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sleddog

S.CAL Sailing, 1950's

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For those who remember, S.Cal had a vigorous ocean racing fleet in the 1950's. For your nostalgic pleasure I include some of their names I remember. These were the days of varnished spinnaker poles, overhangs, South Coast winches, red lead bottom paint, kenyons, RDF's, and NALU II's chickens. HILARIA never had an engine, and SALLY was the prettiest 10 meter in the world. Feel free to add to the list:

 

ALTAMAR, ANTIGUA, AKAHI, ATTORANTE (go Burke!), ANDALE, AMORITA, TEMPEST, KITTEN, ESCAPADE, CHOLITA, VALENTINE, CHUBBY, CAROUSEL, COTTON BLOSSOM, BUTCHER BOY, BARLOVENTO, CHERRIO

 

Alex Irving, Barney Huber, George Griffith, Ash Bown, Peggy Slater, George Fleitz, Clark Sweet, Chuck Ullman,

 

DASHER, DANCER, VIXEN, MADCAP, MARA, CASSANDRA, HOLIDAY, COQUILLE, CALIFIA, GALATEA, JINKER, GAMIN, KIRAWAN, GOOD NEWS, BONNIE DOONE, KELPIE, FREEDOM, HILARIA, JADA, KIALOA, KAMALII, BAGATELLE, LEGEND, FLYING SCOTCHMAN (Lapworth's first design), LEDA, MORNING STAR, NAM SANG, NOVIA DEL MAR,

 

Gene Wells, Fred Smales, Willard Bell, Gabe Giannini, Jack Hedden, George Sturgis, Prent Fulmour, Dick Steele, Peter Grant,

 

ODYSSEY, NALU II, FLYING CLOUD, MARIE AMELIE, ORIENT, QUEEN MAB, HUSSY, REBEL, STARLIGHT, SEA DRIFT, SANTANA, SERENA, SOLILIQUY, SERENADE, STAGHOUND,, ISLANDER, SIRIUS, SPARKLE, SALLY, WINDWARD, WHITE CAPS, WESTWARD HO, LANDFALL, PIONEER, DOUBLE EAGLE, PURITAN, SILOUETTE, TANTALUS, L'APACHE, SEA WITCH, WOOLHARA (honorary powerboat), BRANTA

 

Not a spade rudder yet to be seen.

 

ALERT, MICKEY, LARK, FLAMBOUYANT, SALUDA, QUEST, VIXEN, NARRAGANSETT, SUNDA, CRITERION, ROLAND VON BREMEN, BONGO, DEBRA, CHIRIQUI, DIABLO, CELEBES, NORDLYS, QUEST, FAIR WEATHER, MAI TAI, SKYLARK, GULLMAR, TYPEE, GROOTE BEER, SANDPIPER,

 

K-38's, PCC's, K-40's, L/36's, Cal 32's, Newporter Ketches, PBY's, Ohlson 35's, Owens Cutters

 

Skip Caulkins, Carl Chapman, Rolly Kalayjian, Bill Lapworth, Bob Barneson, Gordon Curtis. Paul Cook, Gerry Driscoll, Bob Dickson.

 

Marina del Rey hadn't been dug, and Dana Point was still the best point break on the Coast.

 

For all those beautiful bows, and stern wakes that went before, MERRY CHRISTMAS!

 

~sleddog

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Somebody needs to lock this guy up in a room with a ghostwriter for a couple of months.

 

 

 

S.A. Press: Volume 1 , The History of West Coast Sailing....

 

 

Ed ... You listening ?

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Well Done Sleddog!!!!!!!

 

I thought I was good at the nostalgia growing up in that era racing/cruising on my dad's wooden sloop--- but you win!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

I am saving your post in my sailing log------ thanks

 

Unless I missed- I would like to add Swede Johnson to your list----

 

 

Wash

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Sled, do some research into the early Whitney Series out of LAYC.

 

If I remember right they did some really heavy duty Ocean Racing. One of the races was from LA Harbor around all the Channel Islands and back. Talk about an Upwind shit fight. Anyone who has been out to Santa Rosa or San Miguel Island knows what I am talking about. Imagine heading downwind in one of those pinched end IOR boats in 40knts on the back side of San Miguel Island (no thanks). In today's boats it would be fun!!

 

The Whitney series like all the big ocean racing series have been whittled down as we have all got older. I wonder it there is a correlation??

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Heh. I didn't get into the SoCal racing scene until the early 70s, but LAYC was still doing that kinda stuff. The "tri-island classic" was a late-friday-afternoon start, up around Santa Barbara Island, down the backside of Catalina, around San Clemente, and back up to LAYC. As you note, pinched-end IOR boats doing the high-speed wobbles off wind were a world of fun (I still twitch when I remember the time I got "tea bagged" while up the rig, when the mull-55 whose rig I was up decided to round up out from under me... the only thought I had time to form was "oh crap, my mom is going to kill me when she hears about this")

 

Fun stuff.

 

(and, yeah, I know you were posting to the other 'sled', but... WTH.)

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Least we forget ANGELITA, NO HU HU, CONSTELLATION, ROBON, BRIGADOON of BOOTHBAY, YUCCA (loveliest 8 meter of my dreams), MALIBU Outriggers, P-Cats, EL GATO, IMA LOA, AIKANE

LADY GODIVA, GOODWILL and Coast Guard Cutter DEXTER.

 

Kenny Watts, Saint Cicero, Swede Johnson (invented first tiller pilot), Al Lockaby, Rudy Choy, Frank Rothwell, Russ Nash, Denni Barr, Harry Bourgeois, Waldo Waterman.

 

OCEAN STATION NOVEMBER, SUNRISE, RENEGADE, FAIR WEATHER, KITTEN, GALLANT, DIUNE, the Schock 25, RIGOLETTO, TYGER TYGER, PT JOE, MARTHA.

 

Deaver, Dr. Thaddeus Jones, Clancy, Goldie Joseph, George Kettenberg, Vic Stern. Walter and Ricardo Hussong, Pappy Allen, Bill Schock, Porter Sinclair, Nick Potter.

 

First Long Distance Race to Mexico: 1953 Acapulco Race.

First Ensenada Race: April 23, 1948. Originally called the "Governor's Cup Race," CA's Gov Earl Warren failed to make his promised appearance in Ensenada that year, and the event was renamed Ensenada Race in '49. Entry fee: $22.50/boat.

 

To get to/from Coronado, you rode the ferry for a nickel. And it cost you a dime to ride the ferry from Newport Penisula to Balboa Island.

 

Happy New Year, Anarchists.

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assuming he went back as far as the 50's, and relevant to this thread, although he's most famous for an exploit in '69...

 

I worked briefly with Plazi Miller shortly before he passed, and didn't learn "who he was" in a sailing sense till later. Wished I'd have known, it would have been fun to hear some of that history.

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Least we forget ANGELITA, NO HU HU, CONSTELLATION, ROBON, BRIGADOON of BOOTHBAY, YUCCA (loveliest 8 meter of my dreams), MALIBU Outriggers, P-Cats, EL GATO, IMA LOA, AIKANE

LADY GODIVA, GOODWILL and Coast Guard Cutter DEXTER.

 

Kenny Watts, Saint Cicero, Swede Johnson (invented first tiller pilot), Al Lockaby, Rudy Choy, Frank Rothwell, Russ Nash, Denni Barr, Harry Bourgeois, Waldo Waterman. Peggy Slater must fit in here, her boats were called Valentine (bright red of course!) she was the first woman to skipper in the Transpac, Acapulco and Sydney to Hobart races.

 

OCEAN STATION NOVEMBER, SUNRISE, RENEGADE, FAIR WEATHER, KITTEN, GALLANT, DIUNE, the Schock 25, RIGOLETTO, TYGER TYGER, PT JOE, MARTHA.

 

Deaver, Dr. Thaddeus Jones, Clancy, Goldie Joseph, George Kettenberg, Vic Stern. Walter and Ricardo Hussong, Pappy Allen, Bill Schock, Porter Sinclair, Nick Potter.

 

First Long Distance Race to Mexico: 1953 Acapulco Race.

First Ensenada Race: April 23, 1948. Originally called the "Governor's Cup Race," CA's Gov Earl Warren failed to make his promised appearance in Ensenada that year, and the event was renamed Ensenada Race in '49. Entry fee: $22.50/boat.

 

To get to/from Coronado, you rode the ferry for a nickel. And it cost you a dime to ride the ferry from Newport Penisula to Balboa Island.

 

Happy New Year, Anarchists.

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Alex Irving, Barney Huber, George Griffith, Ash Bown, Peggy Slater, George Fleitz, Clark Sweet, Chuck Ullman,

 

...and, appropriately, she's listed among the very first names cited...

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Least we forget ANGELITA, NO HU HU, CONSTELLATION, ROBON, BRIGADOON of BOOTHBAY, YUCCA (loveliest 8 meter of my dreams), MALIBU Outriggers, P-Cats, EL GATO, IMA LOA, AIKANE

LADY GODIVA, GOODWILL and Coast Guard Cutter DEXTER.

 

Kenny Watts, Saint Cicero, Swede Johnson (invented first tiller pilot), Al Lockaby, Rudy Choy, Frank Rothwell, Russ Nash, Denni Barr, Harry Bourgeois, Waldo Waterman.

 

OCEAN STATION NOVEMBER, SUNRISE, RENEGADE, FAIR WEATHER, KITTEN, GALLANT, DIUNE, the Schock 25, RIGOLETTO, TYGER TYGER, PT JOE, MARTHA.

 

Deaver, Dr. Thaddeus Jones, Clancy, Goldie Joseph, George Kettenberg, Vic Stern. Walter and Ricardo Hussong, Pappy Allen, Bill Schock, Porter Sinclair, Nick Potter.

