Hike, Bitches!

HB's 'new' boat thread

Recommended Posts

shit - waited too long on the edit.

I noticed some oil hanging out (not dripping out, but collecting) at the edge of the manifold flange the other day too when I installed the carb. It smelled a little sweet, so I am pretty sure this is Marvel Mystery Oil that has done its job from being squirted in the cylinders and dripped down the valve stems and kept everything nice and lubed up all winter. It wasn't pink anymore though..pretty dirty, but hopefully that is the gunk its bringing with it from inside the engine B)

 

nice IB...sounds good!

Hell I come over and bring hot dogs and marshmallows and also the fire extinguisher!!! :lol:B):D:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shit - waited too long on the edit.

I noticed some oil hanging out (not dripping out, but collecting) at the edge of the manifold flange the other day too when I installed the carb. It smelled a little sweet, so I am pretty sure this is Marvel Mystery Oil that has done its job from being squirted in the cylinders and dripped down the valve stems and kept everything nice and lubed up all winter. It wasn't pink anymore though..pretty dirty, but hopefully that is the gunk its bringing with it from inside the engine

 

nice IB...sounds good!

Hell I come over and bring hot dogs and marshmallows and also the fire extinguisher!!! :lol:B):D:)

 

 

VS - Roger..I have two already on board...but I may bring extras! :unsure:

I might have to get some beer and come over to watch the show err...um...help. Does any one know the number for 911.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha...I should have one of those too...we'll definitely want a pic of the smoke...hope the Island Piglet behind me doesn't mind a little MMO laced exhaust on their expensive winter cover! :unsure::lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, no fire extinguisher necessary. Thanks to the help I received from Anarchists Innocent Bystander & No Patience, we got the damn thing running today!

 

Had a little trouble priming the water pump to suck water out of the bucket, but nothing a little hose sucking didn't fix. <_<

 

My "free" alternator from a fellow C-30 owner didn't work, but stickboy's mech fuel pump worked great, after I fixed the leak the fuel/bowl & gasket sprung when I pressurized the fuel system. :unsure:

 

So, after we cleaned all that up and sat in the cockpit & had a beer and let the fuel vapors dissipate, we cranked her up! Little rough to start, and the above initial issues with the water pump, but overall, not too bad. Pulled each plug one at a time, and noticed a difference, so all four cylinders are providing some power.

 

So, the thing should leave the travel-lift slip under its own power. I have done no tuning or anything yet, all base Moyer settings from his book regarding timing, carb adjustments, etc. - The engine got warm enough the thermostat opened, there were no major leaks, and no water in the oil, or blue smoke in the exhaust. For now that is good enough! B)

 

So, to finish this project for now, I need an alternator. I have two I will get tested, then decide the next step, which would likely be a Moyer 55 amp model that actually pumps 14.1 volts into the batteries, if these are both dead. It only takes about 3 minutes to install the alt. with all the furniture removed.

 

So, on to the next project(s), which are to keep the rig in the boat, which so far has the entire hanging locker disassembled, install the holding tank which is supposedly on a UPS truck somewhere between here and Maine, and get the galley re-assembled. Oh yeah, I gotta slap some 5200 in the keel joint (Catalina smile area) & rough up the bottom and put some paint on it too, & wire up my new knotmeter (which will likely max out at 3.99 knots!) & depth sounder.

 

edit - oh yeah, we only just grazed the cover of the Island Piglet with one little splash. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, no fire extinguisher necessary. Thanks to the help I received from Anarchists Innocent Bystander & No Patience, we got the damn thing running today!

 

Had a little trouble priming the water pump to suck water out of the bucket, but nothing a little hose sucking didn't fix. <_<

 

My "free" alternator from a fellow C-30 owner didn't work, but stickboy's mech fuel pump worked great, after I fixed the leak the fuel/bowl & gasket sprung when I pressurized the fuel system. :unsure:

 

So, after we cleaned all that up and sat in the cockpit & had a beer and let the fuel vapors dissipate, we cranked her up! Little rough to start, and the above initial issues with the water pump, but overall, not too bad. Pulled each plug one at a time, and noticed a difference, so all four cylinders are providing some power.

 

So, the thing should leave the travel-lift slip under its own power. I have done no tuning or anything yet, all base Moyer settings from his book regarding timing, carb adjustments, etc. - The engine got warm enough the thermostat opened, there were no major leaks, and no water in the oil, or blue smoke in the exhaust. For now that is good enough! B)

 

So, to finish this project for now, I need an alternator. I have two I will get tested, then decide the next step, which would likely be a Moyer 55 amp model that actually pumps 14.1 volts into the batteries, if these are both dead. It only takes about 3 minutes to install the alt. with all the furniture removed.

 

So, on to the next project(s), which are to keep the rig in the boat, which so far has the entire hanging locker disassembled, install the holding tank which is supposedly on a UPS truck somewhere between here and Maine, and get the galley re-assembled. Oh yeah, I gotta slap some 5200 in the keel joint (Catalina smile area) & rough up the bottom and put some paint on it too, & wire up my new knotmeter (which will likely max out at 3.99 knots!) & depth sounder.

 

edit - oh yeah, we only just grazed the cover of the Island Piglet with one little splash. B)

Great work Hike, it's nice to hear your hard work is paying off... must have been a sweet sound!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boy, let me tell you Sculpin, it was a little rough at first...when she settled in though, there was no smoke in the exhaust or anything, and it ran on all four cylinders!

 

The next project before I put the galley back in the boat is to investigate and adjust the reversing gear (this unit is the closest thing an A-4 has to a transmission). I do not think the cover has ever been off. :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guys,

 

Don't let him kid you. He did a great job in resurrecting an almost gone 35 year old motor. After initial start up, it ran and idled as well and any A-4 I've seen. I can't wait to see how it does under load.

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, no fire extinguisher necessary. Thanks to the help I received from Anarchists Innocent Bystander & No Patience, we got the damn thing running today!

 

Oh yeah, I gotta slap some 5200 in the keel joint (Catalina smile area)....

 

 

HB,

 

I looked at that smile before you arrived. Don't use 5200. Grind it out a little and fill with 3M vinylester putty. Works good. Last a long time.

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice,

 

OK peeps...I completed sanding the bottom today. Just roughed it up with some 40 grit, and sanded down the stuff that was chipping off. This is a cruising bottom after all.

 

This week, paint, & holding tank, since that showed up on Friday. I was out screwing off with Mrs. Bitches all weekend, so I only got a little bit of boat work time in this afternoon.B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wohoo! It's coming together HB. You're going to have a sweet boat when you're done.

 

I put water to mine this weekend (actually still antifreeze-we still have freezing ahead). No leaks so far! I got her up to temp and changed the oil a couple of times.

 

Today I started cleaning up the fallout from the project. I'm not exactly a meticulous worker.

