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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Hike, Bitches!

HB's 'new' boat thread

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OK, What I thought would happen some day has happened. I tried and tried and tried, but I just could not in good conscience let it go.

 

This is both a blessing and a curse and I might as well get on with it.

 

The short story is my father (not the step-father with the Tartan 3000 I usually chat about on CA) is starting his transition to a more permanent, warmer climate in his land yacht. He's decided to start unloading assets and other cumbersome things from his life as his blood thins out. This means I have been 'given' his Catalina 30. It is an old one; 1977, hull #511, to be exact.

 

Much like the 'holding tank thread' from the Tartan, I plan to use this thread to ask for help and bitch and moan about being a boat owner (since I got the registration & stickers in the mail in my name this week), I guess it is official, I am the proud owner of a Catalina 30.

 

The list is looooooooooooooooooooooooooooooong. The boat has been neglected. I do not like sailing neglected boats. I like to sail well maintained boats, that I can drive to, toss some beers in the cooler, head out for some sailing, and enjoy without worrying. I have a log way to get there with this boat..I may never get there :unsure:, but I am gonna start on that process.

 

Here's the short list, or maybe the items of higher importance, along with some Q's thrown in...feel free to throw anything at me, because for sure I've sat back here at SA as an armchair quarterback long enough that I deserve it:

 

Motor - original Atomic 4

  1. Only been drowned twice
  2. Runs like shit
  3. Has some odd, ghetto wiring (thanks Dad!)
  4. It still runs and will push the boat out of its slip (I think)
  5. Must replace exhaust hose soon. Wires sticking out of the hose
  6. What are these seacock things with thumb screws? Rubber seals?! Are you fucking serious?!?!?!?!?

 

Bottom - She's pretty wet, (since it was new)

  1. My Dad liked his boat in the water ready to go..362 1/2 days a year (he pulled it out over a long weekend to scrape and paint)
  2. blisters - oh yeah - at least there were the last time I saw the bottom 5 years ago, and for the last ten years, he's only hauled it every other year
  3. Question - Do I haul it and block it for the winter? Pops says it might get worse if I let it dry out. :o

 

Bilge/Keel - Uh...:unsure:

  1. Jesus, is that a bilge pump?! Does it actually pump water?
  2. Oh, you mean the bilge is actually white underneath all the sludge?
  3. Hey check that out..those protuberances are keel bolts!
  4. what happens when the nuts on the keel boats rust away enough so as to be almost indistinguishable?
  5. whoa...what the hell did the shop vac just suck up?
  6. Jesus! did you ever wipe or sponge this thing? <_<
  7. :unsure:

 

Interior cushions

  1. Mmmm, that's a nice gas & oil smell, yes dear, the garage smells like that from the cushions
  2. Uh, Dad, did you notice that every bit of teak oil that was ever on the hatchboards is now in this one cushion under the steps?
  3. Oh boy, do these smell
  4. Of course, they're 30 years old, don't touch the zippers!
  5. Yes honey, we'll get new ones someday..you do realize each piece is custom, right?
  6. Steam Vac, here I come!

 

Rig/sails - Don't get me started, I am afraid to pull up a sail right now...let's get the engine running enough to haul the boat, we'll sail next spring.

 

OK, so that should get us started. The engine I am OK with, as I have enlisted the help of Indigo & Moyer Marine (and the Moyer forum), however, suggestions are always welcome. I've been working on it that last few weeks as it is much easier to test run & repair in the water than on shore.

 

The biggest looming question is the bottom. I really want to haul it and store it on the hard for the winter to assess the thing. It must have 2,000 lbs. of water in it. Are the blisters really going to get worse?

 

Remember, this is a cruising boat. I want it in as good a shape as I can get a 32 year old boat, but I won't be wet sanding the bottom or anything. I still don't like blisters though.

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Oh..and don't tell me about 'you know a free boat is never free'...I am well aware of this.

 

I have known this boat my entire life, the time has come for me to save it from my own father! :lol:

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that's a lot of work....

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Oh..and don't tell me about 'you know a free boat is never free'...I am well aware of this.

 

I have known this boat my entire life, the time has come for me to save it from my own father! :lol:

 

I guess you should have been working on it then.

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Hike...piece of cake, my to-do list is 3 full pages long, and 90% is done.

 

Make your list by priority, and cross things off (very gratifying). Also sprinkle in some lower priority jobs that bring visual gratification, like a good cleaning.

 

Also calculate all your costs, and double it...tell me in two years if I'm wrong about this.

 

Congratulations

Dan

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Roger that Dan. I have a list, and so far my boat bucks expenditures are just breaking the $100 threshold (edit - aw shit...$126 counting the registration sticker..does boat beer count?) I plan to track it closely, as one of the reasons I pulled the trigger on this was because I figured I could buy a (slightly) newer boat and put a little money into it, or put all the money I was budgeting into a 'free' boat.

 

Before I even started the motor, I spent the entire day with bleach, simple green, a scrub brush & a hose inside. Not very satisfying, as it is hard to drink beer while hanging in the v-berth locker scrubbing the inside of the hull..but the boat already smells better. I figure two or three more of those sessions and we'll be making progress.

 

I think the majority of the oil/gas smell came from the Atomic 4 with no PCV system. Universal used a slash tube (rubber hose sliced crooked) hanging out near the fire arrestor/carb intake, expecting that to suck the fumes in. I think 30 years worth of crankcase gases are laying in the bilge and all the cushions. I know it seems like a low priority deal, but that was the first item on my list. That'll keep Mrs. Bitches happy if I can make the boat smell better...and make me happy if the engine runs a little better B)

 

Incidentally, that list was just from memory, my 'boat binder' is on the nightstand at home :blink:

 

I didn't bother with things like the lack of a regulator in the charging circuit, holding tank, pieces of misc. foam hanging out, lack of a fuel filter Don Moyer says should exist, chipped gelcoat on deck...blah blah blah.... :lol:

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Hike

 

I would want to see a very good reason for NOT hauling her.

