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MR.CLEAN

Beater to Heater

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In honor of our good pals Shife, Burnsy, Ziggy and the rest of the Anarchists aboard the beater 80's Dehler DB1 'Heatwave,' we've got a little contest for you: Nominate your favorite “rags to riches” boat and tell us the story of how a hunk 'o shit became a hot race boat. The 'wave already has a head start (and its own thread on the process), but we know that tons of you cheap bastards have figured out how to get your Pinto-priced boat to win against the best. Let's hear how you did it.

 

The best two stories will get two very cool prizes, and remember – pics or it never happened.

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In honor of our good pals Shife, Burnsy, Ziggy and the rest of the Anarchists aboard the beater 80's Dehler DB1 'Heatwave,' we've got a little contest for you: Nominate your favorite "rags to riches" boat and tell us the story of how a hunk 'o shit became a hot race boat. The 'wave already has a head start (and its own thread on the process), but we know that tons of you cheap bastards have figured out how to get your Pinto-priced boat to win against the best. Let's hear how you did it.

 

The best two stories will get two very cool prizes, and remember – pics or it never happened.

 

What are the prizes ;)

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Well, I only have the start of the story so this is just a bump on the thread..

 

Starts in 2004 with a 1982 T-10, delaminated hull, used/abused by cadets at SUNY Maritime, bought for a modest amount. 3 yrs in the back yard, while I raced on OPB's and occasionally worked on her. New core sections, splashed late last season, 8th out of 10 in 7 heats at the 2007 Fall Series.

 

New sails this season, building new crew from scratch.... DFL, DNF, DNF in our first regatta a couple of weeks ago.. a long road ahead!

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Clearly one of my favorite boats was the an old Sonoma 30, Great Red Shark. My 2 old friends from Hawaii , bought it from a guy that was using it to transport lumber from Oahu to Kawaii! They bought real cheap, began the rebuild, and dropped while using the WYC hois. It fell 4 or 5 5 feet onto the pavement... Patched it up, we raced it and won alot! Then Carl S., designed a new keel, the boat was faster... We won more. I remember one sail, #4 jib, was cut down from an old Windward Passage genoa. The boat had no electronics, these guys were awesome sailors, and we FUN! Most memorable ride was the Lahaina return race fuck'in blasting in the Molokai Channel with a Code 1 surfing in 8-12 foot waves, fucking epic!!! I nominate GRS and Ned. Game, set, and match, send them their swag. Nobody will touch will touch these guys.

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The Great Whisper.

 

Not really a rags to riches gig, but they have our undying respect.

 

We've got nothing on that crew (aside from actually being in the water and floating).

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Clearly one of my favorite boats was the an old Sonoma 30, Great Red Shark. My 2 old friends from Hawaii , bought it from a guy that was using it to transport lumber from Oahu to Kawaii! They bought real cheap, began the rebuild, and dropped while using the WYC hois. It fell 4 or 5 5 feet onto the pavement... Patched it up, we raced it and won alot! Then Carl S., designed a new keel, the boat was faster... We won more. I remember one sail, #4 jib, was cut down from an old Windward Passage genoa. The boat had no electronics, these guys were awesome sailors, and we FUN! Most memorable ride was the Lahaina return race fuck'in blasting in the Molokai Channel with a Code 1 surfing in 8-12 foot waves, fucking epic!!! I nominate GRS and Ned. Game, set, and match, send them their swag. Nobody will touch will touch these guys.

Dan or Ned post a pic, mine are on my laptop, which is in the shop...

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I purchased a complete POS from China. Had it shipped out to the west coast and proceeded to rebuild it from the ground up. Put close to $100K into it above and beyond the purchase price and boy was that worth it! That was some of the best racing of my life! I sailed the boat till it's dieing day and I still dream about it every night.

 

The entire experience was one of the best years of my life and I'd do it again for twice the $$.

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Well, I only have the start of the story so this is just a bump on the thread..

 

Starts in 2004 with a 1982 T-10, delaminated hull, used/abused by cadets at SUNY Maritime, bought for a modest amount. 3 yrs in the back yard, while I raced on OPB's and occasionally worked on her. New core sections, splashed late last season, 8th out of 10 in 7 heats at the 2007 Fall Series.

 

New sails this season, building new crew from scratch.... DFL, DNF, DNF in our first regatta a couple of weeks ago.. a long road ahead!

O yea, funny thing-- the boat's name when I bought it was "Riff Raff"

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I have absolutely no details, just imperfect memory.

 

About a decade ago, I was crewing for I don't remember who, on I don't remember what, but I do remember that some college kids borrowed (or stole) a Morgan 27, which was then at least 20 years old, maybe 25 (sorry about that memory part), and was pretty much Pinto-priced even then, but they sailed the boat well above its rating, and won some kind of trophy.

 

This seemed like one of those boats that accidentally was still competitive when it should've been in a landfill, even back then.

 

If I'd have known then I'd have to recount it here, I'd have remembered more?

 

 

Or maybe not.

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I enjoyed Fretz(?)'s thread a couple seasons back as he rebuilt a scow. It looked like a beater and came out nice.

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Well, I only have the start of the story so this is just a bump on the thread..

 

Starts in 2004 with a 1982 T-10, delaminated hull, used/abused by cadets at SUNY Maritime, bought for a modest amount. 3 yrs in the back yard, while I raced on OPB's and occasionally worked on her. New core sections, splashed late last season, 8th out of 10 in 7 heats at the 2007 Fall Series.

 

New sails this season, building new crew from scratch.... DFL, DNF, DNF in our first regatta a couple of weeks ago.. a long road ahead!

This sounds like Sockeye. Unloved and unimproved for over 30 years. Last year new upwind sails, this year new bottom, still 7th out of 8, but we 're looking for a spinacre closer to full than half sized. and a few good tactics. :lol:

 

Good luck to you.

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So does it have to start as a piece of shit or can it start as a pile of glass, foam, and resin?

 

MS

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post-27955-1212122971_thumb.jpgpost-27955-1212124526_thumb.jpg

 

 

LITTLE OLD LADY OF THE 2006 ROLEX SYDNEY HOBART FLEET

Following a ten and a half month restoration involving up to 12 shipwrights working at one time and 15,500 man hours, Maluka, the oldest and smallest boat contesting the 2006 Rolex Sydney Hobart was launched early December 2006 at Woolwich Dock, Sydney. [/font]The 7.1 tonne, 9.1 metre gaff-rigged Ranger was been brought back to her former glory as part of "an extreme boat building challenge" says owner Sean Langman who oversaw the restoration at his Woolwich boatyard. Coincidentally there is only a week's difference in the time it took to build the original Maluka back in the 1930s and the time it has taken Langman and his team to re-build the boat. Being a timber boat with a heavy Australian red cedar and Huon pine interior, Maluka weighs only 500 kilos less than owner Langman's better known ex - modified Open 66 Xena, which is 36 feet longer. Even the bow sprit weighs too much to be carried and therefore has to be craned onto the "heavy little brute" as Langman affectionately calls his floating antique. Extra structure has been added to satisfy entry requirements but the interior as well as the exterior is almost an exact replica of the original built in 1932 for Sydney brothers George and William Clarke. Only the timber floor was lowered slightly to allow the crew to stand up inside with these boards recycled and used to build furniture for the boat. Maluka completed her entry requirements, including an offshore overnight qualifying passage, before joining the 85 strong fleet for Boxing Day start of the bluewater classic at 1.00pm on Tuesday December 26. Langman completed this overnight requirement on the night of Friday 8 December.

 

 

In terms of performance, Langman thought the boat would surprise a few people, comparing it to the speeds achieved by an S & S 36. She was a one point 60nm ahead of the classic 60' Fidelis, and also held the lead in her class before finishing a very credible 8th in IRC.

