Hike, Bitches!

HB's 'new' boat thread

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Oh..I see..you guys mean a real scraper. I'll have to check that out. I do have a real 3M respirator, but it isn't the full face mask deal. I can see where these would be nice when sanding.

 

I was chatting with anarchist Vitamin Sea at Happy Hour last night about the whole deal. We are gonna wander over to the boat here in the next couple of days and assess the situation. Honestly, since the bottom was in much better shape than I expected, I think I may just scrape the loose spots, rough the rest of it up with sandpaper and paint it for this year..Once I have some of the larger issues taken care of (new thru-hulls, new exhaust for the A-4, a new mainsail, all new running rigging, some fresh cushions for the admiral, etc.etc..) I may spend some $$ on the bottom, if we decide to keep the boat for a while.

 

First order of business is to finish winterizing the A4..then maybe we'll scrape off some bottom paint and let the boat dry out over the winter.

 

Thanks for the input..keep it coming.

 

edit - nice...I even got the top of the page on my own thread B)

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Oh..so, since I've been whining about the ghetto wiring and nasty A-4 in the boat, I remembered to take some pics!

 

The first couple pics are the motor (yes, it is really there under all the corrosion and rust,) and then the one is the latest load of crap I took off the boat. I hope to never have to bend that sail on again...it is not quite original, but almost..I think it was new in 1978-79.

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Those are some goooood looking fenders. Don't be too quick to toss the fenderboard though, just in case you ever end up along side a pier with pilings, as opposed to a floating dock.

 

And is that the emergency tiller I see under there? You might want to hang onto that as well.

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Oh..so, since I've been whining about the ghetto wiring and nasty A-4 in the boat, I remembered to take some pics!

 

The first couple pics are the motor (yes, it is really there under all the corrosion and rust,) and then the one is the latest load of crap I took off the boat. I hope to never have to bend that sail on again...it is not quite original, but almost..I think it was new in 1978-79.

 

Sweet pics! That motor actually runs? Wow.

 

It is amazing how much crap can accumulate on a boat in 30 years.

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Those are some goooood looking fenders. Don't be too quick to toss the fenderboard though, just in case you ever end up along side a pier with pilings, as opposed to a floating dock.

 

And is that the emergency tiller I see under there? You might want to hang onto that as well.

 

No..that is the tiller. It is currently in one piece, but I plan to replace it this winter..it has a crack that starts at the forward bolt hole and runs about half way up the tiller..it is also heavy as crap too! I am sure it is original..I made one for the Tartan a few years ago from maple & mahogany..it came out beautiful (& light). Oh that reminds me, I am looking for a Spinlock Asym tiller extension like the E1200S (47") or the E900S (36"). They are $150+ new. <_<

 

I do plan to keep the fender board...I just need to take it home and revarnish it and put new lines and find some 'updated' bumper thingies..those little guys I might clean up and use for a dinghy that I don't own yet. Every line on the boat is stiff & greasy and salty and nasty..that is the biggest issue.

 

Sweet pics! That motor actually runs? Wow.

 

It is amazing how much crap can accumulate on a boat in 30 years.

 

Yes..it does run! Up until about 1,500 RPM it even runs on all 4 cylinders..after that it starts missing a little bit and getting rough. I simply haven't put enough hours on it myself yet to know why exactly...it seems to have even compression across all 4 cyls. of between 90-95 PSI, but starts to miss if I throttle up too much. I even motored against 20 knots to get to the travel lift...in a protected creek mind you, but a Catalina 30 has a lot of windage..she got us there though and didn't quit...after pulling the carb last week and bringing it home, I am not sure how it kept running, but she made it. She needs some attention.

 

OK..so this pile is about pile #4. The wife and I had already taken at least two loads of stuff off before we hauled the boat - This pile contains:

All the junk from the lazarette, including fenders, lines, about 12 mop handles, 6 rotten mop heads, and the misc. wood is blades from a Snark that may or may not still exist that I sailed as a kid..it is actually the first boat I sailed single-handed. I may keep the rudder and hang it in the garage for nostalgic reasons.

The mainsail, which I took off first (what's left of the main cover is under the sail.

The other brown and white stuff is cooler foam and soft foam (like interior cushion foam) that was stuffed and at one timemaybe wedged under the ice box..most of it was laying in the bottom of the boat behind the steps/galley. I was initially trying to find the exhaust hose to figure out the complexity of replacing it and came across all this stuff that was an attempt to insulate the ice box.

Everything except the mainsail, tiller, fender board, & 'blades' went into the dumpster. I'll give the blades back to the P.O. :P - I hope to toss the mainsail soon, but until I get a replacement, I'll keep this one. maybe I'll make a winter cover for the Laser out of it or something :unsure:

 

Dude, I feel soooooo much better about my A4 now, thanks!!

no problem ;) - someone else's is always worse than yours! One of the things I found in a previous hauling (which is piled up in the garage) is the original owner's manual for said A4! :o

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Oh..I see..you guys mean a real scraper. I'll have to check that out. I do have a real 3M respirator, but it isn't the full face mask deal. I can see where these would be nice when sanding...

 

, rough the rest of it up with sandpaper and paint it for this year..

 

Don't use sandpaper it clogs way to quickly on soft bottom paint, go to the local Home depot and get an open mesh drywall sanding screen and put it on one of those swivelling drywall sanding things that go an a broom handle. Saves your back and the open mesh does not hold the sanding dust, one screen does my whole 34 foot full keel.

 

my 2 cents.

 

Pal

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thanks for the tip pal..I've used the screens before (actually to sand drywall believe it or not!! ;)) - I'll try it!

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thanks for the tip pal..I've used the screens before (actually to sand drywall believe it or not!! ;) ) - I'll try it!

 

taking off years of botton paint by hand sanding is a little tough to imagine.

 

My experience has led me to full face respirator, paper suit with hood, rubber gloves and my trusty LL Bean boots. Ryobi RS281VS 5" Variable Speed Random Orbital sander (Cheap, disposable. Paint dust kills 'em), 5 gallon Shop Vac with double paper filter (one on the center cylinder AND the paper bag ) but the shop vac should be considered dedicated to bottom sanding and probably disposable. Extra long hose on from the vac to the sander with the hose crammed, taped or hose clamped on the sander. If you have a lot of paint go for 40-60 grit paper. I like Norton paper - you get what you pay for with sandpaper, the cheap stuff isn't worth it.

 

Take down the bulk of the paint with the coarse paper and plan to come back with 80 to get down to the gelcoat. The key is the coarse paper.

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The seacocks - are they Groco? They sound similar to mine and I had one with the same symptoms as yours.

 

I called the number listed at the bottom of www.groco.net and the guy gave me a bunch of pointers. He said they are more primitive than what modern folks want to deal with but they can be rebuilt almost forever. He shipped out a bunch of parts for the rebuild and the price was about $10 if I remember correctly.

 

JDW...so, they are the Groco's. The other 'issue' with this boat is that 3 of the 4 thru-hulls are the original pipe nipples I think. I am just planning to replace them. I have 3 of those Groco thru-hulls and I'll send you my old ones when I pull them if you want them!

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olaf, thanks for the link. I hope I don't need it, but you never know!!!

