's -possible- I might have made a mold of my keel-trunk, has a tapered slot built-in,, requires 1'' plastic shaped to fit.

 

 

....**......https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dK9eLe8EQps

 

 

Thanks for the moral support, couch! I might have to wait until Baltimore temps moderate a bit ;-)

 

 

 

 

.....yah well. ...in the meantime, you can claim to be the fist ever i550 fixed-keel! :P

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couch, Hah, OK, I can go with that!

 

Christian, yeah, some serious binding. I suspect the keel on the 640 is only about 1.5 X mine, so yeah 4:1 oughta do it....but it doesn't. My lifting tackle is underspec'd though, so I may go overkill with a set of Harken 40 mm triples for a big-ass 6:1. If I can't

lift the keel, I can't use the boat, especially with my lightweight kids.

 

We've found that levering the top of the foil forward from the back of the keelbox helps, so I think the weight distribution on the bulb is causing the top to lever back against the sleeve and box top/bottom. Whatever it is, it sucks....

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I am also using a 4 to 1 which doubles as my vang to pull my keel up. One thing that makes a big difference is having the boat balanced side to side (I do it with everyone off the boat) if the boat is heeled at all it will not want to be raised.

 

For those of you building I would recommend making the sleeve by wrapping a thick 3/16 cardboard wrapped around your finished keel section, then lay your sleeve up around the cardboard, giving you a reasonable sized space for the keel to slide up and down. I made the last 6 inches or so tighter where the keel exited the hull (see photo)

post-100257-0-35202700-1466553767_thumb.jpg

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I am also using a 4 to 1 which doubles as my vang to pull my keel up. One thing that makes a big difference is having the boat balanced side to side (I do it with everyone off the boat) if the boat is heeled at all it will not want to be raised.

 

For those of you building I would recommend making the sleeve by wrapping a thick 3/16 cardboard wrapped around your finished keel section, then lay your sleeve up around the cardboard, giving you a reasonable sized space for the keel to slide up and down. I made the last 6 inches or so tighter where the keel exited the hull (see photo)

Or make the head of the foil rectangular and the box and inch of so bigger. Way easier to construct both the box and the keel foil and way easier to shim with Delrin or Starboard or the HDMP plastic of your choice.

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I am also using a 4 to 1 which doubles as my vang to pull my keel up. One thing that makes a big difference is having the boat balanced side to side (I do it with everyone off the boat) if the boat is heeled at all it will not want to be raised.

 

For those of you building I would recommend making the sleeve by wrapping a thick 3/16 cardboard wrapped around your finished keel section, then lay your sleeve up around the cardboard, giving you a reasonable sized space for the keel to slide up and down. I made the last 6 inches or so tighter where the keel exited the hull (see photo)

Or make the head of the foil rectangular and the box and inch of so bigger. Way easier to construct both the box and the keel foil and way easier to shim with Delrin or Starboard or the HDMP plastic of your choice.

 

 

 

...this...^^. ...why are you guys so stubburn to stay with something that is proven to be highly dysfunctional and invites catastrophe in the event of a grounding?? :mellow:

 

 

make the keelbox ~2-3'' longer than the keel,, use shearpins at the bottom of the delrin chocks, and fill all excess area with 2 part foam poured into plastic bags. ;)

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"...this...^^. ...why are you guys so stubburn to stay with something that is proven to be highly dysfunctional and invites catastrophe in the event of a grounding?? :mellow:"

 

Mine has a foam crush box around the sleeve in case of grounding, we have stumps in one of our lakes. FYI: I told you guys I would be out for a race in the Pacific Northwest this year but not going to make it, due to a not so fun, divorce after 28 years,,, so having to regroup this year. I would like to make Delta Ditch next year if the i550 attendance holds up. :):wacko::blink::o

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Sorry to hear that, i550sailor! I wonder what the tally is for people who have entered divorce proceedings while building an i550? I bet it's probably into 2 figures by now....

 

OK you guys have convinced me...I'll rework the whole keel thing when I pull the boat out for the winter!

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Sorry to hear that, i550sailor! I wonder what the tally is for people who have entered divorce proceedings while building an i550? I bet it's probably into 2 figures by now....