 

 

Langman intends to race her South again in the 2008 Sydney Hobart and he's determined to better his previous 8th.

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Clearly one of my favorite boats was the an old Sonoma 30, Great Red Shark. My 2 old friends from Hawaii , bought it from a guy that was using it to transport lumber from Oahu to Kawaii! They bought real cheap, began the rebuild, and dropped while using the WYC hois. It fell 4 or 5 5 feet onto the pavement... Patched it up, we raced it and won alot! Then Carl S., designed a new keel, the boat was faster... We won more. I remember one sail, #4 jib, was cut down from an old Windward Passage genoa. The boat had no electronics, these guys were awesome sailors, and we FUN! Most memorable ride was the Lahaina return race fuck'in blasting in the Molokai Channel with a Code 1 surfing in 8-12 foot waves, fucking epic!!! I nominate GRS and Ned. Game, set, and match, send them their swag. Nobody will touch will touch these guys.

 

Thanks for the plug Chief. We'll see what we can scratch up but alot of it was covered here before and died with the old forum. You forgot the part about the old homemade keel exploding which is why it became the boat that ate 1996 and a few other years afterwards. Fabulous boat and looks quite sharp with the new awlgrip job in Whisper Grey.

 

Of course In Cahoots being raised off the bottom of KEehi Lagoon and being turboed is a prety good tale as well.

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Clearly one of my favorite boats was the an old Sonoma 30, Great Red Shark. My 2 old friends from Hawaii , bought it from a guy that was using it to transport lumber from Oahu to Kawaii! They bought real cheap, began the rebuild, and dropped while using the WYC hois. It fell 4 or 5 5 feet onto the pavement... Patched it up, we raced it and won alot! Then Carl S., designed a new keel, the boat was faster... We won more. I remember one sail, #4 jib, was cut down from an old Windward Passage genoa. The boat had no electronics, these guys were awesome sailors, and we FUN! Most memorable ride was the Lahaina return race fuck'in blasting in the Molokai Channel with a Code 1 surfing in 8-12 foot waves, fucking epic!!! I nominate GRS and Ned. Game, set, and match, send them their swag. Nobody will touch will touch these guys.

 

Ah the old Spice, lots of stories and memories. My long time friend Mark Brewer was using the boat to bring lumber to Kauai to repair his houses after Huricanne Iniki as there was almost no building Material available on the Island. On one of many runs the Keel fell off while motorsailing in big seas under auto pilot. The repacement keel was very very ugly but very quickly built.

 

The boat was originaly in San Diego at Neil Esterlys brokerage then was sold and went to San Franscisco. Mark flew over from Kauai, bought the boat fom the guys in SF, borrowed my truck and brought it to San Diego. We worked on the boat, replaced some rigging and such, for 3 days. Mark Bought an autopilot from me at the Boat Shop and a sail from Snapper. We went for a test sail on the fourth day and on the fifth day Mark left singelhanded for Hawaii. I still have pics he sent me from the trip. It was an uneventful passage (compared to Marks 2 other solo trips to Hi and his solo trip to South America and back). We cut the trailer up into bits so that it would fit on a pallett for shipping and Mark had it welded back together for cheap by the welding class at Kauai community College.

 

Before Iniki came Mark was sailing the Nawiliwili to Hanalei race when a shroud broke causing him to drop out and bring the boat home to the special "Boat Barn" he had built for it. this is the reason it survived Iniki.

 

Mark was a crazy dude, lot of freinds and a few enemies. he helped a lot of people and screwed over a few as well. He was also a very good sailor. We sailed hís next boat, the old Irrational a 1979 Peterson 41, doublehanded in the 95 Transpac. I have never seen anyone sail a big heavy IOR boat downwind in big wind and waves so easily for hours on end.

 

Mark disappeared a few years ago. his Power cat was found unmanned between Kauai and Oahu.

 

Greetings from Germany

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Ah the old Spice, lots of stories and memories. My long time friend Mark Brewer was using the boat to bring lumber to Kauai to repair his houses after Huricanne Iniki as there was almost no building Material available on the Island. On one of many runs the Keel fell off while motorsailing in big seas under auto pilot. The repacement keel was very very ugly but very quickly built.

 

The boat was originaly in San Diego at Neil Esterlys brokerage then was sold and went to San Franscisco. Mark flew over from Kauai, bought the boat fom the guys in SF, borrowed my truck and brought it to San Diego. We worked on the boat, replaced some rigging and such, for 3 days. Mark Bought an autopilot from me at the Boat Shop and a sail from Snapper. We went for a test sail on the fourth day and on the fifth day Mark left singelhanded for Hawaii. I still have pics he sent me from the trip. It was an uneventful passage (compared to Marks 2 other solo trips to Hi and his solo trip to South America and back). We cut the trailer up into bits so that it would fit on a pallett for shipping and Mark had it welded back together for cheap by the welding class at Kauai community College.

 

Before Iniki came Mark was sailing the Nawiliwili to Hanalei race when a shroud broke causing him to drop out and bring the boat home to the special "Boat Barn" he had built for it. this is the reason it survived Iniki.

 

Mark was a crazy dude, lot of freinds and a few enemies. he helped a lot of people and screwed over a few as well. He was also a very good sailor. We sailed hís next boat, the old Irrational a 1979 Peterson 41, doublehanded in the 95 Transpac. I have never seen anyone sail a big heavy IOR boat downwind in big wind and waves so easily for hours on end.

 

Mark disappeared a few years ago. his Power cat was found unmanned between Kauai and Oahu.

 

Greetings from Germany

Awesome, thanks .

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In the early 70's at age 17, I was BN on the Britt Chance designed hull #1 or #2 PT 30 "Jet". Bought for a song with moldy spaghetti (pasta, not lines) in the bilge. We installed a gougeon flush deck, new tall rig and won lots of trophies. What are the prizes, Clean?

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So Clean, do we get any SA swag for being your inspiration?? I unfortunately am lacking in the SA goodies department :unsure: Perhaps SA needs to donate a new sticker for the newly painted yachet as well??? ;)

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I purchased a complete POS from China. Had it shipped out to the west coast and proceeded to rebuild it from the ground up. Put close to $100K into it above and beyond the purchase price and boy was that worth it! That was some of the best racing of my life! I sailed the boat till it's dieing day and I still dream about it every night.

 

The entire experience was one of the best years of my life and I'd do it again for twice the $$.

 

 

 

:lol: hehe ok noob i'll ask

what kind of boat was it?

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:lol: hehe ok noob i'll ask

what kind of boat was it?

 

 

Doesn't this belong in the FT-10 Forum?

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... Let's hear how you did it.

 

Though I haven´t bought a wreck and put some new life into it, I wrecked a brand new one which than had been written off and covered by the insurance. After some tough negotiations with the builder and my own possibilities the little Bull 7000 had been restored and being raced in the Sportsboat class.

 

Here is the story: Got my new boat delivered from Auckland into Southampton to take part in the Cowes Week. (1996?) Sailed it across the Solent from Hamble and next day on to the starting line. The breeze was strong, we were only three and had a handful to do with the new boat, checking tide and wind, listening to the radio announcements about the course. We had to put in a reef, therefore I sailed the boat on starboard tack hard on the wind and we fiddled with the rope. Suddenly we were run down by a Swan. A big crash, the rigg came down, the cabin top crashed, the hull got a big triangle hole. The little boat, now a wreck, popped up after it had been turned around 180°. We limped her into the marina, put a big sticker on the hole and back across the Solent to Hamble on to the trailer. She looked like a write off and that is what the surveyor attested.

