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Bash24

Laser Capsize Question

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Allright guys, here is what happened to me this weekend during some Laser Frostbiting.

 

Be kind, I am a little new at this Laser thing.

 

Downwind, heavy air nasty deathroll, capsize to windward. I go in the water, the boat is pointing dead downwind and the sail is still full with the boom sticking skyward. I make some mistakes at this point and the bottom line is that it took way to long to right the boat and get me out of the water and I just got too cold and it pretty much ruined my day.

 

The first thing I did was I swam around the transom to the bottom of the boat and tried to right her. But, that wouldn't work because the sail is full, so I swam back around the transom grabbed the mainsheet and pulled the sail down. Then, back around the transom again and tried to right the boat. I had a devil of a time because the boat is still pointing dead down and not into the wind. By this time I had been in the water too long and started to get real cold.

 

All my other capsizes have been when reaching or going to weather with a leeward capsize, no problem getting the boat up there. But what should I have done, in what order to get the boat righted as quickly as possible? I am guessing it is a combo of getting the sail down, getting the bow into the wind and then getting on the centerboard. How do you guys do that as quickly as possible to get the boat upright and get back into the race?

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Allright guys, here is what happened to me this weekend during some Laser Frostbiting.

 

Be kind, I am a little new at this Laser thing.

 

Downwind, heavy air nasty deathroll, capsize to windward. I go in the water, the boat is pointing dead downwind and the sail is still full with the boom sticking skyward. I make some mistakes at this point and the bottom line is that it took way to long to right the boat and get me out of the water and I just got too cold and it pretty much ruined my day.

 

The first thing I did was I swam around the transom to the bottom of the boat and tried to right her. But, that wouldn't work because the sail is full, so I swam back around the transom grabbed the mainsheet and pulled the sail down. Then, back around the transom again and tried to right the boat. I had a devil of a time because the boat is still pointing dead down and not into the wind. By this time I had been in the water too long and started to get real cold.

 

All my other capsizes have been when reaching or going to weather with a leeward capsize, no problem getting the boat up there. But what should I have done, in what order to get the boat righted as quickly as possible? I am guessing it is a combo of getting the sail down, getting the bow into the wind and then getting on the centerboard. How do you guys do that as quickly as possible to get the boat upright and get back into the race?

 

 

I never mastered that recovery Ron, but I've been thru it.....luckily the water was warm and I got lucky. Went down Adams Creek last year just hauling ass and crashed like Nascar......got the boat up on its feet and it took off as I managed to get on board only to crash again in about 60 yards....after the 3rd crash, I was too tired to continue. It was blowing about 25kts.......Hope you get your answer....

 

Makes that J24 seem like a nice, dry yacht Huh?

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Have spent a fair amount of time swimming as described.

 

Actually its a bit unusual for the boat to still be pointed dead down wind after a deathroll. Usually after death-roll the boat is about broadside (maybe nose down a little) to the wind with the rig pointed into the breeze and the main stuck up in the air as described.

 

My approach is to quickly get up onto the board and grab a hand full of mainsheet and use that to pin the main back down as the boat comes up. Now here comes the fun part...

 

Because the rig is coming up from windward and you are (now on the board) to leeward the boat will be blown right over capsize again (to leeward this time) before you get in unless its really light air (not likely if you deathrolled) so...

 

As the boat comes up hang onto the centerboard and ride it right under the boat coming back above water to windward and if you get good at this... actually already weighting the board. This is then a quick conventional righting of a leeward capsize and you are set to go.

 

On a good day I can go from death roll to sailing in less than 60 seconds but I do end up pretty wet from the trip under the boat

 

My biggest issue is avoiding the second wipe-out after you get in and back going. I think it happens because at that stage you usually have too much mainsheet out as a result of the first wipe-out. Problem is you can't get the boat going again back downwind while bringing the main in so what I end up doing is heading of on a broad reach while sheeting in and then turning full down (as far as conditions allow). Of course this usually means a heavy air gybe will be needed to get to the leeward mark unless you are comfortable at sailing by the lee in heavy air (not yet my cup of tea).

