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xpatriota

Restoring 1965 Plastrend

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Hi Everyone. I'm Gordon, and I'm restoring a 1965 Plastrend here in Sacramento. I want to share the work, and invite advice and comments. We have a fleet of FDs here in the Bay area. You can see the fleet at www.calfd.org.

Thanks

g

 

Here we started out with the fiberglass repair by filling the holes with resin. The hull was in very "needy" condition. Soon after, I brough in a specialist that helped with the bottom that recommended we remove the build up of resin, and fill in the holes with more glass. Our work in the first picture, and the corrected work is what see in the second picture.

 

Note this is my second boat restoration. My first was a Fireball that I started in Novemeber, and finished in January. I was quite proud of my first boat restoration. However, this is another story.

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The trailer was a mess; covered in flakes. I purchased a grinder, and attached a welder's brush, and grinded on her for days. This photos is half way through the process.

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The boat was painted with a polyurethane enamel which I'm told is the next level below Emeron. I am told, we have another week yet until the paint completely stretches, however, it already looks good.

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I forgot a step-removing the hardware and lines. We, Russ and I were looking at this speggetti, and thinking of the best way to approach removing all this, and not loosing our minds when we go to install all the lines and hardware. I had a little experience with this on my Fireball project. I maticulously took pictures of everything, and remove stuff sparingly; not all at once. The Fireball was my first boat, and I was intimidated with it. However, I'm now more familiar with sailing rigging, and thought removing all at once would be the best approach. I was paying guys to help sand and paint the inside, so I didn't want to waist time. Therefore we took lots of pictures, and removed everything while taking mental snap shots. I think visualizing how the lines work during the removal helps too.

 

Plus, I knew if we got too far "over our heads", we had guys in the fleet that would "bail" us out.

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Yesterday, we applied to the inside of the hull the gelcoat with sand for grip. It is bueatiful! Previously, that is two days ago, we applied several coats of polyurethane to the deck to seal it. Here you see where we sanded the deck in preparation for varnishing. Varnish should be here Friday. I love how the blue

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Here you see an upcoming project. I will have to reinforce the truss holding the deck up with is currently slapping the underside of the deck when pressure is applied to the topside of the deck. ... Boy, those trusses really need some paint on them.

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This was the boat that I was restoring, and I ran away from it. What did you do about the rotten core in the false bottom? You have really got her looking great.

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Im very glad to see this getting done. this boat is unique in my experience and I look forward to seeing it in person.

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This was the boat that I was restoring, and I ran away from it. What did you do about the rotten core in the false bottom? You have really got her looking great.

 

That bottom was some concern, but we air it out, and pick out the rotton material. Then we patched with glass, and gelcoat. DJ, the magician restored alot of the strength to the boat. However, there is a little spot around the self bailer that I will want to go back over. We will see. DJ has a lot of history in boats and was great.

 

One question for you. Do you know the boat's identity? Is this clearly a '65?

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One question for you. Do you know the boat's identity? Is this clearly a '65?

 

Xpat, I just sold my '65 Plastrend FD and I have to say it looked nothing like what you are working on here; it didn't have a scrap of wood in it for starters, had rolled tanks, crazy glass ribs structure and the characteristic two holes for the chute(s) next to the mast. (pic below)

 

I like your project - you have done a ton of work and it's looking good. But I'll go out on a limb and say that if she's a Plastrend, she's earlier than '65 -- but I'm not at all sure she's even a Plastrend, unless that's a retrofitted deck on a Plas hull?

 

7, am I way off here?

 

M

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Xpat, I just sold my '65 Plastrend FD and I have to say it looked nothing like what you are working on here; it didn't have a scrap of wood in it for starters, had rolled tanks, crazy glass ribs structure and the characteristic two holes for the chute(s) next to the mast. (pic below)

 

I like your project - you have done a ton of work and it's looking good. But I'll go out on a limb and say that if she's a Plastrend, she's earlier than '65 -- but I'm not at all sure she's even a Plastrend, unless that's a retrofitted deck on a Plas hull?