 

post-8037-1238379904_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah..that's pretty much what the inside of my 4ksb looks like...something similar to a hurricane just blowing thru.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugh,

 

Boat overload.

 

Got the alternator working..short story is wiring problem (user error??) - however, the new diode plate isn't hurting anything.

No Patience came by and gave me some confidence after we checked things out to fire her up again, and then Hobie Dog came by with beer reinforcements and we got her charging..so I am confident the boat will power herself from the travel lift to the slip.

 

I also went to my favorite (albeit expensive) local rigger Zahniser's, and I am having them building me the mini-shroud to strap the chainplate back down to the reinforced glass area under the hanging locker bulkhead with proper stainless/swaged fittings. About one boat buck, but well worth it...So, it will be done properly.

 

Gotta get on the holding tank install & galley install, and interior install (hanging locker, etc..) but, I've also sanded the whole bottom with 40 grit, so after Vitamin Sea helps me slap a coat of ablative cruising paint on it, it will be ready to launch at least...I hope it floats with the 4 thru-hull changes & the two new instrument senors (speed & depth) that I have installed. :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice going Bitches! The wife and I finished our port replacement project (11 ports total) yesterday:

 

post-420-1239012982_thumb.jpg

 

Only two jobs left are rebed chainplates and paint bottom!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sailman..how much of a pain was it to get those new ports in?

 

I need to replace the old OEM Catalina port in the head with something a little more modern that will actually open & close (currently thinking Lewmar size 2), and then re-seal all the other windows. Not looking forward to that job :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bitches, they are easy to get and affordable compared to most others.

 

sailman..how much of a pain was it to get those new ports in?

 

I need to replace the old OEM Catalina port in the head with something a little more modern that will actually open & close (currently thinking Lewmar size 2), and then re-seal all the other windows. Not looking forward to that job :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Bitches, Boyd here.

Had to change my username, problems logging in here...

Anyways, if you're gonna' install the Lewmar 2's you'll have the same issues I had with the compound curvature of the cabintop.

You will need to do an epoxy/fiber buildout as you've probably seen on my site.

Thomas Lynch (member of the Yahoo C30 group) is doing this project too.

I cnc'd and shipped him a pair of the mock-up frames I used for epoxy filling my windows.

I Fedexed these to him free of charge with the provision that he keep them in good condition and send them to the next C30 owner that wants to do this mod.

He's in Miller Place, New York so shipping should be pretty cheap to you, suggest you contact him on the Yahoo site asap and reserve them.

Good luck! - Boyd at www.catalinathirty.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boyd, thanks.. I have read your window install in detail. I will contact him, as it is likely the wife will not like a non-functioning window in the head for very long. I am jealous of your access to CNC milling machines, etc.. I have been mocking up my holding tank stringers using an ancient method called cardboard & scissors - the horror!! :blink::lol:

 

re: log in problems...check with "Dawg" - he is the site administrator here at SA, he can probably hook you up. Your first user name was way cooler B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oooooo...nice bumper sticker! - I am pretty sure that could be successfully marketed outside of Cruising Anarchy. B)

 

Well, here is my update..I started sanding and picking at the keel crack, and next thing you know I am whacking at it with screwdrivers and hammers. I picked off all the old filler that was covering up the delam, and peeled off anything that wasn't bonded...

 

So, now I have about an 18" x 6" section on each side that I need to stuff some glass/resin into to seal up the hull/keel joint, then slap some more filler back on it. Remember this is a 4KSB so I don't need it to be pretty...I would just prefer to keep the water out. I'll try to remember the camera today, as I have some more grinding/sanding to do to prep the area..there are still jagged edges and stuff. Anarchist Sequoia has removed his entire joint and waiting to get the glass work done on it...now I guess we have a smaller scale job to practice on :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oooooo...nice bumper sticker! - I am pretty sure that could be successfully marketed outside of Cruising Anarchy. B)

 

Well, here is my update..I started sanding and picking at the keel crack, and next thing you know I am whacking at it with screwdrivers and hammers. I picked off all the old filler that was covering up the delam, and peeled off anything that wasn't bonded...

 

So, now I have about an 18" x 6" section on each side that I need to stuff some glass/resin into to seal up the hull/keel joint, then slap some more filler back on it. Remember this is a 4KSB so I don't need it to be pretty...I would just prefer to keep the water out. I'll try to remember the camera today, as I have some more grinding/sanding to do to prep the area..there are still jagged edges and stuff. Anarchist Sequoia has removed his entire joint and waiting to get the glass work done on it...now I guess we have a smaller scale job to practice on :lol:

 

HB,

 

Is a delam in the glass or just filler that cracked away? I've seen keel-hull mismatches up to 3/8 of an inch. Sealing should be on the inside of the joint. fairing is for drag, etc. You really aren't looking to pick up loads agcross the outside of that joint. If it's a delam at the front of the keel, I'm wonder why and where it came from. There are no loads until you get to the first keel bolt. a hard grounding might crack filler forward (and break things aft of the keel). Unless you hit something right at the joint.

 

It's the penalty for all those structural/mechanical classes. I have to ask "why" and look at load paths when something breaks. If only contaminated silicon (microcircuits) were as easy to analyze....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IB,

 

The collection of glass & layers of various fillers (some original, and many little hunks of marine tex) that were covering up the keel joint were no longer bonded to the keel itself in that area. It looks like there were lots of (multiple) loose iterations of minimal repairs done over the years probably just to cover up the crack. As soon as you get above the keel's lead and into the hull, everything is sound. You can see the void in between the keel & hull for about 12", where the filler has popped out there too. The keel's lead itself has some signs that water got in between the lead and whatever was originally bonded to it, and worked its way in there to break the bond as far back as the cracks go (~18"). The glass itself on top of this area was OK, but whatever was loose I was able to poke a screwdriver into and without a lot of force I just broke away since it wasn't bonded to anything underneath.

 

I tried not to sand any lead just yet, as I'd just have to do it again to get fresh material when I attempt to bond my repair to it. Which leads me to the next step & some questions. I think my plan is to feather out the edges with my sander (or a grinder), so that I can lay glass/epoxy in there. Will this stuff bond to the lead where it is exposed, & to the filler in the feathered areas? Do I need to put anything on the lead prior to epoxy/glass?

 

I am hoping that a few layers of mat/epoxy will reseal the joint & fill up the void a little bit, and then some filler on top of that will get it back in "4KSB cruising trim". Maybe I should inject something in the void first (West epoxy??), then a few layers of glass, then filler?? :unsure:

 

I know you've already seen the crack, but I'll get some pics today and that will probably help a lot, especially those that haven't seen it.