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climb on the centerboard and pull the sail in the water. wait a bit for the boat to turn so the mast is pointing DW and then start to right. if your mast is pointed upwind, do a San Fran roll: when the boat starts to come up, hang onto the centerboard and go under water with it and pop out the other side.

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#1 Swim to the bow - hold the nose till it swings bow/head to wind. (stay away from the stern you grab the stern and it will swing bow down wind and your in for a wrestling match)

 

#2 Then get the main sail mess sorted out and depowered if you can't do that during your lesure swim to the bow.

 

#3 Make sure the main sheet is loose - and do the normal daggar board recovery (the faster you do this the easier it is given the bow stays head to wind just long enough for you to grunt aboard and grab the helm)

 

(Note if the main sheet is loose even if the bow swings away from the wind you have some grace time to get sorted out before the main loads up enough to be an issue again. Keep your head down at all times as the main will wip around above your head as you climb back on Not an issue unless you stick your noggin up there and take a beating.

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Also, if you can, just as you're realizing that it is an unrecovereable death roll, trim all your mainsheet in that you can, it makes the recovery a LOT easier.

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Slightly off topic. I preferred to avoid the death roll and I found that sailing by the lee helped a lot. I'd let the sheet way out and watch the leech like you do a spinnaker luff on a leadmine. After some practice, I found it faster and I stopped deathrolling. I'm not sure what people like to do these days. It has been a very long time since I've sailed a Laser.

 

If you hear the term "Russian Roll", it is the same thing as the above mentionned "SF Bay roll". Not a bad trick to learn. I've used it a couple of times on the Swift but I usually prefer to right with the mast into the wind. It is much quicker and often the only way on a cat.

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Easing off the boomvang when the death rolls appear will help smooth things out also.

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Easing off the boomvang when the death rolls appear will help smooth things out also.

Humm. Of course it was back in the day of the 4:1 set it and forget it days but we used to go max on the vang by sheeting as hard as possible pulling on the vang while giving an additional push down on the boom, then sail by the lee. It was so hard to adjust the vang that we didn't mess with it much. I sure wish we had the newer controls back then.

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climb on the centerboard and pull the sail in the water. wait a bit for the boat to turn so the mast is pointing DW and then start to right. if your mast is pointed upwind, do a San Fran roll: when the boat starts to come up, hang onto the centerboard and go under water with it and pop out the other side.

 

 

why do you all advocate the california roll?

 

fack me, go over the high side to the board, pull in sheet to douse main, get boat 75% upright, when wind takes it, boogy to new high side, get yer shit in order and continue.... if it's super deep water, when going over highside, pull the rail down to turtle the boat and then right it on the correct side, you may lose a coupla boats, not 20 like being in the water slogging around....

 

remember to pump your main and steer down when ya start to deathroll.... it is the only way. if ya head up the rudder acts like a wing and lifts the transon up and out....

 

oh and practice...a lot of practice....

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Easing off the boomvang when the death rolls appear will help smooth things out also.

 

 

noooooooo..... worst thing you can do, it opens up th leech, allowing it to rotate even further to weather.....

 

head down and pump yer main in one motion.....

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Easing off the boomvang when the death rolls appear will help smooth things out also.

 

 

No. Easing the vang will make the rolls worse.

 

And your capsize recovery might be ok for bigger boats (swimming the bow into the wind), but is not necessary with a little Laser. Get on the board, throw the boom in the water, and do the SF roll.

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Easing off the boomvang when the death rolls appear will help smooth things out also.

 

 

No. Easing the vang will make the rolls worse.

 

And your capsize recovery might be ok for bigger boats (swimming the bow into the wind), but is not necessary with a little Laser. Get on the board, throw the boom in the water, and do the SF roll.