 

7, am I way off here?

 

M

 

You are probably right, I have posed the question of the identity to the seller.

Any ideas on how to identify the boat? There appears to be no name plate on the boat.

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You are probably right, I have posed the question of the identity to the seller.

Any ideas on how to identify the boat? There appears to be no name plate on the boat.

 

There was no builder's plate on mine, either -- I figured some PO had removed or covered it at some point, or possibly it never had one. I did have pretty complete documentation that came with mine, though, so there was not much question about the history.

 

As for identifying it, if USA7 can't immediately name the boat and provide a significant account of it's history, I'll be surprised and a little let down... ;)

 

Seriously though, do you have a sail number that might be original?

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There was no builder's plate on mine, either -- I figured some PO had removed or covered it at some point, or possibly it never had one. I did have pretty complete documentation that came with mine, though, so there was not much question about the history.

 

As for identifying it, if USA7 can't immediately name the boat and provide a significant account of it's history, I'll be surprised and a little let down... ;)

 

Seriously though, do you have a sail number that might be original?

 

Yes, I forgot the obvious. I will have to look again. I opened it once since I purchased the boat a month ago.

g

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This was the boat that I was restoring, and I ran away from it. What did you do about the rotten core in the false bottom? You have really got her looking great.

 

 

I'm glad you ask this question, becuase DJ who is helping with restoring the boat suggested filling the deck with a self expanding foam that would fill the 1-1/2 deck, and glassing over the plugs. I like this idea. However, there are conflicting opinions on this pro and con. In attempt to get the boat on the water asap, I stayed with the original design. It is easy to get distracted with little improvements. Also, I couldn't find the foam fast enough.

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It has features like that low floor, half high CB trunk flange, and those deck braces that Ive never seen before.

 

I feel like indulging in some baseless speculation -

 

Late 60's DeKleer - yard located in Vacouver area, about 20 boats built. not taking bets though.

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Here is my first sailboat, Fireball, I finished restoring (well almost-the bottom needs paint, and I'm still working on the "one pump" spinnaker lauch) in January.

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It has features like that low floor, half high CB trunk flange, and those deck braces that Ive never seen before.

 

I feel like indulging in some baseless speculation -

 

Late 60's DeKleer - yard located in Vacouver area, about 20 boats built. not taking bets though.

Remember that DeKleer that I had a year ago? I just finished sawing it into pieces small enough that the dump would take. Guess what was under the glass? Pegboard! -- you know, that fiber board with the holes every inch that you hang tools on using the special hooks. Unreal. And frikkin' heavy.

 

Still, I said a few words and thought about someone, sometime, being very happy sailing their new boat. Sad, but glad to get the damn thing out of the yard.

 

M

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Remember that DeKleer that I had a year ago? I just finished sawing it into pieces small enough that the dump would take. Guess what was under the glass? Pegboard! -- you know, that fiber board with the holes every inch that you hang tools on using the special hooks. Unreal. And frikkin' heavy.

 

Still, I said a few words and thought about someone, sometime, being very happy sailing their new boat. Sad, but glad to get the damn thing out of the yard.

 

M

 

M,

Was that the one posted on calfd.org? I saw one there that was taken to the dump. What a shame.

 

Since, we are on the subject. My helmsman wants an FD too, and wouldn't mind restoring one. If you see a deal on an older one, let me know.

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Yes, I will do that. Can you tell if the boat is a Plastrend?

If it's a Plastrend, it has had a totally different deck built on a Plastrend hull (the deck does look pretty homebuilt IMO). Looking at some other features of the hull as compared to mine, I will go further and say that doesn't look much like my '65 Plastrend.

 

Betting against 7 is never a good strategy. If he says up is down, I'll try to stand on the ceiling.

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M,

Was that the one posted on calfd.org? I saw one there that was taken to the dump. What a shame.

 

Since, we are on the subject. My helmsman wants an FD too, and wouldn't mind restoring one. If you see a deal on an older one, let me know.

Nope, never posted that junker. It was an accident waiting to happen. I will look around the Jericho club in Vancouver; there's at least 3 FD's there that seem to not get any use.