 

First Long Distance Race to Mexico: 1953 Acapulco Race.

First Ensenada Race: April 23, 1948. Originally called the "Governor's Cup Race," CA's Gov Earl Warren failed to make his promised appearance in Ensenada that year, and the event was renamed Ensenada Race in '49. Entry fee: $22.50/boat.

 

To get to/from Coronado, you rode the ferry for a nickel. And it cost you a dime to ride the ferry from Newport Penisula to Balboa Island.

 

Happy New Year, Anarchists.

 

Does anyone remember the fishing dorys hauled up on the beach by the Newport Pier? They sold fresh fish right there on the Beach.

 

Anyone remeber the South Coast Boatyard. With the cotton sails, wooden boats, varnish? The FD they had on display in the middle of the store?

 

I used to sail on a Rhodes 33. We must have had ten or more at the races out in the ocean. I was too small to do the foredeck so the skipper would give me the helm when we had to jibe! What a thrill.

 

Flight of the snowbirds? What a fiasco!

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I used to sail on a Rhodes 33. We must have had ten or more at the races out in the ocean. I was too small to do the foredeck so the skipper would give me the helm when we had to jibe! What a thrill.

 

Louie,

 

A New Year's toast to the Rhodes 33's. Originally called "Coast Rhodes," the boats of this one-design class were built by South Coast Boatworks pre-WW II. #1, REBEL, was launched in 1939 at South Coast, and 41 of them were built over the years. As a kid, I used to do foredeck on #41, MADNESS, owned by Bud Edgar and Gavin Herbert.

 

Rhodes were cool boats, lead mines really, with frac rigs, 386 sq. feet of sail area, sheet winches that had under deck handles, and a rudimentary interior that you could cruise to Catalina. They usually raced with a crew of four. Over the years, Rhodes 33's plowed a furrow short tacking the Newport ocean beach, then out to "C"buoy on the afternoon westerlies. T

 

In 1947, my father on #20, RUTH, was accidently caught "inside" off 7th Street, and the boat went end over end onto the beach. She was pulled off by the South Coast tug, promptly filled and was towed on the bottom into the Harbor. There, RUTH was craned to the surface, pumped out, and returned to South Coast for a new mast and 20 sistered ribs, and only missed one weekend of racing.

 

Rhodes 33's in the 1950's were raced by some of the best and most colorful skippers in S.CA. Hook Beardslee, the perennial champ, raced SEABEE, #8, Strat Enright had the yellow WITCH, #33, Bill Taylor raced MISTRESS, Hal Thorne had MANANA, Bob Collins was in JOSEPHINE VI, John Pearcy raced #6 WHIM, Jim Shepard had #10 ARGOSY, Glen Brockman skippered VERDI, Tommy Thomas owned NIMBUS. And when George Fleitz showed up with HANAHULI, all bets were off and the water smoked as he and Beardslee duked it out.

 

But the grand old man of the class and its fiercest supporter was Connie Wurdemann on the red MIDSHIP. Connie raced well into his 80's, and was out there every weekend until the Rhodes faded, to be replaced by the Etchells 22's.

 

Good memories of a really good boat.

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Good stuff you guys but I am waiting to hear from the SF old coots for some of the rivalry that I am sure was tossed in to some of that So Cal sailing. Let's hear it Nor Cal.

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Some Rhodes 33 images for those not familiar with the boat (like me)

rhodes33-sketch-s.jpg

rhodes-33-sailing-2-s.jpg

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Those lines look familiar

MrBone%20original.jpg

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Least we forget ANGELITA, NO HU HU, CONSTELLATION, ROBON, BRIGADOON of BOOTHBAY, YUCCA (loveliest 8 meter of my dreams), MALIBU Outriggers, P-Cats, EL GATO, IMA LOA, AIKANE

LADY GODIVA, GOODWILL and Coast Guard Cutter DEXTER.

 

Kenny Watts, Saint Cicero, Swede Johnson (invented first tiller pilot), Al Lockaby, Rudy Choy, Frank Rothwell, Russ Nash, Denni Barr, Harry Bourgeois, Waldo Waterman.

 

OCEAN STATION NOVEMBER, SUNRISE, RENEGADE, FAIR WEATHER, KITTEN, GALLANT, DIUNE, the Schock 25, RIGOLETTO, TYGER TYGER, PT JOE, MARTHA.

 

Deaver, Dr. Thaddeus Jones, Clancy, Goldie Joseph, George Kettenberg, Vic Stern. Walter and Ricardo Hussong, Pappy Allen, Bill Schock, Porter Sinclair, Nick Potter.

 

First Long Distance Race to Mexico: 1953 Acapulco Race.

First Ensenada Race: April 23, 1948. Originally called the "Governor's Cup Race," CA's Gov Earl Warren failed to make his promised appearance in Ensenada that year, and the event was renamed Ensenada Race in '49. Entry fee: $22.50/boat.

 

To get to/from Coronado, you rode the ferry for a nickel. And it cost you a dime to ride the ferry from Newport Penisula to Balboa Island.

 

Happy New Year, Anarchists.

 

Does anyone remember the fishing dorys hauled up on the beach by the Newport Pier? They sold fresh fish right there on the Beach.

 

Anyone remeber the South Coast Boatyard. With the cotton sails, wooden boats, varnish? The FD they had on display in the middle of the store?

 

I used to sail on a Rhodes 33. We must have had ten or more at the races out in the ocean. I was too small to do the foredeck so the skipper would give me the helm when we had to jibe! What a thrill.

 

Flight of the snowbirds? What a fiasco!

 

 

Louie- you are an old codger aren't you?

 

Sailed on Andale (Cal 32 Doug Smith RIP), great boat until you were 100nm offshore and knee deep in water!

 

Quote from Nick Frazee "send up a flare and we'll be there"

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Alex Irving, Barney Huber, George Griffith, Ash Bown, Peggy Slater, George Fleitz, Clark Sweet, Chuck Ullman,

 

...and, appropriately, she's listed among the very first names cited...

 

 

Sorry - I should stop reading threads from the bottom up ;)

 

How about Bill Lawhorn and Dick Blatterman, those two guy's prob won more trophys than anyone else on the west coast

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So I came along much later, 1970's and 80's but my passion was for old wood boats and in particular schooners and the guys and some gals who sailed them. As you have mentioned Kelpie how about HARRY W, LANDFALL, SHEARWATER, MEDLEY, NUTMEG, WANDERER, REVENGE, DAUNTLAS and later SPIKE AFRICA and all those other boats that used to invade Oxnard and put a HUGE dent into the inventory at the local watering holes.

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And as long as we are voting, YUCCA is and forever will be the pretiest 8 meter ever. and this from somebody who has raced against her.

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And after passing this link on to some friends and family:

 

ACE

BRANTA (10 METER), ORIENT, ALERT, TICONDEROGA - REX BANKS - SKIPPER, DON VAUGH(A)N - FOREDECK

BOB JOHNSON - OWNER, SERENA KEN DE MAUSSE, BLACKFIN, LOU DALE, NELLY BLY DICK DUPRIS - OWNER, NEWSBOY MR. BAILEY, PLYM BURKE SAWYER, LA VOLPE, LADY ADA-RANGER- Diosa Del Mar EDDIE WEINBERG OWNER (3 SCHOONERS), ALBATROSS BOB SLOAN, ESTRELLA - 44' ALDEN YAWL BOB HUSSEY, LUCKY STAR, PACIFICA, JONATHAN SWIFT, LAILA - 8 METER, ODYSSEY, ESCAPE, CHULA 40 ft schooner Ventura West)

ROSE OF SHARON ) BYRON CHAMBERLAIN - OWNER, SIRIUS I, SIRIUS II, CHUBASCO, KIALOA I GOODWILL, MINNEY BROTHERS: ERNIE, JOE AND OWEN, LATER: OLINKA, GESTURE, WINDWARD PASSAGE, BLACKFIN, HALF THE PATRONS OF 'SNUG HARBOR', OSPREY, SLIPAWAY, COLUMBIA REX BANKS - CREW <DIV SpellIgnore="1">BILL FICKER - 1970 - WON CUP

 

WITH INTREPID DEFEATING

 

VALIANT

 

HERITAGE

 

WEATHERLY

 

NEWSBOY - THEN 'EASTERNER' WAS ELIMINITED IN 1958, 1962 AND 1964

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And after passing this link on to some friends and family:

 

ACE

BRANTA (10 METER), ORIENT, ALERT, TICONDEROGA - REX BANKS - SKIPPER, DON VAUGH(A)N - FOREDECK

BOB JOHNSON - OWNER, SERENA KEN DE MAUSSE, BLACKFIN, LOU DALE, NELLY BLY DICK DUPRIS - OWNER, NEWSBOY MR. BAILEY, PLYM BURKE SAWYER, LA VOLPE, LADY ADA-RANGER- Diosa Del Mar EDDIE WEINBERG OWNER (3 SCHOONERS), ALBATROSS BOB SLOAN, ESTRELLA - 44' ALDEN YAWL BOB HUSSEY, LUCKY STAR, PACIFICA, JONATHAN SWIFT, LAILA - 8 METER, ODYSSEY, ESCAPE, CHULA 40 ft schooner Ventura West)

ROSE OF SHARON ) BYRON CHAMBERLAIN - OWNER, SIRIUS I, SIRIUS II, CHUBASCO, KIALOA I GOODWILL, MINNEY BROTHERS: ERNIE, JOE AND OWEN, LATER: OLINKA, GESTURE, WINDWARD PASSAGE, BLACKFIN, HALF THE PATRONS OF 'SNUG HARBOR', OSPREY, SLIPAWAY, COLUMBIA REX BANKS - CREW <DIV SpellIgnore="1">BILL FICKER - 1970 - WON CUP

 

WITH INTREPID DEFEATING

 

VALIANT

 

HERITAGE

 

WEATHERLY

 

NEWSBOY - THEN 'EASTERNER' WAS ELIMINITED IN 1958, 1962 AND 1964

 

 

yeah, but if we judged this by style points rather than performance points, Easterner, with that bright-finish mahogany hull, would win hands-down.