 

I have some buddies in the Atomic4 forum that may be interested. B)

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Just remember it's all yours!!!!! and we will be cruising in May!! ;)

 

We may be the last ones in the anchorage, but we'll be there! B)

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OK..so I was dicking around in the boat this weekend...I removed all the old seacocks and measured hose lengths and stuff for replacement. (all but one was the old rubber valve Groco things, and none of them actually sealed the hole any longer.) - The thru-hull fittings that are there are fiberglassed into the hull seem pretty secure. They are probably the original 'pipe nipple' deals from Catalina, as there doesn't appear to be any post-production signs of fiberglass work. I guess I need to kick them and see if they hold up. I do not see any reason to fill the boat with fiberglass dust cutting these bitches out if they are sound.

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OK..so I was dicking around in the boat this weekend...I removed all the old seacocks and measured hose lengths and stuff for replacement. (all but one was the old rubber valve Groco things, and none of them actually sealed the hole any longer.) - The thru-hull fittings that are there are fiberglassed into the hull seem pretty secure. They are probably the original 'pipe nipple' deals from Catalina, as there doesn't appear to be any post-production signs of fiberglass work. I guess I need to kick them and see if they hold up. I do not see any reason to fill the boat with fiberglass dust cutting these bitches out if they are sound.

They're fiberglassed in? That seems... odd. Flush-mounted through-hulls aren't unusual, especially if a boat was intended for racing, but having them fiberglassed into the hull would make it difficult to inspect for corrosion or electrolysis and a bitch to replace. Are you sure the heads of the machine screws or bolts aren't just covered with gelcoat or putty? That's what I found on my '71 Cal 25; when I removed the through-hulls for the head, they appeared to be fiberglassed into the hull, but were actually just covered with a layer of fairing compound and epoxy. 30 seconds with a chisel exposed the head of the through-hull and the associated bolts. Removed the bolts, then took a light sledgehammer and whacked the inside of the through-hull to pop it out. I was just filling the hole with new fiberglass, but it wouldn't have taken much work to clean up the site for a new flush-mounted through-hull. The other thing to consider is that if your Catalina has a cored hull (I'm not familiar enough to say) then those through-hulls are probably not properly sealed and are potential sources of water intrusion to the core.

 

I'm about to start a similar - though hopefully not nearly as in-depth - rebuild project on an Islander 28. Keep the updates coming so I feel sufficiently shamed about my progress/lack thereof on my own project, please? ;)

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Matt:

keep me in the loop on your I-28 project. I'm right down the road from you.

So you are, indeed. Assuming the deal goes through, you can expect an inquiry from me on purchasing a set of design drawings for the boat, in whatever detail you can offer. The current status is negotiating the purchase; I have less work than HB, but my price is higher. :lol:

 

The boat's hull #323, built in '79, powered by a Universal M3-20, currently located in Olympia. Main issues of concern at the moment are a two-year-old survey reporting possible water intrusion at the chainplates and forward hatch, and checking out the compression post. Hmmm... I know she has a cored deck, but what sort of core - balsa? - and any chance the deck's solid at the chainplates? I've gotten conflicting stories from a couple of I28 owners on that point.

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Matt..thanks for the info.

 

Apparently stock config on a Catalina 30 was pipe nipples (not real thru-hulls) glassed into the hull. It makes for a flush hull, but not strong. As far as I know the hull is NOT cored, but the deck is.

 

I've noodled this around in my head and have now gone and bought $300 worth of thru-hulls & real seacocks (still marelon) from Defender...Now I have both and can decide what I want to do, and I'll return the stuff I don't use.

 

I gotta help the stepfather get the Tartan to the travel lift today, so I am gonna take a (small) sledgehammer over to the boat and chip & beat on things for a bit to see how easily the nipples fall out. hopefully VERY easily, and I will justify the added headaches I am about to incur. <_<

 

I have some pics of the current thru-hull situation..on the home PC..I'll post them when I think about it. The hard part is to remember:

 

#1, to take the camera with you

#2, and to take pics when are in the middle of something exciting, so you have proof later. as they say on this site, "pics or it never happened"

#3, remember which damn computer they are on!

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HB,

Highly recommend what Paps said. I saw a booth at IBEX a couple of years ago offering the service or renting the equipment. The entire gel coat surface can be very stripped quickly. You could probably have the stripping part of the job done in a weekend. On the same booth, they had info on a fresh water steam washing system, followed by the application of heating blankets to "cook" the hull and accelerate drying out. I can't lay my hands on it now, but will take a look.

Good luck with the project. It sounds like lengthy but rewarding work.

 

 

 

Before you go machining off perfectly good gelcoat and in order to get the boat dried out AND expose any blisters, might I recommend you do the following;

 

First, pick a spot in your boatyard near electricity and get your boatyard to promise to put you there!

 

Second, Find the heaviest weight plastic sheeting and put it where your boat's going to sit.

 

Third, Make sure the yard puts you there.

 

Forth, Go crazy with the power washer when it's hauled. Do it yourself if you have any experience. Most boatyards do an OK job but you really want a better than OK job for this time.

 

Fifth, With the boat blocked in place hire a lacal mobile SODA BLASTER to remove all your bottom paint. Make sure it's Baking Soda and not anything real abrasive so your gelcoat won't be distroyed.

 

Sixth, When the soda blaster is done and all your bottom paint is gone take a close look for blisters, etc.

 

Seventh, Dewax your hull a couple of inches above the waterline bootstripe and tape more plastic sheeting around the entire hull. Tape this sheeting to the bottom sheeting. Now comes the important part.

 

Eighth, Get a household dehumidifier and put it under your boat. remove the catchpan and install a length of gardenhose to let the condensate exit the plastic tent. Plug it in and et it run and run and run. As the sun heats up your tented bottom the air inside will heat up causing the moisture in the hull to raise te humidity in the tent which the humidifier will collect and remove. Within a month you should have a reasonable dry hull ready for final inspection, repair and epoxy barrier coat.

 

P.S. All this includes your rudder also!

 

Good luck and take pics. We love pics! And beer......

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[snip]

 

Eighth, Get a household dehumidifier and put it under your boat. remove the catchpan and install a length of garden hose to let the condensate exit the plastic tent. Plug it in and let it run and run and run. As the sun heats up your tented bottom the air inside will heat up causing the moisture in the hull to raise the humidity in the tent which the humidifier will collect and remove. Within a month you should have a reasonable dry hull ready for final inspection, repair and epoxy barrier coat.

 

[/snip]

 

Very cool -- a moisture pump for boats!

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OK..so I was dicking around in the boat this weekend...I removed all the old seacocks and measured hose lengths and stuff for replacement. (all but one was the old rubber valve Groco things, and none of them actually sealed the hole any longer.) - The thru-hull fittings that are there are fiberglassed into the hull seem pretty secure. They are probably the original 'pipe nipple' deals from Catalina, as there doesn't appear to be any post-production signs of fiberglass work. I guess I need to kick them and see if they hold up. I do not see any reason to fill the boat with fiberglass dust cutting these bitches out if they are sound.

 

 

HB,

 

Don't over engineer it. Those "pipe nipples with ball valves" are used on literally 10's of thousands of boats, including something like 6,000 Cat 30's. if they are solid, just thread on new marelon ball valves.