 

I was thinking newbie sailor where the basic recovery is a challenge - SF Roll works once you know the program.

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If you're getting cold that quickly in the water, I'd suggest you need to think about what you're wearing for the conditions

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Easing off the boomvang when the death rolls appear will help smooth things out also.

 

 

No. Easing the vang will make the rolls worse.

 

And your capsize recovery might be ok for bigger boats (swimming the bow into the wind), but is not necessary with a little Laser. Get on the board, throw the boom in the water, and do the SF roll.

 

I was thinking newbie sailor where the basic recovery is a challenge - SF Roll works once you know the program.

 

I think the best thing he can do is learn to race it right. The fastest recovery is usually the safest as well, especially in cold conditions.

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The Deathroll - a guide

 

Step 1 - Realizing you're completely fucked...

The exact point at which you need to realize you're completely fucked will vary and comes later and later with experience. For some, its the first moment the boat starts to wobble going downwind, for others its when the last twitch of the tiller was too much or the yank on the mainsheet wasn't enough. Either way, knowing your moment be it early or late is paramount to both executing and recovering from the death roll.

 

Step 2 - Execution of the perfect death roll...

The execution of the perfect death roll entails several key points; style, recovery planning and timing/placement. The easiest yet often overlooked element of the death roll is timing. The most opportune moments to perform this maneuver are directly to leeward of the windward mark and directly to windward of the leeward mark. Performing a death roll at the opportune time near those two points is certain to make you the hero of the day. It also serves to encourage others to join in the fun of a death roll, a result you may see if you get your timing right. Style and recovery planning are linked in a way, they will often increase and decrease in direct relation to each other. They're also both linked directly to knowing the moment at which you're completely fucked as you must know that moment to execute any style or recovery planning.

- The most basic method of death roll is to be caught completely by surprise and ride it all the way down without a word, the look on your face will out you as an amateur.

- A slightly more complicated technique is to let out a battle cry as you reach your moment and proceed to ride it down (points are deducted if you scream like a little girl).

- Next would be the spider monkey over the side combined with a swan dive. This method shows the beginning of recovery planning as you'll now be on the correct side of your newly capsized vessel.

- Even more complicated is the spider monkey front-flip handspring. As you desperately clamor up to the new high side of your doomed vessel you then lunge at the daggerboard hands first just as the mast hits the water. This method can be risky as when slightly misjudged will result in a daggerboard-faceplant or slug slide down the side.

- The pinnacle of deathrolling is the railslide. This is performed beginning with a spidermonkey over the side, pausing and balancing ones self on the rail and riding it down to the bow as the mast hits the water. Extra points are added for a rebel yell on the way to the bow.

 

Step 3 - Recovery

So your moment has come and past and now you've got to sort all the crap out and get going again. If time isn't of essence, hoist your sorry ass up onto the daggerboard, reach in and grab the mainsheet and tiller, flip the main down and bob the mast till its no longer pointing into the wind. If your recent cockup is about to cost you the race, grab onto the board and pop the mast into the air holding on as it takes you for a ride.

 

Now take a moment and enjoy all the applause you're getting if you did it with style and perfect timing. And yes, your water bottle is now floating away...

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The Deathroll - a guide

 

Step 1 - Realizing you're completely fucked...

The exact point at which you need to realize you're completely fucked will vary and comes later and later with experience. For some, its the first moment the boat starts to wobble going downwind, for others its when the last twitch of the tiller was too much or the yank on the mainsheet wasn't enough. Either way, knowing your moment be it early or late is paramount to both executing and recovering from the death roll.

 

Step 2 - Execution of the perfect death roll...