 

There was a similar boat to mine in Port Townsend, WA - DA'er PTSailor had that one, but I thought I heard a rumour that he'd sold it.

 

M

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This was the boat that I was restoring, and I ran away from it. What did you do about the rotten core in the false bottom? You have really got her looking great.

 

 

FDer, I see where you describe this boat as a 1968. Do you know the sail number and is this the correct year of the boat?

 

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showuser=23380

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I got the year from FD777. I never wrote down the sail number. Hope to see you at huntington.

 

 

According to the DMV. The CF7078SA hull number on the boat is a 1970 Plastrend. I will call them back to see if there is a sail number listed.

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If I am unable to identify the boat, what is the proceedure to secure a sail number?

 

The Secretary-Treasurer of the class association, IFDAUS, maintains the registry.

you can chose an unused or retired number from the list of take the next one in sequence. currently that would be USA-1496.

You will be asked to join the association.

 

 

I am intensely curious to know its history. Mr. 777 is our only link here. are you reading this Z?

after going back over Mike's deKleer thread I dont really think this one is from deKleer.

 

That peg board stuff was called Masonite. cant think of a less likely boat building material!

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The Secretary-Treasurer of the class association, IFDAUS, maintains the registry.

you can chose an unused or retired number from the list of take the next one in sequence. currently that would be USA-1496.

You will be asked to join the association.

 

 

I am intensely curious to know its history. Mr. 777 is our only link here. are you reading this Z?

after going back over Mike's deKleer thread I dont really think this one is from deKleer.

 

That peg board stuff was called Masonite. cant think of a less likely boat building material!

 

According to the the DMV, the CF number on the hull CF7078SA, is registered as a 1970 Plastrend. I ask if there is a sail number posted, but that is not recorded. When I have time, I will enter the DMV to get a $5 history report, and pay the registration fees. The history report will tell me who own the boat, and I should be able to track down the sail number.

I will also try reverse by asking IFDAUS to look up the CF number to see if it crosses over to the sail number.

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According to the the DMV, the CF number on the hull CF7078SA, is registered as a 1970 Plastrend. I ask if there is a sail number posted, but that is not recorded. When I have time, I will enter the DMV to get a $5 history report, and pay the registration fees. The history report will tell me who own the boat, and I should be able to track down the sail number.

I will also try reverse by asking IFDAUS to look up the CF number to see if it crosses over to the sail number.

IFDCAUS has no HIN# information from state DMVs to cross refference.

A former owners name could be very helpful.

 

"1970 Plastrend" has an odd sound to it.

The PlasTrend company folded at the end of 1969 after Ted Turner got out of the FD class. A single boat was registered as a Plastrend built in 1970, to an owner in NY.

The PlasTrend FD tooling then went to someone in California who carried on using the name Glasspeed, and about 10 or so boats were built between 1971 and 1975. Ive never seen one. Its possible that this boat came out of that period.

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Guest One of Five

that's the first time I've heard of the tooling going to California. Is there any further details/information about Glasspeed?

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that's the first time I've heard of the tooling going to California. Is there any further details/information about Glasspeed?

I will go back and check my records about where and how the boat got here.

 

If it is a 1970 and from California it may have been one of those boats. Maybe asking Bernardo or Jim A. may make some sense?

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Hi Everyone. I'm Gordon, and I'm restoring a 1965 Plastrend here in Sacramento.

 

Haha that sounds like an Alcoholics Anonymous intro! Was about to say 'F*!k Off Newbie' but then I saw what you are doing and your photos and decided it wasnt really warranted in this case! Keep up the good work, and you might want to tie your deck beams on the centreline to the inner keel with some glass or carbon coated cedar uprights (or similar), especially if you are going to refasten the deck to the beams which is also a good idea to help hold the boat together.

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Gordon the boat looks good. If you can find out the sail number then you can get the mesurement cert from that you can find the builder. Someone will know.

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How does one go about getting a copy of the measurement certificate for an FD?