 

The other option is to feather and just slap lots of filler in there. I don't know if it would just crack again in a few years or not. It may do that even with glass underneath anyway???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IB,

 

The collection of glass & layers of various fillers (some original, and many little hunks of marine tex) that were covering up the keel joint were no longer bonded to the keel itself in that area. It looks like there were lots of (multiple) loose iterations of minimal repairs done over the years probably just to cover up the crack. As soon as you get above the keel's lead and into the hull, everything is sound. You can see the void in between the keel & hull for about 12", where the filler has popped out there too. The keel's lead itself has some signs that water got in between the lead and whatever was originally bonded to it, and worked its way in there to break the bond as far back as the cracks go (~18"). The glass itself on top of this area was OK, but whatever was loose I was able to poke a screwdriver into and without a lot of force I just broke away since it wasn't bonded to anything underneath.

 

I tried not to sand any lead just yet, as I'd just have to do it again to get fresh material when I attempt to bond my repair to it. Which leads me to the next step & some questions. I think my plan is to feather out the edges with my sander (or a grinder), so that I can lay glass/epoxy in there. Will this stuff bond to the lead where it is exposed, & to the filler in the feathered areas? Do I need to put anything on the lead prior to epoxy/glass?

 

I am hoping that a few layers of mat/epoxy will reseal the joint & fill up the void a little bit, and then some filler on top of that will get it back in "4KSB cruising trim". Maybe I should inject something in the void first (West epoxy??), then a few layers of glass, then filler?? :unsure:

 

I know you've already seen the crack, but I'll get some pics today and that will probably help a lot, especially those that haven't seen it.

 

The other option is to feather and just slap lots of filler in there. I don't know if it would just crack again in a few years or not. It may do that even with glass underneath anyway???

Bitches,

 

I did the initial fairing on our J22 keel when we got it. Used Bondo Glass and that lasted 8 years before we noticed any blistering. That was to bare lead and barrier coat.

 

Will Museler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IB,

 

The collection of glass & layers of various fillers (some original, and many little hunks of marine tex) that were covering up the keel joint were no longer bonded to the keel itself in that area. It looks like there were lots of (multiple) loose iterations of minimal repairs done over the years probably just to cover up the crack. As soon as you get above the keel's lead and into the hull, everything is sound. You can see the void in between the keel & hull for about 12", where the filler has popped out there too. The keel's lead itself has some signs that water got in between the lead and whatever was originally bonded to it, and worked its way in there to break the bond as far back as the cracks go (~18"). The glass itself on top of this area was OK, but whatever was loose I was able to poke a screwdriver into and without a lot of force I just broke away since it wasn't bonded to anything underneath.

 

I tried not to sand any lead just yet, as I'd just have to do it again to get fresh material when I attempt to bond my repair to it. Which leads me to the next step & some questions. I think my plan is to feather out the edges with my sander (or a grinder), so that I can lay glass/epoxy in there. Will this stuff bond to the lead where it is exposed, & to the filler in the feathered areas? Do I need to put anything on the lead prior to epoxy/glass?

 

I am hoping that a few layers of mat/epoxy will reseal the joint & fill up the void a little bit, and then some filler on top of that will get it back in "4KSB cruising trim". Maybe I should inject something in the void first (West epoxy??), then a few layers of glass, then filler?? :unsure:

 

I know you've already seen the crack, but I'll get some pics today and that will probably help a lot, especially those that haven't seen it.

 

The other option is to feather and just slap lots of filler in there. I don't know if it would just crack again in a few years or not. It may do that even with glass underneath anyway???

Bitches,

 

I did the initial fairing on our J22 keel when we got it. Used Bondo Glass and that lasted 8 years before we noticed any blistering. That was to bare lead and barrier coat.

 

Will Museler

 

 

HB,

 

I have had great luck with 3M's Vinlyester filler, both on glass and bare lead brushed with a brass wire brush just before filling. Mixes just like Bondo. I did the entire hull/keel joint fairing on one boat with it and it was solid 6 years later, even after a truck ride from DC-Seattle and back. I faired a coule of gouges that were in Melelana's keel when I bought her, including a .5" deep, golf ball sized dent in he front of the keel. Got no idea what the PO hit a foot up the leading edge.....

 

 

 

With that much of a gap, that deep, you might want to fill it in a couple of stages. I know you put in the new keelboats, so it should be sound, but that's a big "smile". If there's any flexing between the hull and keel, it will crack eventually.

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot the good camera, but I took some cell phone pics..I have to figure out how to get them off "My Pix" and then upload some of them. That sounds like a project for tomorrow at work.

 

After some more grinding today, the 'ledge' above the lead is in pretty good shape...the various layers around the top of the keel itself are the variables, and vary in thickness. I'll try the 3M vinylester filler, I'll try glass tape & epoxy, or anything. I just don't want water leaking in the boat, and I'd like to avoid further ingress into the filler/glass laminated to the hull/keel.

 

I could just slap on a shitload of West & light (403) filller...I have lots of that..but, if the vinylester or Bondo is better, I'll go buy some.

 

I also have more other boat stuff update. I got done grinding for the day, so I did a Moyer recommended acid flush on the engine block today...some black stuff came out, so I guess that is good...hopefully I didn't break loose any crud that is holding the motor together! :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
After some more grinding today, the 'ledge' above the lead is in pretty good shape...the various layers around the top of the keel itself are the variables, and vary in thickness. I'll try the 3M vinylester filler, I'll try glass tape & epoxy, or anything. I just don't want water leaking in the boat, and I'd like to avoid further ingress into the filler/glass laminated to the hull/keel.

 

I could just slap on a shitload of West & light (403) filller...I have lots of that..but, if the vinylester or Bondo is better, I'll go buy some.

 

I'm picturing a wedge from the front of the keel back 12 inches that starts about 1/4 inch wide. Is that about what you have at this point? It concerns me a little that the keel to sump connection isn't tighter. I've seen horizontal mismatches of 1/4 inch (think the leading edge of the lead about 1/4-3/8 in aft of the leading edge of the sump) but only minimal vertical gaps. That said, I'll bet keel castings are a lot more precise today then they were in the mid 70's. Remember, nothing you add there is structural. The structural connection is the keel bolts and the keel should be solid to the hull from them. You're filling a large but basically cosmetic gap and hoping to add to the watertight integrity by closing off that path. If you think you can use a blade to push saturated mat tightly into the joint, you might try to fill it as well as you can, packing it in as tight as possible. Drive it in a little (like paying seams) if you like. Leave a groove or gap around the perimeter (or grind one in after you're done) and then fair that with the 3M, or 403, or whatever as long as it's OK below the waterline.