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Some Rhodes 33 images for those not familiar with the boat (like me)

rhodes33-sketch-s.jpg

rhodes-33-sailing-2-s.jpg

 

Boy, does that hull shape on the Rhodes 33 look like an IOD. Only thing different is the cabin house and jib overlap size..

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Sled, do some research into the early Whitney Series out of LAYC.

 

If I remember right they did some really heavy duty Ocean Racing. One of the races was from LA Harbor around all the Channel Islands and back. Talk about an Upwind shit fight. Anyone who has been out to Santa Rosa or San Miguel Island knows what I am talking about. Imagine heading downwind in one of those pinched end IOR boats in 40knts on the back side of San Miguel Island (no thanks). In today's boats it would be fun!!

 

The Whitney series like all the big ocean racing series have been whittled down as we have all got older. I wonder it there is a correlation??

 

I can probably credit the Whitney series for my Dad (and thus me) getting into racing. During the early '60s he jumped right into racing as a newbie doing the Whitneys on the PCC "Dorothy E" out of San Pedro. What a way to start--they broke their mast into 5 pieces going around San Nicholas during one of the severe winter gales we used to get in SoCal. The PCCs did pretty well until the Cal 40s came out and blew them out of the water.

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And after passing this link on to some friends and family:

 

ACE

BRANTA (10 METER), ORIENT, ALERT, TICONDEROGA - REX BANKS - SKIPPER, DON VAUGH(A)N - FOREDECK

BOB JOHNSON - OWNER, SERENA KEN DE MAUSSE, BLACKFIN, LOU DALE, NELLY BLY DICK DUPRIS - OWNER, NEWSBOY MR. BAILEY, PLYM BURKE SAWYER, LA VOLPE, LADY ADA-RANGER- Diosa Del Mar EDDIE WEINBERG OWNER (3 SCHOONERS), ALBATROSS BOB SLOAN, ESTRELLA - 44' ALDEN YAWL BOB HUSSEY, LUCKY STAR, PACIFICA, JONATHAN SWIFT, LAILA - 8 METER, ODYSSEY, ESCAPE, CHULA 40 ft schooner Ventura West)

ROSE OF SHARON ) BYRON CHAMBERLAIN - OWNER, SIRIUS I, SIRIUS II, CHUBASCO, KIALOA I GOODWILL, MINNEY BROTHERS: ERNIE, JOE AND OWEN, LATER: OLINKA, GESTURE, WINDWARD PASSAGE, BLACKFIN, HALF THE PATRONS OF 'SNUG HARBOR', OSPREY, SLIPAWAY, COLUMBIA REX BANKS - CREW <DIV SpellIgnore="1">BILL FICKER - 1970 - WON CUP

 

WITH INTREPID DEFEATING

 

VALIANT

 

HERITAGE

 

WEATHERLY

 

NEWSBOY - THEN 'EASTERNER' WAS ELIMINITED IN 1958, 1962 AND 1964

 

Was Newsboy the 12 that later raced in SoCal enginless and with a piano in the cabin?

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This attachment is a good trip down memory lane (all the way back to the first Transpac) and includes a lot of the boats/skippers already mentioned plus more. It also mentions the rating rules used in each TP and the weather conditions for each race going back to the '60s.

 

TPYC_Races.pdf

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I have news for you guys. There are still skiffs selling fish at the base of the Newport Beach pier.

Trivia question: What yacht sailed (and I think won) both the Whitney and Danforth series concurrently?

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How about Bill Lawhorn and Dick Blatterman

 

Dang, there's a pair.

 

Had the honor of racing with those two quite a bit in the early 80s. Bill could just flat "smell" windshifts about an hour before they happened. And Dick could pick a layline (or a VMG angle) better than any modern-day tac-instruments I've ever seen. Between the two of them, we were just about unbeatable when they were on board. "All" we had to do is point the boat where they told us, and get sails up and down <g>.

 

Good stuff.

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Trivia question: What yacht sailed (and I think won) both the Whitney and Danforth series concurrently?

 

That would be MOONSHADOW, a Wylie 30 (Max MORC) design, that yo-yo'd between SF and LA multiple times, back to back, in 1972-73. MOONSHADOW won the Danforth Series that year, and came second in the Whitney only because they missed the last race, due to conflict in dates with the Danforth. MOONSHADOW's crew for this epic adventure, never repeated, was Dave Wahle, Jon Nackarud, Don Peters, and Tom Wylie.

 

~sleddog

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Sled, do some research into the early Whitney Series out of LAYC.

 

If I remember right they did some really heavy duty Ocean Racing. One of the races was from LA Harbor around all the Channel Islands and back. Talk about an Upwind shit fight. Anyone who has been out to Santa Rosa or San Miguel Island knows what I am talking about. Imagine heading downwind in one of those pinched end IOR boats in 40knts on the back side of San Miguel Island (no thanks). In today's boats it would be fun!!

 

The Whitney series like all the big ocean racing series have been whittled down as we have all got older. I wonder it there is a correlation??

 

I can probably credit the Whitney series for my Dad (and thus me) getting into racing. During the early '60s he jumped right into racing as a newbie doing the Whitneys on the PCC "Dorothy E" out of San Pedro. What a way to start--they broke their mast into 5 pieces going around San Nicholas during one of the severe winter gales we used to get in SoCal. The PCCs did pretty well until the Cal 40s came out and blew them out of the water.

WOW, can you imagine racing around San Nichols Island now. It is about 100 miles off the coast of Ventura County, which makes it even further and more upwind from LA. We are such a bunch of fair weather downwind pussies now.

 

Back when boats were solid and Sailors were men, they would not flinch at the thought.

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Sled, do some research into the early Whitney Series out of LAYC.

 

If I remember right they did some really heavy duty Ocean Racing. One of the races was from LA Harbor around all the Channel Islands and back. Talk about an Upwind shit fight. Anyone who has been out to Santa Rosa or San Miguel Island knows what I am talking about. Imagine heading downwind in one of those pinched end IOR boats in 40knts on the back side of San Miguel Island (no thanks). In today's boats it would be fun!!

 

The Whitney series like all the big ocean racing series have been whittled down as we have all got older. I wonder it there is a correlation??

 

I can probably credit the Whitney series for my Dad (and thus me) getting into racing. During the early '60s he jumped right into racing as a newbie doing the Whitneys on the PCC "Dorothy E" out of San Pedro. What a way to start--they broke their mast into 5 pieces going around San Nicholas during one of the severe winter gales we used to get in SoCal. The PCCs did pretty well until the Cal 40s came out and blew them out of the water.

WOW, can you imagine racing around San Nichols Island now. It is about 100 miles off the coast of Ventura County, which makes it even further and more upwind from LA. We are such a bunch of fair weather downwind pussies now.

 

Back when boats were solid and Sailors were men, they would not flinch at the thought.

 

Hey Dawg, I'm not that old and the boat I sailed around San Nicholas Island on way back in '73 or '74 in a Whitney series was not that strong. I recall sticking pencils found in the nav. table between the bulkhead and the coachroof, to see them break when we crested a wave. Great fun!

More like things go in cycles. Figure eight racing, and roller derby goes in and out of style also. Arn't there a lot of older, really cheap, uldb one design boats sitting around Socal? Why not set up a claims race format series? That would be a real form of sailing anarchy. Something to stave off recession boredom. Could even bet on it in N.Z., or... the web... I wouldn't flinch at the thought.

Or, you could keep sailing on line, yawn.

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When asked about this years Whitney series, and if we will ever see the back side of San Clemente island again. The LAYC gang said the Navy won't let them go around any longer? I find this hard to believe? Has homeland security saved us from ourselves again? What would these pioneers of offshore, say about this world of clipboards and badges now? Hell the Navy made the San Nickolas fleet round Begg Rock buoy and not the island this last year? I feel much safer now. 07 Transpac the Navy sent up a C130 to buzz us for over an hour, finally when I figured they wanted to talk to us. we were commanded to start our motor and assume their called heading of 120 degrees. We guilted them into letting us continue, by asking if they ever heard of the TransPac race?

 

Brownie

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Make the race go around Santa Barbara Island. Not as epic as San Nicolas (it's only 40 miles off the coast) but at least it gets boats out past Catalina and away from the Navy.

 

It would be kind of cool to have a four race SoCal ocean series:

 

 

(1) Santa Barbara Island (or some other overnight channel island race) during early spring like the old Whitneys or Overtons

(2) Newport-Ensenada

(3) SB-KH

(4) SDYC's Bishop Rock race

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The Whitney's are alive and well. But they neeed a little help. this year, as always the first race will be around Catalina. and we can work on LAYC to continue the tradation of Santa Barbara island as the second race. sign up! it starts in February. Nothing better than hot lasagana on the back side. although, the park ranger might come by to collect your overnight fee at the East end.

 

Brownie

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More of the '50's S.CA Ocean Racing Fleet:

 

WHITE CLOUD, LANAKOA (Porter family), ORTONA, ZIA, Y COMO, KINGS RANSOM, EVENING STAR, GROOTE BEER tho she was hardly an "ocean racer" and neither was the E Scow MACHINE that did the Ensenada Race in '58.