The execution of the perfect death roll entails several key points; style, recovery planning and timing/placement. The easiest yet often overlooked element of the death roll is timing. The most opportune moments to perform this maneuver are directly to leeward of the windward mark and directly to windward of the leeward mark. Performing a death roll at the opportune time near those two points is certain to make you the hero of the day. It also serves to encourage others to join in the fun of a death roll, a result you may see if you get your timing right. Style and recovery planning are linked in a way, they will often increase and decrease in direct relation to each other. They're also both linked directly to knowing the moment at which you're completely fucked as you must know that moment to execute any style or recovery planning.

- The most basic method of death roll is to be caught completely by surprise and ride it all the way down without a word, the look on your face will out you as an amateur.

- A slightly more complicated technique is to let out a battle cry as you reach your moment and proceed to ride it down (points are deducted if you scream like a little girl).

- Next would be the spider monkey over the side combined with a swan dive. This method shows the beginning of recovery planning as you'll now be on the correct side of your newly capsized vessel.

- Even more complicated is the spider monkey front-flip handspring. As you desperately clamor up to the new high side of your doomed vessel you then lunge at the daggerboard hands first just as the mast hits the water. This method can be risky as when slightly misjudged will result in a daggerboard-faceplant or slug slide down the side.

- The pinnacle of deathrolling is the railslide. This is performed beginning with a spidermonkey over the side, pausing and balancing ones self on the rail and riding it down to the bow as the mast hits the water. Extra points are added for a rebel yell on the way to the bow.

 

Step 3 - Recovery

So your moment has come and past and now you've got to sort all the crap out and get going again. If time isn't of essence, hoist your sorry ass up onto the daggerboard, reach in and grab the mainsheet and tiller, flip the main down and bob the mast till its no longer pointing into the wind. If your recent cockup is about to cost you the race, grab onto the board and pop the mast into the air holding on as it takes you for a ride.

 

Now take a moment and enjoy all the applause you're getting if you did it with style and perfect timing. And yes, your water bottle is now floating away...

 

Beauty.

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did you write that mm?

yep.... a little bored a work today...

Very nice - front page stuff.

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did you write that mm?

yep.... a little bored a work today...

Why don't you come over and scrub the 49er then?

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did you write that mm?

yep.... a little bored a work today...

Why don't you come over and scrub the 49er then?

 

After work... only if beer is involved...

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There's always beer involved. Possibly this weekend, might take 18 apart and clean it up a bit too.

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did you write that mm?

yep.... a little bored a work today...

Very nice - front page stuff.

Thanks man...

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did you write that mm?

yep.... a little bored a work today...

Very nice - front page stuff.

Thanks man...

 

Looks like you're gonna make the cover of the Rolling Stone.

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Looks like you're gonna make the cover of the Rolling Stone.

 

and all those f-bombs... whatever will my parents think...

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Great miahmouse. We used to do the "oh shit" and curl up in a ball while hanging onto the hiking strap so you didn't make that rail slide and sudden stop at the mast. Once the spray settles, over the side you go.

 

As for learning. Learn the right way to start and then you don't have to go through all of the work of un learning bad habits later.

 

My friends and I used to regularly have "death roll duels" when it was deemed too windy to race. Sail a couple miles up wind and then back to the marina. The one with the fewest death rolls wins. Laser version of the Chinese downhill. The best one was when we were all in a group and a dust devil came down off the hill and went straight over a friend and my brother. Broke a boom and after three very sudden jybes, deposited my brother in the water faster than any capsize I've ever seen.

 

Good times and lots of pain but it was a good time.

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Great Thread. Jajaja, the death roll guide is great. Did any of you guys witness my spectacular wipeout on praia Ferradura Buzios on Nov 3? If so I'd enjoy a critique. It always happens fast and ugly, I can't imagine what it looked like from shore. At least the water was warm.

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Not sure how much i can add... but i need to waste some invaluable time...