 

West with the 403 will work, but if you really want to pack it with epoxy filler, I think I still have some colloidal silica you can mix with West for a stronger mix. Only thing I don't like about West as a filler is it gets runnier as it kicks off, so you'll need to mix it pretty dry and build a dam around the gap so it doesn't sag out of the joint as it cures. Don't forget a wet coat on the keel and sump before you mix up the fairing compound. The 3m is non structural, but kicks off in a few minutes and can be sanded in about an hour. Great for fill, sand, fair and paint operations.

 

A little bit of a shift in my advice, but I sense you're really concerned about water intrusion and the size sounds pretty large. Glass packed into the wedge won't hurt.

 

I'm in NC and SC this week college shopping (this out of state crap is expensive!) and promised C we'd catch the Army-Navy and MD-Hopkins Lax games in Raven's stadium on Sat. so it'll be Sunday before I'm back in battery (Easter Sunday is a boat day, right?)

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the West is running out, it's not thick enough. I built up a structural fairing around my shaft strut using wet-on-wet West with colloidal silica mixed up to thick peanut butter consistency, and it did not sag a millimeter. That was overhead, using a putty knife and lots of acetone to clean it, and I built up 4" in 2 hours. Helped having the big bronze strut there as a heat sink, it kicked that epoxy off perfectly. Without it, I could have had a smoking mess on my hands. A keel would work as well. I did the final sandable fairing with 410.

Epoxy would give you some structural support if you can't torque the keel any tighter. Making up a mishmash of chopped glass and colloidal silica to fill the gap would likely be the strongest part of the boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn right it is a boat day!! Didn't Jesus want us to be happy, especially on his day? :unsure: Whether this little repair is done or not, me & Vitamin Sea are painting the rest of the boat.

 

I have both a big roll of mat that can be made into chop with a few strokes of the scissors, and 4" wide tape (which is intended for the holding tank, but I can buy more).

 

OK, let me go see if I can get those pix up here.

edit - Ooops..My company's IT policy doesn't let me get to them at work..I'll have to figure out a workaround to that :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wohoo! It's coming together HB. You're going to have a sweet boat when you're done.

 

I put water to mine this weekend (actually still antifreeze-we still have freezing ahead). No leaks so far! I got her up to temp and changed the oil a couple of times.

 

Today I started cleaning up the fallout from the project. I'm not exactly a meticulous worker.

 

post-8037-1238379904_thumb.jpg

 

 

Dude, WTF! Do you start a project by getting every tool you own and throw them all over the place? I recored 70% of my deck from the inside and it never looked that messy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OK...here is the first pic...at least I figured out how to do it.

 

I'll get more up later!

 

Pack that sucker full of 5200. It will seal it water tight better than West, won't work loose if there is movement in the keel. Actually, I did that on a much smaller scale on our last boat. It had just a small indication of a seam all the way around. I put the Dremel with a small square router bit in it all the way around - about a quarter inch deep and wide - and filled it with 5200. never saw a sign of that seam again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dude, WTF! Do you start a project by getting every tool you own and throw them all over the place? I recored 70% of my deck from the inside and it never looked that messy!

 

Are you serious? It took me 3 months to get all that crap on there! I never would begin if I waited until everything was so perfectly arranged as you see there!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dude, WTF! Do you start a project by getting every tool you own and throw them all over the place? I recored 70% of my deck from the inside and it never looked that messy!

 

Are you serious? It took me 3 months to get all that crap on there! I never would begin if I waited until everything was so perfectly arranged as you see there!

That looks like the proverbial "bomb went off in a hardware store" setup. Thanks! Makes my current work scene look more tidy. Of course, I've got the sole out so I can't stack stuff there, it would fall into the bilge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dude, WTF! Do you start a project by getting every tool you own and throw them all over the place? I recored 70% of my deck from the inside and it never looked that messy!

 

Are you serious? It took me 3 months to get all that crap on there! I never would begin if I waited until everything was so perfectly arranged as you see there!

That looks like the proverbial "bomb went off in a hardware store" setup. Thanks! Makes my current work scene look more tidy. Of course, I've got the sole out so I can't stack stuff there, it would fall into the bilge.

 

I think you have volunteered to be the posterboy for "See honey, it could be worse, I'm not as messy as that guy" :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK guys..I am glad stickboy's boat is as messy as mine. :unsure::P

 

Here are some more pics. I had to build the top of the hanging locker tonight, so I've been a little busy..it is busy having the epoxy cure now, so I am done for the evening with that. Tomorrow, I can flip and add a coat to the bottom side.

 

here are some more keel pics. Sorry for the old shitty 640x480 cell phone pics. At least I figured out how to get them uploaded!

 

I am currently liking the idea of stuffing it with 5200 and when that cures, slapping some epoxy filler on it or 3m or bondo or something and being done with it, unless these pics provide another idea.

 

The first three pics are stbd side, and the last 4 are port side..the close up is also port..i dug in there a little bit with a dremel, but would need to dig out the crud before repair..

 

I dunno why the stbd side is built up so much above the lead, up there on the stub. :unsure: \/ \/ \/ \/

post-4755-1239332238_thumb.jpg

post-4755-1239332242_thumb.jpg

post-4755-1239332246_thumb.jpg

post-4755-1239332251_thumb.jpg

post-4755-1239332296_thumb.jpg

post-4755-1239332592_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OK guys..I am glad stickboy's boat is as messy as mine. :unsure::P

 

Here are some more pics. I had to build the top of the hanging locker tonight, so I've been a little busy..it is busy having the epoxy cure now, so I am done for the evening with that. Tomorrow, I can flip and add a coat to the bottom side.

 

here are some more keel pics. Sorry for the old shitty 640x480 cell phone pics. At least I figured out how to get them uploaded!

 

I am currently liking the idea of stuffing it with 5200 and when that cures, slapping some epoxy filler on it or 3m or bondo or something and being done with it, unless these pics provide another idea.

 

The first three pics are stbd side, and the last 4 are port side..the close up is also port..i dug in there a little bit with a dremel, but would need to dig out the crud before repair..

 

I dunno why the stbd side is built up so much above the lead, up there on the stub. :unsure: \/ \/ \/ \/

 

Hey Bitches did you drill test the keel stub? There is no point doing anything if the keel stub is rotten. What you have is a BAD !!! KEEL SMILE. shooting the crack full of what ever won't help if the stub is fucked. However if the keel stub is solid then the 5200 deal is perfect, but it needs to be pressure forced into the keel crack. Know anyone with a air caulking gun? After the 5200 has set for a good amount of time then fair the keel in with micro balloons and a good epoxy. I would suspect the keel stub has substrate issues.

 

Pal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pal,

 

This winter I drilled a handful of 7/16" holes into the lead and added 8" long lag bolts. When Catalina built the boat they have some wood in the middle of the glass, which tends to rot. Some of mine is damp, but none was rotten. The proper fix is to cut out the top layer of glass, dig out the wood, and re-glass the keel sump. I may do that someday, if the boat actually floats this spring and survives.