 

SQUALL, TANTARA, TANTALUS, CONEJO, ANTIGUA, MARILYN, ROCKING CHAIR III, AKAHI, CORSICAN, QUEST, COQUILLE, ROWDY, RANSOM, PHILADELPHIA, SENTA, TYBOON, ALEMBIC

 

You'd think with this number of boats, there wouldn't be any ocean left to occupy.....there wasn't when John Wayne would con his 136' converted minesweeper WILD GOOSE into the anchorages at Santa Cruz Island. The Duke liked his privacy, and invariably had his crew let out all their anchor rode. WILD GOOSE then swinging large at anchor would clear out an entire cove of smaller boats by sunset, leaving Wayne alone to enjoy his cocktail.

 

Bogey had one of the first private moorings at Catalina, an icebox filled with cement, and SANTANA's name stenciled on the cliff astern to identify his private patch of water.

 

Somebody decided we needed to race around the 14 Mile Bank, halfway to Catalina...in those days depth sounders were less than reliable. And the Race Committee would invariably be unable to locate this elusive sea mount to lay the weather mark in 350 feet of water. Race abandoned.

 

And god forbid we forget the TransPacific Yacht Club, in it's infinite wisdom, denied entry to Chuck Ullman's LEGEND for the '55 Honolulu Race.....something about this totally cool Caulkin's design being too light or too downwind oriented. Ullman came back in '57 and won the TransPac, confirming the Board of Director's worst fears.

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The "Channel Islands Race" was much worse than the San Nic. The course was pretty simple: Leave all island, including Richardson's Rock, to port. Start and finish in Los Angeles. If I recall correctly. If you can't find Richardson's Rock on the charts, you're in good company. A lot of great sailors spent hours trying to find that damn thing in the dark. I went around it on the C&C 62 "Sorcery" and it was wet-wet-wet up on the foredeck. The old Sorcery didn't plane, so as we headed out away from the rock all we did was tow a 10' high quarter wake. Geesh that was fun!!

 

(Hint on location of Richardson's Rock: Go to Point Conception, turn left and go off shore a fair bit to where another "Channel Island" would be if there was one even further to windward and right in the blast from Pt. Conception.

 

B

 

 

Sled, do some research into the early Whitney Series out of LAYC.

 

If I remember right they did some really heavy duty Ocean Racing. One of the races was from LA Harbor around all the Channel Islands and back. Talk about an Upwind shit fight. Anyone who has been out to Santa Rosa or San Miguel Island knows what I am talking about. Imagine heading downwind in one of those pinched end IOR boats in 40knts on the back side of San Miguel Island (no thanks). In today's boats it would be fun!!

 

The Whitney series like all the big ocean racing series have been whittled down as we have all got older. I wonder it there is a correlation??

 

I can probably credit the Whitney series for my Dad (and thus me) getting into racing. During the early '60s he jumped right into racing as a newbie doing the Whitneys on the PCC "Dorothy E" out of San Pedro. What a way to start--they broke their mast into 5 pieces going around San Nicholas during one of the severe winter gales we used to get in SoCal. The PCCs did pretty well until the Cal 40s came out and blew them out of the water.

WOW, can you imagine racing around San Nichols Island now. It is about 100 miles off the coast of Ventura County, which makes it even further and more upwind from LA. We are such a bunch of fair weather downwind pussies now.

 

Back when boats were solid and Sailors were men, they would not flinch at the thought.

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The "Channel Islands Race" was much worse than the San Nic. The course was pretty simple: Leave all island, including Richardson's Rock, to port. Start and finish in Los Angeles. If I recall correctly. If you can't find Richardson's Rock on the charts, you're in good company. A lot of great sailors spent hours trying to find that damn thing in the dark. I went around it on the C&C 62 "Sorcery" and it was wet-wet-wet up on the foredeck. The old Sorcery didn't plane, so as we headed out away from the rock all we did was tow a 10' high quarter wake. Geesh that was fun!!

 

(Hint on location of Richardson's Rock: Go to Point Conception, turn left and go off shore a fair bit to where another "Channel Island" would be if there was one even further to windward and right in the blast from Pt. Conception.

 

B

 

 

Sled, do some research into the early Whitney Series out of LAYC.

 

If I remember right they did some really heavy duty Ocean Racing. One of the races was from LA Harbor around all the Channel Islands and back. Talk about an Upwind shit fight. Anyone who has been out to Santa Rosa or San Miguel Island knows what I am talking about. Imagine heading downwind in one of those pinched end IOR boats in 40knts on the back side of San Miguel Island (no thanks). In today's boats it would be fun!!

 

The Whitney series like all the big ocean racing series have been whittled down as we have all got older. I wonder it there is a correlation??

 

I can probably credit the Whitney series for my Dad (and thus me) getting into racing. During the early '60s he jumped right into racing as a newbie doing the Whitneys on the PCC "Dorothy E" out of San Pedro. What a way to start--they broke their mast into 5 pieces going around San Nicholas during one of the severe winter gales we used to get in SoCal. The PCCs did pretty well until the Cal 40s came out and blew them out of the water.

WOW, can you imagine racing around San Nichols Island now. It is about 100 miles off the coast of Ventura County, which makes it even further and more upwind from LA. We are such a bunch of fair weather downwind pussies now.

 

Back when boats were solid and Sailors were men, they would not flinch at the thought.

 

I tried the Channel Islands race once....unfortunately, it was a very light year and we DNF'ed after 48 hours when we hadn't gotten past Santa Cruz Island and the forecast called for very little wind for the following few days (most of the crew had to get back to work). We anchored for a few hours in one of the Santa Cruz coves, partied with the guys from Tinsely Light who had DNF'ed as well, and motored on home to King Harbor. A couple of boats stuck it out and if my recollection is correct the first boat finished after about 5 days. Dennis Choate may have been the overall winner, but since that was 1977 (I think....), my memory could be a bit off....

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The '50's S.CA ocean racing fleet always seemed to be bouncing off things. Or so it seemed to an impressionable kid. The first "bump in the night" I recall was the '53 Ensenada Race when Bogey mistook a car's headlights for the finish boat searchlight, and put race leader SANTANA on the bricks at Punta del Morro, two miles west of Ensenada Village. Boy was he mad.

 

Not soon after, in a Whitney Race, the 36' WESTWARD HO somehow got wedged between Catalina's West End and the visible outlier. How did they do that?

 

The start of the '55 Transpac was memorable when the big blue 72' ketch ESCAPADE, working up the coast past Pt. Fermin, found a rock off Portuguese Bend and dropped her badly bent bronze daggerboard. Whoops.

 

If I had a nickel for every boat that found the reef immediately south of Ship Rock....well, you know that place, and so does the PCC KINGS RANSOME.

 

"Searoom!" Angels Gate, in the shadow of the LA Breakwater Lighthouse, became fertile ground for unanticipated contact with the submerged end of the breakwater. If you got past that, well there is that damn rock on the starboard tack layline out to Pt. Fermin buoy, something we hit with our L/36 at least once. Buck Ayres at Lido Shipyard kept a large sledgehammer just for straightening bent lead keels.

 

Short tacking up to Catalina's West End, it pays to stay in close, and get those big port tack lifters. But did anyone check the tide? There's that half tide reef, one mile east of the West End, that sticks out 100 yards, and we hit that too.

 

The saddest case was '57 TransPac Race winner LEGEND. On her return passage from Honolulu, in the fog, her delivery crew sighted what they thought was the whistle buoy off Begg Rock, NW of San Nick. They altered to the south, not realizing it was the buoy marking the west end of San Miguel Island. LEGEND went aground at Pt. Bennett, her crew swam ashore, and this famous ocean racer broke up in the surf.

 

These days, with GPS and chart plotters, I'm sure Anachists never endanger their keels by taking chances that we took in the 50's. But just in case anyone finds themselves close aboard the west side of Arrow Pt., on Catalina, there is an uncharted rock waiting for some unsuspecting TransPac'er.

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Driving the I-5 recently to the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival, I had hours to reflect on the ocean racing fleet of S.Cal mid-20th century. You see, my father was Secretary of the S.C.Yachting Association during that time. And in cleaning out his files, I found Universal Rule Rating certificate documentation for at least 140 S.Cal ocean racers, from MORNING STAR, PATOLITA, PURSUIT and ENDYMION at the top end, to COASTER, SPINDRIFT (Chuck Ullman,Dave's dad,) WESTWARD HO, and SEA WITCH on the bottom.

 

16 hours of driving later I arrived in Port Townsend. If you've never been to the PTWBF, it is a really fun three days. Youth sail training and wooden boat building is being served in PT, you'd better believe it.

 

SPIKE AFRICA was there, being restored to Sloan's no compromise standards. SF's two pilot schooners, ZODIAC and ADVENTURESS, graced the waterfront, all varnish and overhang. Three restored R class boats from the 1920's were match racing: to see PIRATE,ALOHA, and LADY VAN go at it was a feast for sore eyes.

 

MARTHA was there, 103 years old and last year's winner of the Round the County. ALCYONE with Sugar and Leslie was all business. A couple of Kettenburg 50's; the L.Francis ARAMINTA; DIRIGO II; MALABAR XV; the 90'S&S yawl ODYSSEY (ex SALUDA from San Diego.); SUVA; VITO DUMAS; and dozens more. There was even a restored tug with a crane and racy Cal-20 cradled aboard. Now that's a mothership.

 

Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival is held the first weekend after Labor Day. Mark your calendars, and hoist one to those who went before.