 

Try to stop the death roll first. Drive down and pump the main. If the boat is completely uncontrollable, you either have too little vang, too much main out, or are not far enough off DDW; either by the lee or slight reach. If the ticks are straight down and not flowing surely in one direction you're going down. When you know its going, either from the rate of speed the mast is going... horizontally... or because the rudder has no resistance, just brace yourself and hope you dont hit the mast too hard...

 

Once in the water, get on the board first, the fastest way possible. I usually just dock under the rail and get on the other side. The place i sail is shallow so i generally try to waste no time.The last boat i had to swim into the wind was a lightning... maybe a 420 in the one proper death roll i had with it in the begining. Reach over the boat and grab the mainsheet from the final 2purchases and yank the boom back into the water. As the boat comes upright, chances are that the mast will be straight upwind, so the boat will come up on the oppsosite tack on a beam reach... You can either do a california roll or try and jump into the boat and jump across the boat and hit the rail before the boat goes back over. I would start with a california roll. Its a little bit more sure of not recapszing and is a little easier. To jump accross, you've gotta do it real fast.

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Back in the day...my anti-death roll tactic was steering so that the tiller pointed towards the mast. This is counter-intuitive but seemed damn effective. The theory may have involved using momentum, or uncoupling Van Karman vortices from the flight path.

 

For all I know this worked because of forcing you to sail by the lee, or maybe the old slower hull shapes had some special propeties.

 

Regards

aa

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Here's one that takes some practice, but it works from some of the time to most of the time-

 

When the deathroll starts (and you only learn this from experience), let your head and torso fall back into the water, and let your lifejacket float your weight. The boat will pivot around your drag, and if you time it right, the boat will start to rotate into the wind. When you're coming back to a reach, pull in fast on the mainsheet, and just as the sail starts to pull to leeward, sit up while still pulling in on the mainsheet, which will help you sit up, and the sail will pull you up out of the water. If you do this too late you will hurt yourself. I never got into the straight leg hike, so my hiking strap was a bit looser than most, and I was droop hiking. Old Finn Sailor.... :lol: Sometimes if you just relaxed for a little bit, the whole boat would weathervane downwind, and come to a stop, if you pulled in a little with the mainsheet, and you could have a little rest. Once you get good at it, you could have a long rest, depending on the wind and seastate.

 

Waterstart!

 

Noseplugs help. Your back needs to be in perfect shape, and your stomach and side muscles strong, but it does work. BUT YOU CAN HURT YOURSELF!!!!

 

A really floaty life jacket, smooth across the back helps. Sliding back as you come up allows the bow to fall off some. But remember to let the sail out a little towards the end of the manouver, because if your bow hits a wave that knocks you to windward, and you're still sheeted in, it gets sporty.

 

It worked for those of us around 6' or so, one guy around 5'8" made it work.

 

Paul

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Great miahmouse. We used to do the "oh shit" and curl up in a ball while hanging onto the hiking strap so you didn't make that rail slide and sudden stop at the mast. Once the spray settles, over the side you go.

 

As for learning. Learn the right way to start and then you don't have to go through all of the work of un learning bad habits later.

 

My friends and I used to regularly have "death roll duels" when it was deemed too windy to race. Sail a couple miles up wind and then back to the marina. The one with the fewest death rolls wins. Laser version of the Chinese downhill. The best one was when we were all in a group and a dust devil came down off the hill and went straight over a friend and my brother. Broke a boom and after three very sudden jybes, deposited my brother in the water faster than any capsize I've ever seen.

 

Good times and lots of pain but it was a good time.

My favourite death roll took place in light conditions with a dying seaway. Blowing about 4 but had been blowing 15 earlier. So I'm hiking way forward and sailing by the lee with only one toe hooked aft into the strap. And the death roll starts. I try to compensate with weight and almost get it right but then I slip.

 

I went in, still holding onto the boat by the tip of my toe and watched the boat continue to sail away from me as I dragged along head underwater. Finally realized enough what had happened to kick my toe free and grab the rudder as it went by.