 

Gordon the boat looks good. If you can find out the sail number then you can get the mesurement cert from that you can find the builder. Someone will know.

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How does one go about getting a copy of the measurement certificate for an FD?

I was lucky in my search for mine as the builders fee sticker was still attached to the boat and the sail number wasn't lost. So the national secretary was able to find the original of which I have a copy.

A measurement cert is needed at major regattas to prove that your FD is anFD

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Some time over the weekend I will try to post pictures of a Glasspeed Dutchman. Just have to take the cover off and figure out how to post pics.

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Some time over the weekend I will try to post pictures of a Glasspeed Dutchman. Just have to take the cover off and figure out how to post pics.

Should get the paperwork on Monday. Maybe that help settle the identity crisis?

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[attachmen

t=76832:Dutchman_006.jpg]

 

Here are a few pictures of what I have been told is a Glasspeed Dutchman

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[attachmen

t=76832:Dutchman_006.jpg]

 

Here are a few pictures of what I have been told is a Glasspeed Dutchman

wow ! nice Studebaker!

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I was gonna say! That's an Avanti, right? 440cid? Rare and sadly one of the ugliest cool cars ever...

I think there should be a Studebaker thread, I like em. specially the pick up trucks.

 

I think that FD looks like it has potential also.

Let's go Edboat.

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to start with the Avanti has a 350 in it. That belongs to my neighbor who has about as many cars as we have boats. He also has another Avanti as well as a Golden Hawk a Jag XK 120 FHC and a 55 T-Bird.

As soon as I make a little more progress on the cruising boat I can start the rebuild on the FD. The plan is to make next years MUG Race. I've got most of the bits and pieces for the Dutchman. As I do the work I'll post pictures.

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to start with the Avanti has a 350 in it. That belongs to my neighbor who has about as many cars as we have boats. He also has another Avanti as well as a Golden Hawk a Jag XK 120 FHC and a 55 T-Bird.

As soon as I make a little more progress on the cruising boat I can start the rebuild on the FD. The plan is to make next years MUG Race. I've got most of the bits and pieces for the Dutchman. As I do the work I'll post pictures.

 

thatll be good. Id like to see a pic up under the fore deck and a transom shot.

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Just another bit of information on my boat. The bottom of the hull is balsa cored. The cloth covering the core is clear and you can see the small balsa blocks. What other boats were cored back then?

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Guest One of Five
Just another bit of information on my boat. The bottom of the hull is balsa cored. The cloth covering the core is clear and you can see the small balsa blocks. What other boats were cored back then?

 

not that many, it was state of the art back then...

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Haha that sounds like an Alcoholics Anonymous intro! Was about to say 'F*!k Off Newbie' but then I saw what you are doing and your photos and decided it wasnt really warranted in this case! Keep up the good work, and you might want to tie your deck beams on the centreline to the inner keel with some glass or carbon coated cedar uprights (or similar), especially if you are going to refasten the deck to the beams which is also a good idea to help hold the boat together.

 

 

Do you have photos of what your talking about? Right now, I have a problem with one of the deck beams slapping the underside of the deck which is being repaired. Mayb you could sketch something. I like pictures.

Thanks,

Gordon (Newbie) lol

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Just another bit of information on my boat. The bottom of the hull is balsa cored. The cloth covering the core is clear and you can see the small balsa blocks. What other boats were cored back then?

 

Plastrend pioneered the end-grain balsa core. No one else Im aware of did that in the FD. One of the last of Plastrend's boats built for Ted Turner used aluminum honeycomb for the core. It didnt last long.

 

The Newport boats were of cored construction. Newport used an early acrylic foam material that decayed rapidly leaving the core space with voids and loose powder.

 

Modern FDs are all made with cores of modern, long-life material . the Lindsay boats were made with Nomex Honeycomb, and they are still as solid as they day they were built.

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Plastrend pioneered the end-grain balsa core. No one else Im aware of did that in the FD. One of the last of Plastrend's boats built for Ted Turner used aluminum honeycomb for the core. It didnt last long.