 

How does the rudder look at closer inspection?

 

IB

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IB, I haven't really messed with the rudder yet. I got your PM from a few weeks ago, that is a good idea.

 

Guess I need to go do that before it all freezes up and breaks stuff.

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First I have seen this thread. Do you ever get any work done? :lol: No wonder you have over 2K posts!!!

 

Congrats on the new boat... Need to see her in person sometime, will be over in Solomons getting parts at Washburns around 1600, text me if you are around...

 

BTW MF is fucked up big time; fucking lightning strike!

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Yeah dude..you just need to come hang out in CA more often :lol:

 

What? MF is trashed? Jesus...track the issues so you can tell the insurance company. They probably thought they were done with you <_<

 

No, I never get any work done. I was over beating on the thru-hulls yesterday..they seem pretty sound..I am liking IB's idea to not over think this..it is a 30 year old 4KSB. What I need is some wi-fi in the boat yard so I can post while I am working on it!

 

Anyone got a super (3") deep 1 1/8" or 1 1/4" socket? I measured but I am not sure which size they are..I didn't have calipers. I have cleaned off most of the crud around the keel bolts..I am hoping I can get 'em off! Oh..what about a trailer hitch nuts..what size are those?? I have a wrench for that :blink:

 

I'll give you a shout...the boat is on the hard at Spring Cove, over near the Naughty Gull. Maybe I'll meet you over there. Pete just hauled the Tartan yesterday, she's on the hard over at Washburns...looks pretty good except for the keel..I think he has a chemical reaction problem...there are these hard black spots all over the place.

 

Oh..there is also an Eastport 32 over there too..near CMF...it is sweet! Light blue! B)

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Yeah dude..you just need to come hang out in CA more often :lol:

 

No, I never get any work done. I was over beating on the thru-hulls yesterday..they seem pretty sound..I am liking IB's idea to not over think this..it is a 30 year old 4KSB. What I need is some wi-fi in the boat yard so I can post while I am working on it!

 

Anyone got a super (3") deep 1 1/8" or 1 1/4" socket? I measured but I am not sure which size they are..I didn't have calipers. I have cleaned off most of the crud around the keel bolts..I am hoping I can get 'em off! Oh..what about a trailer hitch nuts..what size are those?? I have a wrench for that :blink:

 

 

Aren't you able to receive the HI wireless from your spot on the hard?

 

I may have a socket but am gone until the 1st. Not sure if my set goes that large. Remind me when I get back if you haven't found another source. At least I got tanks, heads, etc winterized before I left.

 

IB

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IB, I haven't really messed with the rudder yet. I got your PM from a few weeks ago, that is a good idea.

 

Guess I need to go do that before it all freezes up and breaks stuff.

 

 

Before the cold snap, drill a row of 1/4" holes on the bottom of the rudder, just thru the glass. If it's really wet the water will drip right out. Inspect the upper rudder-to-shaft join for cracks. If you see any take a dremel tool to the join making a vee groove. Clean with acetone and seal with a flexible sealant like silicone or sikaflex 0r even 5200. 5200 breaks down in UV rays but you should have those under your boat. Use a wet finger or chuck of raw potato to make a smooth filet to shed water.

 

If you have access to a vac pump, bad the bottom holes on the rudder and cycle it through a dozen vac cycles. Leave all winter and repair in spring with epoxy.

 

Good Luck!

 

Go Terps!

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Oh..so, since I've been whining about the ghetto wiring and nasty A-4 in the boat, I remembered to take some pics!

 

The first couple pics are the motor (yes, it is really there under all the corrosion and rust,) and then the one is the latest load of crap I took off the boat. I hope to never have to bend that sail on again...it is not quite original, but almost..I think it was new in 1978-79.

 

Did you get a tetnis shot before approaching that engine? LOL

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Aren't you able to receive the HI wireless from your spot on the hard?

 

I may have a socket but am gone until the 1st. Not sure if my set goes that large. Remind me when I get back if you haven't found another source. At least I got tanks, heads, etc winterized before I left.

 

IB

 

You know, I didn't check, but I'll have to being the laptop over one day....

Oh..I found the socket..I have both a 30MM (axle nut for the Corolla) and a 1 1/8" (keel bolts on the Tartan) - the nuts just crumble under the socket..I will have to chisel them (what's left) off.

 

Did you get a tetnis shot before approaching that engine? LOL

:P

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Oh..I found the socket..I have both a 30MM (axle nut for the Corolla) and a 1 1/8" (keel bolts on the Tartan) - the nuts just crumble under the socket..I will have to chisel them (what's left) off.

If there's room to get a crescent wrench in there, it's worth checking Sears or similar for a nut or bolt remover (I've seen them with several names, it's probably easier just to ask.) Comes in several sizes, looks like a vice grip with teeth and a smaller range of motion. It's purpose is explicitly to remove corroded nuts and bolts; get the jaws over the nut or the head of the bolt (even if there isn't much left), tighten it down as far as it goes, and turn. I've had it work on several nuts and bolts that were so far gone they were unidentifiable.

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thanks Matt, I'll check Sears tomorrow! Here is a pic of two of the keelbolts

 

On another note, I had HobieDog come by the boat tonight and we had a beer (or three) and chatted..I beat the nipples enough on two of the openings that I've distorted them, so now I have to remove them (overzealous dumbass) and replace them. How do I get them out if they are glassed in there? the old sizes are 1/2" & 1 1/4" respectively, and I plan to replace them with 3/4" and 1 1/2" thru hulls, so maybe I can chop the nipple in the boat off with a hacksaw or saw-zall, and then use a hole saw on a drill and it will be big enough to take it out clean and be the right size for the new fitting? I need to go measure things I guess..I bought myself some electronic calipers at Lowe's today B)

post-4755-1227231819_thumb.jpg

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thanks Matt, I'll check Sears tomorrow!

 

On another note, I had HobieDog come by the boat tonight and we had a beer (or three) and chatted..I beat the nipples enough on two of the openings that I've distorted them, so now I have to remove them (overzealous dumbass) and replace them. How do I get them out if they are glassed in there? the old sizes are 1/2" & 1 1/4" respectively, and I plan to replace them with 3/4" and 1 1/2" thru hulls, so maybe I can chop the nipple in the boat off with a hacksaw or saw-zall, and then use a hole saw on a drill and it will be big enough to take it out clean and be the right size for the new fitting? I need to go measure things I guess..I bought myself some electronic calipers at Lowe's today B)

That'd be my approach. There can't be that much of a flange on those things or they'd be more expensive to have fabricated than using standard through-hulls.

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How do I get them out if they are glassed in there?

Clamp them with a vise-grip and twist counterclockwise. Your description sounds familiar. The embeded part might be threaded -or you will crack the bedding material. I remember it was pretty brittle to twisting motion. Get a die-grinder and a a few roll-locs (tiny 40 grit 1.5" in diameter circular discs). Vacuum as you go.