 

Actually the boat didn't captsize, it just deathrolled ME into the water. by grabbing the rudder I was able to grab onto the gunwhale and hold onto the boat. Timed the next roll and just rolled right back into the boat.

 

Took all of 30 seconds end to end and I got some double takes from the boats near me. Couldn't do it again if you paid me.

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I'm an advocate of the 360 degree barrel roll recovery. Pull the high side over on top of you, turtle the boat, and right it on the other side. Don't let the board slide down.

 

It saves a lot of time screwing around with getting the boom down and getting the orientation to the wind right. It also avoids the dive into the boat, grab the tiller and get to the new high side while dodging the fast moving boom trick. This can be a bit dicey if it was heavy enough that you had a fair amount of vang on and the boom is close to the deck. Finally, unlike the california roll, it can be done while keeping the torso dry if you're quick when it first goes over.

 

Of course, you've gotta know that it's deep enough and that you have some some cuny on or a retainer line so that the mast will stay put.

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Here's one that takes some practice, but it works from some of the time to most of the time-

 

When the deathroll starts (and you only learn this from experience), let your head and torso fall back into the water, and let your lifejacket float your weight. The boat will pivot around your drag, and if you time it right, the boat will start to rotate into the wind. When you're coming back to a reach, pull in fast on the mainsheet, and just as the sail starts to pull to leeward, sit up while still pulling in on the mainsheet, which will help you sit up, and the sail will pull you up out of the water. If you do this too late you will hurt yourself. I never got into the straight leg hike, so my hiking strap was a bit looser than most, and I was droop hiking. Old Finn Sailor.... :lol: Sometimes if you just relaxed for a little bit, the whole boat would weathervane downwind, and come to a stop, if you pulled in a little with the mainsheet, and you could have a little rest. Once you get good at it, you could have a long rest, depending on the wind and seastate.

 

Waterstart!

 

Noseplugs help. Your back needs to be in perfect shape, and your stomach and side muscles strong, but it does work. BUT YOU CAN HURT YOURSELF!!!!

 

A really floaty life jacket, smooth across the back helps. Sliding back as you come up allows the bow to fall off some. But remember to let the sail out a little towards the end of the manouver, because if your bow hits a wave that knocks you to windward, and you're still sheeted in, it gets sporty.

 

It worked for those of us around 6' or so, one guy around 5'8" made it work.

 

Paul

 

I should have mentioned that feet stay in the hiking straps the whole time. Or they should.

 

:lol:

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Once you know that the deathroll is inevitable I find it best to let go of the tiller, hang onto the mainsheet and remove my feet from the straps. When the mast hits the water the boat spins around with the mast head to wind, the main is sheeted in full, the boat then flips over with the mast down wind. Pull yourself to the boat with the mainsheet and right the boat normally. This method puts almost no load on the top section as your weight is off the boat at the time of impact and righting is really fast and easy.

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climb on the centerboard and pull the sail in the water. wait a bit for the boat to turn so the mast is pointing DW and then start to right. if your mast is pointed upwind, do a San Fran roll: when the boat starts to come up, hang onto the centerboard and go under water with it and pop out the other side.

 

 

why do you all advocate the california roll?

 

fack me, go over the high side to the board, pull in sheet to douse main, get boat 75% upright, when wind takes it, boogy to new high side, get yer shit in order and continue.... if it's super deep water, when going over highside, pull the rail down to turtle the boat and then right it on the correct side, you may lose a coupla boats, not 20 like being in the water slogging around....

 

remember to pump your main and steer down when ya start to deathroll.... it is the only way. if ya head up the rudder acts like a wing and lifts the transon up and out....

 

oh and practice...a lot of practice....

 

 

Yes. The vertical 360. One of my favorite ways to recover from a capsize to weather when the water is deep enough. If you actually "pull" the boat down into a turtle position it will go way faster than the whole swim the bow around or wait for the bow to swing into the wind deal.