 

The Newport boats were of cored construction. Newport used an early acrylic foam material that decayed rapidly leaving the core space with voids and loose powder.

 

Modern FDs are all made with cores of modern, long-life material . the Lindsay boats were made with Nomex Honeycomb, and they are still as solid as they day they were built.

 

 

Any suggestions to repair the core? I was told that filling it with self expanding form would be the way to get the string back.

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Any suggestions to repair the core? I was told that filling it with self expanding form would be the way to get the string back.

 

By all reports I have ever read, your best bet is to stay the hell away from expanding foam. Think "sponge". I think you'd be best off to find someone who really does know what they are talking about, have them poke and prod a little and decide:

 

a: If it needs to have anything done to it to make it safe and usable;

b: If it is worth the money/time/trouble;

c: What the best technique will be to achieve 'a' in consideration of 'b'.

 

I can't help with any of that except to cheer you on and remind you that any sailboat, and perhaps old FD's in particular, will absorb cash the way a black hole does light...

 

By the way, she looks lovely. Don't be too hard on yourself the first time you bang it into something!

 

M

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[attachmen

t=76832:Dutchman_006.jpg]

 

Here are a few pictures of what I have been told is a Glasspeed Dutchman

 

 

Is that an Avante in the driveway? Nice!

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Does anyone know where these go on the boat? How do I install? Anyone have a picture of theirs that I look at for reference.

Thanks

Here ya go.

Often there is a tackle above the handle as well as below. If you rake the mast substantially, the crew will find the hooks drop down quite a bit. the proper height of the hooks and crossover gear is at the crew's navel. the shock cord must be tight, so that when the crew is crossing the boat the ends of the two hooks are held firmly together to form a solid bar that the gear slides over easily, while the crew is busy with the genoa sheets.

post-11767-1214063069_thumb.jpg

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Here ya go.

Often there is a tackle above the handle as well as below. If you rake the mast substantially, the crew will find the hooks drop down quite a bit. the proper height of the hooks and crossover gear is at the crew's navel. the shock cord must be tight, so that when the crew is crossing the boat the ends of the two hooks are held firmly together to form a solid bar that the gear slides over easily, while the crew is busy with the genoa sheets.

 

Thank you for taking the time to send this e-mail. However, I"m a little fuzzy where those pieces fit? If I'm quessing correctly, it appears to be between the handle and the shackle?

Thanks again.

G

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Thank you for taking the time to send this e-mail. However, I"m a little fuzzy where those pieces fit? If I'm quessing correctly, it appears to be between the handle and the shackle?

Thanks again.

G

yes. the ones in my sketch are sinous rather than T-shaped. There a several makes. The shock cord goes through the tube, and the vertical part goes up to the wire. when the crew is all they way out the ring rests in the crook of the T.

 

Continous trap gear is clearly visible in all these photos on Sailfd.org/USA

http://www.sailfd.org/USA/img/lm90/mw90lm03b.jpg

http://www.sailfd.org/USA/img/lm83/ml83lm04b.jpg

http://www.sailfd.org/USA/img/v76/ad76v03a.jpg

http://www.sailfd.org/USA/img/3l/nf86l04b.jpg

http://www.sailfd.org/USA/img/lm75/DCP_0402.JPG

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I see now how it works. I can be on the trapeze, and not have to worry about unhooking and hooking each time, brilliant.

 

yes. the ones in my sketch are sinous rather than T-shaped. There a several makes. The shock cord goes through the tube, and the vertical part goes up to the wire. when the crew is all they way out the ring rests in the crook of the T.