 

Have you thought about a spectra cascading system for your backstay? if it splits at the bottom, you already have two good anchoring points. I think it is cheaper then the wire scruncher wheel plate type

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thanks Matt, I'll check Sears tomorrow! Here is a pic of two of the keelbolts

 

On another note, I had HobieDog come by the boat tonight and we had a beer (or three) and chatted..I beat the nipples enough on two of the openings that I've distorted them, so now I have to remove them (overzealous dumbass) and replace them. How do I get them out if they are glassed in there? the old sizes are 1/2" & 1 1/4" respectively, and I plan to replace them with 3/4" and 1 1/2" thru hulls, so maybe I can chop the nipple in the boat off with a hacksaw or saw-zall, and then use a hole saw on a drill and it will be big enough to take it out clean and be the right size for the new fitting? I need to go measure things I guess..I bought myself some electronic calipers at Lowe's today B)

 

Why chop off the nipple? Drive a wooden plug in from the outside, cut it off flush, and use that as a place to center the drill bit on the hole saw. Take everything out at once.

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thanks Matt, I'll check Sears tomorrow! Here is a pic of two of the keelbolts

 

On another note, I had HobieDog come by the boat tonight and we had a beer (or three) and chatted..I beat the nipples enough on two of the openings that I've distorted them, so now I have to remove them (overzealous dumbass) and replace them. How do I get them out if they are glassed in there? the old sizes are 1/2" & 1 1/4" respectively, and I plan to replace them with 3/4" and 1 1/2" thru hulls, so maybe I can chop the nipple in the boat off with a hacksaw or saw-zall, and then use a hole saw on a drill and it will be big enough to take it out clean and be the right size for the new fitting? I need to go measure things I guess..I bought myself some electronic calipers at Lowe's today B)

 

Why chop off the nipple? Drive a wooden plug in from the outside, cut it off flush, and use that as a place to center the drill bit on the hole saw. Take everything out at once.

Or use two hole saws at the same time (on one arbor). Find one that fits inside the existing nipple, preferred is a tight fit, and the larger one sized for the new fitting on top of that. The small one will act as a guide.

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thanks Matt, I'll check Sears tomorrow! Here is a pic of two of the keelbolts

 

On another note, I had HobieDog come by the boat tonight and we had a beer (or three) and chatted..I beat the nipples enough on two of the openings that I've distorted them, so now I have to remove them (overzealous dumbass) and replace them. How do I get them out if they are glassed in there? the old sizes are 1/2" & 1 1/4" respectively, and I plan to replace them with 3/4" and 1 1/2" thru hulls, so maybe I can chop the nipple in the boat off with a hacksaw or saw-zall, and then use a hole saw on a drill and it will be big enough to take it out clean and be the right size for the new fitting? I need to go measure things I guess..I bought myself some electronic calipers at Lowe's today B)

 

Why chop off the nipple? Drive a wooden plug in from the outside, cut it off flush, and use that as a place to center the drill bit on the hole saw. Take everything out at once.

 

Good thinking...

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IB, I haven't really messed with the rudder yet. I got your PM from a few weeks ago, that is a good idea.

 

Guess I need to go do that before it all freezes up and breaks stuff.

 

 

Before the cold snap, drill a row of 1/4" holes on the bottom of the rudder, just thru the glass. If it's really wet the water will drip right out. Inspect the upper rudder-to-shaft join for cracks. If you see any take a dremel tool to the join making a vee groove. Clean with acetone and seal with a flexible sealant like silicone or sikaflex 0r even 5200. 5200 breaks down in UV rays but you should have those under your boat. Use a wet finger or chuck of raw potato to make a smooth filet to shed water.

 

If you have access to a vac pump, bad the bottom holes on the rudder and cycle it through a dozen vac cycles. Leave all winter and repair in spring with epoxy.

 

Good Luck!

 

Go Terps!

 

Terps fan from RI??? I like it!

 

Yea HUGE game this Saturday, I am pumped already...

 

GO TERPS!!!

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thanks Matt, I'll check Sears tomorrow! Here is a pic of two of the keelbolts

 

On another note, I had HobieDog come by the boat tonight and we had a beer (or three) and chatted..I beat the nipples enough on two of the openings that I've distorted them, so now I have to remove them (overzealous dumbass) and replace them. How do I get them out if they are glassed in there? the old sizes are 1/2" & 1 1/4" respectively, and I plan to replace them with 3/4" and 1 1/2" thru hulls, so maybe I can chop the nipple in the boat off with a hacksaw or saw-zall, and then use a hole saw on a drill and it will be big enough to take it out clean and be the right size for the new fitting? I need to go measure things I guess..I bought myself some electronic calipers at Lowe's today B)

 

 

 

 

I think your keel bolts appear to be a major issue... are they all like that??

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thanks Matt, I'll check Sears tomorrow! Here is a pic of two of the keelbolts

 

On another note, I had HobieDog come by the boat tonight and we had a beer (or three) and chatted..I beat the nipples enough on two of the openings that I've distorted them, so now I have to remove them (overzealous dumbass) and replace them. How do I get them out if they are glassed in there? the old sizes are 1/2" & 1 1/4" respectively, and I plan to replace them with 3/4" and 1 1/2" thru hulls, so maybe I can chop the nipple in the boat off with a hacksaw or saw-zall, and then use a hole saw on a drill and it will be big enough to take it out clean and be the right size for the new fitting? I need to go measure things I guess..I bought myself some electronic calipers at Lowe's today B)

I think your keel bolts appear to be a major issue... are they all like that??

 

Whaddya mean "all"? You mean there's more than two?

 

 

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Um..yeah, pretty much..the question I guess is whether or not I can get the old nuts off and some new nuts on. There are some alternatives available too...apparently some of other Catalina guys have added 'sister bolts', adding some big-ass lag bolts and either cutting off the heads and putting on nuts, or slightly smaller lag bolts that go all the way down to the bilge surface.

 

I just don't want the thing to fall off <_<

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Um..yeah, pretty much..the question I guess is whether or not I can get the old nuts off and some new nuts on. There are some alternatives available too...apparently some of other Catalina guys have added 'sister bolts', adding some big-ass lag bolts and either cutting off the heads and putting on nuts, or slightly smaller lag bolts that go all the way down to the bilge surface.

 

I just don't want the thing to fall off <_<

 

 

Get a spray can of PB Blaster and drown your keel nuts. these is a good penetrating oil. Another is KROIL if you can find it locally. I order mine from the back of trade magazines. If you need to cut them off you might try to find a big nut cracker.

They look like this...

 

http://www.sjdiscounttools.com/kdt710.html

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sailorbob..thanks for the tip. These nuts are 30mm (1 1/8") so I dunno if that tool will work..that site is great!

 

i did spray them with PB Blaster and will do so at every visit. I also bought a set of cheap cold chisels which I think will end up being the tool of success <_<

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The actual threaded studs into the keel could be a real problem... it's pretty hard to tell from just a pic, but what is the material? I'm not familiar with Catalinas but if other owners have done the "sistering" method on similar boats, you may find the nuts are the least of your worries.

I don't like to sound negative but I would make that keel bolt attachment one of my first priorities with that boat.

Everything else like engines, sails etc. you can get around but not a keel.

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c28 i agree...apparently it may be mild steel...they did not start using stainless until about 1979.

 

I won't splash the boat until I do something with them. I had to get the motor running to get the boat out of the water ;)

 

Right now what I'd like to do is get the old nuts off, replace them, and then probably try some sistering so I have the added advantage of the boat on the hard resting on the keel.