 

Also, to avoid the roll, when you feel it starting take a big yank on the sheet and steer slightly down.

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Once you know that the deathroll is inevitable I find it best to let go of the tiller, hang onto the mainsheet and remove my feet from the straps. When the mast hits the water the boat spins around with the mast head to wind, the main is sheeted in full, the boat then flips over with the mast down wind. Pull yourself to the boat with the mainsheet and right the boat normally. This method puts almost no load on the top section as your weight is off the boat at the time of impact and righting is really fast and easy.

 

Once you know the deathroll is inevitable? WTF? Keep fighting that raging horse your are riding! Pull in the sheet and redistribute your weight (but not too much). If you win you are making some serious speed (the laser is fastest when you are close to disaster).

 

BTW if it is really seriously windy and if you are sailing in deep water the boat will turtle almost instantly as the wind blows the boat down (through the main). Make sure that your board is secured

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I managed to do a season in a National 12 without getting too dunked, even when the idiot with the tiller helmed over the sheet. Couple of 40 knot plus races that were really hairy. Just remember when you hit the leeward gunwhale hard, half a second later you might need to be on the windward or the transom. Alternatively, backflip onto the board, and climb back in early

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When my laser starts the roll, the first thing I do is to drop the centreboard a foot or so (assuming it is raised). That usually dampens the roll enough to get it back under control.

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I'm interested in trying the San fran roll as described in this thread, but I can't get away from the idea that the hull must smack down hard on your head as you go under. Am I missing somthing here? Does the hull just skip over you? I should probably just stop being such a girl - my head gets smacked Enough with the boom anway.

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I'm interested in trying the San fran roll as described in this thread, but I can't get away from the idea that the hull must smack down hard on your head as you go under. Am I missing somthing here? Does the hull just skip over you? I should probably just stop being such a girl - my head gets smacked Enough with the boom anway.

Just curl up in a little ball on the dagger board. Hold on tight and you just roll with the boat. It happens quite quickly and the hull does not thump you on the head. Extra points if you can do by haning upside down in the first side. When you come up on the new side, you're on the dagger board and ready to go. I've done this a few times. Mostly just for fun. When I raced, I spent more time on avoiding the roll than worring how to recover. After a while, the actions to save the roll become so automatic that I once went out on a borrowed Laser to show someone who was having issues how to save it but I kept compensating as a matter of habit that I didn't have the boat roll on me.

 

I don't know that I ever hit the mast but I've seen some people that got pretty hurt by doing so.

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I'm interested in trying the San fran roll as described in this thread, but I can't get away from the idea that the hull must smack down hard on your head as you go under. Am I missing somthing here? Does the hull just skip over you? I should probably just stop being such a girl - my head gets smacked Enough with the boom anway.

What Fugu said. If you do it right, as the boat starts to right (mast tip out of the water) you will feel the whole thing come "unstuck".

 

At this point you hold on tight to the board and start to anticipate aggressively rotating your body (more about this next). Ideally you are offset to one side of the board (aft works better for me)

 

As the blade comes into the water, grab hold of the board in a bear hug in a way that you rotate your body to the new "upper" side (ie the weather side).

 

This should allow you to ride the board up and out of the water. Stand up on the board, and step in.

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2nd 3rd 4th whatever the california roll

 

Just make sure your not wearing glasses or a hat :unsure:

 

Although if I'm feeling lazy, cold, or tired, I wait for the boat to turn around, which it will. Then, I simply right the boat as normal.

 

When going downwind in heavy air, try to never actually go DDW. I also thinks it helps to kind of kneel in the cockpit (on your feet) with your back facing the stern. I steer like college sailors, with my extension on the deck. Try not to move too much, and be sure to counter act any roll.

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Have spent a fair amount of time swimming as described.