 

My understanding is haul her, open the blisters, wash the goo inside off repeatedly as it will not evaporate...let her dry all winter...leaving her in the will not help the situation.

 

Fill the blisters and seal the hull.

 

Honestly, I think this is an exciting project...you can make her as good as you want, and in time you have breathed life into a tired boat. Be sure to take before and after photos.

 

If you want to avoid hundreds of mistakes, call me, I've made them all.

 

Dan

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Welcome to my world.

 

Do as Gatekeeper says. If your list is not at least 3 pages long, you're probably not being honest.

 

I don't see how the blisters could possibly get worse. Pull it ASAP, clean the bottom, and mark all blisters with a Sharpie or something right away. Often they will lose swelling and you can't find some 6 months from now.

 

Use the backside of a screwdriver to tap & listen for funky sounds. I have had superficial blistering on mine that is undetectable or nearly so with this method though. Only sanding all the way to gelcoat revealed things.

 

If you can, grind open any blisters right after haulout. Rinse them out & let them air dry for as long as possible. More water outta the hull = better. Removing old antifouling or other coatings will help with this.

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Hey Hike, do you have another boat you can sail on next season while you're getting this one ready? The blisters definitely need to be examined, though you may be 'lucky' in this regard. My last boat was a polyester boat, built in 1980, and it had a lot of blisters - not 'boat pox,' which is thousands of little ones, but probably 75 - 100 good sized ones. Fortunately, none of them had penetrated the entire layup and into the core - usually they were in the 2nd or 3rd layer. Depending on size, you may be able to get away with epoxy only - no extra glass.

 

However, that being said, there are two approaches you can take. Either you can haul the boat, grind out a bunch of blisters and let them dry out over the winter and spring, then repair them in before launching - lather, rinse, repeat - or you can do the nasty job of grinding them all out, taking the boat down to bare gelcoat, let it dry for a season or two, and then filling, barriercoating, and painting. some of that depends on how long you plan to own this thing.

 

Of course, whether you decide to do blisters or not may be dependent on the condition of those keelbolts. You sure you don't want to just say 'thanks, but no thanks, Dad?'

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Thanks Burnsy & Ryley, I've done the blister mark/grind/dry/fill/sand before..on a buddy's J/36. Those were pinholes, and we were making a racing bottom. If I recall, most of these blisters were dime or nickel sized, so I suspect more of the "100 or so good ones."

 

I think I'll haul and dry out toute suite. Hopefully the engine will run well enough to get the 25 minutes to the marina where I am hauling...she starts missing under load, and I suspect there are plenty of barnacles on the prop too, further reducing efficiency.

 

Too late on the 'thanks, but no thanks.'...Title's been transferred, and registration in my name already came in the mail. I think I'll have this 'til we sink it, because I don't think it'll be worth anything to anyone but me..at least with old cars, you can find a guy in town that'll haul the piece of junk out of your driveway and give you $100.

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HB,

 

Congrats. Play with the engine for another couple of weeks and then haul it out for the winter. Use a dremel with a gtrinder tip to open up small - medium blisters. A once over with 80 grit and a DA as soon as the bottom paint is dry wil reveal much. Not that much surface area on a 30.....If it's bad, start at the bow and do as much as you can this winter. Barrier coat what you do and slap some paint on it and sail next season. Finish it next winter.

 

A set of OEM sails (M and 150) will run you about 3500. Max might be able to find you some used rags (or might have some) to get you through a couple of years.

 

IB

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How to avoid blisters...do this 6 months a year. Piss poor solution, but it seems to work quite well.

post-25646-1223494872_thumb.jpg

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HB, just for you I'm gonna join one of those religious cult things today..............just so I can learn how to pray for you...............B)

 

 

Just kidding, congrats on the new toy.

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This probably sounds obvious, but if it was me, I'd try to break the list into "absolutely must do to get sailing" and "everything else" and would try to get the "must do" done so I could be sailing next summer. That way you can start enjoying the boat as you continue working on it. We sailed my Dad's Ericson 35 for several years with the interior ripped up (nothing structural) and big ugly patches all over the deck where the deck had been opened up to dry the core and resealed. He's now gotten the deck resprayed and it looks great, but hasn't gotten to the interior yet. Meanwhile, we've had a lot of great coastal cruising trips with our kids that we would have missed if all of his boat time had been spent working on it rather than sailing it. If your "must do list" seems like it can be done by January you'll proably just make it by June.....

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Hike

 

I would want to see a very good reason for NOT hauling her.

 

My understanding is haul her, open the blisters, wash the goo inside off repeatedly as it will not evaporate...let her dry all winter...leaving her in the will not help the situation.

 

Fill the blisters and seal the hull.

 

Honestly, I think this is an exciting project...you can make her as good as you want, and in time you have breathed life into a tired boat. Be sure to take before and after photos.

 

If you want to avoid hundreds of mistakes, call me, I've made them all.

 

Dan

 

 

Dan's right.

 

Open the blisters right after hauling, wash them, and let them dry all winter.

 

Even if it's cold, water will sublimate off.

 

And winter is typically very dry, so it will help the sublimation process.

 

-M

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Definitely haul the boat and make this your dedicated second job. Don't put it back in the water until you get the to do list so it's not overwhelming. If you put it in before that you'll end up in the same spot as now. Even with a short list(oh yes you will always have a list) you have to keep at it, new things pop up at a regular stream. If you go out sailing and something comes up it was still a good day sailing, if nothing breaks it is a great day.

Welcome to boat ownership.

 

PS for your sanity and your marriage never add up the costs.