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Cold chiseling nuts apart is usually more distructive than necessary. A Dremel tool with tiny cutoff disks should be used first (almost to the major thread diameter in two oppososing places if possible. then, when you wack it with the chisel it will split into two halves. Dremel cutoff wheels are fragile but cheap. Use a lot. Take yout time. Wear eye protection.

 

Here's the tool set you need

 

http://www.chain-auto-tools.com/general_au...ols/MI0083C.htm

 

Take Pics!

 

 

Here's another site with a lot of good info on removing rusted fasteners

 

http://www.crankshaftcoalition.com/wiki/Re...roken_fasteners

 

Bob

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sailorbob,

I am always looking for new uses for my Dremel tool! Good idea. I had never owned one until a few years ago. I took the chisels to the boat one day, but forgot the safety glasses so I nixed that idea for that day. I had a buddy that had left his safety glasses on the kitchen counter and was chipping up old tile, and almost lost an eye when a piece got lodged, so I am pretty careful about that stuff <_<

 

Those nut crackers look pretty cool...my current issue is the nuts are 1 1/8" (30mm) so the largest won't quite make it in theory. However, most of the nuts probably have enough corrosion that I can get the tool over them.

 

Thanks B)

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sailorbob,

I am always looking for new uses for my Dremel tool! Good idea. I had never owned one until a few years ago. I took the chisels to the boat one day, but forgot the safety glasses so I nixed that idea for that day. I had a buddy that had left his safety glasses on the kitchen counter and was chipping up old tile, and almost lost an eye when a piece got lodged, so I am pretty careful about that stuff <_<

 

Those nut crackers look pretty cool...my current issue is the nuts are 1 1/8" (30mm) so the largest won't quite make it in theory. However, most of the nuts probably have enough corrosion that I can get the tool over them.

 

Thanks B)

 

So if the keelbolts themselves are as nasty as they look in your photo - how would you go about replacing them? Heat 'em up to get the lead/adhesive in the keel soft and twist 'em out? Cut 'em off flush, drill and sink new keelbolts in a different location and rebuild the boat's keelbolt box to provide sufficient strength?

 

Are there any less destructive cool tricks to replacing keelbolts?

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sailorbob,

I am always looking for new uses for my Dremel tool! Good idea. I had never owned one until a few years ago. I took the chisels to the boat one day, but forgot the safety glasses so I nixed that idea for that day. I had a buddy that had left his safety glasses on the kitchen counter and was chipping up old tile, and almost lost an eye when a piece got lodged, so I am pretty careful about that stuff <_<

 

Those nut crackers look pretty cool...my current issue is the nuts are 1 1/8" (30mm) so the largest won't quite make it in theory. However, most of the nuts probably have enough corrosion that I can get the tool over them.

 

Thanks B)

Bitches,

 

Try McMaster Carr, I think they have one large enough. I know they work from experience.

 

Will Museler

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The keelbolts in Catalinas are supposed to be J-bolts. I think you can only cut them off at the bilge, or remove the boat from the keel and then drill/tap new studs in the lead :blink:

 

The Secretary/Treasurer of the International Catalina 30 Assoc. is also in my club, so we chat a lot. Apparently the proper way to really fix them is:

 

Drill a hole into the keel to about 12" below the sump (into nice solid lead)...

Then drill across and thru the keel to intersect the bottom of the hole....

Insert a long stud and attach nuts/washers using the cross drilled access hole...

Suck the keel back into the boat with nuts/washers/backing plates from bilge...

Fill holes with epoxy filler.

I have not seen pictures of this extreme repair, but the drilling of the lead is probably the easiest part.

 

He has also mentioned that although the "Catalina smile" is quite common, he's never seen nor heard of a keel falling off. I have about an 18-20" crack along the front of the keel, and from memory I recall it being there for quite a while.

 

I have started casually shopping for 10-12" long stainless lag bolts. It seems sistering bolts in between the original studs in the bilge with either a backing plate or large washers is also common.

 

One fix I read about from another Catalina owner was a to drive a long lag bolt in as far as they could get it and have machine threads cut into the top of the lag bolt (probably before it's screwed into the keel), then cut off the bolt head and put on washers/nuts to cinch everything tight.

 

edit - Thanks sailman..I'll check them out. I am hoping that when I remove the bad nuts, I may be able to clean the studs up enough to get some new nuts on there, and I've also heard rumors from other Catalina owners that sometimes the threads under the old nuts are in good shape.

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sailorbob,

I am always looking for new uses for my Dremel tool! Good idea. I had never owned one until a few years ago. I took the chisels to the boat one day, but forgot the safety glasses so I nixed that idea for that day. I had a buddy that had left his safety glasses on the kitchen counter and was chipping up old tile, and almost lost an eye when a piece got lodged, so I am pretty careful about that stuff <_<

 

Those nut crackers look pretty cool...my current issue is the nuts are 1 1/8" (30mm) so the largest won't quite make it in theory. However, most of the nuts probably have enough corrosion that I can get the tool over them.

 

Thanks B)

 

So if the keelbolts themselves are as nasty as they look in your photo - how would you go about replacing them? Heat 'em up to get the lead/adhesive in the keel soft and twist 'em out? Cut 'em off flush, drill and sink new keelbolts in a different location and rebuild the boat's keelbolt box to provide sufficient strength?

 

Are there any less destructive cool tricks to replacing keelbolts?

 

If they were done right, those keelbolts were L-shaped and cast in place in the keel, so they are not going to twist out. I'm not sure how Catalina did it in those days, but judging by the rest of the boat, anything is possible. Not casting asparagus at anyone right now...

 

A "proper" replacement is to drill down into the keel, and sideways to intersect the end of the new bolt (actually a rod with threads on both ends). Then new nuts or sturdy plates are threaded onto the bottom end, nuts are torqued onto the top of the bolts, and the holes in the keel filled back in.

 

Lag bolts are easier but not nearly as secure.

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Ish

 

Good tutorial...I'll print it and file it with the rest of my "never throw this out" technical stuff.

 

Questions

Do you fabricate some kind of a spacer, with a radius, for the lower bolt to shoulder againest?? Or use a rasp to square the top of the bored hole??

 

What do re-fill the keel holes with??

 

Thanks

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Another method developed by the Gougeon Brothers WEST system epoxy guru's for bonding threasded fasteners into wond turbine blade root fittings was to drill a slightly oversized hole and cast the threaded fitting into the hole. Destructive testing proved that the epoxy/fastener bond was stronger than the ultimate yied in sheer of the base material. If this were my boat I'd do the following:

 

First, remove existing nuts, use a thread chaser/die to clean the threads on the existing bolts and reapply/torque w/ new nuts.

 

Seocnd, if the original threaded fasteners are steel and not SS, I'd bore a set of slightly oversized holes eual distant between the existing holes and using the Gougeon method, bond in same size SS threaded rod. Upon full cure, I'd add thick backing washers and torque.

 

Remember, you MUST lubricate the threaded fastener prior to torquing or the torque vqalue means nothing!

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Ish

 

Good tutorial...I'll print it and file it with the rest of my "never throw this out" technical stuff.

 

Questions

Do you fabricate some kind of a spacer, with a radius, for the lower bolt to shoulder againest?? Or use a rasp to square the top of the bored hole??