 

Actually its a bit unusual for the boat to still be pointed dead down wind after a deathroll. Usually after death-roll the boat is about broadside (maybe nose down a little) to the wind with the rig pointed into the breeze and the main stuck up in the air as described.

 

My approach is to quickly get up onto the board and grab a hand full of mainsheet and use that to pin the main back down as the boat comes up. Now here comes the fun part...

 

Because the rig is coming up from windward and you are (now on the board) to leeward the boat will be blown right over capsize again (to leeward this time) before you get in unless its really light air (not likely if you deathrolled) so...

 

As the boat comes up hang onto the centerboard and ride it right under the boat coming back above water to windward and if you get good at this... actually already weighting the board. This is then a quick conventional righting of a leeward capsize and you are set to go.

 

On a good day I can go from death roll to sailing in less than 60 seconds but I do end up pretty wet from the trip under the boat

 

My biggest issue is avoiding the second wipe-out after you get in and back going. I think it happens because at that stage you usually have too much mainsheet out as a result of the first wipe-out. Problem is you can't get the boat going again back downwind while bringing the main in so what I end up doing is heading of on a broad reach while sheeting in and then turning full down (as far as conditions allow). Of course this usually means a heavy air gybe will be needed to get to the leeward mark unless you are comfortable at sailing by the lee in heavy air (not yet my cup of tea).

I'm on board with this one. Sometimes you can get into the boat quick enough without riding under, but not usually. If you are racing, this is your best bet to get going as fast as you can.

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climb on the centerboard and pull the sail in the water. wait a bit for the boat to turn so the mast is pointing DW and then start to right. if your mast is pointed upwind, do a San Fran roll: when the boat starts to come up, hang onto the centerboard and go under water with it and pop out the other side.

 

 

why do you all advocate the california roll?

 

fack me, go over the high side to the board, pull in sheet to douse main, get boat 75% upright, when wind takes it, boogy to new high side, get yer shit in order and continue.... if it's super deep water, when going over highside, pull the rail down to turtle the boat and then right it on the correct side, you may lose a coupla boats, not 20 like being in the water slogging around....

 

remember to pump your main and steer down when ya start to deathroll.... it is the only way. if ya head up the rudder acts like a wing and lifts the transon up and out....

 

oh and practice...a lot of practice....

 

 

+1 on this. Ex-national junior champ here. One capsize and recovery is faster than two!

 

The boat turtles pretty quickly in a death roll anyway, with the sail all the way out and being held that way by the wind. Only problem is when the water's too shallow to roll the boat through 360 deg.

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When my laser starts the roll, the first thing I do is to drop the centreboard a foot or so (assuming it is raised). That usually dampens the roll enough to get it back under control.

 

I was always faster than everyone else with my board down more. Pulling it up doesn't reduce drag as much as people think. Beyond a certain point it makes drag worse because of the rolling and the extra rudder input needed to keep sailing straight.

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When my laser starts the roll, the first thing I do is to drop the centreboard a foot or so (assuming it is raised). That usually dampens the roll enough to get it back under control.

 

I was always faster than everyone else with my board down more. Pulling it up doesn't reduce drag as much as people think. Beyond a certain point it makes drag worse because of the rolling and the extra rudder input needed to keep sailing straight.

 

sorry to bump an old thread but i agree with this.

you should mark on your centerboard when the board is level with the rudder, if its up any more than this the boat will want to skate sideways when you steer and not actually let you point the bow in the right direction.

my advice is, set the vang up so the leach is just able to flick, if it is on too right you risk losing your mast, and if its off too much the leech will go foward of the mast making death rolls inevitable.

keep your hand right at the block and if you feel even the beginnings of a roll give a good 2 foot yank on the sheet, and hold it there till the boat is settled then ease it back out.

NEVER let go of the tiller, use it to compliment what your doing to the sheet.

and finally... in heavy breezes, i found it much quicker and easier to controll if i sailed just by the lee. but you do have to be on your toes for big gusts.

hope it helps

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