 

Continous trap gear is clearly visible in all these photos on Sailfd.org/USA

http://www.sailfd.org/USA/img/lm90/mw90lm03b.jpg

http://www.sailfd.org/USA/img/lm83/ml83lm04b.jpg

http://www.sailfd.org/USA/img/v76/ad76v03a.jpg

http://www.sailfd.org/USA/img/3l/nf86l04b.jpg

http://www.sailfd.org/USA/img/lm75/DCP_0402.JPG

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Okay, the boat is rigged, and ready for the race this upcoming weekend. I have to thank Doug at www.CALFD.org who helped us rigged the boat in two days. The first day we rigged everything, but the spinnaker. However, this allowed us time to get on the water to see how the boat performed. What an amazing boat! I can see this boat has the excitement of my Fireball, but more stable. We took in a lot of water, enough to fill the skippers area of the 1-1/2 deck. We found out that it was comming through the transom covers. I shifted my wait up more forward, and we got the bailers working. This will be an area, I will be looking at later. I think we will raise the lip on the boat.

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Here you can see we got the spinnaker in position, and rigged. It is a bueatiful spinnaker too. I will try to get a shot at Lake Huntinton next week during the High Sierra Race.

post-28379-1215315527_thumb.jpg

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We replaced the handle from 1-1/2 aluminum to 1" aluminum at the skipper's request. The original one was way too bulky. The tape will go away, as soon as we can router some wood off the rudder.

 

The rudder is wood, with nothing to protect it. I heard that I should coat it with fiberglass. I"m not sure if I will coat it with fiberglass, or look for something already done. I would like anyone opinion on if it is worth coating it, or simply find a used one already fiberglassed.

post-28379-1215316503_thumb.jpg

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Keep in mind we are going for function right now, so the wood is temporary. I am also going to make or purchase a deck organizer which is a neatly row of turning blocks instead of the blocks you see in the photo. The goal is to get all the lines coming down along side the centerboard trunk, and then over to the side. You see old lines still in use which is intentional despite having all new strings for the boat. I'm waiting for the perminate mounting of all the gear before I start cutting the new strings.

post-28379-1215316930_thumb.jpg

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Here we are looking at the transom covers. We had a lot of water comming into this area through the covers. Part of the problem was the covers were tightly closed. Come to find out after we returned that the transom covers should be secured to the cleat there in the middle. I had only used one bungie cord to hold each of the transom covers. Here, as you can see I ran the bungie through each corner of the transom cover. We will see if it is enough to keep the water out of the cockpit are.

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Here is the outside view of the transom covers. Not pretty, but there on the boat. Not sure where to go with these yet. I have stainless nails, and I have some aluminum stock. My thought is to run the aluminum stock across the top of the rubber, and nail it to the boat. Stay tunned.

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have fun with the rigging, I know I did. By the way the deck varnish looks deep enough to swim in, how did you do it?

john

 

 

John,

I have did the varnish on my Fireball, but this one I needed help with to get it done in time. DJ, who did the work did so at night. Temperature was very important. He did it in a couple of days. I highly recommend him if you are in the Sacramento area.

Thanks,

gordon

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nice pics, boat looks great! it really is unique, I wish we knew more bout its history.

 

I recommend a big ss ring about 2" in diameter to run across the trapeze hooks, then hang your gear off that. otherwise that looks good. that shock cord needs to be tighter, to keep the thing in a straight line while the crew is crossing the boat.

 

you always sink the back end of a 1 1/2 putting on the rudder and such. Once you get going the bailers will suck it dry and keep it that way. In light air sit forward of the traveller.

you could actually do away with those transom flaps altogether. they are just extra weight in the back end, which is bad. if the transom is below the water line there is something else wrong. normally its completely out of the water.

 

wish I could be at huntington . one of these years.

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USA 7 is correct, take the weight out of the transom. At least reduce the size of the flaps. You could make them out of light plastic (like TAP plastics) and attach them across the back. See some of the other pictures in the calfd.org website. We have seen them just done in tape, or mylar film.

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USA 7 is correct, take the weight out of the transom. At least reduce the size of the flaps. You could make them out of light plastic (like TAP plastics) and attach them across the back. See some of the other pictures in the calfd.org website. We have seen them just done in tape, or mylar film.

 

Yes, I'm going to remove the transom covers, and tape them over with clear self-adhesive-shelving paper.

Thanks

g

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Here is a deck organizer that I"m trying. Basically it is the slidding door ball bearing wheels on aluminum stock.

Not sure how it will hold up to the stress.

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