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PS for your sanity and your marriage never add up the costs.

 

OH MY GOD....I forgot that!!! Absolutely right, don't even keep the receipts for cheap stuff like marine paint, SS hardware, sandpaper, beer, tarps, beer, hoses, beer...

 

Dan

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Bitches,

 

Welcome to boat ownership! I had the same problem with our boat, probably worse than what you have. You can see what I went through here. Spend a weekend with a grinder and open up all the blisters for the winter. After that, strip/sand off all the bottom paint. Let them dry out and when the weather is warm enough, start filling them back in. Fair everything up and apply a barrier coat. It is a ton of work but it will be the last time you will have to bother with it again!

 

Will Museler

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PS for your sanity and your marriage never add up the costs.

 

OH MY GOD....I forgot that!!! Absolutely right, don't even keep the receipts for cheap stuff like marine paint, SS hardware, sandpaper, beer, tarps, beer, hoses, beer...

 

Dan

 

Don't keep anything you don't need for warranty. There's a bottomless pit out there that absorbs money, and I just don't want to know.

 

Congratulations on signing on to a lifetime of servitude.

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HA ha - good read HB.

 

I don't envy you - shoot my experience with getting small things fixed and up to speed on my well taken care of e28 has been a good "big" boat learning experience.

 

HEY congrats on the new boat!

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HB

 

Thought a lot about your boat last night...do a complete job on the hull.

 

This will give you the best idea of how far you want to go on this girl. If the hull works out well you can spend your time and money knowing she has good "bones"

 

Dan

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What gatekeeper said....damn right! The hull shell/structure is the important stuff that everthing else hangs off.

 

Keep on keepin' on, you will get there!

 

Cheers,

Jim. ;)

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Sounds like a great project!! Good for you.

 

Make it so !

 

and WHAT DOES IT RATE??

 

 

Sail safe!

 

Back in the day when I was a kid and we raced it, it was 186, but it is 192, or even 198 I think these days. It is a fin keel (yay!) with the standard (short) rig - they didn't start making the tall rig or slapping bowsprits & wing keels on these things until after this boat was built.

 

HB

 

Thought a lot about your boat last night...do a complete job on the hull.

 

This will give you the best idea of how far you want to go on this girl. If the hull works out well you can spend your time and money knowing she has good "bones"

 

Dan

Dan, you are not supposed to think about other people's boats. I had dreams about my boat last night. The wife and I discussed at dinner last evening about putzing up the creek to spend one night on the boat before we haul it. So, I had dreams about the boat all night, and of everything on the boat failing, registration stickers & numbers falling off, all the way to the gelcoat peeling off the hull to reveal wood underneath!! :unsure:, except for the motor! That bitch ran great!

 

Thanks for the replies. I am convinced now to haul it and poke at it and let it dry out for the winter. Maybe the real issue is the old man doesn't want me to see all the presents he's left underneath for me. Since it isn't a race boat, I don't have to complete it all in one winter. Any work I do on it, will improve it to some extent. :ph34r:

 

IB, the jib is probably only 15 years old, and the last time I went sailing, not in terrible shape. The mainsail is from 1979, which my Dad bought from Catalina after he blew his out in a storm, so it is pretty old. Right now, I am worried if I pull the sails up, the halyards may fail they are so nasty. Max has already offered up his help. "What you need to do is invite me over to the boat, and we'll make a list" :lol:

 

One other thing I've noticed inside the boat is that some of the interior fiberglass is turning brown..I may be able to get to the backside of some of it and see if I can tell what's causing the discoloration. I would guess it got wet on the end, and water has seeped in the glass. Do I just paint it to make it white again? Guess it is time to grab the camera and start snapping some pics..if I ever resurrect this boat, I need documentation! :huh: Pics or didn't happen!

 

Heading down to the boat today after work to put on new plug wires..the little snap fitting stayed attached to the coil and not the wire the last time I pulled them to get the plugs out and do a compression check. Those are probably original too.

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Dan, you are not supposed to think about other people's boats. I had dreams about my boat last night. The wife and I discussed at dinner last evening about putzing up the creek to spend one night on the boat

IB, the jib is probably only 15 years old, and the last time I went sailing, not in terrible shape. The mainsail is from 1979, which my Dad bought from Catalina after he blew his out in a storm, so it is pretty old. Right now, I am worried if I pull the sails up, the halyards may fail they are so nasty. Max has already offered up his help. "What you need to do is invite me over to the boat, and we'll make a list" :lol:

 

Didn't I tell you? When you get a "new" boat, you are supposed to call all of us over to "take a look and help you make a list". Of course, amber liquids (on you) are required and since it will be a long list, you should plan on having Fred make up crab cake sandwiches and fried oysters to help us maintain our energy. :P

 

 

IB

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I have 2 words for you:

 

charitable donation.

 

Failing that, congrats on the new yatchett!

 

Oh...as a boat warming present I bought you a new pic for your avatar.....

 

post-1770-1223568732_thumb.jpg

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HB

 

Looks like there's lots of folks here from MD...invite them over, and hand'em some sandpaper. The job will go much faster if they help.

 

Dan

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Oh...as a boat warming present I bought you a new pic for your avatar.....

 

Ha ha ha!!! That is funny.

 

Here is a real pic of the boat. The pic is about 30 years old since it has the correct sail number, so this was before the mainsail blew up in '79-ish. Also...that rig came down in about 1990...it has aluminum spreaders now too.

 

This is the pic we have silkscreened on the back of our bowling shirts too :P

 

edit - hold on..I am having issues..<_<

 

edit again..Ok..resize-o-matic done

post-4755-1223570133_thumb.jpg

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Oh...as a boat warming present I bought you a new pic for your avatar.....

 

Ha ha ha!!! That is funny.