 

Got paid out and collected the wreck due to save disposing costs. With the help of one of the White´s (of Tornado fame) and Greg Young who fabricated a deck section the boat had been put back into life over a span of 2 or 3 years. OK, by now it had a 2 colour scheme. Maybe they could not find the right Gelcoat but they fixed it for a very reasonable price. Thus allowming me to take part with a "story of how a hunk 'o shit became a hot race boat". Anyway my first real race and sailing with the boat had been Travemünde in 2000, when we had 3 Bull 7000´s on the start line and a good mixture of other Sportsboats. And you bet, I still love my little boat.post-23963-1212158425_thumb.jpg

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My boat's story has been on here before....bought half rotten, practically rig-less old Dragon at the start of a year out from uni, replaced some frames, bits of the planking, 2 keelbolts and the deck and got her ready to launch in the space of 9 months of evenings and weekends, with the boat outside all of the time. Bought all the deck gear and rig off another boat going for a re-fit, blagged some second hand sails....got her on the water just in time for a local regatta week with a dragon fleet to trail around the back of.

 

This year, now back at uni, I have even less spare time, and live 250 miles from the boat, I fitted her out for the season over two weekends, got her back on the water, and found some-how on the nice sheltered river i sail on, with a good crew, she can keep with and even beat modern glass boats 40-50 years younger than her, worth easlity twice as much money. Some how, by luck, we even manged to win the club's oldest (over 110 years old!) cup the other week!

 

Cost; Approx £4000, a bunch of favours from freinds, and god knows how many hours on the boat and in kind to pay for her mooring......Value; money wise....not much more than what she cost....to me, priceless! Sailing that boat has no equal. Danger is now I want to do the same again, with a bigger boat...

post-194-1212164777_thumb.jpg

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To mark my return to sailing after a 12 year hiatus, I bought a 1982 C&C 25 in Nov on a really rainy and windy Noreaster day in Montauk, NY. Walked down the dock, didn't even get on the boat, it was set up for cruising, nothing new on it in 20 years. Later that week I met the owner in a diner in the Hamptons, paid him and had the boat trucked home (only 70 miles). Spent Dec, Jan, Feb, March pulling every single piece of hardware off the boat. Hired the best rigger on Long Island and we put this thing back together. New sails, cosmetics, rigging, you name it. Planed the gelcoat off the bottom, full fairiing job. Boat looks showroom now and is turning out to be pretty quick in a very competitive fleet of the same boat.

 

It's a 5ktsb but I love this little boat and I couldn't be happier to back on the water!

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I have absolutely no details, just imperfect memory.

 

About a decade ago, I was crewing for I don't remember who, on I don't remember what, but I do remember that some college kids borrowed (or stole) a Morgan 27, which was then at least 20 years old, maybe 25 (sorry about that memory part), and was pretty much Pinto-priced even then, but they sailed the boat well above its rating, and won some kind of trophy.

 

This seemed like one of those boats that accidentally was still competitive when it should've been in a landfill, even back then.

 

If I'd have known then I'd have to recount it here, I'd have remembered more?

Or maybe not.

 

 

Hell, 20-25 years old? Back then, that M27 one was just getting broken in. We're working on 36 years with ours!

 

Here's some pictures of the keel project:

 

Man's best friend (when you own an old boat):

CIMG0052m.jpg

 

2nd best friend:

CIMG0116m.jpg

 

 

 

In addition to the keel, we've faired the entire bottom, pulled off all the hardware and repainted the deck twice, filled in about 10,000 holes from the last 36 years of moving hardware around, etc...

post-16372-1212165985_thumb.jpg

post-16372-1212165999.jpg

post-16372-1212166009.jpg

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here's another shot of the keel.

 

CIMG0111m.jpg

 

I'll have to dig around for pictures of the other projects...

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To mark my return to sailing after a 12 year hiatus, I bought a 1982 C&C 25 in Nov on a really rainy and windy Noreaster day in Montauk, NY. Walked down the dock, didn't even get on the boat, it was set up for cruising, nothing new on it in 20 years. Later that week I met the owner in a diner in the Hamptons, paid him and had the boat trucked home (only 70 miles). Spent Dec, Jan, Feb, March pulling every single piece of hardware off the boat. Hired the best rigger on Long Island and we put this thing back together. New sails, cosmetics, rigging, you name it. Planed the gelcoat off the bottom, full fairiing job. Boat looks showroom now and is turning out to be pretty quick in a very competitive fleet of the same boat.

 

It's a 5ktsb but I love this little boat and I couldn't be happier to back on the water!

 

I hear they'll hit 17 knots in a blow... good little boats!

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08CRAOD9379.JPG

 

My brother's boat. I think he has less that 5k invested in her.

 

For 2008, he has gotten 6 bullets, 2 2nds, and 1 3rd in 9 PHRF SD races, class 6b (non-flying sails).

 

The story.

 

My brother bought a Columbia 26 for $500 from one of the boat donation non-profits. He raced beer cans for a while and had just bought new sails for her. He pulled the boat to do some fairing on the keel, and discovered that the entire keel was mis-aligned. This would have cost big bucks to repair, so instead of fixing her, he purchased another beater C-26 (for less than $1000), and transferred all his gear, rigging, etc to his new boat. She's been racing south end for 2 years now. His primary crew is his wife and 8 year old son.

 

Not sexy. No, he's not racing against the Ed or Dennis Conner, but he's doing the best he can on his budget.

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I hear they'll hit 17 knots in a blow... good little boats!

 

Only on Midwestern Lakes in the middle of the night with nobody around in races nobody's ever heard of :)

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GER308,

 

thanks for the Mark Brewer tale - one of Hawaii's watermen-characters, for sure - he once lost ( as in sunk and never seen again ) a small keelboat in a Friday Night Race off Waikiki, and used to transport the Kauai Paddling team's 6-man Outrigger canoes to Hale A Lono for the channel races on the deck of that 2-tonner !

 

The boat he sold us he'd hardly recognize, but I'm always glad I've managed to keep it together - lots of adventure in that hull. We even got to sail it with Carl once.

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Hi GRS ,

 

The boat he sunk was Kahuna a Mirage 236. he sailed that boat to Peru (singlehanded down and with his brother back) from San Diego and then shortly after to Hi with his girlfriend Nancy. He provisioned the boat for the trip with food he swiped when he was fliping burgers at the Boll weevel on Shelter Island. He used to feed us and a couple of Homeless guys burgers and beer and (I was like 17 Mark was I think 6 or 7 years older than me) from the backdoor of the Boll weevel.

 

Kahuna was one of the first keel boats I ever sailed. We raced MORC on it in the early 80s. My finn is named Kahuna after that boat. Kahuna sunk when the improvised lock on the lift keel failed.

 

Mark singelhanded a Thunderbird to Hi when he was 18(mid 70´s). Bought the boat with 1500 dollars he saved working in High School. had a rough trip, broke boom, sails, low on food and water but made it. His Family thought they would never see him again when he left. Mark could not be stopped.

 

The Tbird fell apart in the middle of the Kauai channel some tine afterwards. Last flight for the night picked up his EPIRB signal. When the helicopter came and mark got into the rescue basket they said only he and not his bag of stuff could go so he jumped back into the water untill they agreed to take his stuff to.

 

Mark had the first windsurfing school on Kauai as well.

 

Glad to here the Sonoma is still going. Fun Boat! I lived on that boat for a few months in Nawiliwili.

Do you know if the Freya 39 is still floating?

 

I gotta get back to the Islands one day!

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No idea on the Freya. When Ned & I bought the boat, Mark had it for sale for like 10k with a bunch of really tired, old offshore gear - SSB that looked near death, etc. I told Ned to offer him 6, and keep the garbage - it was blowing like Hell at the time and the channel was pretty nasty, so I figured we'd have a week or so to round up the cash or flake on the deal and like the next night the phone at the house rings, and it's Ty Pryne calling from the WYC bar, saying, " Mark Brewer is here with your boat..."