 

Here is a sketch from Catalina..the lag bolts are an acceptable fix provided the wood is sound...I would classify mine as "in-the-middle". One of the other problems with this is the engine covers the back bolt 100%, and the first pair in front of that are still hard to get to. So this would likely get done if the Atomic Bomb ever fails and requires replacement or rebuild.

post-4755-1239367801_thumb.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dude, WTF! Do you start a project by getting every tool you own and throw them all over the place? I recored 70% of my deck from the inside and it never looked that messy!

 

Are you serious? It took me 3 months to get all that crap on there! I never would begin if I waited until everything was so perfectly arranged as you see there!

That looks like the proverbial "bomb went off in a hardware store" setup. Thanks! Makes my current work scene look more tidy. Of course, I've got the sole out so I can't stack stuff there, it would fall into the bilge.

 

I think you have volunteered to be the posterboy for "See honey, it could be worse, I'm not as messy as that guy" :P

 

As the one who is married to "that guy," I'm LMAO. Now I understand why - when I ask if he needs a hand with anything - he keeps saying there isn't room for another person up there right now. :)

 

What's funny is that he is (or perhaps used to be?) incredibly meticulous about a lot of stuff. I'm sure the after picture (once taken) will be equally impressive. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pal,

 

This winter I drilled a handful of 7/16" holes into the lead and added 8" long lag bolts. When Catalina built the boat they have some wood in the middle of the glass, which tends to rot. Some of mine is damp, but none was rotten. The proper fix is to cut out the top layer of glass, dig out the wood, and re-glass the keel sump. I may do that someday, if the boat actually floats this spring and survives.

 

Here is a sketch from Catalina..the lag bolts are an acceptable fix provided the wood is sound...I would classify mine as "in-the-middle". One of the other problems with this is the engine covers the back bolt 100%, and the first pair in front of that are still hard to get to. So this would likely get done if the Atomic Bomb ever fails and requires replacement or rebuild.

 

 

I did the cure and lag bolt deal on my Catalina 27, it was more work than I anticipated. But worth the peace of mind in the long run. But then I had full access to all the bolts.

 

Pal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HB -

 

Wow! Can you pass a fine blade through from one side to another? SOmeting like a hacksaw blade?

 

You going to the boat today? I've got to take care of some stuff ariound the house, but plan on getting over to the marina this afternoon. I'll drop by and take a look.

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IB....I don't know about passing anything thru..me & Vitamin Sea are going to paint the rest of the bottom today after it warms up a bit, so yes we will be there...I think mostly it is just surface corrosion of the soft lead in salt water from 30 years of exposure without proper care.

 

I am going to grab some picks & a hacksaw blade and the grinder, etc... and drag it over there today to mess around with it some more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't mess with it yesterday...we were in tyvek suits and painting. I need to take some tools like IB suggested over to the boat and actually use them..we had other things on the agenda after painting so I didn't have time to mess with it.

 

The weather is supposed to be cold & crappy (50's & rain!) here for the next three days, so I dunno how much work I'll get done on it before then. I feel like I am in Seattle! :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HB,

 

Sorry I didn't get by yesterday. Leaving on work travel this afternoon and took care of a couple of "honey do's" for SWMBO. That turned into "As long as you have your tools out, could you also......." that kept me house and yard bound for the day. I'll be back in town late Thurs. This weekend's forecast looks good for spring cleaning, bend on sails, flush water tanks for us.

 

 

From the pics, I'm leaning toward the "Pack as tightly as you can with 5200 and fair the seam" approach. Due to the depth of filler, I'd look at an epoxy filler with colloidal silica and maybe some chopped up mat that gives you more structural than the basic "Bondo" approach that the 3M or low density WEST filler. It is possible that a good deal of the smile is where the 35 year old sealer/filler (did they have 5200 then?) used when the boat was built has dried out. IIRC, there was no crushing or delamination of the keel sump internal to the hull.

 

Whatever you do, periodically dive on the boat this season and inspect the joint for cracking that is indicative of any movement.

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some thick mat that I can chop up to go in the seam...I'll mix that in with the epoxy.

 

Gotta cut the grass today before the rain. This time of year the yard needs mowing every 5 days! :unsure: - it sure cuts into boat work time <_<

 

Thanks all for checking in on the thread & providing your thoughts B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HB, sorry for hijacking your thread a little but the discussion is already focused on hull/keel joints...

 

I have had some minor cracking come back in the joint for the second season in a row. There was evidence of water seeping out of the crack and some rust staining as well. Last season I ground out the crack a little, re-faired with epoxy and repainted. That didn't last so I decided to a little more this time around. I had the keel removed and rebedded in 2001and it was fine untily 2006. Everything appears sturcturally sound, no cracking in bilge or sump etc. The mast is in and the mast step covers the forward 2 keel nuts so I am thinking of addressing the crack again and if it comes back again I will have the keel pulled next season. I am fairly sure the traces of rust are coming from a stell plate that is glassed into the sump. There is water in the bilge now and non is seeping out any more so I am assuming the water got in the joint from keel, not the bilge.

 

I ground down the joint around the cracks all they way through all the faring and exposed the joint. It was bedded with 5200 back in 2001 and there were places where the 5200 had pulled away from the lead. I dug it out of those areas with a razor knife. Then i ground a 1/4" deep 1/4" wide groove along the joint with a dremel. I filled this with 5200 fast cure the other day. I hate working with that shit! I put a pretty thick bead on it and now want to clean that up some before glassing over it all with glass tape and epoxy and then finally fair it all back smooth.

 

What's teh best way of cleaning up the excess 5200? I tried to cut it off with a razor but that was very difficult and tended to pull on the 5200 some. I don't want to disturb the stuff in the groove, just clean up the stuff that is proud of it and over the edges. The 5200 is still very rubberry so it may not have completely cured (it had been 24 hours but it has been at the bottom of the temp range for it)

 

Does sanding it off work or will that just make a bigger mess?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JeffR, no worries on the hijack..I don't really know how to help you, but there are zillions of experts here ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have some thick mat that I can chop up to go in the seam...I'll mix that in with the epoxy.

 

Gotta cut the grass today before the rain. This time of year the yard needs mowing every 5 days! :unsure: - it sure cuts into boat work time <_<

 

Thanks all for checking in on the thread & providing your thoughts B)

 

 

HB,

 

It's been a while since I checked in on you and am impressed with your efforts. You've got the right idea but the wrong materials for the application.

 

1: NEVER use bondo below the waterline. It absorbs moisture and breaks down.