 

Here is a real pic of the boat. The pic is about 30 years old since it has the correct sail number, so this was before the mainsail blew up in '79-ish. Also...that rig came down in about 1990...it has aluminum spreaders now too.

 

This is the pic we have silkscreened on the back of our bowling shirts too :P

 

edit - hold on..I am having issues..<_<

 

edit again..Ok..resize-o-matic done

 

Main is overtrimmed and you need some BS tension. That weather helm is SLOW!

 

IB

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Main is overtrimmed and you need some BS tension. That weather helm is SLOW!

 

IB

 

Wow...tough crowd.

 

Dan

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I like to sail well maintained boats, that I can drive to, toss some beers in the cooler, head out for some sailing, and enjoy without worrying.

 

 

Sounds like "crewing" to me. :)

 

Welcome to the world of boat ownership where there's always something to do and rarely will any of what's needed will come from sweat equity alone!

 

Cheers and good luck!

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Congrats Beyotches!

 

My first 4ksb was a Catalina. I liked the boat, even though some of the hardware seemed undersized. Or maybe I just break more stuff than most. Does your keel have the 'Catalina smile'? Mine did but it's not a difficult fix.

If you decide on a new main, I'd take a look at Ullman. They do tons of Catalina sails.

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Main is overtrimmed and you need some BS tension. That weather helm is SLOW!

 

IB

 

Wow...tough crowd.

 

Dan

 

 

That's because we are tired of getting beat by him in his FIL's Tartan. He finishes a week behind on a middle distance race and kills everybody on handicap! If you embarrass the rest of the club like that, you deserve to catch some sh**

 

IB

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That's because we are tired of getting beat by him in his FIL's Tartan. He finishes a week behind on a middle distance race and kills everybody on handicap! If you embarrass the rest of the club like that, you deserve to catch some sh**

 

IB

 

Got it...in that case some vang wouldn't hurt either.

 

 

Dan

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Bitches, if your going to do the bottom do it right, its actually easier in the long run. Im assuming due to the vintage its solid glass?

 

There are specialist machining services that will strip the entire bottom back to sound glass. They use a machine head with horizontal spinning blades with depth wheels either side and lots of water. They take it back 5mm at a time until its all good or if its really bad just as far as is prudent and then deal with the bad spots that are left.

 

A couple of layers of new glass, at least one new layer of epoxy and its better than new.

 

Grinding out and patching is heart breaking work, and as itchy as fuck. Often the more you grind the more you find and you end up doing most of the hull anyway. Problem is now you have a bottom full of bog rather than glass.

 

Osmosis is an amazing thing and those blisters are a soggy mix of glass and goopy, smelly, sticky, treacle that MUST be completely removed.

 

If you do go down the patching route, as mentioned before, rinse, rinse, rinse. At least once a week while the blisters are open. It may sound agricultural but a good blast with a blow torch at the end works wonders.

 

Have fun.

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you know i'm just lurking here....

 

laughing a little on the inside....

 

i'm glad you braced me ahead of time....

 

;)

 

let me know if i can help you with any specifics.....

 

/c

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Oh...as a boat warming present I bought you a new pic for your avatar.....

 

Ha ha ha!!! That is funny.

 

Here is a real pic of the boat. The pic is about 30 years old since it has the correct sail number, so this was before the mainsail blew up in '79-ish. Also...that rig came down in about 1990...it has aluminum spreaders now too.

 

This is the pic we have silkscreened on the back of our bowling shirts too :P

 

edit - hold on..I am having issues..<_<

 

edit again..Ok..resize-o-matic done

 

Main is overtrimmed and you need some BS tension. That weather helm is SLOW!

 

IB

 

Well actually the jib car needs to be moved forward about 6 inches and the sheet hauled in, the main needs to be eased a foot or so. That will get rid of the weather helm.

 

Seriously, you got a free boat that needs some attention. Man if I was in your shoes I would just wish I was 40 years younger. Can you imagine being given a boat when you were young and just beginning to explore life. As it is only you know what your pocket book can handle, if its deep fix it up if thats what you want to do. If your pockets aren't that deep enjoy it anyhow and you are lucky either way

 

NICE!!!!

 

Pal

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Well...me and fellow anarchist No Patience took the boat out for its maiden voyage yesterday afternoon. The weather was so nice, I just couldn't stand sitting at the dock any longer.

 

So..for her maiden voyage down Mill Creek, we went to a familiar landmark... :lol:

 

The poor motor needs some help. She labors a lot to make this boat move, even at a couple of knots...Another anarchist (Vitamin Sea) said he may help me dive it this weekend to at least scrape the prop, as I have no idea how fouled it is from barnacles.

 

Oh, and the running lights even work! :lol:

post-4755-1223650323_thumb.jpg

post-4755-1223650335_thumb.jpg

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Congrats on the new ride. I've been fixin' up my CL35 for a few years now as time and $$$ allow. I've tried to concentrate on the structural/seaworthy projects as a first priority. Keep the water out and the mast up and things are easier! I also try to do a few small cosmetic projects as well since it pays to keep the Admiral positive and you'll feel better too. No matter what, I put the boat in and sail during the summer when the kids are out of school (otherwise you own a money sucking lawn ornament-not a boat). There are many ways to do a job and you don't always need perfection. The difference between pretty damn good and perfect is usually a LOT more money and/or effort. Consider the return on effort and investment when deciding on your level of "perfect". Read Good OLd Boat magazine. It has lot's of ideas and more importantly -success stories of other suckers ,er, boatowners like you.

One thing about breathing life back into an old boat- you will soon get to know it.

Have fun!

Shoalcove

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Thanks for the trim tips, IB & Gatekeeper. Keep in mind, that pic is of my father at probably about the same age as I am now (this pic is circa 1978-79). The little blue pennat on the backstay indicates we were racing in working jib Delta class, so that is pre-PHRF here in Solomons. Since the Solomons bridge is in the background, we had probably finished racing and were trying to beat the cool storm in the pic to our dock.