 

We figured it was either a tougher boat than we thought or the guy REALLY wanted rid of it.... turns out, it was both.

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Here is the before picture:

 

post-617-1212184576_thumb.jpg

 

The previous owner believed in an open concept.

 

After more than two years and thousands of hours of sweat and tears, stolen from already busy lives, of vacuum bagging, of hogging and bogging, of replacing every single piece of wood inside with composite panels, of removing and replacing the hardware, of painting, non-skidding and fixing unforeseen damage - we sailed it last weekend.

 

Nope - not even nearly finished - but sailing again.

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In honor of our good pals Shife, Burnsy, Ziggy and the rest of the Anarchists aboard the beater 80's Dehler DB1 'Heatwave,' we've got a little contest for you: Nominate your favorite “rags to riches” boat and tell us the story of how a hunk 'o shit became a hot race boat. The 'wave already has a head start (and its own thread on the process), but we know that tons of you cheap bastards have figured out how to get your Pinto-priced boat to win against the best. Let's hear how you did it.

 

The best two stories will get two very cool prizes, and remember – pics or it never happened.

I bought the old gal for 15k in 1989 she is a 1981 Lee Creekmore 36 footer (1 of) named "Unicorn" the old Volvo was dead but I slapped a 9hp outboard on the back and raced her alot and seldom did much. She sat for about 8 years rotting in the water behind my house, until the guilt got the best of me. I put in a New Diesel, some new sails, bondo'ed over the rotten spots, replaced the wood in the rotten floor down below. We painstakingly faired the hull. added spectra running backstays. and started doing well. We took first overall in the Miami to Key Largo Race in 2006 and 2008. We took 2nd overall PHRF in the Lauderdale to Key West Race, We took first overall in the 2007 Wirth Munroe Race even though "Numbers" and two TP 52's were in it :) and We took 1st overall in the 2007 Mango Cup (Lauderdale to Miami Race) in 25-35 knot winds all in all we got plenty of bang for our buck with this old gem. We have a full trophy room from all the club races weve won. I'm sure were in for a rating hit in a PHRF rating review next month

post-18125-1212187113_thumb.jpg

post-18125-1212187155_thumb.jpg

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The triumphant return of a Formula 40. I found her basically derelict and forgotten in Texas. There was 2 feet of water in the hulls, the tramp was rotten, the cockpit and deck were rotten, all the ring frames had been cut out. She hadn't sailed in 4 years and the mud had silted around her rudders. So I bought her for too much, then spent 4 months fixing her. After many 100 hour weeks and all my savings spent, I shipped her to the Caribbean, and started doing daysails. This past March we took the "Fastest Round the Island" at Heineken Regatta for the 3rd straight year. What was probably the most underfunded boat out of 250 was also the fastest.

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post-7360-1212186999_thumb.jpg

post-7360-1212187051.jpg

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over here in oz the "Wright" boys bought an old "yachting world diamond" called "SALTASH II" converted her to ocean racing, she only races once a year for the 308 nm BRISBANE TO GLADESTONE ocean race! has won it so many times under every single handicap firstly in IOR then CHANEL H'CAP IMS now even IRC its an absolute freak!all the the rich bastards hate it with their million dollar boats and paid pro crews and this humble plywood (firewood) boat continually gives them a hiding year after year! i dont have a photo or know how to put up photos but maybe someone else could!

love there work and im sure many a owner has tried to buy her just so they could burn her so she doesnt upstage their ego's anymore!!!

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My boat's story has been on here before....bought half rotten, practically rig-less old Dragon at the start of a year out from uni, replaced some frames, bits of the planking, 2 keelbolts and the deck and got her ready to launch in the space of 9 months of evenings and weekends, with the boat outside all of the time. Bought all the deck gear and rig off another boat going for a re-fit, blagged some second hand sails....got her on the water just in time for a local regatta week with a dragon fleet to trail around the back of.

 

This year, now back at uni, I have even less spare time, and live 250 miles from the boat, I fitted her out for the season over two weekends, got her back on the water, and found some-how on the nice sheltered river i sail on, with a good crew, she can keep with and even beat modern glass boats 40-50 years younger than her, worth easlity twice as much money. Some how, by luck, we even manged to win the club's oldest (over 110 years old!) cup the other week!

 

Cost; Approx £4000, a bunch of favours from freinds, and god knows how many hours on the boat and in kind to pay for her mooring......Value; money wise....not much more than what she cost....to me, priceless! Sailing that boat has no equal. Danger is now I want to do the same again, with a bigger boat...

U got my vote because she's a sexy boat. But to be legit, you oughta put up a sail number and/or region you've competed her in.

 

Any other thoughts over at ICE?

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here's another shot of the keel.

 

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I'll have to dig around for pictures of the other projects...

Go the Spray!

"yammerschooner"

CJV

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I bought the old gal for 15k in 1989 she is a 1981 Lee Creekmore 36 footer (1 of) named "Unicorn" the old Volvo was dead but I slapped a 9hp outboard on the back and raced her alot and seldom did much. She sat for about 8 years rotting in the water behind my house, until the guilt got the best of me. I put in a New Diesel, some new sails, bondo'ed over the rotten spots, replaced the wood in the rotten floor down below. We painstakingly faired the hull. added spectra running backstays. and started doing well. We took first overall in the Miami to Key Largo Race in 2006 and 2008. We took 2nd overall PHRF in the Lauderdale to Key West Race, We took first overall in the 2007 Wirth Munroe Race even though "Numbers" and two TP 52's were in it :) and We took 1st overall in the 2007 Mango Cup (Lauderdale to Miami Race) in 25-35 knot winds all in all we got plenty of bang for our buck with this old gem. We have a full trophy room from all the club races weve won. I'm sure were in for a rating hit in a PHRF rating review next month

The after photo is the background on my homepage southflasailing.com

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Hello All,

I am a long time reader and first time poster who has finally been sparked enough by a front page article to register and post here in the forums. I read about this contest and instantly thought of the program I sail with aptly named Wharf Rat Racing (for our ugly paint jobs, low budget, and constant presence at the top in our first 4 years of racing.)

 

The owner is the type of person who would never really nominate himself but he is an avid forum browser. This kid has flipped many a crappy boat in the short 4 years i have been sailing with him including multiple rhodes 19 projects (all sub 1000 sail numbers), a j22 with major work needed, and an Evelyn 26 which became quite the PHRF machine in the Hingham Bay / Mass Bay Circuit. The most recent boat, a Pearson 30 Flyer was aquired by trading the Evelyn. I must say, the first time I saw the Flyer I almost cried. I could not believe he had traded our hard work and effort on the Evelyn for this hunk of floating heavy crap. However, determined as he was, the owner really put time in, rebuilding the entire interior, re-rigging everything, installing a head and outfitting us with race-ready sails all on a shoe string budget. This is a true rags to riches story. With a crew of inexperienced college sailors and a boat that is as ugly as sin, Pearson Flyer USA 92 has come from no where to out-perform the veteran racers of Boston Harbor.

 

This boat in its first 3 years has done many incredible things including podium finishes in almost every race she has entered. Addidtionally in her first year sailing she was awarded Mass Bay Sailing's Rookie of the Year trophy for her outstanding performance . As such I would like to nominate USA 92 aka Wharf Rat Boston's B-fleet boat to beat for the beater to heater contest.

 

Good luck and may the best..eh the worst, best boat win.

 

-George S.

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I just bought the Pinto, it got hit and blew up ( or down in the case of a moored boat).

(I was the only bidder at auction)

A 20 yrd old J24 with 5 holes through the hull thanks to the lightning but at least the salt water has stopped the dry rot in all the bulkheads.