 

OK you guys have convinced me...I'll rework the whole keel thing when I pull the boat out for the winter!

You can also take a look at the way it is done on Thompson's sportboats (including mine) - it has a recess in the keelbox each side of the keel at max width - slightly wedge shaped. On the keel are 2 corresponding delrin wedges that fit snugly into the recess'es when the keel is down - rock solid even before you put the 2 keel tie down bolts in. The wedges/recess'es are almost the entire height of the keel box. On the bigger T-boats (30+ feet) the top of the keel is a rectangular section - but that is way overkill for your boat. You know where my boat lives so you are welcome to take a look before starting up the saws-all

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Sorry to hear that, i550sailor! I wonder what the tally is for people who have entered divorce proceedings while building an i550? I bet it's probably into 2 figures by now....

 

OK you guys have convinced me...I'll rework the whole keel thing when I pull the boat out for the winter!

Note to self... program cell to reject calls from Tim this winter. :P

 

If its not too hot or too cold (yea right) or raining, or too sunny, or cloudy, and if you have cold beer that is not domestic, and as long as I don't have to bring my own tools, and so long as I can point and laugh while you work...

 

I am happy to try to "help" this weekend.

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Sorry to hear that, i550sailor! I wonder what the tally is for people who have entered divorce proceedings while building an i550? I bet it's probably into 2 figures by now....

 

OK you guys have convinced me...I'll rework the whole keel thing when I pull the boat out for the winter

 

 

...yah sad news. :mellow:

 

On a brighter note,, it seems 'sail lady' in Colorado, who posted above, is with her partner in their build :)

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Sorry to hear that, i550sailor! I wonder what the tally is for people who have entered divorce proceedings while building an i550? I bet it's probably into 2 figures by now....

 

OK you guys have convinced me...I'll rework the whole keel thing when I pull the boat out for the winter

 

 

...yah sad news. :mellow:

 

On a brighter note,, it seems 'sail lady' in Colorado, who posted above, is with her partner in their build :)

 

 

 

 

It's pretty cool they are building their boat together. A really awesome couple, I can' wait to race them.

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I am also using a 4 to 1 which doubles as my vang to pull my keel up. One thing that makes a big difference is having the boat balanced side to side (I do it with everyone off the boat) if the boat is heeled at all it will not want to be raised.

 

For those of you building I would recommend making the sleeve by wrapping a thick 3/16 cardboard wrapped around your finished keel section, then lay your sleeve up around the cardboard, giving you a reasonable sized space for the keel to slide up and down. I made the last 6 inches or so tighter where the keel exited the hull (see photo)

Or make the head of the foil rectangular and the box and inch of so bigger. Way easier to construct both the box and the keel foil and way easier to shim with Delrin or Starboard or the HDMP plastic of your choice.

 

 

 

...this...^^. ...why are you guys so stubburn to stay with something that is proven to be highly dysfunctional and invites catastrophe in the event of a grounding?? :mellow:

 

 

make the keelbox ~2-3'' longer than the keel,, use shearpins at the bottom of the delrin chocks, and fill all excess area with 2 part foam poured into plastic bags.

 

 

 

....I came across the mold for the keelbox I used,, could knock a trunk out for $100 plus shipping.

PM me if interested and I'll send pictures. ;)

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Mark V Viper 640s now have the wedge system. I haven't seen it yet, but I heard good things. 6:1 lifting tackle is so much nicer than 4:1.

 

Cheers

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I am confused at the 4:1 or 6:1 comments. Forgive the idle curiosity but what do these bulbs and fins weigh about? I would have guessed not much as I'm a fat old guy and have grunted one of these up by hand (after we got it unstuck and moving).

 

Not throwing stones here but should it be this difficult? Seems like there has to be some binding going on and if lots of boats are needing a tackle system for the keel lift maybe the trunk could stand for a rethink in terms of design??

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Thanks Christian!

 

Did you buy Dan's T-650? I saw and took photos of the old "Anarchy" when Dan had it out at SSA last year for an early season event (on shore) displaying a collection of boats (no thanks, don't want to join the Lightning fleet, but thanks for asking). The big rectangle might be the way to go eventually.