 

You'll also notice that the boat had no vang, nor did it have any backstay adjuster in that pic..and for the most part still doesn't..I'll likely add some squeezie deal for the split backstay at some point...the boat does have a real vang now.

 

From my subsequent post you'll probably get the drift I wasn't happy with the engine yesterday. It runs about 1,200 RPM until it starts running like shit. I have some issues to work thru to try and get the beloved Atomic 4 back to health.

 

I do honestly appreciate everyone's advice..or else I would have posted this in regular SA and be subjected to the ridicule of all the asshats. There is a community of wealth & knowledge here, and I am grateful for it. I am planning to haul it in a few weeks and dry her out, buy a nice sander, and spend every free moment this winter poking & sanding & filling. So, if I am absent from CA on a random Saturday, you will know where I am :ph34r: - oh except when I am racing on OBP's in Key West Race Week the middle of January... :P

 

Mmmmm.... I love a hole in the water (or on jackstands) that must have money dumped into it on a regular basis!!!

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Congratulations on the first outing. I'll echo the advice to never add up the costs. I just put together my 2009 racing budget and wish I hadn't. Better to be in the dark on this one!

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Congrats HB! Old or new, gotta love getting a toy!

 

I'll be holding down the left coast here, working on mine. Good luck on the blister nightmare. I am blissfully free from that, though I have been reading close on the "bulkhead replacement" threads.

 

And in case you don't already know, Catalina's service department has a pretty good reputation for parts and help -- they've treated me well already on a few pieces parts for my "new" Capri 25.

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At the risk of complicating your winter, you should seriously consider dropping the rig and moving the boat to inside storage for the winter. Speeds up the drying process and lets you know you've got a solid rig ready to go. Little things like worn pins and sheaves can make for a worrisome night of sailing in a blow.

 

I reclaimed a 38' IOR and redid the bottom, it was a backbreaking job. No matter how many friends you get to help it still falls mostly to you. Although several will be quick to point out,at the most inappropriate times, how much work they have done on your bottom and how large it was ;)

 

Congrats on the new boat, you will have many wonderful times ahead. As well as a few "WTF was I thinking"

 

WL

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HB,

Highly recommend what Paps said. I saw a booth at IBEX a couple of years ago offering the service or renting the equipment. The entire gel coat surface can be very stripped quickly. You could probably have the stripping part of the job done in a weekend. On the same booth, they had info on a fresh water steam washing system, followed by the application of heating blankets to "cook" the hull and accelerate drying out. I can't lay my hands on it now, but will take a look.

Good luck with the project. It sounds like lengthy but rewarding work.

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I sailed my 1976 Catalina 30 in So Cal for 18 years. Good boat. Enjoy.

Practical Sailor on Refurb Cat 30

 

By the way........for a few years Catalina hulls had real blister problems. I just happens it was during the period yours was manufactured. The advice above is good. Did mine and saw her still sailing and looking good a year or two ago.

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I sailed my 1976 Catalina 30 in So Cal for 18 years. Good boat. Enjoy.

Practical Sailor on Refurb Cat 30

 

By the way........for a few years Catalina hulls had real blister problems. I just happens it was during the period yours was manufactured. The advice above is good. Did mine and saw her still sailing and looking good a year or two ago.

 

I was chatting with a Catalina 34 owner at the club yesterday...we were trying to figure out if the blister problem was during this era.

 

I've seen the scrape job done on a few boats locally..that is pretty extreme for this boat I think, but I will have to decide once we've hauled.

 

Vitamin Sea is coming by the house this morning, and we are gonna head to the boat and see what's up..I think he's bringing his dive gear. Better make sure I have beer ready! :unsure:

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Nice...the short story is the prop cleaning job was a success. Much thanks to fellow anarchist Vitamin Sea for his services. The engine, although not at 100%, is now running at maybe 75%, instead of the 35% it was running on Thursday. He said I had some pretty big barnacles on there. It is hard to troubleshoot motor problems when you have organisms deciding to camp out on your bronze hardware. So, for now, those are gone!

 

This gives me a good baseline to work with. The boat even made a stern wave today UNDER POWER!!!!!! B)

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Max has already offered up his help. "What you need to do is invite me over to the boat, and we'll make a list" :lol:

 

HB! - Congrats on the "new" boat! Many years ago I owned a Catalina 27 that I kept at Spring Cove Marina in Solomons. It was the first real "yacht" that I had owned (my previous boats were dinghies and Hobie Cats) so I had lots of questions. I remember the first winter I hauled the boat at Spring Cove - Max, whom I'd met on one of the Catalina forums (probably Sailnet, which, at the time, was as popular as SA is now), met me one day on my boat. Because I live almost two hours from Solomons, I had a long list that I wanted to get through. All I can remember of that day was Max talking up a storm while I tried to work. I eventually just gave up and sat down to listen to him (I think was working on replacing my standing rigging and the spreader compression tube on the mast). It was the first time that I'd met Max and I ended up seeing him in subsequent years at the Annapolis Sailboat show manning the Catalina Owners booth. The last time I saw him was at Screwpile this year where we raced in the same class. We came close to trading paint a few times but it was funny during one mark rounding when we rounded with our bow 2 feet from his transom when he yelled back " are you guys still there? Geez, I can't get rid of you!!". Good times. I know you know Max but bottom line is he has a WEALTH of Catalina 30 knowledge and I would take advantage of him every chance you get. He may even be able to help you prioritize your list.

 

If you want to get a decent set of Catalina OEM-like sails that are good quality and will hold up, I recommend ordering them from Rolly Tasker. I ordered a mainsail from them for my Catalina 27. It was a very nice sail.