The sinking or recovery also fractured the keel sump on one side so it has a swung to port keel now.

It even has the original Nissan winches ( being a Nissan J24)

Work starts after I get back from http://www.samuiregatta.com/

Does this qualify as a starter?

MrClean how long is the comp open?

 

Sailabout

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this boatlost its keel during an overnight race and was bought from the insurance company for a couple of grand by a friend of mine who then got it to look like the photo he now beats half million dollar boats round the cans

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Copied from the hobie 33 yahoo group, this is not my boat.

 

"Hi guys,

Thought this may interest you. I recently bought a Hobie 33 in Cape Town

which had been rebuilt. She has a chequered history beginning with a sinking

in the Caribean Islands in 1990 during Hurricane George. An intrepid family

of South African sailors salvaged the hull and what was left of the deck

after the locals had been at her for the fittings. On the way to the harbour

she was hit by a tug and sent to the bottom again. Undeterred the guys

refloated her and brought her home to S.A. in 1993 where she lay on the

front lawn for 10 years.

A local automotive company building the Ford GT40 out of composite plastics

decided this would be their project for a marine division and began the

ardous task of rebuilding her. Due to our strong winds and rough sea around

Cape Town she was rigged with a stiff double spreader mast and a new carbon

fibre rudder. Most of the rest is pretty standard other than the interior

which I am busy refitting..........................."

 

This is what she looks like now.macs08-005.jpg

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One of my mates has a Bruce Kirby designed "Fox", which is basically a 20 foot Laser with a fixed fin keel. Belonged to a neighbor, and a tree fell on it in the driveway smashing up the fiberglass. Neighbor was going to take it to the dump. My mate got it free, fixed the glass and it's going on my mooring, maybe tomorrow morning.

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I got this Malcom Tennant GBE catamaran for free from a lady who lived on an island off Auckland. It hadn't sailed for 7 years and had about 250kg of mussels growing on the hulls, 5 dead seagulls inside. Everything that could rot had. The mast fell down in a storm and was on the beach. All that was worth keeping were the bare hulls, the main beam and the mast tube. I was only 22 when i got the boat so had plenty of time and mates, but no money. So over the period of about 6 months we got it off the island, back to the main land, made structural repairs, re-faired the hulls and made new beams and replaced all the electronics, standing rigging, sails, rudders and any other fittings we could. Couldn't afford pulleys so we made our own carbon ones. Finally, the boat was back into mint racing condition. Probably the most work i'll ever do on a boat! We entered the Coastal Classic race and drifted 130 miles north. We finished in ok shape. But on the trip home we got a blow and being our first time out in a multihull we had a whole lot on. We smoked down the coast under full main, staysail and MH gennaker at 15-25kts boat speed. Wicked ride! Wind died to nothing 5 miles from home. So we peeled to MH code 0. 10 mins after and just as darkness set in we got a 15kt gust from nowhere! We got ready to drop the 0 but it was too late. We flipped it. In the dark upside down we got rescued by a fishing boat and at dawn we got a salvage team out to cut the rig out and right the boat. So my boat was a mess again with destroyed sails and missing foils. We fixed it though and it was sweet as!

 

Somebody else owns her now.

 

I have a keel boat :-)

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This is a killer fucking thread. Keep up the great stories.

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Guest One of Five

Even better, the complete history of a Shields which sank, lay on the bottom for a couple of years and was recovered to become fleet Champ...Mermaid's Resurrection

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So this story starts with a $1.00 wooden sailboat I found when I was like 13 and stops with my current boat and S2 7.9 13 years later... which I've basically traded up to over the years.

 

Every single day I would surf the web trying to find a sailboat I could afford. One day I found a BB-11 sitting up in Lake St. Claire for $1 dollar. I called the guy up and he said the boat floated. I told my parents and they were a little skeptical but agreed to go up to check it out. When we got there the hull was sound, so I bought it. I spent every day after school for 2 years fixing that boat. I recaulked all the seams, stripped and revarnished the hull, and put a completely new deck on this thing. When I finished, I found out that these boats are sought after a little here in the states and sold it for $3000 bucks. The reason I sold the boat was I wanted to race....

 

So with cash in hand I put a ad up on the J24 class website asking for any cheap J24... I think I even said I didn't care if it had a hole in it. About a month later I get an e-mail from a guy in Muskegon with just that, a J/24 for 2500 bucks. The mast had broken when the boat pulled the starboard bulkhead through the deck... (deck was rotted, bulkhead was rotted). So at 15 I went to Muskegon to buy a J24, hull #45. The trailer was good, and the hull was solid. So with $500 in hand, that winter I chipped out all the vermiculite in the sump, tore out the remains of the bulkhead, put a new bulkhead in, and replaced 30 some square feet of core in the deck. I learned more about fiberglass repair then I ever thought possible that year. I was also able to sell the motor that came with it to buy a surplus mast from Kenyon's going out of business sale. (New spar for 600 bucks, it was awesome and pure luck.) Anyways that summer we raced that boat and won our local club's MORC boat of the year. Over the years the deck was repainted (I learned how to spray), I put the boat on her side and faired the bottom and VC-Performance painted the bottom... sanded to 800 grit. I did the foils... and eventually repainted the hull with awlgrip. When I did the hull I also got rid of all the teak on the outside and replaced it all with starboard, the plastic toe rails, 100% rewire of all the electrical inside... the boat was like new.

 

About 3 or 4 years ago I decided I needed a boat I could do longer distance races in. So just for kicks I put the J24 up for sale... I sold it for 12k and delivered it to Florida. I was also able to keep the trailer for delivering the boat and sold that in Atlanta on my way back. When I got back to Michigan I found out that a local S2 7.9 that was known to be fast was for sale. I went and bought it for the total cash I had gotten for the J/24... Another trade up. This boat I've replaced a bulkhead in, rewired, fixed numerous odds and ends, and haven't had to do anything I would consider major (compared to the BB11 and J24) yet (knock on wood.) Next year will be repainting the deck and some core work though.

 

So what started with a $1 dollar wooden boat that needed work eventually turned into a nice J24 and an even nicer S2 7.9... That’s my story.

 

 

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Wooden Sailboat (BB-11) "Spirit"

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J/24 USA 45 "Gator Bait"

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S2 7.9 USA 106 "Gauntlet"

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Here are some pictures of the J24 along the way... I also forgot, to help pay for the cost of repairing the J24 I also restored a 13' boston whaler along the way too.

 

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Here is the before picture:

 

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The previous owner believed in an open concept.

 

After more than two years and thousands of hours of sweat and tears, stolen from already busy lives, of vacuum bagging, of hogging and bogging, of replacing every single piece of wood inside with composite panels, of removing and replacing the hardware, of painting, non-skidding and fixing unforeseen damage - we sailed it last weekend.

 

Nope - not even nearly finished - but sailing again.

 

 

Is this a SC 50 that was in moss landing?

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Ive done a couple of these type projcts and I have a few more in the works.

 

My first real big project was my Soverel 30, Wild Cherry. I bought the boat from the YMCA which had it donated to them. They had no idea what to do with the boat so they stuck it in a nice motorboat/houseboat marina. They basically forgot about it for a while, and owed back sip fee's. The boat had been chained to the dock. The dock lines had rotted off, which allowed it to bang into the pilings for a few years. and the boat had barnacles on the Inside.

All the bulkheads, and bunks were rotten, the deck was shot, the hull was waterlogged. All the rigging was a mess.

I dont know why I bought it for the price of the slip fee's. All I can say is the boat had lots of sentimental value to me. Plus back in its day it was a killer.

Needless to say. I did a bottom peel/refair. New core in the deck., new bulkheads, ribs, chainplates, standing rigging, running rigging, well. As you would expect, pretty much everythig had to be rebuilt.