 

2: 5200 is good for a lot of stuff. If you've got water intrusion worries and have opened up the seam enough to get the tip of a caulking cartridge into it, then Id definitely recommend a small bead as far in as you can get. Use a squirt bottle with acetone and throw-away paint brushes first to get the gap super clean. Cut just the very tip of the nozzle for the smallest opening possible and take your time applying it. the goal is to get the 5200 into the very back of the opening only. If this is not possible you should consider making the openning slightly larger, Let it fully cure (24-48 hours) before continuing.

 

3: After the 5200 has cured go back with scrapers, dental tools, dremel, hacksaw blade, etc and clean, and I mean really clean and roughen the seam sides and edges. Nothing likes to stick to cured 5200. The Dremel with sanding/grinding disks and router tips works well here.

 

4: This is the important part: Go to your local FG supply house and get a cup or two of something called "Milled Glass". This is exactly what it says. Looks like a heavy glass powder but has micro fibers to give cross linked strength to the putty you are going to make with Epoxy resin; Sort of like 3-dimensional CSM.

 

5: with rags and new chip brushes, wash the area with liberal use of acetone. You can use a heat gun to accerate the drying time if you are careful. HINT!: Place blue painters masking tape on either side of the opening to keep it clean (more on this later)

 

6: Brush a clear coat of Epoxy resin with fast cure hardener. Then mix the milled glass in to a peanutbutter consistancy. A real great tool to use here is a disposable caulking gun cartridge tube. You fill the putty into the tube, insert the plunger, assemble the caulking gun and squirt the mix into the opening. The goal is to get the mix deep into the opening without any trapped voids. Keep the nozzle pressed into the crack firmly and inject at an angle pushing into the angle as you proceed.

 

7: Have a helper follow behind you, removing the blue masking tape and applying packing tape (clear plastic adhesive 2: wide) to tape over the seam as flush as possible. This will keep the epoxy filler material from slumping as it warms up during cure.

 

8. When cure is complete, remove the tape, wash and sand and wash the area again. I recommend you use 3M Marine fairing compound for all underwater repairs.

 

9. after fairing is complete, bottom paint and your done.

 

In a nutshell, this repair has sealed the keel to hull joint followed by an epoxy filler with great compressive strength right out to the edges of the keel to hull joint providing the most support to the bending loads present. Hope this helps

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob,

 

I'll have to disagree with the Bondo statement. I have used the Bondo-Glass filler several times and it has lasted 6-8 years minimum.

 

Will Museler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have some thick mat that I can chop up to go in the seam...I'll mix that in with the epoxy.

 

Gotta cut the grass today before the rain. This time of year the yard needs mowing every 5 days! :unsure: - it sure cuts into boat work time <_<

 

Thanks all for checking in on the thread & providing your thoughts B)

 

 

HB,

 

It's been a while since I checked in on you and am impressed with your efforts. You've got the right idea but the wrong materials for the application.

 

1: NEVER use bondo below the waterline. It absorbs moisture and breaks down.

 

2: 5200 is good for a lot of stuff. If you've got water intrusion worries and have opened up the seam enough to get the tip of a caulking cartridge into it, then Id definitely recommend a small bead as far in as you can get. Use a squirt bottle with acetone and throw-away paint brushes first to get the gap super clean. Cut just the very tip of the nozzle for the smallest opening possible and take your time applying it. the goal is to get the 5200 into the very back of the opening only. If this is not possible you should consider making the openning slightly larger, Let it fully cure (24-48 hours) before continuing.

 

3: After the 5200 has cured go back with scrapers, dental tools, dremel, hacksaw blade, etc and clean, and I mean really clean and roughen the seam sides and edges. Nothing likes to stick to cured 5200. The Dremel with sanding/grinding disks and router tips works well here.

 

4: This is the important part: Go to your local FG supply house and get a cup or two of something called "Milled Glass". This is exactly what it says. Looks like a heavy glass powder but has micro fibers to give cross linked strength to the putty you are going to make with Epoxy resin; Sort of like 3-dimensional CSM.

 

5: with rags and new chip brushes, wash the area with liberal use of acetone. You can use a heat gun to accerate the drying time if you are careful. HINT!: Place blue painters masking tape on either side of the opening to keep it clean (more on this later)

 

6: Brush a clear coat of Epoxy resin with fast cure hardener. Then mix the milled glass in to a peanutbutter consistancy. A real great tool to use here is a disposable caulking gun cartridge tube. You fill the putty into the tube, insert the plunger, assemble the caulking gun and squirt the mix into the opening. The goal is to get the mix deep into the opening without any trapped voids. Keep the nozzle pressed into the crack firmly and inject at an angle pushing into the angle as you proceed.

 

7: Have a helper follow behind you, removing the blue masking tape and applying packing tape (clear plastic adhesive 2: wide) to tape over the seam as flush as possible. This will keep the epoxy filler material from slumping as it warms up during cure.

 

8. When cure is complete, remove the tape, wash and sand and wash the area again. I recommend you use 3M Marine fairing compound for all underwater repairs.

 

9. after fairing is complete, bottom paint and your done.

 

In a nutshell, this repair has sealed the keel to hull joint followed by an epoxy filler with great compressive strength right out to the edges of the keel to hull joint providing the most support to the bending loads present. Hope this helps

 

Bob

 

HB,

 

I like this approach a lot.

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me too. I have everything except the glass stuff (inquiring with local glass shop, i.e. Z's) & a cartridge for the caulk gun. Going to clean up the joint today and get all the 'stuff' out of it.

 

I also am considering going the 5200, high density jammed in there (tan), then fairing (pink) with West if i can't find the fancy stuff. I already have those fillers & plenty of West epoxy to go with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sailorbob's plan looks good. Two other thoughts. Some acetone is recylcled and containes impurities that will impare epoxy sticking. Get the good stuff or use something else. The milled glass and epoxy mix is amazingly strong. I once made a plug of it as a test for an end pour in small boat building. I could pound on it with a hammer on a cement floor with no visable damage. The downside is it is almost impossible to sand (behond roughing up the surface), so make sure it does not cure behond where you will be fairing. If it does it can be taken down with a sureform or paper while it is still "green". After that I think you would need a grinder. Another faring option is to use epoxy mixed with microballoons. This is sandable and I have used it in small boats. I do not know how it holds up with prolonged imersion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Another faring option is to use epoxy mixed with microballoons. This is sandable and I have used it in small boats. I do not know how it holds up with prolonged imersion.

Quite well. I've used it below the waterline without noticeable degradation or problems several times, most recently on a Cal 25 keel that's in the water year-round.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK...I got sidetracked by a sailing buddy, so I forgot to take pics of the keel after the 5200...Here is the pre-5200, ground out keel.

 

IB - I can finally answer your question about how big the gap is. I could get a hacksaw blade about 4" back across the keel from the front.

 

The 5200 is curing, so I'll snap some more pics when at the boat soon.

 

After the 4" back, the gap is only about 1/2" - 3/4" deep, because that is as far as the Dremel disk would go...great idea by the way. Everything seems sound inside of that..I was removing lots of material.