 

Toss the cushions and have new ones made. I've been through this twice with boats I've owned -- you will never get the smell out of the cushions - ever! Toss 'em and have some new ones made. They ain't cheap but you may be able to order some from the factory.

 

I would definitely haul the boat for the winter and unstep the mast. Replace all the running rigging and, if I were you, replace the standing rigging, too. You can get very good, reasonably priced rigging from SECO South in Florida. They duplicated my rigging on two boats and did a great job. Just coil up and zip-tie the old rigging and ship it to them and they will duplicate. I would also consider replacing the lifelines, too. Doesn't cost much more and it will give you piece of mind. Go the uncoated route.

 

Good luck with the new boat. You're probably going to need another job!!! I teach engineering at a local university - the money I make is my boat slush fund.

 

Take care,

cheap

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Nice...the short story is the prop cleaning job was a success. Much thanks to fellow anarchist Vitamin Sea for his services. The engine, although not at 100%, is now running at maybe 75%, instead of the 35% it was running on Thursday. He said I had some pretty big barnacles on there. It is hard to troubleshoot motor problems when you have organisms deciding to camp out on your bronze hardware. So, for now, those are gone!

 

This gives me a good baseline to work with. The boat even made a stern wave today UNDER POWER!!!!!! B)

 

Excellent!

 

If you decide to drop the rig, VS and I can probably raft either side of you and lift it out with our spin halyards to save the crane charge.

 

IB

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Mrs. Bitches and I decided to haul the boat and work on the bottom to get her in better shape for next year, rather than wasting time cruising a dirty nasty boat this fall. I am scheduling the hauling for the next week or two.

 

I got the engine running better, which was my initial concern, since it was kinda a show stopper if it wouldn't run. I don't think I was ready to dump $5k into the motor right off the bat. I am usually the last guy to fire up the iron-genny, but when I do, I want it to run. Recently, I have been hanging out over at the Moyer Marine forum, listening to youtube videos of Atomic 4's running...how geeky is that?? - I've decided that mine's sounding pretty good! :unsure:

 

Now I am researching winterizing procedures for the engine (fuel storage, etc..) before hauling. I bought a random orbit sander yesterday and a big-ass package of 40 grit sanding discs ;)

 

Other things on the list - replace all running rigging (you mean this green line used to be white?), and inspect all standing rigging.

The lifelines are suspect as well..I was thinking about replacing those with spectra since it is cheaper than wire B)

I chatted with my local sailmaker for an estimate on a mainsail..I laid the jib out in the yard and it looks OK..for a cruising sail anyway.

Fuel line replacement and fuel filter installation (no fuel filter anywhere in the boat!) :o

Maybe a electronic ignition upgrade so I don't have to worry about points & condensers.

Add a voltage regulator into the charging circuit to remove the switch & resistor setup that is currently chilling out in the engine compartment.

Replace the exhaust hose that has the metal reinforcement sticking out of it like thorns. Also, replace all the hoses in the holding tank system (I'll have no trouble with that one ;))

Replace all the old funky thru-hulls with the rubber stoppers with real ball-valve bronze dealios.

I am probably gonna have to replace the cushions..the 1976 blue plaid is pretty nasty.

Fix leaks from the deck hardware...anyone here used butyl tape for bedding? Do you just lay the stuff out in strips under the hardware, or just little squares only where you have screw holes in the deck?

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Fix leaks from the deck hardware...anyone here used butyl tape for bedding? Do you just lay the stuff out in strips under the hardware, or just little squares only where you have screw holes in the deck?

 

 

Remove the old bolts, and pass a drill bit through the hole to clean it out...I have a drill bit, I think it's called a chamfering bit, that I use to open the top of the hole slightly on a 45 deg angle...I then wrap the bolts with buytl and tighten everything down. The 45 degree bevel feeds the buytl down into the hole. Workes well.

 

You can also put flat buytl around that same hole to double up the protection.

 

Dan

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Butyl? Ick. May as well use rolled up lumps of Wonder Bread.

 

There's way better solutions out there without resurrecting something from WWII, unless you really like having sticky gray crap oozing out of every compression join on the boat, getting all over your clothing and shoes and transferring to your upholstery and eventually covering your entire body, especially the hairy bits.

 

Our 1980's C&C's came with butyl in the hull-deck joint, which was acceptable but not best (it allows retightening the joint a couple of times when it starts to leak), and used silicone to bed hardware. Silicone is adequate as a gasket in a properly torqued assembly, but something with a little more adhesion, such as Life Seal, would be a better choice.

 

Dan's description of chamfering the edges of holes is a good idea, leaves a ring of sealant right at the top of the hole, plus stops the gel coat from cracking (providing the hole is the right size; I use 1/64" less than the screw size as a pilot hole in glass). I use a rose bit in a drill to make nice easy chamfers around the holes.

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Ish is right about it oozing out over time...but is it a proven sealer. There are just some places it seems to work very well.

 

I also use Sikaflex and use the same technique. If I do it properly the sealer will actually be pushed right through the bore and will show up on the other side, under the washer.

 

Dan

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I think the Tartan has butyl in the hull/deck joint too...up in the bow you can see it oozing.

 

I am open to suggestions..if Lifecaulk is good enough, that's cool. I noticed some of the other Catalina 30 guys have been using butyl tape to re-seal windows and other deck fittings like stanchion bases, etc.etc..

 

I noticed some water streaks running down the chainplate/bulkhead on one side, which is why I suspect I'll need to do some re-bedding this winter. I haven't found any soft spots in the deck (yet) :unsure: , but there are places the gelcoat has chipped off because Dad was lazy and powerwashed the deck instead of scrubbing. <_<

 

Thanks for the chamfering tip..We used to do that a lot when I installed boat canvas at the sail loft back in the day.