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I cant find my pics from when I first piced up the boat. Im going to keep digging around for em tho. heres a few morefrom what I can find.

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Here are some pictures of the J24 along the way... I also forgot, to help pay for the cost of repairing the J24 I also restored a 13' boston whaler along the way too.

 

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you rock.

 

great story. something tells me you're gonna have a big, fast boat in a few years...

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here are a few of my boats. I probobly shouldn't say how much i have made doing this work. Oh yeah i'm only 22, and will be graduating with a mechanical engineering degree soon so i have been busy.

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Here are two of them, one in "heater" and the beneteau almost done.

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So this story starts with a $1.00 wooden sailboat I found when I was like 13 and stops with my current boat and S2 7.9 13 years later... which I've basically traded up to over the years.

 

Every single day I would surf the web trying to find a sailboat I could afford. One day I found a BB-11 sitting up in Lake St. Claire for $1 dollar. I called the guy up and he said the boat floated. I told my parents and they were a little skeptical but agreed to go up to check it out. When we got there the hull was sound, so I bought it. I spent every day after school for 2 years fixing that boat. I recaulked all the seams, stripped and revarnished the hull, and put a completely new deck on this thing. When I finished, I found out that these boats are sought after a little here in the states and sold it for $3000 bucks. The reason I sold the boat was I wanted to race....

 

So with cash in hand I put a ad up on the J24 class website asking for any cheap J24... I think I even said I didn't care if it had a hole in it. About a month later I get an e-mail from a guy in Muskegon with just that, a J/24 for 2500 bucks. The mast had broken when the boat pulled the starboard bulkhead through the deck... (deck was rotted, bulkhead was rotted). So at 15 I went to Muskegon to buy a J24, hull #45. The trailer was good, and the hull was solid. So with $500 in hand, that winter I chipped out all the vermiculite in the sump, tore out the remains of the bulkhead, put a new bulkhead in, and replaced 30 some square feet of core in the deck. I learned more about fiberglass repair then I ever thought possible that year. I was also able to sell the motor that came with it to buy a surplus mast from Kenyon's going out of business sale. (New spar for 600 bucks, it was awesome and pure luck.) Anyways that summer we raced that boat and won our local club's MORC boat of the year. Over the years the deck was repainted (I learned how to spray), I put the boat on her side and faired the bottom and VC-Performance painted the bottom... sanded to 800 grit. I did the foils... and eventually repainted the hull with awlgrip. When I did the hull I also got rid of all the teak on the outside and replaced it all with starboard, the plastic toe rails, 100% rewire of all the electrical inside... the boat was like new.

 

About 3 or 4 years ago I decided I needed a boat I could do longer distance races in. So just for kicks I put the J24 up for sale... I sold it for 12k and delivered it to Florida. I was also able to keep the trailer for delivering the boat and sold that in Atlanta on my way back. When I got back to Michigan I found out that a local S2 7.9 that was known to be fast was for sale. I went and bought it for the total cash I had gotten for the J/24... Another trade up. This boat I've replaced a bulkhead in, rewired, fixed numerous odds and ends, and haven't had to do anything I would consider major (compared to the BB11 and J24) yet (knock on wood.) Next year will be repainting the deck and some core work though.

 

So what started with a $1 dollar wooden boat that needed work eventually turned into a nice J24 and an even nicer S2 7.9... That’s my story.

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Wooden Sailboat (BB-11) "Spirit"

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J/24 USA 45 "Gator Bait"

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S2 7.9 USA 106 "Gauntlet"

 

Thats a great story...reminds me of the lad who traded on ebay starting with a paper clip and made his way up to a mansion in 7 trades - no cash involved! Keep it up dude

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We came across a Kiwi 35 that had been used for solo racing which the owner had taken the wings off and added water tanks and slabs of lead on the keel in an attempt to stiffen up the boat without crew. We cleaned the boat up and sailed it the first summer to determine what changes we wanted to make to the boat. While sailing the boat that summer we discovered that the 4x4 the previous owner had placed across the trailer to support the bow had sheared the divinycell allowing the hull to flex 2-3 inches between the forward bulkheads.

 

After a year and a half, over a thousand hours of sanding, fairing and fresh paint we are finally back in the water. We updated the deck layout upgrading most of the hardware. Added foot cleats so we can stay on the boat. We re-cored several section of the hull around the bow. Removed the slabs of lead and added some of the lead back onto the keel bulb. Installed a retractable carbon sprit giving us a SPL of almost 20'. Replaced the original aluminum mast with a Melges 30 carbon rig which was a luck find. My bother was looking for a ridged boomvang for the boat on e-bay and found one attached to a carbon mast with boom and sails. After a quick trip to Cap Cod through a blizzard we had it back in Michigan to fit it to the boat. The only modifications we needed to make was to shorten the mast since the Kiwi is deck stepped and we changed the spreader angle because we didn't want to change the location of the the chain plates. The P remained the same but we gained 14" on the E and added significantly to the roach.

 

It was a big project but with some sweat equity a few boat bucks ($100.00 = 1 boat buck) and some technical advise form Joe Parker and Bruce Niederer at Gougeon Brothers we ended up with a really nice high performance boat.

We sailed it for the first time yesterday and the four of us were very pleased with it's performance.

 

More restoration photos on Destination One Design.com under WingNuts

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I purchased a complete POS from China. Had it shipped out to the west coast and proceeded to rebuild it from the ground up. Put close to $100K into it above and beyond the purchase price and boy was that worth it! That was some of the best racing of my life! I sailed the boat till it's dieing day and I still dream about it every night.

 

The entire experience was one of the best years of my life and I'd do it again for twice the $.

 

Ha Fooled me !!!

 

I thought you were going to say it was a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[drum roll.Gif]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FT10m :o:o:lol::lol::lol:

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Restoration is nice and all... but I thought the point of the beater to heater was to have turned a POS into a race machine. So I must ask... have any of you won anything with your "heaters" ? Its cool to make an old boat look newer and sail better, but new sails, new glass and shiny paint jobs only get you so far. I thought this was a race boat thread. Where are the results?

 

YES IM A NEWB. Save your comments.

 

-G

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Restoration is nice and all... but I thought the point of the beater to heater was to have turned a POS into a race machine. So I must ask... have any of you won anything with your "heaters" ? Its cool to make an old boat look newer and sail better, but new sails, new glass and shiny paint jobs only get you so far. I thought this was a race boat thread. Where are the results?

 

YES IM A NEWB. Save your comments.

 

-G

 

Save your thoughts.

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Well, I was slightly taken aback when "radar" called me and told me he had nominated my project for this contest.

 

Like a few of the other projects on here I found my current boat at a donations program. In my case it was the Mass Maritime Boat Donations program, and the boat was a 1981 pearson flyer. Had I known how much work it would take to get it back into some sort of racing shape I would probably have passed.

 

Thankfully we have managed to race the boat hard and do pretty well with it, even when it seemed like it was determined to sink under us! After a new main bulkhead (we fractured it during Buzzards Bay Regatta our first year with the boat) a rebuilt Keel sump (we broke the floors during a 200nm ocean race) new electrical system, and a head (a special request from the female members of our crew) the rat is still pretty ratty looking, but seems to be going as fast as ever.

 

As has been said, this thread is supposed to be about beaters to heaters so here are a few highlights from the two seasons we have under our belt with the boat. Solstice regatta 1st, Scorpion Bowl 1st, Scituate Invatational 1st, Corinthian-Chapman bowl 200 1st, Sullivan Series 1st, Flashlight Series tied for 1st, Hingham Bay Govenors Cup 2nd Twice, Mass Bay season champs 2nd, 2006 Season Mass Bay Rookie of the Year.