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And after passing this link on to some friends and family:

 

ACE

BRANTA (10 METER), ORIENT, ALERT, TICONDEROGA - REX BANKS - SKIPPER, DON VAUGH(A)N - FOREDECK

BOB JOHNSON - OWNER, SERENA KEN DE MAUSSE, BLACKFIN, LOU DALE, NELLY BLY DICK DUPRIS - OWNER, NEWSBOY MR. BAILEY, PLYM BURKE SAWYER, LA VOLPE, LADY ADA-RANGER- Diosa Del Mar EDDIE WEINBERG OWNER (3 SCHOONERS), ALBATROSS BOB SLOAN, ESTRELLA - 44' ALDEN YAWL BOB HUSSEY, LUCKY STAR, PACIFICA, JONATHAN SWIFT, LAILA - 8 METER, ODYSSEY, ESCAPE, CHULA 40 ft schooner Ventura West)

ROSE OF SHARON ) BYRON CHAMBERLAIN - OWNER, SIRIUS I, SIRIUS II, CHUBASCO, KIALOA I GOODWILL, MINNEY BROTHERS: ERNIE, JOE AND OWEN, LATER: OLINKA, GESTURE, WINDWARD PASSAGE, BLACKFIN, HALF THE PATRONS OF 'SNUG HARBOR', OSPREY, SLIPAWAY, COLUMBIA REX BANKS - CREW <DIV SpellIgnore="1">BILL FICKER - 1970 - WON CUP

 

WITH INTREPID DEFEATING

 

VALIANT

 

HERITAGE

 

WEATHERLY

 

NEWSBOY - THEN 'EASTERNER' WAS ELIMINITED IN 1958, 1962 AND 1964

 

 

yeah, but if we judged this by style points rather than performance points, Easterner, with that bright-finish mahogany hull, would win hands-down.

 

Not to mention the rumored piano below on EASTERNER / NEWSBOY.

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Lots of those boats raced in the early editions of BBS on S.F. Bay when the event was a week long. The first one in '65 even had a distance race out around the Lightship and back (~30 miles). Wind crapped out and nobody finished until after midnight. It was the end of the distance race.

 

We also brought some S.F. boats to SoCal for Whitney.

 

Was great racing all over the Cali Coast in the 50s and 60s. CCA working for ratings, Kenny Watts and Burke Sawyer making the best sails and sailing a lot up and down the coast, Barient Winches evolving into some of the very best gear possible, the TRANSPAC being the ultimate race every odd-numbered summer, emergence of the Cal 40s in fiberglass with spade rudders and aluminum spars, Dacron sails and lines coming forth, the first braided ropes...

 

Good times. Still good, just different.

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And after passing this link on to some friends and family:

 

ACE

BRANTA (10 METER), ORIENT, ALERT, TICONDEROGA - REX BANKS - SKIPPER, DON VAUGH(A)N - FOREDECK

BOB JOHNSON - OWNER, SERENA KEN DE MAUSSE, BLACKFIN, LOU DALE, NELLY BLY DICK DUPRIS - OWNER, NEWSBOY MR. BAILEY, PLYM BURKE SAWYER, LA VOLPE, LADY ADA-RANGER- Diosa Del Mar EDDIE WEINBERG OWNER (3 SCHOONERS), ALBATROSS BOB SLOAN, ESTRELLA - 44' ALDEN YAWL BOB HUSSEY, LUCKY STAR, PACIFICA, JONATHAN SWIFT, LAILA - 8 METER, ODYSSEY, ESCAPE, CHULA 40 ft schooner Ventura West)

ROSE OF SHARON ) BYRON CHAMBERLAIN - OWNER, SIRIUS I, SIRIUS II, CHUBASCO, KIALOA I GOODWILL, MINNEY BROTHERS: ERNIE, JOE AND OWEN, LATER: OLINKA, GESTURE, WINDWARD PASSAGE, BLACKFIN, HALF THE PATRONS OF 'SNUG HARBOR', OSPREY, SLIPAWAY, COLUMBIA REX BANKS - CREW <DIV SpellIgnore="1">BILL FICKER - 1970 - WON CUP

 

WITH INTREPID DEFEATING

 

VALIANT

 

HERITAGE

 

WEATHERLY

 

NEWSBOY - THEN 'EASTERNER' WAS ELIMINITED IN 1958, 1962 AND 1964

 

 

yeah, but if we judged this by style points rather than performance points, Easterner, with that bright-finish mahogany hull, would win hands-down.

 

Not to mention the rumored piano below on EASTERNER / NEWSBOY.

 

The piano was there - I played it when I was about 17. Jack, the owner, was getting shit from guys about his "light weight" boat (a F**king 12 meter!!) because it didn't have a motor, so he gave them the single digit salute and installed a piano. Jack was a CLASS ACT!!

 

BV

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And after passing this link on to some friends and family:

 

ACE

BRANTA (10 METER), ORIENT, ALERT, TICONDEROGA - REX BANKS - SKIPPER, DON VAUGH(A)N - FOREDECK

BOB JOHNSON - OWNER, SERENA KEN DE MAUSSE, BLACKFIN, LOU DALE, NELLY BLY DICK DUPRIS - OWNER, NEWSBOY MR. BAILEY, PLYM BURKE SAWYER, LA VOLPE, LADY ADA-RANGER- Diosa Del Mar EDDIE WEINBERG OWNER (3 SCHOONERS), ALBATROSS BOB SLOAN, ESTRELLA - 44' ALDEN YAWL BOB HUSSEY, LUCKY STAR, PACIFICA, JONATHAN SWIFT, LAILA - 8 METER, ODYSSEY, ESCAPE, CHULA 40 ft schooner Ventura West)

ROSE OF SHARON ) BYRON CHAMBERLAIN - OWNER, SIRIUS I, SIRIUS II, CHUBASCO, KIALOA I GOODWILL, MINNEY BROTHERS: ERNIE, JOE AND OWEN, LATER: OLINKA, GESTURE, WINDWARD PASSAGE, BLACKFIN, HALF THE PATRONS OF 'SNUG HARBOR', OSPREY, SLIPAWAY, COLUMBIA REX BANKS - CREW <DIV SpellIgnore="1">BILL FICKER - 1970 - WON CUP

 

WITH INTREPID DEFEATING

 

VALIANT

 

HERITAGE

 

WEATHERLY

 

NEWSBOY - THEN 'EASTERNER' WAS ELIMINITED IN 1958, 1962 AND 1964

 

 

yeah, but if we judged this by style points rather than performance points, Easterner, with that bright-finish mahogany hull, would win hands-down.

 

Not to mention the rumored piano below on EASTERNER / NEWSBOY.

 

The piano was there - I played it when I was about 17. Jack, the owner, was getting shit from guys about his "light weight" boat (a F**king 12 meter!!) because it didn't have a motor, so he gave them the single digit salute and installed a piano. Jack was a CLASS ACT!!

 

BV

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"Searoom!" Angels Gate, in the shadow of the LA Breakwater Lighthouse, became fertile ground for unanticipated contact with the submerged end of the breakwater. If you got past that, well there is that damn rock on the starboard tack layline out to Pt. Fermin buoy,

Not the '50s, but I recall a Midwinters back when LAYC used to draw

the Gran Prix IOR fleet of the day, when both 'Zig Zag' and I think

'Aleta' each stuffed their keels through the bottom of the hull.

I believe ZZ hit Fermin and Aleta the breakwater entrance.

They were both hauled out at the old San Pedro Boatworks.

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Wasn't one of the reasons for Big Boat Series popularity that it was "on the way home" from TransPac? Getting southern California boats to bash their brains out getting up the coast was a hard sell. Thus BBS series attendance is always higher on odd-numbered years.

 

And +1 for Skip writing a book. Hey! Look how rich it's made Bill Barton!

 

For a good time, go to Raven Maps and order their 39" x 63" (100 cm x 160 cm) map of Southern California. You read read right, Rocky; it's over 5-feet wide. Yes, Richardson Rock is there, as is Bishop Rock. I've got one in a frame behind my office desk. The frame cost more than the print. blankface.gif

 

Wonderful detail.

 

SOCALsitelinkfull.jpg

 

SOCAL-Large.jpg

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Advert and Class Winners.pdf

I used to sail on a Rhodes 33. We must have had ten or more at the races out in the ocean. I was too small to do the foredeck so the skipper would give me the helm when we had to jibe! What a thrill.

 

Louie,

 

A New Year's toast to the Rhodes 33's. Originally called "Coast Rhodes," the boats of this one-design class were built by South Coast Boatworks pre-WW II. #1, REBEL, was launched in 1939 at South Coast, and 41 of them were built over the years. As a kid, I used to do foredeck on #41, MADNESS, owned by Bud Edgar and Gavin Herbert.

 

Rhodes were cool boats, lead mines really, with frac rigs, 386 sq. feet of sail area, sheet winches that had under deck handles, and a rudimentary interior that you could cruise to Catalina. They usually raced with a crew of four. Over the years, Rhodes 33's plowed a furrow short tacking the Newport ocean beach, then out to "C"buoy on the afternoon westerlies. T

 

In 1947, my father on #20, RUTH, was accidently caught "inside" off 7th Street, and the boat went end over end onto the beach. She was pulled off by the South Coast tug, promptly filled and was towed on the bottom into the Harbor. There, RUTH was craned to the surface, pumped out, and returned to South Coast for a new mast and 20 sistered ribs, and only missed one weekend of racing.

 

Rhodes 33's in the 1950's were raced by some of the best and most colorful skippers in S.CA. Hook Beardslee, the perennial champ, raced SEABEE, #8, Strat Enright had the yellow WITCH, #33, Bill Taylor raced MISTRESS, Hal Thorne had MANANA, Bob Collins was in JOSEPHINE VI, John Pearcy raced #6 WHIM, Jim Shepard had #10 ARGOSY, Glen Brockman skippered VERDI, Tommy Thomas owned NIMBUS. And when George Fleitz showed up with HANAHULI, all bets were off and the water smoked as he and Beardslee duked it out.

 

But the grand old man of the class and its fiercest supporter was Connie Wurdemann on the red MIDSHIP. Connie raced well into his 80's, and was out there every weekend until the Rhodes faded, to be replaced by the Etchells 22's.

 

Good memories of a really good boat.