 

What do re-fill the keel holes with??

 

Thanks

 

 

The method described is OLD SCHOOL and works very well. Instead of cross drilling a hole imagine a half circle with the flat up. The washer/nut rests there. You also need to use a good locktite on the nut for obvious reasons. Purests would use a hand torch and plumbers stick of lead to fill in the holes when done to lock the nut from turning, Know adays they use epoxy w/ filler.

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The method described is OLD SCHOOL and works very well. Instead of cross drilling a hole imagine a half circle with the flat up.

 

How do I drill a hole with a flat top?? That must be an interesting drill bit!!

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The method described is OLD SCHOOL and works very well. Instead of cross drilling a hole imagine a half circle with the flat up.

 

How do I drill a hole with a flat top?? That must be an interesting drill bit!!

 

You drill a hole slight bigger in diamer to the washer OD then you use either a coarse bastard file (waxed first to keep from cloging) or a sawzall to create the flat. If you go with a custom half-round washer it will act like a point and over time and toeque will deform the lead making for a loose joint..... a bad thing!

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You drill a hole slight bigger in diamer to the washer OD then you use either a coarse bastard file (waxed first to keep from cloging) or a sawzall to create the flat. If you go with a custom half-round washer it will act like a point and over time and toeque will deform the lead making for a loose joint..... a bad thing!

 

 

Ok...that's what I thought...next question

 

How on earth do you know where to cross drill?? The problem I see is finding any shared reference point to measure from that can be viewed from both inside, and outside, the hull.

 

I would be tempted to drill an 1/8" hole through the fibreglass, next to an existing keel bolt, and take all my measurements from there...seal it with epoxy when the job is done. However I would prefer to not frill holes below the waterline if I can avoid them.

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Thanks Ish..it seems you may have done that once or twice..my chat was at the bar with a few brews down the gullet!

 

I don't plan to get that extreme I don't think, but I do expect to at least get new nuts on the thing. Next I need is to find a die?? to fit those studs, which are not stainless either..the nuts are 1 1/8", so how do I pick the correct die to fix up the threads?

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You drill a hole slight bigger in diamer to the washer OD then you use either a coarse bastard file (waxed first to keep from cloging) or a sawzall to create the flat. If you go with a custom half-round washer it will act like a point and over time and toeque will deform the lead making for a loose joint..... a bad thing!

 

 

Ok...that's what I thought...next question

 

How on earth do you know where to cross drill?? The problem I see is finding any shared reference point to measure from that can be viewed from both inside, and outside, the hull.

 

I would be tempted to drill an 1/8" hole through the fibreglass, next to an existing keel bolt, and take all my measurements from there...seal it with epoxy when the job is done. However I would prefer to not frill holes below the waterline if I can avoid them.

 

 

Transfering lines and points from inside to out isn't all that hard with some strips of wood three plumb bobs and tape measure. The trick is get a good starting reference point. First, using a carpenters square adjust your jack stands until the boat is level. This may take a while. I usually take a 2x4 wider than the boat and lay it across, spanning the companionway, or a centerline hatch. using a framers square of drywall Tee square as well as measuring from shroud points make sure the 2x4 is perpindicumar to the centerline of the boat. Hang two plumb bobs just outboard the hull shy of the ground. String a line under the bob points and find the center. This defines the center of the boat and an be confirmed if a plumb bob from the underneath center of the keel to rudder line falls on your centerline. Lastly use the thirdd plumb bob from the center of the 2x4 into the boat. This is your inside referece point. By using the inside and outside points you should be able to measure and transfer all inside dimensions to outside the boat. good Luck!

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Next I need is to find a die?? to fit those studs, which are not stainless either..the nuts are 1 1/8", so how do I pick the correct die to fix up the threads?

 

 

oh!! Oh!! I know this one!!

 

Take a nut to your local tool store, they'll determine the thread from that...assuming you can get one off in a single piece.

 

How are you going to turn the die down in that hole??

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Next I need is to find a die?? to fit those studs, which are not stainless either..the nuts are 1 1/8", so how do I pick the correct die to fix up the threads?

 

 

oh!! Oh!! I know this one!!

 

Take a nut to your local tool store, they'll determine the thread from that...assuming you can get one off in a single piece.

 

How are you going to turn the die down in that hole??

 

If you can't get a nut off it intact measure the OD (Major) thread diameter and take some wax or playdo and squish an imprint off the threads, You will then know the size and thread count for your die.

 

You can get dies that size that are hexogonal on shape and actually will fit inside a socket!

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great..thanks guys! you beat me to it sailorbob..my first thought was 'what good is carrying a pile of rusted chunks in a bag to the local machine shop?' - lol

 

As soon as the turkey is in the oven in the AM, I am hoping to spend time on the boat tomorrow! My wife said we are eating dinner at home this year, because she just got a new dining room table and we are going to use it, dammit! (instead of the boat getting a new mainsail!) <_< - maybe it will just have to wait until spring..she's been waiting for that table for 5 years...

 

Now I just have to figure out what we'll do with a 17 lbs. turkey...we have no guests!

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Here's a trick when drilling lead I learned from an old machinist.... use MILK as a lubricant versus cutting oil. I don't know why it works. It just does!

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Here's a trick when drilling lead I learned from an old machinist.... use MILK as a lubricant versus cutting oil. I don't know why it works. It just does!

Use whole milk. Not 2% and certainly not skim.

 

The fat in the milk is the actual lubricant, the water serves to thin it out and provide a little extra cooling. It does work, it's almost the ideal mix for lead, though regular cutting oil should be fine too as long as you're going slow enough.

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Ooooo...nice...milk. OK..first order....remove old bolts...

2nd..assess - boat is on hard...keel will stay intact

3rd....buy (whole) milk.

4th...Drill

5th....sister bolts of the probably lag variety

6th...new nuts on old bolts

7th...splash and go sailing god dammit!

8th (ignore the 8 billion other things on my list)

 

I did finish putting the carb back together tonight, and also pulled apart the water pump for cleaning/soaking...need new impeller, & fresh hose fittings. Water pump pic (prior to removal)...Mmmmm....green. <_<

post-4755-1227757040_thumb.jpg

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Ooooo...nice...milk. OK..first order....remove old bolts...

2nd..assess - boat is on hard...keel will stay intact

3rd....buy (whole) milk.

4th...Drill

5th....sister bolts of the probably lag variety

6th...new nuts on old bolts

7th...splash and go sailing god dammit!

8th (ignore the 8 billion other things on my list)

 

I did finish putting the carb back together tonight, and also pulled apart the water pump for cleaning/soaking...need new impeller, & fresh hose fittings. Water pump pic (prior to removal)...Mmmmm....green. <_<

 

Nice patina. I'd say Jacobean, maybe early Dutch Pennsylvania, about 1620. Notice the original carved walnut header.

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Here's a trick when drilling lead I learned from an old machinist.... use MILK as a lubricant versus cutting oil. I don't know why it works. It just does!

It may work but why would you do that? I don't know what milk runs by you but it is $3.50-$4.50 a gallon up here. You can buy a water based cutting fluid for ~$20 which mixes at 25:1 and do the job properly.