 

I also have to give lots of Props to Jeff Kent of Composite Solutions for his help and guidance when rebuilding the keel sump, Skip Matos of Hall Spars for the base tuning and John Gluek of Dimension Polyant for sail inventory suggestions.

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Restoration is nice and all... but I thought the point of the beater to heater was to have turned a POS into a race machine. So I must ask... have any of you won anything with your "heaters" ? Its cool to make an old boat look newer and sail better, but new sails, new glass and shiny paint jobs only get you so far. I thought this was a race boat thread. Where are the results?

 

YES IM A NEWB. Save your comments.

 

-G

 

Well...fark off newbie

 

I can see results posted...been staring at a solar eclipse have we?

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I bought the old gal for 15k in 1989 she is a 1981 Lee Creekmore 36 footer (1 of) named "Unicorn" the old Volvo was dead but I slapped a 9hp outboard on the back and raced her alot and seldom did much. She sat for about 8 years rotting in the water behind my house, until the guilt got the best of me. I put in a New Diesel, some new sails, bondo'ed over the rotten spots, replaced the wood in the rotten floor down below. We painstakingly faired the hull. added spectra running backstays. and started doing well. We took first overall in the Miami to Key Largo Race in 2006 and 2008. We took 2nd overall PHRF in the Lauderdale to Key West Race, We took first overall in the 2007 Wirth Munroe Race even though "Numbers" and two TP 52's were in it :) and We took 1st overall in the 2007 Mango Cup (Lauderdale to Miami Race) in 25-35 knot winds all in all we got plenty of bang for our buck with this old gem. We have a full trophy room from all the club races weve won. I'm sure were in for a rating hit in a PHRF rating review next month

Radar asked for some results so heres a link to our wirth munroe results in a video

and a key largo race award

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I figure Ill tell you about my Sov that is up the page a little way. Its a 77' vintage. Its hull #3. It was one of 3 built by Mark Soverel for the MORC Nationals in 78. He had, One that was a masthead version, One with a massive rig a foot further forward and fractional , and one with a massive rig and lifting keel, named JB Express.(which won) Well mine was the one built with the massive rig, and the mast abit futher forward. It has been through a number of masts's in its life. It has 2 spreaders, jumpers, and a boom that goes to the very back of the transome.

People allways walk down the dock looking at the rig on it and compare it to other boats its size, and just laugh or gaze in amazement. The rig on this beast is a monster. The main is massive, its taller ad longer than the one on the Sov 33.

 

Another story for you guys is the fact that when I bought the boat it was rated PHRF @ 138.(used to be 129) That is mainly because the owner that donated it away, didnt take care of it, and also wasnt the best sailor in the world. He also happened to be very good friends with the area handicapper. Well since Ive done my rebuild of the boat. Its won just about everything in our area. Its rating is now at an alltime low. 126. -9 secs @ the last meeting. Its kind of an odd boat in that when the wind is around 5-8 knts it goes 6-6.1 upwind. When it goes to 8+knts, the boat slows down and does around 5.8and sometimes slower. So thats something I need to work on. But so far its a light air killing machine. It won just about every race @ the GYA's Challenge Cup last year. Which got a nice little write up in the May copy of SW. A nice shot of the boat too.

All in all, its been a great boat. When I rebuilt her, I made the aft bunks larger to accomadate 2 people,(cruising mod) the maincabin bunks wider and longer to accept taller people. And a nice little Nav table for the weekend adventures.

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Zane,

 

It is great to see how your project came out. If it came out at all like your Rhodes 19 then it has gotta be something special. Will you be doing the R19 nats again this fall? I haven't done them since chicago and have been thinking about doing them again, esp since they will be local for me.

 

The Flyer I have is nothing special which keeps us in the good graces of the rating commitee, and our crew has been having a great time with the boat, although we tend to like a bit more breeze than the real light stuff.

 

rj

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This is a Cal 2-24 my family bought used in 1972. I am pretty sure it was made in '68, so it definitely qualifies as an "Old plastic shit box". My brother and I raced the crap out of the poor old thing until about 89'. By that time the deck stepped mast was pushing through the cabin top (no compression post, just bulk heads on each side). It rotted on its lines for the next couple of years until my Dad moved it to Astoria Oregon. Of course the salt water and marine growth only screwed it up more, if that was even possible. About '98, Dad decided to trade it away for $1000 worth of labor to the sheet rock guy working on his new home. Well, I needed a new project and besides I was kind of attached to the damn thing as it was the boat I learned to sail and race on. So I bought for $1K thinking I would just clean up the bottom, install a compression post, fix the leaks and soft spots in the deck, new sails, etc… And then go race it again.

 

Of course the reality was that the deck and hull were so soft and full of moisture, that one project just leads to another and next thing you know 8years had gone by. It's back in the water now and we are racing on Tuesday nights. Last series we got 4 bullets out of 5 scheduled races!

http://www.sailpdx.com/results/sysco-spring-tue08.htm

I would like to attribute our good results to superior sail trim, tactics and crew work, but when you are the ONLY boat to show up in your class, it kind of hard NOT to get the best start, and a bullet at the finish.

Good times at 3.5 knots'.

 

This is what it took to get it back into shape.

 

-Drop keel, grind it down to bare steel, seal it, fare it.

-Strip hull of all parts.

-Roll boat over.

-Bottom peel to the very last layer of mat. (i.e. no structure left, just enough for a form to re-build upon)

-New bottom made of 3 layers of 18oz bi-axial glass in epoxy. Fair it a lot!

-Roll boat back over.

-Remove rotten bulk heads in bilge, splice in new ends, re-glass to hull.

-Beef up the keel pan and keel attachment points.

-Add compression post.

-Remove and glass over hull to deck flange.

-Beef up shroud chain plates under the deck. Tie upper shrouds directly to bulk heads and aft lowers to new hull attachment points.

-Sand, fill, sand, fill, sand, fill.... you get the idea.

-Paint it. Note the original color scheme: Sea foam green deck, off white shear stripe and turquoise hull. There is no missing this boat in a fleet of white plastic.

-New suit of sails

 

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I also have a story of an old DB1 built in 82. This particular boat was sailed years before by my father and friends for quite a few time until the owner decided to sell. From there on it passed by several hands, that never quite kept it in sailing conditions. About 10 years later, the boat came back to us in a quite poor condition. So we decided to dock it, strip it down to the bone and renew various parts of the boat, from woods to electrical parts, engine, woods and acrilycs, including work at the mast as well.

In the end we got a nearly new boat, with all new wiring, instruments and interiors. We got it out and still managed to win a few regatas with it, until after a rather stupid discussion the boat was sold again. Nonetheless it was a hell lot of fun.

 

nunocrzt

Portugal

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There are some very good looking rebuilds in this thread. I love it. I love bringing dead boats back to life. It gives a certain amount of pride to you when yourdone with the work. It gives you a good feeling knowing your old totaled out POS is beating everyone else in their new high dollar jobs.

 

After my Sov rebuild I bought a j24 which was totaled out in hurricane Katrina. I bought it for 500$. It had a crushed starboard hull deck joint, various gouges on the rail. About 15 spots where 2x4's banged through the bottom of the boat. All the stanchions had been knocked through the deck. You know how hurricanes beat up boats. They certainly arnt good for them. This J was also awet sailed boat from my home club. It hadnt been used in around 15 years untill it was donated to the Jr YC and then sold to a guy across the bay from us. He did a little bit a thurs night races untill the storm killed her.

Allways one for a bargin I got her, and once again tore the bottom down. I had to recore the deck areas that were bad, I had to rebuild a 7 foot area from the stem to the bulkhead, where something had crushed the hull deck joint and smashed the core through. Not to mention all the standard racing upgrades to make her a competitive boat again.