 

 

Hi Sleddog, Louie and everyone else :)

 

I just came across this thread and its of great interest to me as I am restoring Rhodes 33 #34 Therapy (ex. Witch). Sleddog mentioned she was yellow when owned by Strat Enright and I can confirm two different shades of yellow are hidden under the numerous old coats of white on her! She is a slow work in progress as I spend little time in the States these days but it was love at first sight when I found her looking forlorn in San Diego 3 1/2 years ago.

 

Can you guys provide any more early history on any of the boats or stories about racing on them? Myself and previous owners have a roster going trying to keep tabs on all the boats. As far as we know there is 7 confirmed still in one piece. 3 are Sailing and 3 are in various stages of restoration.

 

 

I look forward to hearing from anyone with some interesting info or contacts about the Rhodes 33s or the South Coast yard.

If anyone has old pictures/records tucked away that would be even more fantastic.

 

 

Regards,

James

Advert and Class Winners.pdf

BOAT # NAME

#1 REBEL

 

#3 LANAKI

#4

#5

#6 WHIM

#7

#8 SEABEE

#9

#10 MARUJA

#11

#12 MISTRESS

#13 HI-JINX / Antonia

#14 VERDE

#15

#16

#17 MIDSHIPS

#18

#19

#20 RUTH

#21

#22

#23

#24

#25 REVIELLE

#26 RUM RUNNER

#26 LOKI

#27 CAPER

#29 WALK ON BY

#30

#31

#32 DARK STAR

#33

#34 THERAPY (ex Witch)

#35

#36 SERENADE / Windswept

#37 DUSTY

#38 SPELLBOUND

#39 ARIRANGI

#40

#41 MADNESS

#42 AH WAHINE

Unknown Numbers

#? Manana

#? Josephine VI

#10? Argosy

#? Nimbus

#? Hanahuli

#? Crispin

#? Marlan

#? Impulse

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... there is that damn rock on the starboard tack layline out to Pt. Fermin buoy,

...I recall a Midwinters back when LAYC used to draw the Gran Prix IOR fleet of the day,

 

Also not the 50s, but had the "pleasure" of being on Audacious when we dropped into a trough and came down on that rock during a LAYC midwinters, prob'ly '80 or '81. Boat went from full speed to 0 in a heartbeat. Mike found a primary with his ribs, Byron found the traveller with his face, blood everywhere. Hurried check under the floorboards showed no water coming in, so we got the boat going and actually stayed in the race. I've always wondered how it might have been different it we'd hit it head-on instead of dropping onto it.

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Name these 1950's boats?

Sparkle and Escapade!

Duh!

 

I remember sailing against Sparkle in the '60s, but I can't remember Escapade.

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Brilliant Thread for history. As an ex Pat Brit, my only connection to any of this is that I got to sail in the last full edition of the Channel Islands race, start and finish in LA and leave all Islands including Richardson Rock to Port. Had a tough beat up to the rock, but as soon as you crossed that invisible boundary line between Conception and Richardson Rock, someone threw the wind switch on. Nothing like learning how much Conception shelters SoCal. We had an epic Run from the Rock to top end of San Clemente, 120 miles in 10 hours flat. Really fun race, that one.

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Name these 1950's boats?

Sparkle and Escapade!

Duh!

 

I remember sailing against Sparkle in the '60s, but I can't remember Escapade.

 

 

Same Sparkle that's up in Puget Sound now with a J-29 rig on it?

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Same Sparkle that's up in Puget Sound now with a J-29 rig on it?

Dunno.

 

Tell me where it is and I'll try and swing by when I'm up in Bellevue and Issaquah for Christmas!

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Name these 1950's boats?

Sparkle and Escapade!

Duh!

 

I remember sailing against Sparkle in the '60s, but I can't remember Escapade.

 

 

Same Sparkle that's up in Puget Sound now with a J-29 rig on it?

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Sparkle was designed by her first owner, Alex Irving, who raced the boat for decades out of Balboa YC. He sold the boat several years ago to Puget Sound and it was last seen painted black and still sailing. Hadn't heard about a J-29 rig in the boat. It was 2 spreader masthead sloop when it left So Cal.

 

Alex was an interesting guy. I heard a story about him developing a hydrofoil boat in the 1940's. One of his friends had a photo of it being towed up on foils in Newport Bay. He wasn't clear if they ever got it sailing on foils under its own power. WW II got in the way according to the story. Alex passed away a few years ago, living well into his 90's.

 

Name these 1950's boats?

Sparkle and Escapade!

Duh!

 

I remember sailing against Sparkle in the '60s, but I can't remember Escapade.

 

 

Same Sparkle that's up in Puget Sound now with a J-29 rig on it?

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Sparkle was designed by her first owner, Alex Irving, who raced the boat for decades out of Balboa YC. He sold the boat several years ago to Puget Sound and it was last seen painted black and still sailing. Hadn't heard about a J-29 rig in the boat. It was 2 spreader masthead sloop when it left So Cal.

 

Alex was an interesting guy. I heard a story about him developing a hydrofoil boat in the 1940's. One of his friends had a photo of it being towed up on foils in Newport Bay. He wasn't clear if they ever got it sailing on foils under its own power. WW II got in the way according to the story. Alex passed away a few years ago, living well into his 90's.

 

Name these 1950's boats?

Sparkle and Escapade!

Duh!

 

I remember sailing against Sparkle in the '60s, but I can't remember Escapade.

 

 

Same Sparkle that's up in Puget Sound now with a J-29 rig on it?

 

 

OK, so after some research I found I had the wrong boat.

I had Sparkle confused with a design that Ben Seaborn did called Twinkle (apparently his take on the Sparkle design).

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Sparkle was designed by her first owner, Alex Irving, who raced the boat for decades out of Balboa YC. He sold the boat several years ago to Puget Sound and it was last seen painted black and still sailing. Hadn't heard about a J-29 rig in the boat. It was 2 spreader masthead sloop when it left So Cal.

 

Alex was an interesting guy. I heard a story about him developing a hydrofoil boat in the 1940's. One of his friends had a photo of it being towed up on foils in Newport Bay. He wasn't clear if they ever got it sailing on foils under its own power. WW II got in the way according to the story. Alex passed away a few years ago, living well into his 90's.

 

Name these 1950's boats?

Sparkle and Escapade!

Duh!

 

I remember sailing against Sparkle in the '60s, but I can't remember Escapade.

 

 

Same Sparkle that's up in Puget Sound now with a J-29 rig on it?

 

 

OK, so after some research I found I had the wrong boat.

I had Sparkle confused with a design that Ben Seaborn did called Twinkle (apparently his take on the Sparkle design).

 

Twinkle;

sailboat-twinkle.jpg

 

http://yachtpals.com/node/11558

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I know this is a couple-year-old post, but it's new to me...and it got alot of memories going. I grew up in the 50's sailing to Catalina's Howlands Landing almost every summer weekend, and knew alot of these names-both the boats and the owners. You have one in your list that I knew better than the rest, and have to correct the spelling on his name- because he was my dad. Prent Fulmor was already getting out of racing by the time I was old enough to crew ( I was born in '52 and he was 50 years old at the time), but I did get to race one Ensenada Race with him on his last boat before he hung up his topsiders. I always wished I could have sailed with him when he won the Transpac in '53 and '55 on Staghound , but I have to console myself with the knowlege that I was likely concieved after the finish of the '51 Transpac when he only got 2nd overall but had the fastest elapsed time for a class "C" boat 13-03-13-52. I hardly remember Staghound, but his next boat, Criterion, I do remember a little.

Anyway, though he was Commodore of NHYC at the time, and was flying that burgee when he won the Transpacs, we hung out more at LAYC, which is where I knew most of the folks on your list. Our Catalina mooring was next to Gordon Curtis's Naragansett (sp) and close to the Griffith's Cal 40. The Bell family in Westward Ho with her bright-finished hull, and later Westward, the literally gold plated L-50, held down the opposite side of the cove. The high point at the beginning of every weekend was watching Jack Bailey sail in and grab his mooring perfectly every time, first on the blue-hulled 10 meter Hilaria, and later on the 12 meter Newsboy ex Easterner that others have mentioned. Neither boat had an engine, but both had a piano. I had a serious crush on his daughter Cathie.

 

Anyway, you must be an old coot like me, wonder if I knew you?

 

Mike Fulmor

 

For those who remember, S.Cal had a vigorous ocean racing fleet in the 1950's. For your nostalgic pleasure I include some of their names I remember. These were the days of varnished spinnaker poles, overhangs, South Coast winches, red lead bottom paint, kenyons, RDF's, and NALU II's chickens. HILARIA never had an engine, and SALLY was the prettiest 10 meter in the world. Feel free to add to the list:

 

ALTAMAR, ANTIGUA, AKAHI, ATTORANTE (go Burke!), ANDALE, AMORITA, TEMPEST, KITTEN, ESCAPADE, CHOLITA, VALENTINE, CHUBBY, CAROUSEL, COTTON BLOSSOM, BUTCHER BOY, BARLOVENTO, CHERRIO

 

Alex Irving, Barney Huber, George Griffith, Ash Bown, Peggy Slater, George Fleitz, Clark Sweet, Chuck Ullman,

 

DASHER, DANCER, VIXEN, MADCAP, MARA, CASSANDRA, HOLIDAY, COQUILLE, CALIFIA, GALATEA, JINKER, GAMIN, KIRAWAN, GOOD NEWS, BONNIE DOONE, KELPIE, FREEDOM, HILARIA, JADA, KIALOA, KAMALII, BAGATELLE, LEGEND, FLYING SCOTCHMAN (Lapworth's first design), LEDA, MORNING STAR, NAM SANG, NOVIA DEL MAR,

 

Gene Wells, Fred Smales, Willard Bell, Gabe Giannini, Jack Hedden, George Sturgis, Prent Fulmour, Dick Steele, Peter Grant,

 

ODYSSEY, NALU II, FLYING CLOUD, MARIE AMELIE, ORIENT, QUEEN MAB, HUSSY, REBEL, STARLIGHT, SEA DRIFT, SANTANA, SERENA, SOLILIQUY, SERENADE, STAGHOUND,, ISLANDER, SIRIUS, SPARKLE, SALLY, WINDWARD, WHITE CAPS, WESTWARD HO, LANDFALL, PIONEER, DOUBLE EAGLE, PURITAN, SILOUETTE, TANTALUS, L'APACHE, SEA WITCH, WOOLHARA (honorary powerboat), BRANTA

 

Not a spade rudder yet to be seen.