 

post-768-0-69196200-1466699579_thumb.jpg

 

Ever see the one-off Problem Child that Brian Jones built? They have a wedge-shaped keel top that fits down into a female wedge (gulp) and that seems to make a really effective set-up.

 

Wess, the whole thing weighs about 180. Sure I can clean & jerk that and you probably could too :rolleyes: but the issue is limited access to the lifting point, bad geometry on the lifting load, etc. Like Streetwise says, 6:1 beats 4:1. Another issue is the acorn size mini-blocks on the lifting tackle...gonna upgrade that to 40mm.

 

No help needed this weekend, just some 60 grit on the orbital sander and a bucket of vas-o-line should do it!

 

Thanks for all the input, people...you can now get back to our regularly scheduled program :)

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Just a $1.80. Why don't you just use my Laser vang... think that has 15:1. :o

 

Yes, I am kidding.

 

But an orbital sander you say? What make and model? Hummm, maybe I should stop by. Need a new sander as mine went swimming unexpectedly last week. Or you can bring it over when you help me get the new outboard onto Lola while in the water on Friday. :ph34r:

 

Seriously, good luck. Really cool boat. Hope you get to spend more time sailing and less time working.

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Wess, the whole thing weighs about 180. Sure I can clean & jerk that and you probably could too :rolleyes: but the issue is limited access to the lifting point, bad geometry on the lifting load, etc. Like Streetwise says, 6:1 beats 4:1. Another issue is the acorn size mini-blocks on the lifting tackle...gonna upgrade that to 40mm.

 

 

...sounds like the whole system needs a re-design. oh. ...waidaminute,, nevermind :mellow::rolleyes:

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Thanks Christian!

 

Did you buy Dan's T-650? I saw and took photos of the old "Anarchy" when Dan had it out at SSA last year for an early season event (on shore) displaying a collection of boats (no thanks, don't want to join the Lightning fleet, but thanks for asking). The big rectangle might be the way to go eventually.

 

attachicon.gifTboatAtSSA.jpg

 

Ever see the one-off Problem Child that Brian Jones built? They have a wedge-shaped keel top that fits down into a female wedge (gulp) and that seems to make a really effective set-up.

 

Wess, the whole thing weighs about 180. Sure I can clean & jerk that and you probably could too :rolleyes: but the issue is limited access to the lifting point, bad geometry on the lifting load, etc. Like Streetwise says, 6:1 beats 4:1. Another issue is the acorn size mini-blocks on the lifting tackle...gonna upgrade that to 40mm.

 

No help needed this weekend, just some 60 grit on the orbital sander and a bucket of vas-o-line should do it!

 

Thanks for all the input, people...you can now get back to our regularly scheduled program :)

Nope - I was talking about my Viper 830, which is a Thommo design - Dan's boat is a Shaw 650 and that boat has one of the WORST lifting keel setups I have ever used - truly horrible and prone to really fuck up the keel blade. - Dont go that route. The boat is fun to sail though - just a really bad lifting keel setup

 

Have seen PC - didn't study the keel in detail though. PC is sitting looking very sad at Port Annapolis

 

My boat lives at EYC Drystall

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Recently Dwyer started making the DM-4 in a 29 foot stick, but just a few years ago it was available in the 24' 7" length. .An inner Sleeve and a short section made up the differences.

 

Early on, Lunatic Fringe had a mast come down. If I remember right, it was a compression post failure. Wild Child lost an old Kenyon H section about five years ago. The last i550 mast I remember coming down was a CF stick during a race on the west coast last year.

 

 

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Recently Dwyer started making the DM-4 in a 29 foot stick, but just a few years ago it was available in the 24' 7" length. .An inner Sleeve and a short section made up the differences.

 

Early on, Lunatic Fringe had a mast come down. If I remember right, it was a compression post failure. Wild Child lost an old Kenyon H section about five years ago. The last i550 mast I remember coming down was a CF stick during a race on the west coast last year.

 

 

.

 

...I think there was a 49er stick that failed in the early daze in Aus.

 

...best to stick with a mast that's designed for similar weight and sail area as i550 has.