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HB

 

The advantage of butyl in many applications is...when you compress it, it pushes back.

 

For sealing window flanges I think it's the best choice, I don't like it under deck hardware as much. I prefer clutches and winches tightened hard onto the fibreglass.

 

Dan

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gotcha...the windows on this boat have had some work done to them..but there is a 1/2' ring of silicone all the way around them and it looks like shit.

 

This boat also has NO lines running aft..makes for a nice clean deck :)

 

What I am thinking about here is the necessity to replace the teak hand rails some day, & I will probably need to re-bed the forward hatch hinges (old fiberglass style) & some of the stanchions and the chainplates.

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I like butyl tape for some applications. Sometimes you can trap butyl between poly sulfide and the thing will never leak and never ooze butyl isnce it is trapped inside the poly.

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If your C-30 has the old metal rimmed windows, then butyl tape is the best thing to bed them with. The fiberglass & metal have different expansion rates and butyl is the only thing that tolerates that difference over time. Catalina used butyl when the boat was originally built. Here is a link to the C-30 Intl Association fix for leaky windows. Clicky

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Spring Cove...since we are hauling out kinda early, I suspect we'll be off in the back forty...but at least not the back forty like over at Washburns! :unsure:

 

The other nice thing about that is walking over to the Naughty Gull for some Cream of Crab soup and a nice cold beer after grinding all day!

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well, you know what they say...

 

The two best days of sailboat ownership are the day you buy it and the day after you've celebrated (by being overserved) and you wake up around noon on YOUR boat. By then, you still don't realize it's one of your best days until you've puked your guts out into YOUR holding tank. In fact, you probably won't realize it until about sundown when the last fog of hangover lifts and you can finally take a sip of coffee in YOUR cockpit.

 

congrats. ;)

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Ha..I do not plan to use the holding tank until I have replaced every hose and inspected thoroughly. Done that once before and won't make that mistake again. I've primarily been focusing on getting the Atomic 4 running a little better, to see if I can justify dumping some money into the boat.

 

Today, I was checking out thru-hull fittings and seacocks, since all of the fittings (except for one) currently are the original gate valves from 1977. :o

 

The updated short list of stuff to buy right now is:

--engine--

* new fuel pump bowl

* fuel filter (spin on water separator type)

* new exhaust hose

* new cooling hoses

 

--other stuff--

*assess the blisters/hull situation

* three marelon thru-hulls with proper seacocks - if I put bronze seacocks on marelon thru-hulls do I still have to bond the bronze seacock to avoid corrosion? :blink: (I think so) - maybe I'll just get 100% marelon.

* new head hoses

* lots of stainless clamps...i seem to recall that there are no double clamps anywhere on this boat <_<

* new hatch (crib) boards - the original 3/4" teak is now about 3/8" thick and failing. Any bright ideas? I am thinking about star board, or maybe mahogany..teak is EXPENSIVE!, but I also don't necessarily have time to build all this crap, nor the proper woodworking tools (router, joiner, table saw, etc.)

* keep scrubbing and cleaning everything

 

 

Sons - The wake up and hangover extravaganza on my *own* boat will happen in the spring, when I am confident she won't sink while I am passed out down below B)

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Sons - The wake up and hangover extravaganza on my *own* boat will happen in the spring, when I am confident she won't sink while I am passed out down below B)

 

yeah. and until then, there will be no chance of having a coherent conversation with you. We bought our first boat in January. Sailing was all I could think about until spring came 4 or 5 years later. At least, it SEEMED like 4 or 5 years.

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Ha..I do not plan to use the holding tank until I have replaced every hose and inspected thoroughly. Done that once before and won't make that mistake again. I've primarily been focusing on getting the Atomic 4 running a little better, to see if I can justify dumping some money into the boat.

 

Today, I was checking out thru-hull fittings and seacocks, since all of the fittings (except for one) currently are the original gate valves from 1977. :o

 

The updated short list of stuff to buy right now is:

--engine--

* new fuel pump bowl

* fuel filter (spin on water separator type)

* new exhaust hose

* new cooling hoses

 

--other stuff--

*assess the blisters/hull situation

* three marelon thru-hulls with proper seacocks - if I put bronze seacocks on marelon thru-hulls do I still have to bond the bronze seacock to avoid corrosion? :blink: (I think so) - maybe I'll just get 100% marelon.

* new head hoses

* lots of stainless clamps...i seem to recall that there are no double clamps anywhere on this boat <_<

* new hatch (crib) boards - the original 3/4" teak is now about 3/8" thick and failing. Any bright ideas? I am thinking about star board, or maybe mahogany..teak is EXPENSIVE!, but I also don't necessarily have time to build all this crap, nor the proper woodworking tools (router, joiner, table saw, etc.)

* keep scrubbing and cleaning everything

 

 

Sons - The wake up and hangover extravaganza on my *own* boat will happen in the spring, when I am confident she won't sink while I am passed out down below B)

 

HB,

 

Not a bad "first list".

 

Go with all Marelon seacocks. Decide now if you are willing to use the "through hull mated to a ball valve" approach so common or if you are going to install 1 piece (2 actually) sea cocks.

 

On the hatch boards, TB has a killer set of woodworking tools, including biscuit joiners, etc. Take him a bottle of Mount Gay and the wood and he'll help you do wonders.

 

IB

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We bought our first boat in January. Sailing was all I could think about until spring came 4 or 5 years later. At least, it SEEMED like 4 or 5 years.

 

 

We bought our first boat, a CS27 in July and launched the next may...our Mirage 33 in October, launched the next May.

 

Winters here are already wayyyyyy too long, without making them feel longer. But as far as deals, late summer is a great time to buy, here in the land of ice and snow.