 

ALERT, MICKEY, LARK, FLAMBOUYANT, SALUDA, QUEST, VIXEN, NARRAGANSETT, SUNDA, CRITERION, ROLAND VON BREMEN, BONGO, DEBRA, CHIRIQUI, DIABLO, CELEBES, NORDLYS, QUEST, FAIR WEATHER, MAI TAI, SKYLARK, GULLMAR, TYPEE, GROOTE BEER, SANDPIPER,

 

K-38's, PCC's, K-40's, L/36's, Cal 32's, Newporter Ketches, PBY's, Ohlson 35's, Owens Cutters

 

Skip Caulkins, Carl Chapman, Rolly Kalayjian, Bill Lapworth, Bob Barneson, Gordon Curtis. Paul Cook, Gerry Driscoll, Bob Dickson.

 

Marina del Rey hadn't been dug, and Dana Point was still the best point break on the Coast.

 

For all those beautiful bows, and stern wakes that went before, MERRY CHRISTMAS!

 

~sleddog

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I know this is a couple-year-old post, but it's new to me...and it got alot of memories going. I grew up in the 50's sailing to Catalina's Howlands Landing almost every summer weekend, and knew alot of these names-both the boats and the owners. You have one in your list that I knew better than the rest, and have to correct the spelling on his name- because he was my dad. Prent Fulmor was already getting out of racing by the time I was old enough to crew ( I was born in '52 and he was 50 years old at the time), but I did get to race one Ensenada Race with him on his last boat before he hung up his topsiders. I always wished I could have sailed with him when he won the Transpac in '53 and '55 on Staghound , but I have to console myself with the knowlege that I was likely concieved after the finish of the '51 Transpac when he only got 2nd overall but had the fastest elapsed time for a class "C" boat 13-03-13-52. I hardly remember Staghound, but his next boat, Criterion, I do remember a little.

Anyway, though he was Commodore of NHYC at the time, and was flying that burgee when he won the Transpacs, we hung out more at LAYC, which is where I knew most of the folks on your list. Our Catalina mooring was next to Gordon Curtis's Naragansett (sp) and close to the Griffith's Cal 40. The Bell family in Westward Ho with her bright-finished hull, and later Westward, the literally gold plated L-50, held down the opposite side of the cove. The high point at the beginning of every weekend was watching Jack Bailey sail in and grab his mooring perfectly every time, first on the blue-hulled 10 meter Hilaria, and later on the 12 meter Newsboy ex Easterner that others have mentioned. Neither boat had an engine, but both had a piano. I had a serious crush on his daughter Cathie.

 

Anyway, you must be an old coot like me, wonder if I knew you?

 

Mike Fulmor

 

...snip...

 

 

Mike,

 

I'm thinking you and I must have bumped into each other at Howlands when we were both kids, but too much time and drink has flowed under the bow for me to remember when. My dad owned Nis Randers, the dark blue, astoundingly heavy, german sloop with the 7/8 rig, and I hung around on Akamai a lot with Stan and Tami. I'm certain we must have been together aboard Westward on some weekend or other. I crewed for George on both Persephone and Tabasco and enjoyed learning literally at the knee of the master.

 

It really took me back, reading your post, and remembering Jack sail in with the Cal-25 headsail mounted on a roller as a staysail on Newsboy. His "outboard" as he called it.

 

Those were good times racing and cruising. It is interesting to note that we did both on the same boats.... but, that was then and this is now.

 

All the best,

 

Beau

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In this pic I am driving Westward. It was taken about 6 weeks ago with Rosey.

 

Westward_sailing_upwind_Sept_2010.jpg

 

The gold is getting a little pitted. Charlie says the base metal may be too far gone for another dip in the plating tank.

 

Go Poly Panthers?

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In this pic I am driving Westward. It was taken about 6 weeks ago with Rosey.

 

Westward_sailing_upwind_Sept_2010.jpg

 

The gold is getting a little pitted. Charlie says the base metal may be too far gone for another dip in the plating tank.

 

Go Poly Panthers?

 

 

 

Great to see the Westward continuing to be well loved!!!

 

BV

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The old Sorcery didn't plane

B

 

 

Sled, do some research into the early Whitney Series out of LAYC.

 

If I remember right they did some really heavy duty Ocean Racing. One of the races was from LA Harbor around all the Channel Islands and back. Talk about an Upwind shit fight. Anyone who has been out to Santa Rosa or San Miguel Island knows what I am talking about. Imagine heading downwind in one of those pinched end IOR boats in 40knts on the back side of San Miguel Island (no thanks). In today's boats it would be fun!!

 

The Whitney series like all the big ocean racing series have been whittled down as we have all got older. I wonder it there is a correlation??

 

I can probably credit the Whitney series for my Dad (and thus me) getting into racing. During the early '60s he jumped right into racing as a newbie doing the Whitneys on the PCC "Dorothy E" out of San Pedro. What a way to start--they broke their mast into 5 pieces going around San Nicholas during one of the severe winter gales we used to get in SoCal. The PCCs did pretty well until the Cal 40s came out and blew them out of the water.

WOW, can you imagine racing around San Nichols Island now. It is about 100 miles off the coast of Ventura County, which makes it even further and more upwind from LA. We are such a bunch of fair weather downwind pussies now.

 

Back when boats were solid and Sailors were men, they would not flinch at the thought.

 

 

The "new" one didn't, either.

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Cool thread. I know a few of these boats (more than I thought I would) and would be actively racing one of them if I hadn't moved out of the LA area.

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There's a memorable picture of Rhodes 33 #20 RUTH. My father, Bob Allan, was skippering RUTH (named after owner Tom Myer's wife) up the Balboa/Newport shoreline in a local race. Obviously there was a misjudgement, as in the photo RUTH is aground in the surf, with Bob and crew wading ashore near 6th St.

 

That little black South Coast tug was called, and it pulled RUTH off the beach, where she promptly sank. The tug towed RUTH back to Newport Harbor, dragging along the bottom, and got RUTH inside the Bay to the corner in front of Bartholomew's house. There RUTH was raised, pumped out, towed to South Coast, repaired, and back racing two weeks later.

 

As kids we used to hang out at Howlands. At low tide we would try and climb along the cliffs all the way to Emerald. George and Millie Griffith had L/36 #1 CASSANDRA's mooring alongside. Usually the alcohol stove would flame up on Saturday night, and get thrown overboard. It was my job to dive down and recover the stove on Sunday morning. Getting chased by wild boars in the canyon back of Frog Rock is a story for another day.

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There's a memorable picture of Rhodes 33 #20 RUTH. My father, Bob Allan, was skippering RUTH (named after owner Tom Myer's wife) up the Balboa/Newport shoreline in a local race. Obviously there was a misjudgement, as in the photo RUTH is aground in the surf, with Bob and crew wading ashore near 6th St.

 

That little black South Coast tug was called, and it pulled RUTH off the beach, where she promptly sank. The tug towed RUTH back to Newport Harbor, dragging along the bottom, and got RUTH inside the Bay to the corner in front of Bartholomew's house. There RUTH was raised, pumped out, towed to South Coast, repaired, and back racing two weeks later.

 

As kids we used to hang out at Howlands. At low tide we would try and climb along the cliffs all the way to Emerald. George and Millie Griffith had L/36 #1 CASSANDRA's mooring alongside. Usually the alcohol stove would flame up on Saturday night, and get thrown overboard. It was my job to dive down and recover the stove on Sunday morning. Getting chased by wild boars in the canyon back of Frog Rock is a story for another day.

 

Hi Sleddog,

Any chance of you scanning the pic for us? I would love to see the photo.

 

Regards,

James

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From a few years ago. My kids gravitated toward the same spot on the boat that I always found most comfortable. Up in "Adventureland"....as far away as possible from those back in "Fantasyland". There's a photo floating around which was taken of the boat on a mooring over at Avalon (probably in the '50s) cresting a breaker that I'll have to see if I can dig up. I seem to remember CQR using it as an advertisement back in the '70s....basically implying that the boat was on one of their hooks.

post-3002-015247900 1290568018_thumb.jpg

post-3002-072902000 1290568025_thumb.jpg

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In this pic I am driving Westward. It was taken about 6 weeks ago with Rosey.

 

Westward_sailing_upwind_Sept_2010.jpg

 

The gold is getting a little pitted. Charlie says the base metal may be too far gone for another dip in the plating tank.

 

Go Poly Panthers?

 

 

Damn! I lost track of this thread when the forum went down. So the Bells still have Westward? How cool is that. I love it when there's some continuity to the world. I see the Guppy is still hanging in there too- we had one just like it, but ours never sailed as well...might have been a sailing skills deal... Please say hi for me next time you see those folks, it's been about 40 years. So any chance you could reveal your identity?

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Advert and Class Winners.pdf

I used to sail on a Rhodes 33. We must have had ten or more at the races out in the ocean. I was too small to do the foredeck so the skipper would give me the helm when we had to jibe! What a thrill.

 

Louie,

 

A New Year's toast to the Rhodes 33's. Originally called "Coast Rhodes," the boats of this one-design class were built by South Coast Boatworks pre-WW II. #1, REBEL, was launched in 1939 at South Coast, and 41 of them were built over the years. As a kid, I used to do foredeck on #41, MADNESS, owned by Bud Edgar and Gavin Herbert.

 

Rhodes were cool boats, lead mines really, with frac rigs, 386 sq. feet of sail area, sheet winches that had under deck handles, and a rudimentary interior that you could cruise to Catalina. They usually raced with a crew of four. Over the years, Rhodes 33's plowed a furrow short tacking the Newport ocean beach, then out to "C"buoy on the afternoon westerlies. T

 

In 1947, my father on #20, RUTH, was accidently caught "inside" off 7th Street, and the boat went end over end onto the beach. She was pulled off by the South Coast tug, promptly filled and was towed on the bottom into the Harbor. There, RUTH was craned to the surface, pumped out, and returned to South Coast for a new mast and 20 sistered ribs, and only missed one weekend of racing.

 

Rhodes 33's in the 1950's were raced by some of the best and most colorful skippers in S.CA. Hook Beardslee, the perennial champ, raced SEABEE, #8, Strat Enright had the yellow WITCH, #33, Bill Taylor raced MISTRESS, Hal Thorne had MANANA, Bob Collins was in JOSEPHINE VI, John Pearcy raced #6 WHIM, Jim Shepard had #10 ARGOSY, Glen Brockman skippered VERDI, Tommy Thomas owned NIMBUS. And when George Fleitz showed up with HANAHULI, all bets were off and the water smoked as he and Beardslee duked it out.

 

But the grand old man of the class and its fiercest supporter was Connie Wurdemann on the red MIDSHIP. Connie raced well into his 80's, and was out there every weekend until the Rhodes faded, to be replaced by the Etchells 22's.

 

Good memories of a really good boat.

 

 

Hi Sleddog, Louie and everyone else :)

 

I just came across this thread and its of great interest to me as I am restoring Rhodes 33 #34 Therapy (ex. Witch). Sleddog mentioned she was yellow when owned by Strat Enright and I can confirm two different shades of yellow are hidden under the numerous old coats of white on her! She is a slow work in progress as I spend little time in the States these days but it was love at first sight when I found her looking forlorn in San Diego 3 1/2 years ago.

 

Can you guys provide any more early history on any of the boats or stories about racing on them? Myself and previous owners have a roster going trying to keep tabs on all the boats. As far as we know there is 7 confirmed still in one piece. 3 are Sailing and 3 are in various stages of restoration.

 

 

I look forward to hearing from anyone with some interesting info or contacts about the Rhodes 33s or the South Coast yard.

If anyone has old pictures/records tucked away that would be even more fantastic.

 

 

Regards,

James

Advert and Class Winners.pdf

BOAT # NAME

#1 REBEL

 

#3 LANAKI

#4

#5

#6 WHIM

#7

#8 SEABEE

#9

#10 MARUJA

#11

#12 MISTRESS

#13 HI-JINX / Antonia

#14 VERDE

#15

#16

#17 MIDSHIPS

#18

#19

#20 RUTH

#21

#22

#23

#24

#25 REVIELLE

#26 RUM RUNNER

#26 LOKI

#27 CAPER

#29 WALK ON BY

#30

#31

#32 DARK STAR

#33

#34 THERAPY (ex Witch)

#35

#36 SERENADE / Windswept

#37 DUSTY

#38 SPELLBOUND

#39 ARIRANGI

#40

#41 MADNESS

#42 AH WAHINE

Unknown Numbers

#? Manana

#? Josephine VI

#10? Argosy

#? Nimbus

#? Hanahuli

#? Crispin

#? Marlan

#? Impulse

 

 

 

Here ya go, my dad's Rhodes, not sure what her name was. It was his third boat, after a Thistle and a Snipe. They were called "Primero" and "Segundo" so whatever spanish for "third" is was probably this boat's name. Sorry the photo is a bit larger than my scanner...

post-33412-079247800 1290985058_thumb.jpg

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It was his third boat, after a Thistle and a Snipe. They were called "Primero" and "Segundo" so whatever spanish for "third" is was probably this boat's name.

 

Tercera?

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Sparkle is in Port Townsend, never had a J-29 mast as far as I know and is still the 1947 version of fast is fun (see photo). She's been in the shed for too long getting some wood boat love but it will be great to see her back out on the Bay some day. Sparkle pictures and an article on Elizabeth Becker's site here. Photo lifted from her site.

 

post-212-001574900 1291009178_thumb.png

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Here ya go, my dad's Rhodes, not sure what her name was. It was his third boat, after a Thistle and a Snipe. They were called "Primero" and "Segundo" so whatever spanish for "third" is was probably this boat's name. Sorry the photo is a bit larger than my scanner...

 

Brilliant! Another one to add to the list and a new wallpaper for my desktop. Great photo.

Thanks Ketchenup.

 

Im thinking this photo will be on the invite to Therapy's re-launch party when the time comes.

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Least we forget ANGELITA, NO HU HU, CONSTELLATION, ROBON, BRIGADOON of BOOTHBAY, YUCCA (loveliest 8 meter of my dreams), MALIBU Outriggers, P-Cats, EL GATO, IMA LOA, AIKANE

LADY GODIVA, GOODWILL and Coast Guard Cutter DEXTER.

 

Kenny Watts, Saint Cicero, Swede Johnson (invented first tiller pilot), Al Lockaby, Rudy Choy, Frank Rothwell, Russ Nash, Denni Barr, Harry Bourgeois, Waldo Waterman.

 

OCEAN STATION NOVEMBER, SUNRISE, RENEGADE, FAIR WEATHER, KITTEN, GALLANT, DIUNE, the Schock 25, RIGOLETTO, TYGER TYGER, PT JOE, MARTHA.

 

Deaver, Dr. Thaddeus Jones, Clancy, Goldie Joseph, George Kettenberg, Vic Stern. Walter and Ricardo Hussong, Pappy Allen, Bill Schock, Porter Sinclair, Nick Potter.

 

First Long Distance Race to Mexico: 1953 Acapulco Race.

First Ensenada Race: April 23, 1948. Originally called the "Governor's Cup Race," CA's Gov Earl Warren failed to make his promised appearance in Ensenada that year, and the event was renamed Ensenada Race in '49. Entry fee: $22.50/boat.

 

To get to/from Coronado, you rode the ferry for a nickel. And it cost you a dime to ride the ferry from Newport Penisula to Balboa Island.

 

Happy New Year, Anarchists.

 

Does anyone remember the fishing dorys hauled up on the beach by the Newport Pier? They sold fresh fish right there on the Beach.

 

Anyone remeber the South Coast Boatyard. With the cotton sails, wooden boats, varnish? The FD they had on display in the middle of the store?

 

I used to sail on a Rhodes 33. We must have had ten or more at the races out in the ocean. I was too small to do the foredeck so the skipper would give me the helm when we had to jibe! What a thrill.

 

Flight of the snowbirds? What a fiasco!

 

I used to sail with my Dad on Diune, then Attorante. Goldie was a family friend. and yes, I remember the Dorys and the South Coast Boat Yard.

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In the early 70's I bought #33 off a gentleman at NHYC. Took delivery on July 4th and sailed all day. When we went to dock at the slip I had rented on Balboa, ended up on the sand as I had never had a boat that was such a witch even with no sails up, she could go forever on momentum. Met the Taylor family that owned Mistress and Linda worked with me for a season. Of all the boats in my past, none was such a joy as my Coast Rhodes. She was all original including the full South Coast hardware and the full cockpit camping setup. I eventually had the mast rebuilt, relayed the canvas decks, re-caulked the hull, sistered more than a few ribs, took out the toilet, and repaired the gar boards, faired the hull, replaced lots of other wood that was tired, and had Moritz Brass Foundry in CM make up casting molds for the gudgeons and pintles (mine had rotted to zip). She had a seen a season or two in SF and they were putting weight in the bow to help carry through on a tack but that was not good for the boat as it racked the hull. On a full moon night, you could sail on a whisper in Newport Harbor and on a nice brisk sunny summer day, only the latest go-fast sleds had a chance against you in a tacking duel. An E-22 may be a better sailor but who ever enjoyed sleeping on one or camping out on our can in the bay? My thanks to a great lady who taught me so much about the real reasons why we sail.

Bob Jarrard

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Bob,

 

Great post, welcome aboard. (There may be less kind, but more traditional welcomes for SA coming.)

 

I am restoring a beautiful boat and folks keep walking by asking: "Why?" and saying: "Must be a labor of love." while thinking: "That guy is crazy!" Unless you've put the work in and felt the boat come to life with your touch, you won't ever understand. Unless you've felt the boat move like a living thing and not as a tool for the season championship, you won't understand.

 

Your post does a wonderful job of illustrating what I've attempted poorly: the difference between a love of sailing and a love of racing.

 

Thanks,

 

Beau

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A few pics I recently found for sale through the net while searching for Rhodes 33 info. Unfortunately I can hardly read the pencil notes on the back of them. Still not bad for a couple of bucks. Hopefully someone can shed some light on em.

post-41534-095678800 1321060092_thumb.jpg

post-41534-095415800 1321060106_thumb.jpg

post-41534-051891300 1321060119_thumb.jpg

post-41534-055657900 1321060133_thumb.jpg

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Rhodes,

 

Have a look at this site for information on the boats in the first and last photo. Those are 10-meter class sloops, and in So. Cal. the most famous one is "Sally". But, back in the day there were at least 4 or 5 of them racing. I can't blow the last picture up enough, but I'm guess that the boat on the right is Sally, she was a lovely green color that the International Paint Company (I think) called "Sally Green". Sally is currently owned by Kohler in San Diego.

 

BV

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