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This will be a hijack, apologies but you guys might be qualified to help. I have a 24ft, DM-4 section from my stillborn i550. I am now working on a "turbo" Venture 21. I am contemplating lengthening the section I have to about 27 or 28 ft which would allow me to use used viper sails. Spar length and sail area would be smaller than that of an i550 so I guess nothing to worry about but obviously displacement is more at around 1200lbs. Not sure how to tell if this is a good or terrible idea ?

 

Again sorry for the hijack.

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.

 

...this is the i550 thread. It is the undead. Time has shown that it survives -all- hijacks! :lol:

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I have no personal interest in this boat, but thought I'd bring it up in case anyone is interested. Meade Gougeon has slashed the price on his very nice carbon rig i550 "Hot Canary" to $8,000. I'm only sharing this because I've seen the boat up close and I've spent some time talking to Meade about it and think it needs to find a good home. The boat is in the Tampa area. Deets on the West Coast Trailer Sailing Squadron "for sale" pages.

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Recently Dwyer started making the DM-4 in a 29 foot stick, but just a few years ago it was available in the 24' 7" length. .An inner Sleeve and a short section made up the differences.

 

Early on, Lunatic Fringe had a mast come down. If I remember right, it was a compression post failure. Wild Child lost an old Kenyon H section about five years ago. The last i550 mast I remember coming down was a CF stick during a race on the west coast last year.

 

 

.

 

...I think there was a 49er stick that failed in the early daze in Aus.

 

...best to stick with a mast that's designed for similar weight and sail area as i550 has.

Baby Faced Assassin was running a first generation 49er stick. They were known to fall out of 49ers so the writing was on the wall. It fell out of the boat first day she came

To duel with TTB. She ended up with a brand new longer carbon stick with new working sails. I think she is sailing about 2hrs south from me now. No idea about TTB though. Carbon vs alloy stick really only comes into play if you like sailing on your ear everywhere or you are trying to shed some weight. TTB had a pretty beefy alloy mast and would carry our masthead chute up to the high end 20's of wind speed.

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So,,,,, While launching the boat last Friday for a regatta, the keel dropped from full height and fractured the keel trunk (i did not realize the damage until later), I should have checked the air chamber under the cockpit but figured the fiberglass would be flexible enough to absorb the shock, in the first race the boat was lethargic at best, although we did hit 9+ downwind I couldn't figure out why we were not planing, in the second race we got hit by a 40+ MPH micro burst that turtled two other boats and broke another boats mast.

 

Long story short, we had 2 1/2" to 3" of water inside the entire underside of the cockpit, my math puts the water in the hull at around 400 pounds which aided in our turtling.

 

Lesson learned, don't drop your f#*king keel while launching.

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So,,,,, While launching the boat last Friday for a regatta, the keel dropped from full height and fractured the keel trunk (i did not realize the damage until later), I should have checked the air chamber under the cockpit but figured the fiberglass would be flexible enough to absorb the shock, in the first race the boat was lethargic at best, although we did hit 9+ downwind I couldn't figure out why we were not planing, in the second race we got hit by a 40+ MPH micro burst that turtled two other boats and broke another boats mast.

 

Long story short, we had 2 1/2" to 3" of water inside the entire underside of the cockpit, my math puts the water in the hull at around 400 pounds which aided in our turtling.

 

Lesson learned, don't drop your f#*king keel while launching.

 

 

...good lesson to learn! :rolleyes:

...reminds me of my first race with the PDX mafia,,,

...... when transferring worksheets, I somehow dropped.. 'plug drill-hole in keeltrunk' :wacko:

 

 

....the good news for you,, the keel remained in place when you turtled! :P

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the keel remained in place when you turtled!

 

 

Oh good point. Snipes sails with a metal daggerboard. Not as heavy as this obviously but the daggerboard retention systems that are rigged on Snipes could be helpful here. Sure would suck to turtle and have the keel slide back in causing damage (or slide back out upon righting causing damage. A few bucks and minutes spent here sure could save a lot of $s and safety issues downstream.

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Has anyone said that the Ringframe idea allows for fuckoff long retractable sprit on centerline avoiding articulating complexities? seems like a simple turbo option?