 

On another (smelly) note, my holding tank fittings showed up today..ha! Exciting! <_<

post-4755-1239934411_thumb.jpg

post-4755-1239934456_thumb.jpg

post-4755-1239934464_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Another faring option is to use epoxy mixed with microballoons. This is sandable and I have used it in small boats. I do not know how it holds up with prolonged imersion.

Quite well. I've used it below the waterline without noticeable degradation or problems several times, most recently on a Cal 25 keel that's in the water year-round.

 

 

Microballons and epoxy make great, light fairing compound, but I prefer to stay away from it for anything remotely structural. To carry out the repair scheme SailorBob suggests, a structural filler is best.

 

HB - Cleaned up photos actually look a lot better as far as the seriousness of the problem.

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IB..my current plan is to use something structural on top of the 5200 to seal the joint, and make that as thick as possible up until I get to the 'surface' level. You can see from the pics there is a bit of a shelf (in terms of thickness) between the keel sump and the lead. It is more pronounced in person than the pics.

 

Only the final top layer will be fairing...

 

So, speaking of the various types of bondo and repairing cars, how about using West system to repair the rust on my '91 Civic?? That is a summer time project after the boat is floating. :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IB..my current plan is to use something structural on top of the 5200 to seal the joint, and make that as thick as possible up until I get to the 'surface' level. You can see from the pics there is a bit of a shelf (in terms of thickness) between the keel sump and the lead. It is more pronounced in person than the pics.

 

Only the final top layer will be fairing...

 

So, speaking of the various types of bondo and repairing cars, how about using West system to repair the rust on my '91 Civic?? That is a summer time project after the boat is floating. :unsure:

 

 

With the cost of epoxy, won't that make the repair worth more than a 91 Civic? :P I think you can buy a gallon of bondo for less than a quart of WEST.

 

I'll try to come by the boat tomorrow afternoon after C's LAX game. Staying away from that side of the bridge this afternoon.

 

Come to think of it, Sam's sleeping aboard my boat tonight so he doesn't have to drive after TIKI opening. I might have to show up about 0700 to do something noisy!

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IB..my current plan is to use something structural on top of the 5200 to seal the joint, and make that as thick as possible up until I get to the 'surface' level. You can see from the pics there is a bit of a shelf (in terms of thickness) between the keel sump and the lead. It is more pronounced in person than the pics.

 

Only the final top layer will be fairing...

 

So, speaking of the various types of bondo and repairing cars, how about using West system to repair the rust on my '91 Civic?? That is a summer time project after the boat is floating. :unsure:

 

 

With the cost of epoxy, won't that make the repair worth more than a 91 Civic? :P I think you can buy a gallon of bondo for less than a quart of WEST.

 

I'll try to come by the boat tomorrow afternoon after C's LAX game. Staying away from that side of the bridge this afternoon.

 

Come to think of it, Sam's sleeping aboard my boat tonight so he doesn't have to drive after TIKI opening. I might have to show up about 0700 to do something noisy!

 

IB

 

Yeah probably...however, at the liquor store yesterday a fellow Honda enthusiast asked me how it was running and was impressed with her credentials. That car is half the age of the boat, it may well have another 241,000 miles in it! :P

 

And Sammy worked a good deal. I make sure he doesn't puke any MaiTai all over your boat when I see him this afternoon.

 

I hope to be at the boat most of the day tomorrow unless my wife makes me drive to PA to purchase a horseless carriage. :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK,

 

Dropped by after working on my boat for a while. Looking pretty good. I see the shelf you are talking about. Don't sweat that. It is a mismatch between the keel as poured and the keel stub in the hull. I've seen them around that much before, particularly on older boats. I really don't think you have anything structural to worry about.

 

From where you are (5200 curing), I's hit it with an epoxy filler to cover the actual seam. Once that cures, sand with 80 grit, make sure the lead is nice and brite and go right to the 3m vinylester fairing. Goes on just like Bondo and is ready to sand in about 30 minutes. Shape it with a DA and add another layer if needed. Paint and launch that sucker.

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you leave alone long enough I can come up with some really creative repair techniques.

 

Bottom line you want 100% fill of all the nooks and carannies between the keel and the hull.

 

Forget the 5200 or any other sealant/adhesive.

 

Tape a plastic sheet securely around the keel to hull joint.

 

Seal the edges to the hull and keel real well.

 

Add a 1/4" poly vacumn fill line on either the front or back of the keel bag, which ever is lower in elevation.

 

On the opposite side put another 1/4" poly line attached to a vacumn with a catch bucket in between so you don't toast the pump.

 

Pull a vacumn and check for leaks. Fix accordingly.

 

Now mix up your west slow cure epoxy and the milled glass (make it very runny).

 

Put the lower fill line into the pail of mix and start the pump.

 

When the mix appears in the vac out line, shut off.

 

You are now guarenteed to have a completely solid joint. Let cure and fair with whatever you want!

 

Hope this helps. Wicked Clean. Fast, and 100% structural!

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK...update time..it's been two weekends. IB, you and I are on the same page. sailorbob's idea was nice, but way too complicated for this stage of the game. I should have started on that in September. Anyway, vacuum bagging may be in the future depending how well this holds up, or if I ever really need to do something about the keel bolts, etc..

 

Here is how the keel repair has gone..it is 85% done. So, I used small hand tools, hacksaw blades, pics, sharp pointy things, sandpaper, etc.. to clean up everything as well as possible. Stuffed in a nice fat bead of 5200, let cure.

 

Came back few days later and sand everything including the lead with 40 grit. Immediately brush liberally with acetone, and apply a nice coat of West with high density filler, getting in all the remaining cracks and liberally covering my 5200 repair.

 

This past weekend, I roughed that up with some 60 grit paper by hand, just to knock off the peaks and applied acetone everywhere and began the filling process with low density (407). I have done 3 batches of that now, to build up the thickness, and I am hoping I only have one more to go. It takes so long to add the 407 into the epoxy, and this weekend was 86-90F, that sometimes it started curing in the pot! :o Need a slightly cooler day to give me more pot time to make one final batch and get it nice and smooth..Sand, paint, done! (for this season anyway) :unsure:

 

Also got a 2nd coat of bottom paint on the rest of the boat this weekend. Letting the paint cure a few days & the yard will move the jackstands..I should be ready to paint the keel & the jackstand spots by then.

 

I also filled in the leaky anchor well drain with epoxy/filler..Now I want it to rain to make sure that solved my fresh water in the v-berth problem I have been experiencing. Then I have to figure out how to re-drill that without drilling a hole in the boat! <_< Once, this part is solved, I should have a dry v-berth to finish the holding tank installation.