 

 

Will Museler

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Hiker,

My buddy is getting a ready made kit for his 27 that includes the bolts/drillbit etc if you decide to go the lag bolt route. I think it was $280.00 or so, ordered from the Cat 27 site. I'm sure the 30's have an analagous deal...

 

Mike Sr.

 

 

found the link:

 

click-o-matic

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No need to invent the wheel here it is a C30 there are over 6,000 of them. It is the largest production run of any 30 footer ever built. There is a yahoo group you can search they have fixed everything on the beast at one time or another. Then you have Max the ultimate C30 expert.

 

Leave those keel bolts alone. Add a few new bolts and move on.

 

How is your mast step, that 4x4 in front of the bilge? Is it exposed? Is it solid? If it is rotten that is PIA job.

 

Paint that motor when you get a chance it has good compression will give you years of service. The carburetor is a piece of cake only 6 screws holding together I think. You may be cleaning is a couple of times until you get through all the old gas and trash in the tank. I added a inline filter that may help. Mine is glass so you can at least see what you have.

 

Dave Casey has a few books out there that will come in handy.

 

You have a tough built boat and you will not the last one there. The boat loves a bit of breeze and moves pretty well in light air. It will be a pleasant ride for you and the admiral.

 

DEW

C30 Hull#199

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infidel & dew thanks for the input.

 

I have a wish list running at the catalina direct site...it is laid out a little funny..one thing I've noticed there is that if a kit (such as the keel bolt kit) crosses platforms, they don't repeat it. Same for things like hatchboards, there aren't any in the Catalina 30 section, but I am 95% sure the 27's are the same size. I am making my own out of PVC board at $5.xx a board foot. I'll check into the keel bolts too, although that seems expensive for a handful of stainless bolts and a drill bit. :blink:

 

dew - Be careful with that glass bowl...they are not 'legal' for inboard applications, you are supposed to have the metal bowl. I am replacing everything between the tank and the carb, including adding the Racor filter and an inline filter between the mech pump & carb. I brought the fuel pump home yesterday and I am surprised it holds anything in the fuel bowl, it looks about rusted thru. I wonder if Moyer Marine has gift certificates? "no need to buy me any presents family, here is my Atomic 4 shopping list" :lol:

 

I think the mast step post is still solid...someone at the C30 yahoo group recommended poking around in the bilge with an ice pick to check for rot...everything seems solid, despite the fact that there has been 4 inches of water in the bilge for 30 years..the only issue seems to be the rusty nuts.

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Hey Bitches!! I took my Dad's boat over to Oxford with a friend last month and had to sail home due to motor issues. We literally sailed out of the slip from Oxford and back to Solomons. More quality time I guess... :) At any rate our diagnosis so far is the fuel pump. We checked around town and were told that a rebuild kit was not available for the mechanical fuel pump. We NOW know differerntly. Again, at any rate, I just finished attempting to put in a new electric fuel pump for an Atomic IV. Got off the phone with Don Moyer about an hour ago(we did not buy the unit from him but should have) and think it will go smoothly when I get back to the boat.

We have a lot of expeience with Atomic IVs trust me. We rebuilt the whole thing in my Dad's basement.

Congrats on the new boat!! Enjoy those turkey sandwiches! Yumm..

Capt. G

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CT nice...thanks for the input...you need another sailboat!

 

How did you know I had leftover turkey today? <_<

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How did you know I had leftover turkey today? <_<

 

Hell Bitches', I'll bet most of us here in the good ole' USofA had leftover turkey today. I had ham too! :lol:

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ha Greever...what that really means is another anarchist outed himself...now I know who he is! Actually, two, because a different anarchist than CrashTack found me on the Moyer forum talking about Atomic 4's today, and picked me out.

 

OK...so the latest update. Been at the boat the last two days. The holding tank is no good (boy does this seem familiar)...Cracks in the bottom of the tank, so it is compromised. The tank was not OEM anyway, so I guess I have to source Catalina OEM holding tanks now and rebuild that system too...The tank in this boat was under the v-berth, and supposedly the OEM tank is under the port settee...one more bonus is the P.O. added pressure water, and installed the pump on the opposite side of the boat from the water tank, exactly where the holding tank belongs..so two tasks (move water pump to where it should go, then install a holding tank.)

 

It just never ends <_< (but in a different way!)

 

Oh, I made a turkey sandwich (with stuffing, cranberry sauce, mayo, cheese, & pepper) and ate in in the cockpit for lunch today! B) While that was happening I watched a couple with no clue (clew?) trying to set up their bimini (on shore) :blink:

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Go HB, Go HB....

hahaha.

I guess I really need to be careful(again, I guess?) with this SA identification stuff. I've had an account since 05 but must not have caught on to the SA trend. It's obvious I knew who you were though.... :)

Later dude.... and I'm looking for the next sailboat and you are not the first to tell me that I need another(or that I shouldn't have sold the other)...

Go Moyer!

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Hey Bitches, before you go drilling holes. You might want to check with some Catalina 30 folks to find out what the keel bolts are mounted through. On early Catalina 27's and I assume 30's might be the same, the keel stub was a plywood cored sandwich. Over time if the keel developed a smile or the seals at the keel bolts leaked the core would turn to mush. When you looked in the bilge it looked ok but the keel bolts were rotten at the plywood level. If you tighten the keel bolts on a stub like this, it would oil can due to the lack of core integrity. One of the cures was to put the boat on the hard and cut out the top of the keel stub, leaving the bolts in place. remove all the rotten wood then glass it back up. That way you don't have to pull the keel. Then you can sink in really long lag bolts to spread the load.

 

Pal

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Dammit, Pal..you are exposing all the work I do not want to do!!! I have that particular PDF printed out and carry it around with me in my 'boat stuff to do folder' <_<

 

At the recommendation of some other C30 owners, I poked around in the bilge a little bit with an ice pick, and did not find any failed wood. My current plan is to sister some lag bolts into the bilge. I beat on the nuts with a cold chisel yesterday and even though they are compromised enough they won't conform to the proper size 30mm socket, they won't crack either...I figure I toss in some sister bolts and that should hold her the 4 or 5 years I expect to sail her...If I keep it longer than that, I can then replace or repair the stock mild steel nuts/studs, or at least the next owner will appreciate I did something!!!

 

Crash Tack....My Moyer shopping list is only up to $175 right now..i am getting off cheap! B)

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Dammit, Pal..you are exposing all the work I do not want to do!!! I have that particular PDF printed out and carry it around with me in my 'boat stuff to do folder' <_<

 

At the recommendation of some other C30 owners, I poked around in the bilge a little bit with an ice pick, and did not find any failed wood. My current plan is to sister some lag bolts into the bilge. I beat on the nuts with a cold chisel yesterday and even though they are compromised enough they won't conform to the proper size 30mm socket, they won't crack either...I figure I toss in some sister bolts and that should hold her the 4 or 5 years I expect to sail her...If I keep it longer than that, I can then replace or repair the stock mild steel nuts/studs, or at least the next owner will appreciate I did something!!!