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Has anyone said that the Ringframe idea allows for fuckoff long retractable sprit on centerline avoiding articulating complexities? seems like a simple turbo option?

 

 

...TURBO OPTION!!?? :lol:

 

 

......perhaps you should sail an i550 before you suggest it needs more sail area :mellow:

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Has anyone said that the Ringframe idea allows for fuckoff long retractable sprit on centerline avoiding articulating complexities? seems like a simple turbo option?

 

 

...TURBO OPTION!!?? :lol:

 

 

......perhaps you should sail an i550 before you suggest it needs more sail area :mellow:

 

 

Yep,,, the boat has plenty of sail, we hit 9+ downwind with three people on board and lugging 400 pounds of water. This was a shot taken shortly before turtling.

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Has anyone said that the Ringframe idea allows for fuckoff long retractable sprit on centerline avoiding articulating complexities? seems like a simple turbo option?

Only time they are underpowered is upwind in light air.

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Has anyone said that the Ringframe idea allows for fuckoff long retractable sprit on centerline avoiding articulating complexities? seems like a simple turbo option?

 

 

...TURBO OPTION!!?? :lol:

 

 

......perhaps you should sail an i550 before you suggest it needs more sail area :mellow:

 

 

Yep,,, the boat has plenty of sail, we hit 9+ downwind with three people on board and lugging 400 pounds of water. This was a shot taken shortly before turtling.

 

What kind of gybing angles do you see in those conditions?

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What kind of gybing angles.........?

 

 

 

.....between 90 and 180,, depending on wind strength :mellow:

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Anyone know where the beavertail bulb plug might be? I think the last we heard was that it made its way to Singapore. If it's still intact, there's a builder in Italy and one in Canada that would like to use it.

 

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Canadian beaver tail plug? That maneuver is part of growing up around here!

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Wings to be soldered on after casting

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The mould for the bulb was shipped to Ebbe Larsen. He was willing to pay the shipping cost to Singapore.

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Mr Ford, did you resolve your keel / keel box issues?

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Just started building that bulb minus the beaver tail for the L650. Current bulb is 1300mm long so trying a shorter fatter bulb as an experiment.

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Hey monster, yes, it is much better with the 6:1 and also we figurerd out better ergonomics in terms of where to place Humans when lifting. Turns out standing on the coach roof straddling the companionway and pulling up from there gets the most out of the lifting system.

 

I KNEW I shouldn't have used depleted uranium for that damn bulb! :rolleyes:

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Hey monster, yes, it is much better with the 6:1 and also we figurerd out better ergonomics in terms of where to place Humans when lifting. Turns out standing on the coach roof straddling the companionway and pulling up from there gets the most out of the lifting system.

 

I KNEW I shouldn't have used depleted uranium for that damn bulb! :rolleyes:

Pics or it never happened (the easy lift).

 

And before you SaY what I no yuo will say; I didt post about ut on SA.

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Would anyone mind chiming in on what they finished the bottom of their boats with? I have 4 coats of west with barrier 420 added. Next will be a primer, then bottom coat ,below the waterline, and for the top sides 2 part poly. Leaning towards perfection, for topside, but not sure of below waterline products. Thx

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Dry sailed mostly. Possible mooring in the prime summer months

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VC performance epoxy is an excellant product.

 

+1 It's been on my boat 10 yrs now. No issues whatsoever. White looks just like gelcoat after wetsanding with 600.

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Thanks , I was thinking that was the way to go. Appreciate the experience

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VC performance epoxy is an excellant product.

+1 It's been on my boat 10 yrs now. No issues whatsoever. White looks just like gelcoat after wetsanding with 600.

 

 

 

...yes, it's great paint,, but imprtant to note that it doesn't spray, flow out bristol like other 2part poly's,, sprays more like gelcoat,, leaving similar to the texture of orange peel... sanding required to finish.

For the sanding,, start at ~180-220grit... it's best to get the first stage of sanding done the next day,, before the paint acheives full hardness ;)

 

So yaah, great paint,, but a lot of extra labor time :mellow:

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So after years of sanding this project, I am worried about going over it again? Hah, it's now a labour of love , or an obsession with the Hutchins speed file. Shoulders are like the Incredible Hulk these days. Thanks all for the reflections. Weather has cooled enough to get back to the boat shed. Hoping for more visible progress soon...