 

Heres Wild Cherry #2 Before and an after shot or 2 of after. Ill also throw in some Boobies . =) Just to make everyone happy.

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"Crab Smash"- T-22 CB - #2

 

Here's her (ongoing) story-

 

When I bought my Tanzer 22 Keel/CB back in '02, she was structurally sound but tired. Like many here, I hoped to transform her from a 4kt to a 5kt shitbox, on the CHEAP. My first step was scraping off more than 30yrs of anti-fouling paint, down to the gelcoat. Next- I filled/faired the rusty keel (poorly). Finally- I grinded (ground?) the jagged decaying iron centerboard bright, and coated it with primer.

 

With a reasonably smooth bottom, and really crappy sails, my results improved slightly- more 4ths and 5ths, less 8ths and worse.

 

I wanted to race spinnaker in 2004, but had no equipment. Found a very old J-24 chute for sale for $50, fashioned a pole from a 9' wooden closet rod (home depot $20), and off we went. During one moderate air race, however, the home depot special bent like overcooked spaghetti- time to upgrade the pole. Back to the J24 classifieds- found an old, slightly bent, pole for $100- done. Upgraded the spinnaker (evelyn 26- used - $75)- sold the J24 chute (ebay- $270!).

 

While racing in '04- felt heavy thumping on the cockpit floor- the centerboard had broken off! Continued racing, as it slowly twisted itself in the wire pennant. Eventually, the wire failed, and we finished the race with only the stubby keel. Luckily, my brother's employer (machine shop) was able to water-jet me a new board from scrap. (free)

 

Next upgrade was adding a removeable traveller. Bought a 6ft length of track ($35) and car ($25) from the Harken closeout site - and drilled holes in the cockpit seats. Two scrap wood supports and small cam cleats complete the apparatus. Best part is I only install it (bolts to seat into settee berth) for racing.

 

Wanted, and needed (badly) new-er sails. The Mainsail and genoa were at least 25yrs old. No chance for new, given the $$$. So, back to internet. Found a nearly J22 kevlar genoa (a bit short on the hoist) for $400. Also, bought a J-22 mainsail (much talller J)- had it cut down to the first reef.($150 all in) The J22 sail logo on the T22 caused some consternation in the fleet, especially since the newer genny seemed quite fast. I offered to trade boats with one whiner(brand new 30+ft Beneteau) for the next race- got no answer.

 

Tanzer industries produced more than 2200 T-22's from 1970 until the mid 80's. Crab Smash is hull number 2(!)- the FIRST keel/cb made, and very likely THE OLDEST TANZER of any kind ON THE PLANET.

 

I enjoy family (6 kids) sails and racing her (casually), and take great pride in her thrifty transformation from "beater to heater".

 

Taugh Lynch

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Thanks guys for the encouragement... my biggest challenge now is figuring out what boat to start looking to trade the 7.9 in for. I want something that draws 6 feet max, over 30 feet, double digit PHRF rating, and a beater price range of 18-20k...

 

For that guy who was asking for results for the Heater part of the story... we aren't national champs or anything huge, but we've done ok.

 

The wooden boat was a dog... that boat was a stepping stone.

The J24 got BOTY 2000 (First year I had it.) We've got a bunch of yellow, red, and blue flags to go along with that boat.

The S2 7.9 we got BOTY in 2005 and 2006, couple halyards worth of flags, and have done well in the past 2 trans eries we ran with it.

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Since I cant get enough project boats to work on. here is my next one.

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Since I cant get enough project boats to work on. here is my next one.

 

That a tornado boat? If it's anything like your previous work, it'll be a heater before to long. How low do you pick something like a tashed Melges for these days?

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Yes the tornado boat from PYC. Not as cheap as I wanted to. But under 10k. I Love the barter system.....

The biggest problem Ive had was doing deals for a better keel and a mast. Both of which have been totaled out aswell. So Im guessing Ill be doing a bunch of carbon crap this summer. The mast needs the top 6 inches put back together. (no biggie) The keel I have is another story. Im thinking I should have just bought a new one. But then I wouldnt have traded a mototrboat out of my yard for it. Plus I got sails, engine, hiking pads, shrouds spreaders etc..... Tons of spar crap....

 

And you guessed it Red is the color. lol....

 

And Boston. Thanks. Ill be getting about 2-3 rhodes ready this winter.... And so far all my boats have come out Much better than the General. So..... Now if I could only find the time to race all these things it would be great.

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Bought a totally trashed T-10 for 6.5K and brought it back. Won first in class in the '05 Bermuda 1-2. I love this boat.

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post-6128-1213210805_thumb.jpgpost-6128-1213210805_thumb.jpg[a

ttachment=76870:2008_PYC_Regatta.jpg]post-6128-1213210805_thumb.jpgKP,

Saw your boat last night while sailing my project boat (which isn't done yet). Looked great!

 

JM

 

This is a Cal 2-24 my family bought used in 1972. I am pretty sure it was made in '68, so it definitely qualifies as an "Old plastic shit box". My brother and I raced the crap out of the poor old thing until about 89'. By that time the deck stepped mast was pushing through the cabin top (no compression post, just bulk heads on each side). It rotted on its lines for the next couple of years until my Dad moved it to Astoria Oregon. Of course the salt water and marine growth only screwed it up more, if that was even possible. About '98, Dad decided to trade it away for $1000 worth of labor to the sheet rock guy working on his new home. Well, I needed a new project and besides I was kind of attached to the damn thing as it was the boat I learned to sail and race on. So I bought for $1K thinking I would just clean up the bottom, install a compression post, fix the leaks and soft spots in the deck, new sails, etc… And then go race it again.

 

Of course the reality was that the deck and hull were so soft and full of moisture, that one project just leads to another and next thing you know 8years had gone by. It's back in the water now and we are racing on Tuesday nights. Last series we got 4 bullets out of 5 scheduled races!

http://www.sailpdx.com/results/sysco-spring-tue08.htm

I would like to attribute our good results to superior sail trim, tactics and crew work, but when you are the ONLY boat to show up in your class, it kind of hard NOT to get the best start, and a bullet at the finish.

Good times at 3.5 knots'.

 

This is what it took to get it back into shape.

 

-Drop keel, grind it down to bare steel, seal it, fare it.

-Strip hull of all parts.

-Roll boat over.

-Bottom peel to the very last layer of mat. (i.e. no structure left, just enough for a form to re-build upon)

-New bottom made of 3 layers of 18oz bi-axial glass in epoxy. Fair it a lot!

-Roll boat back over.

-Remove rotten bulk heads in bilge, splice in new ends, re-glass to hull.

-Beef up the keel pan and keel attachment points.

-Add compression post.

-Remove and glass over hull to deck flange.

-Beef up shroud chain plates under the deck. Tie upper shrouds directly to bulk heads and aft lowers to new hull attachment points.

-Sand, fill, sand, fill, sand, fill.... you get the idea.

-Paint it. Note the original color scheme: Sea foam green deck, off white shear stripe and turquoise hull. There is no missing this boat in a fleet of white plastic.

-New suit of sails

 

post-25479-1212507885_thumb.jpg

post-25479-1212507900_thumb.jpg

post-25479-1212507909_thumb.jpg

post-25479-1212507920_thumb.jpg

post-25479-1212507929_thumb.jpg

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Damn Boston, you made yrs to pretty..... Mines nothing more than a big stick that you Have to walk softly on....

 

My J is pretty, the Sov is just for doing phrf wankin and pissin people off. the M-24, will be ,,,, hrmmm I think I may try a symetrical spinn on it just for shits and giggles.... How low does she go???

 

But the inside of yours looks Great.....

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Come on..someone has a Macgregor story........

 

:lol:

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