 

BTW...here is what my slip looks like today. Old pile docks are gone. New docks by next week.

 

Dan

post-25646-1225217647_thumb.jpg

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The other nice thing about that is walking over to the Naughty Gull for some Cream of Crab soup and a nice cold beer after grinding all day!

 

Oh man, you got that right! Their cream of crab soup is the best!

 

cheap

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HB,

 

Not a bad "first list".

 

Go with all Marelon seacocks. Decide now if you are willing to use the "through hull mated to a ball valve" approach so common or if you are going to install 1 piece (2 actually) sea cocks.

 

On the hatch boards, TB has a killer set of woodworking tools, including biscuit joiners, etc. Take him a bottle of Mount Gay and the wood and he'll help you do wonders.

 

IB

 

I do need to correct my earlier statement...I mistakenly called the things that are in the boat currently, gate valves..I didn't realize a gate valve was the old spin the knob kind like a hose spigot. Apparently, this boat has 'real' seacocks, but from about 1980. They have a little thumbscrew on one side, and a handle on the other..you open the thumbscrew and twist the handle 90 degs, and then tighten down the thumbscrew to squish the rubber seal inside so it seals. I could not get the engine intake to seal yesterday, so water was still trickling in the engine intake..not gushing, but a steady slow stream..I think I'll be replacing these, and I think I will just go ahead and pick up the real marelon seacocks..they are about $45, so I am really not saving much dough by going with a marelon ball valve.

 

All will be revealed later today when I head over to see if the boat came out..it was still floating this morning, but there was no activity at the travel lift..Mrs. Bitches and I got the boat over yesterday afternoon, with about 20 to 30 knot gusts in our face. The engine ran well enough, but it will need more work..it starts missing above about 1,600 RPM, so i don't know if that is a fuel, timing, or compression problem.

 

Some of this may be overkill for this old boat, but when I need it, I like the engine to work, and I don't like sinking!

 

The hatch board deal sounds sweet. I may go over and visit Dyson's Lumber today and see what they have hanging around before I pay to get wood shipped.. I probably also need to make a new tiller..I can buy one from Catalina Direct for $75, but I made one for the Tartan about 5 years ago for about $15. B), and it was a fun project.

 

Mmmmm...boat projects. :unsure:

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Nice....update time.

 

Boat out & onthe hard..hull in MUCH better shape than I expected..Thanks to fellow anarchist Innocent Bystander for providing his opinion as an experienced Catalina owner.

 

Current plan: Strip the bottom paint off...either soda blast or chemical strip (Interlux??), tend to the blisters (not too many!!) and put some barrier coat on the gelcoat.

 

According to IB it sounds like the rudder needs some attention, so I'll check that out on my next visit.

 

At least the boat didn't sink in the travel lift slip! :unsure:

 

Need to do some work on the hull/keel joint too...it has the (trademark?) Catalina smile. I don't know that there is much 'nut' holding the keel to the boat.

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Nice....update time.

 

Boat out & onthe hard..hull in MUCH better shape than I expected..Thanks to fellow anarchist Innocent Bystander for providing his opinion as an experienced Catalina owner.

 

Current plan: Strip the bottom paint off...either soda blast or chemical strip (Interlux??), tend to the blisters (not too many!!) and put some barrier coat on the gelcoat.

 

According to IB it sounds like the rudder needs some attention, so I'll check that out on my next visit.

 

At least the boat didn't sink in the travel lift slip! :unsure:

 

Need to do some work on the hull/keel joint too...it has the (trademark?) Catalina smile. I don't know that there is much 'nut' holding the keel to the boat.

 

HB,

 

I used the envirostrip paste stuff on my last boat. Trowel it on, cover with a wax paper to keep it from evaporating and leave it overnight. Really messy to do. Three 5 gallon tubs for a 31 footer. It took off about 6 coats of paint (ablative) well but the blue residue that washed off should have had me in jail for DNR violations. I'd be surprised if SC allows it's use these days. Folks that have had their boats starch blasted seem to swear by that. As I was in a suit and tie, I didn't explore too much, but as I said in the PM, i think the laminate is in pretty good shape. Knowing your attention to detail, I expect a fast bottom is in this boat's future.

 

IB

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IB,

 

Ditto on the enviro stuff. We did ours with the supplied paper. It pulled off several layers of paint. Very messy and time consuming, check how much they would charge to soda blast the hull.

 

Will Museler

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Peel away sounds pretty nasty.

 

The guys at the yard know the boat, since my old man has hauled it there for years...just never for longer than a week. One of the guys said they have a soda blast guy that comes around all the time, so I am going to check in with them and find out the damage to blast it off of there. There are sections where the pressure wash took out some chunks of paint..man is it thick! :o Looking at the hull, it looks like my old man would just finish chipping away until it was adhered again and paint over the spot <_<

 

This is still a cruising boat, and I promised my wife I would waste time wet sanding the bottom paint since there are so many other projects, but I will at least roll & tip :P

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Ditto on the soda blasting, especially if you don't know exactly what kind of paint went on the bottom. a good soda blaster will leave the bottom in pretty decent condition, and you'll thank him a million times over for the time you DIDN'T spend with a scraper/sander/wet guck. The enviro strippers seem to have a mixed result.

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I still have access to the P.O., so I can ask him. There is so much paint on here from the last 30 years that the under layers may still have lead in it :ph34r:

 

I have an inquiry with the marina about blasting...anyone have educated guesses on the cost, so I know if I am getting a fair deal??? (Catalina 30)

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I still have access to the P.O., so I can ask him. There is so much paint on here from the last 30 years that the under layers may still have lead in it :ph34r:

 

I have an inquiry with the marina about blasting...anyone have educated guesses on the cost, so I know if I am getting a fair deal??? (Catalina 30)

If I remember correctly, mine was ~$800.

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