 

Crash Tack....My Moyer shopping list is only up to $175 right now..i am getting off cheap! B)

 

 

Just out of curiosity why did the bilge/keel stub have water in it? More importantly was the water coming in from the keel hull joint? :blink:

 

Pal

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Pal, I mostly think it was because the PO ran the cheapo bilge pump (which siphons abotu 2 litres of water back in when you shut it off) and never sponged the bilge. The chainplates and windows also leak (this is a Catalina 30 after all) but I do not know how much they contribute to the overall water in the bilge. You can almost see the 'ring' in the bilge which showed the constant level after I scrubbed most of it..there is some black that just wont' come off though.

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Catalina windows leaking? Perish the thought.

 

They're pretty fun to re-bed. Whoever engineered the windows for Catalina was a masochist. Have fun with that!

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Pal, I mostly think it was because the PO ran the cheapo bilge pump (which siphons abotu 2 litres of water back in when you shut it off) and never sponged the bilge. The chainplates and windows also leak (this is a Catalina 30 after all) but I do not know how much they contribute to the overall water in the bilge. You can almost see the 'ring' in the bilge which showed the constant level after I scrubbed most of it..there is some black that just wont' come off though.

 

Well if its general leakage, from the windows or whatever thats a good thing, sort of. If you really want to know what the keel stub is doing you could drill a small pilot hole to the level of the wood. If its dry then use it as a pilot for the lag bolts. If it is wet, well you have the instructions. :(

 

Pal

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HB,

 

Don't over engineer it. Those "pipe nipples with ball valves" are used on literally 10's of thousands of boats, including something like 6,000 Cat 30's. if they are solid, just thread on new marelon ball valves.

 

How does the rudder look at closer inspection?

 

IB

 

IB, I drilled a few holes in the rudder...dry! not even wet drill bit shavings. B)

 

Busy this week with non-boat stuff, but here is the latest:

 

Holding tank...shot...need entirely new system minus the recently replaced head itself. <_< - At least I've done that before. If I install the 'stock' tank , I have the added bonus of moving the fresh water pump, which the P.O. conveniently installed where the black water tank belongs.

 

Beat on a couple of easily accessible keel nuts with a cold chisel..seem intact once you get thru the soft stuff I scraped off. Cannot get a socket to hold on any of them however. Likely will add a couple of lag bolts, and/or maybe crack a nut or two off to see how it is underneath..I am not sure the threads are good enough above the seating area to get a nut on them though. :unsure:

 

Built new backing plates for all thru-hulls and epoxy coated them in the garage on Sunday when the weather sucked here. Found a marine-tex repair on one of the pipe nipples (head intake), so I deiced to replace the two nipples, and simply add a backing plate and proper seacock to the other sound thru-hull fittings which I inspected this weekend.

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HB,

 

Don't over engineer it. Those "pipe nipples with ball valves" are used on literally 10's of thousands of boats, including something like 6,000 Cat 30's. if they are solid, just thread on new marelon ball valves.

 

How does the rudder look at closer inspection?

 

IB

 

IB, I drilled a few holes in the rudder...dry! not even wet drill bit shavings. B)

 

Busy this week with non-boat stuff, but here is the latest:

 

Holding tank...shot...need entirely new system minus the recently replaced head itself. <_< - At least I've done that before. If I install the 'stock' tank , I have the added bonus of moving the fresh water pump, which the P.O. conveniently installed where the black water tank belongs.

 

Beat on a couple of easily accessible keel nuts with a cold chisel..seem intact once you get thru the soft stuff I scraped off. Cannot get a socket to hold on any of them however. Likely will add a couple of lag bolts, and/or maybe crack a nut or two off to see how it is underneath..I am not sure the threads are good enough above the seating area to get a nut on them though. :unsure:

 

Built new backing plates for all thru-hulls and epoxy coated them in the garage on Sunday when the weather sucked here. Found a marine-tex repair on one of the pipe nipples (head intake), so I deiced to replace the two nipples, and simply add a backing plate and proper seacock to the other sound thru-hull fittings which I inspected this weekend.

 

Cool about the dry rudder. Not cool to marine tex a below the WL thru hull....

 

Somebody recommended earlier that you use a "nutcracker" to get the nuts off the keelbolts. These are way cool tools. I had one years ago and used it extensively rebuilding old sports cars with rusty, frozen fasteners. They work almost 100% of the time and never damage threads. If you can get one in an appropriate size, you should give it a try.

 

Sounds like you're finding somewhat fewer major problems than you expected???

 

IB

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Somebody recommended earlier that you use a "nutcracker" to get the nuts off the keelbolts. These are way cool tools. I had one years ago and used it extensively rebuilding old sports cars with rusty, frozen fasteners. They work almost 100% of the time and never damage threads. If you can get one in an appropriate size, you should give it a try.

 

Sounds like you're finding somewhat fewer major problems than you expected???

 

IB

 

 

We use them everyday here at work...excellent tool. If you can get on it with an impact gun, all the better.

 

HOWEVER, buy a good one. If it's made in China, forget it.

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Somebody recommended earlier that you use a "nutcracker" to get the nuts off the keelbolts. These are way cool tools. I had one years ago and used it extensively rebuilding old sports cars with rusty, frozen fasteners. They work almost 100% of the time and never damage threads. If you can get one in an appropriate size, you should give it a try.

 

Sounds like you're finding somewhat fewer major problems than you expected???

 

IB

 

 

We use them everyday here at work...excellent tool. If you can get on it with an impact gun, all the better.

 

HOWEVER, buy a good one. If it's made in China, forget it.

 

Gatekkeper, You might want to rethink that impack gun use. The threaded driver on the nutbuster (quality non-chinese tool of course) is mad of high rockwell hard (read brittle) high yield steel. It's meant to be loaded smoothly. The hammering action of the impact gun does speed things up but wears the tools out faster.

 

 

Had some idiots in my shipyard driving a 2.75" UNF tap through welded blocks of high tensile steel on 3rd shift. Every morning I'd come in to a bunch of holes tapped and a busted or worn out tap at close to $500 per tap. Had to re-educate them rapidly before they blew through the tool budget. Caught another bunch using a #4 air motor with the same results.

 

Bob

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[

 

Gatekkeper, You might want to rethink that impack gun use. The threaded driver on the nutbuster (quality non-chinese tool of course) is mad of high rockwell hard (read brittle) high yield steel. It's meant to be loaded smoothly. The hammering action of the impact gun does speed things up but wears the tools out faster.

 

 

Bob

 

Hadn't considered that or experienced that...but it stands to reason.

 

However if there are only 6-8 nuts, and there is no room to swing a wrench, HB may have to sacrifice the tool to get the job done. So, by hand where you have room, impact gun where there is no room...not a bad solution.

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Gatekkeper, You might want to rethink that impack gun use. The threaded driver on the nutbuster (quality non-chinese tool of course) is mad of high rockwell hard (read brittle) high yield steel. It's meant to be loaded smoothly. The hammering action of the impact gun does speed things up but wears the tools out faster.

 

 

Bob

 

Hadn't considered that or experienced that...but it stands to reason.

 

However if there are only 6-8 nuts, and there is no room to swing a wrench, HB may have to sacrifice the tool to get the job done. So, by hand where you have room, impact gun where there is no room...not a bad solution.

 

Exactly A good aplication for Harbor Freight or Northern Hydraulic Tool line. They're cheap so you don't feel bad when you trash them!

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