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Does that have an anti divot auto guide?

.

 

 

...pfft,, just don't speed it up before making contact :wacko:

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random thought... if you had the data files and cnc'd the panels for an i550 out of aluminum and then welded it together do you think that would work?

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random thought... if you had the data files and cnc'd the panels for an i550 out of aluminum and then welded it together do you think that would work?

 

 

...my guess?.......it'd sound and perform like an oilcan ...and,or be really heavy :mellow:

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Disagree, it would probably be lighter. Oilcan issue can be cured easily with lightweight U stringers, like you'd find in any fishing tinny.

 

The issue would be whether or not it's class-legal. Which it probably wouldn't be. If there were a class. Which there isn't. Unless you are in the Portland part of Canada :rolleyes:

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Real Canadians run cabin versions, makes mounting the wood stoves easier than the flush deck models...as for aluminum, I think it would be cold to sit on. I would be interested what the cost comparison would be. Welded aluminum boats ain't cheap around here....

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Disagree, it would probably be lighter. Oilcan issue can be cured easily with lightweight U stringers, like you'd find in any fishing tinny.

 

The issue would be whether or not it's class-legal. Which it probably wouldn't be. If there were a class. Which there isn't. Unless you are in the Portland part of Canada :rolleyes:

 

You don't happen to own tin snips do you?

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Bump... Boat for sale in Portland... ready to go, fast, carbon foils and spars, North Sails... blah blah blah... bring your checkbook...

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yours?

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What happened to the i550 in aus? I just had a quick check to see what the cbh and SMS ratings were, nothing up for either due to lack of boats?

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They had a big clean up of the cbh list recently. TTB was on there for a long time, but this all happened long after I sold the boat. I550 never met the SMS requirements.

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What was the i550 cbh, if you can remember? I can probably find the results from one of the ccyc regattas somewhere, but I don't want to dig through my old backups

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Anyone know where the beavertail bulb plug might be? I think the last we heard was that it made its way to Singapore. If it's still intact, there's a builder in Italy and one in Canada that would like to use it.

 

attachicon.gifBeavBulb.jpg

The bulb you made are safe and sound with me ready for the next casting. Let me know who is next in the line and I will DHL it immediately

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I recently cast my bulb here in B.C. It weighed in at 155 lbs. I have the wooden pattern used for the cement mold, if anyone close is interested

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I recently cast my bulb here in B.C. It weighed in at 155 lbs. I have the wooden pattern used for the cement mold, if anyone close is interested

 

In recent years, we've mostly learned that the boats don't really need a bulb. Definitely don't need a max weight foil/bulb. This is of course with carbon rigs. The weight of the bulb seems irrelevant for tin rigs in heavy air and big waves during a broach; in other words, you will still turtle or at least be standing on the foil before the ride is over.

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After taking way too long to build hull #296, I finally went sailing in early Aug. Mist has a 155 pound keel and a tin (Dywer DM-5) rig. By no means do I know the ins and outs of sailing a sportboat. I feel no rest when sailing this boat in winds greater than 12 knots. I feel I have been pushing the boat to the limits of the crew (we've experienced many calamities). The asym has been the most challenging. Wrapping the lazy sheet around the bulb during a jibe, getting caught in too much air, on a reach, on a plane, with the rudder retracted too far. On this occasion I was knocked down shortly after jibing the spin in 16ish knots of wind. The mast was in the water and one crew was thrown to leeward. Myself and my 110 pound daughter were on the high side watching at the bulb dance well out of the water. It took awhile (couple a minutes) but the boat finally righted itself, suprizingly we had no inrush of water into the cabin. All in all the boat performed well and I feel I was pushing may luck as I was sooo close to going all the way upside-down.

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The asym has been the most challenging. Wrapping the lazy sheet around the bulb during a jibe.

If you haven't figured this out yet, switch to inside gybes. The sprit is plenty long to create a generous slot for inside gybes. The lazy sheet is therefore contained and no longer a bulb wrapping hazzard.

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