 

Oh, I also ripped the old name off the boat. Mrs. Bitches is in charge of the new name and the subsequent vinyl. This boat needs topsides work, so this will be very simple for now, as it will have to come off again if/when we do hull work. I like a nice cool looking font that is legible, but not too much fancy graphic business..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool,

 

Can't recommend the 3M vinylester filler strongly enough over the 407. the 3M stuff mixes like a polyester (or like Bondo) and cures in 30 minutes so you can fill/sand/fill/sand/fill/fair all in 1 afternoon. No structural strength, but the 407 isn't structural either. I faired a cradle dent in the leading edge of my keel 9 years ago and you cannot see where it was.

 

When do you splash? I get back in town Friday PM.

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I also filled in the leaky anchor well drain with epoxy/filler..Now I want it to rain to make sure that solved my fresh water in the v-berth problem I have been experiencing. Then I have to figure out how to re-drill that without drilling a hole in the boat! <_< Once, this part is solved, I should have a dry v-berth to finish the holding tank installation.

Why wait for rain? Why not just drag a hose up, then if it does still leak you can shut off the source of water, unlike if it's raining.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IB..my current plan is to use something structural on top of the 5200 to seal the joint, and make that as thick as possible up until I get to the 'surface' level. You can see from the pics there is a bit of a shelf (in terms of thickness) between the keel sump and the lead. It is more pronounced in person than the pics.

 

Only the final top layer will be fairing...

 

So, speaking of the various types of bondo and repairing cars, how about using West system to repair the rust on my '91 Civic?? That is a summer time project after the boat is floating. :unsure:

 

 

WEST System is great for repairing cars!

 

BONDO for auto body repair soaks up water and should never be used on a boat.

 

BONDO (the Company) now makes a marine filler.

 

We should probably stop using BONDO as a generic name for what is now a complete range of fillers made by the BONDO company.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well..that is good news. We just bought Mrs. Bitches a vehicle, so now I have to keep my car running and the boat floating with what money I have left. I have plenty of west system hanging around :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well..that is good news. We just bought Mrs. Bitches a vehicle, so now I have to keep my car running and the boat floating with what money I have left. I have plenty of west system hanging around :rolleyes:

 

 

What? You bought a car and are restoring a classic sailing yacht all at the same time? You sailors are just too damn rich I tell you. There should be a rich guy tax on all sailboats! :lol:

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well..that is good news. We just bought Mrs. Bitches a vehicle, so now I have to keep my car running and the boat floating with what money I have left. I have plenty of west system hanging around :rolleyes:

 

 

What? You bought a car and are restoring a classic sailing yacht all at the same time? You sailors are just too damn rich I tell you. There should be a rich guy tax on all sailboats! :lol:

 

IB

 

Cars too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2007 Audi A4 2.0T quattro. I have no idea what to do with an AWD vehicle. :(

 

Fortunately, I taught Mrs. Bitches how to drive a manual trans years ago, so we bought her a 6-speed B)

 

What that also means is that the upgrades to the 4KSB are minimal for a while. Thank goodness I did all the engine work, bought the new mainsail & holding tank prior to the car (honey, do you want to sew some new curtains and cushions? :lol: ) :unsure:

 

My '91 Civic had better run for about 10 more years!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My '91 Celica will roll along with you...this is a kind climate for cars, except for the shitstorm of increasingly inept drivers. OOOps. Driver anarchy. Not going there again.

 

Good on ya for tackling your labour of love. Ain't it fun?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2007 Audi A4 2.0T quattro. I have no idea what to do with an AWD vehicle. :(

 

Fortunately, I taught Mrs. Bitches how to drive a manual trans years ago, so we bought her a 6-speed B)

 

Nice car. We looked at a 2001 for J last fall but the 1.8T motor didn't have a good rep for longevity and the one we were looking at had over 90K miles. 2.0 motor is supposed to be really sweet.

 

AWD with SRS and and traction is wicked fast in the wet and slippery.

 

IB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IB, thanks Mrs. Bitches is enjoying the ride. I am just glad I bought the new mainsail before the car :ph34r:

 

OK, so here's the new update...Keel, done! Boat could splash tomorrow, if the yard had moved the jackstands as I'd asked. It was on schedule today to be done, but they didn't do it. :rolleyes:

 

I'll just have to do the spots and the bottom of the keel when it is hanging in the slings.

 

I also got the stringer glassed in this afternoon for the holding tank. No pics of that though. I was doing that while it was raining, and then after it stopped, I went and did the final sand on the keel with the orbital and by hand with a longboard, and painted that bitch! Dammit, it is time to go sailing!

 

Here are some keel pics. Filler done, pre-acetone wash, and then painted & complete..you can tell it was starting to get dark in the 2nd pic. Remember, this is a cruising boat...nevermind the bumps and blisters and flaking layers of paint. :unsure:

post-4755-1241226484_thumb.jpg

post-4755-1241226495_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that it really matters, but here is a pic of the other side, complete (as it is going to get)

post-4755-1241227694_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I also got the stringer glassed in this afternoon for the holding tank. No pics of that though. I was doing that while it was raining, and then after it stopped, I went and did the final sand on the keel with the orbital and by hand with a longboard, and painted that bitch! Dammit, it is time to go sailing!

So, is the v berth still dry?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IB, thanks Mrs. Bitches is enjoying the ride. I am just glad I bought the new mainsail before the car :ph34r:

 

OK, so here's the new update...Keel, done! Boat could splash tomorrow, if the yard had moved the jackstands as I'd asked. It was on schedule today to be done, but they didn't do it. :rolleyes:

 

I'll just have to do the spots and the bottom of the keel when it is hanging in the slings.

 

I also got the stringer glassed in this afternoon for the holding tank. No pics of that though. I was doing that while it was raining, and then after it stopped, I went and did the final sand on the keel with the orbital and by hand with a longboard, and painted that bitch! Dammit, it is time to go sailing!

 

Here are some keel pics. Filler done, pre-acetone wash, and then painted & complete..you can tell it was starting to get dark in the 2nd pic. Remember, this is a cruising boat...nevermind the bumps and blisters and flaking layers of paint. :unsure:

 

 

Ahhh The Cruisers motto: Putty and Paint will make her what she ain't. Looks good. Alwsays take before and after pics. If there's ever an insurance claim it is the best form of documentation!

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes...the v-berth is still dry. There was NO water in it yesterday during the passing showers and downpours we had B)

Now, I need to properly re-create the anchor locker drain so it stays dry.

 

Knowing previous owner, I am confident the keel repair is better than it was ever done before. It may need more work in a few years, and I'll attend to that then. sailorbob, I do appreciate the extensive repair guidelines you provided. One of the reasons for this thread is to chronicle this boat's resurrection. It won't happen in one year. Maybe not even three. But I always appreciate the advice of those that have been there done that more than me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites