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sdhunter

farr 3.7

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Anyone have any more info on plans and/or building? in oz not nz..

 

I've sailed the 3.7 and they are good fun. However you will have trouble finding any competition in this country.

 

I'd suggest building an IC instead. In my opinion they are a much sweeter boat to sail and there are other active boats to play with in Aus.

 

The weight of both classes are similar too.

 

Good luck with it all and don't forget the build pictures of whatever you creat.

 

Fish

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Plans - talk to the NZ 3.7 assn http://www.3-7class.org.nz/. Can be built from stitch/glue ply (and looks like it wouldn't be much harder to build than a ply sabre or 125 once you have a basic jig set up) or foam sandwich.

 

There used to be a builder in AUS for them in sydney somewhere according to a bloke I know who owns an old ply one... he said that connell's point used to have the fleet in aus but that was in the 80s and early 90s so I wouldn't hold my breath over their existance and condition if they are still in one piece somewhere. If you were interested in making moulds for fleet building it'd probably be better getting a boat from NZ and then flopping a mould off that (although I'm not sure what the go would be with royalties to farr) or building a ply plug and going that way.

 

Apparently a couple in NZ have been rigged with kites for some extra grunt... reckon that'd make for a very fun little boat.

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Plans - talk to the NZ 3.7 assn http://www.3-7class.org.nz/. Can be built from stitch/glue ply (and looks like it wouldn't be much harder to build than a ply sabre or 125 once you have a basic jig set up) or foam sandwich.

 

There used to be a builder in AUS for them in sydney somewhere according to a bloke I know who owns an old ply one... he said that connell's point used to have the fleet in aus but that was in the 80s and early 90s so I wouldn't hold my breath over their existance and condition if they are still in one piece somewhere. If you were interested in making moulds for fleet building it'd probably be better getting a boat from NZ and then flopping a mould off that (although I'm not sure what the go would be with royalties to farr) or building a ply plug and going that way.

 

Apparently a couple in NZ have been rigged with kites for some extra grunt... reckon that'd make for a very fun little boat.

 

Video, with kite:

 

http://www.sentech.co.nz/farr37/37Spinnaker.mpg

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Anyone have any more info on plans and/or building? in oz not nz..

 

I've sailed the 3.7 and they are good fun. However you will have trouble finding any competition in this country.

 

I'd suggest building an IC instead. In my opinion they are a much sweeter boat to sail and there are other active boats to play with in Aus.

 

The weight of both classes are similar too.

 

Good luck with it all and don't forget the build pictures of whatever you creat.

 

Fish

 

 

and then he can have the only IC in queensland = drive at least 1000km to have some competition, makes good sense.

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I think they are basically small Contenders

Not really, no. The design ancestry is quite different. Much shorter and wider in proportion. They're pure NZ Cherub/12 footer design lines, and *very* similar to contemporaries in those classes.

 

and then he can have the only IC in queensland = drive at least 1000km to have some competition, makes good sense.

Maybe a tad quicker than a trip across the Tasman though... Both nice boats, but in very different ways.

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sorry, profile is wrong!! i'm in sunny victoria now!!

 

i like the ye olde performance look of them!!

 

i wouldn't be all that competitive in either, so not too worried about racing, and busy racing big boats, more interested in the building and havin a wee bit of fun...... and the build loooks pretty straight forward??

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and the build loooks pretty straight forward??

Reasonably so I would have thought...

Maybe not a first boat in wood. I would say that Farr's designs at that time were about as high a level as lightweight wood boat building ever reached, and there's a lot of framing and complexity, and I *suspect* (judging by my very similar Cherub) a good bit of 3d curvature in the ply, so I'm sure they're nowhere near as simple to build as a Mirror or a Fireball...

 

1217928600.163000.540-medium.jpg

 

Of course, like any of this kind of boat, it would be far easier to build in foam sandwich, and hand consolidation/wet layup would be perfectly satisfactory but you do have the extra task of building a jig first as I doubt you'll be able to borrow one in Victoria!

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Hi,

 

There are boats for sale on Trademe.co.nz all the time.

The Australian Builder was Ian Dixon also well known for his centreboards.

There was/is a mould they used with composite sandwich construction and aluminium space frame inside.

Five Australian boats visited NZ in 1985, Ian Dixon himself was the highest placed of the visitors.

Bruce Farr waived all royalties on the 3.7 Class years ago, he has done a lot to support the class and makes no financial gain from it.

I think he was about 16 years old when he designed and built the first one and hopefully he is tickled pink that it worked out so well and has grown so much.

I think he would be upset if they were not built properly and in synch with the class rules.

The Class rules do allow for a turbo version that has a gennaker on a prod, though this complication is awesome it has not achieved critical mass here.

I think the original 3.7 was raced as a 12 foot skiff. Unfortunately, it beat the other 12 foot skiffs, so they banned it and introduced a rule to have a minimum of two people in the 12 footers. As I understand it this left Farr and his boat high and dry and this is how the class got started as a one design hull.

The contender is a great boat, but totally and utterly different to the 3.7 Class.

The contender is like a one man flying dutchman or a BMW 735 it is very cruisy, very fast and has a long wheelbase.

the 3.7 is very short, it is a one man 12 foot skiff, it is very twitchy and is more in the style of the BMW M3 or a mini cooper if we can carry on that motoring analogy.

There is a builder in NZ (Andrew Howden) who is offering kitsets to any level where he will sell frames etc in a flat pack or building up the boat to whatever level you like. There are second hand boats fully built and the plans are freely available from the class www.3-7class.org.nz as others have already written, costs are peanuts. I agree with the writer that it should not be your first boat in wood, probably not the second either.

 

I hope this information was kind of useful, I have tried to answer all the questions raised. I'm not trying to advertise anyone or thing, but they are a great boat and with the cost of air tickets these days you should pop over and we'll be happy to show you. They are very rewarding when you sail them well, which is a cute way of saying that they are not so easy to sail and punish you for sailing badly. They suit a body weight of 60 to 80kg, but the upper limit is blurred with windspeed if you have a windy venue and are reasonably agile.

 

It will be quicker (and possibly even cheaper) to fly 1200km across the Tasman than to drive a car 1000km to/from Queensland!

 

It would be hard to get a class started with critical mass of 30 or more boats in one area, and I think this is/was true when Ian Dixon and all the others did this previously. But they really are good fun and it is equally true that it is hard to find decent fleets of 49'er and 470 and all manner of classes (at least that is the case here in NZ). I would say that if you sailed a 3.7 and got the hang of it, then it would be an ideal training boat for the 49'er and a stepping stone to all manner of skiff classes through to the 18.

 

Lastly, since the audience to this is mostly Australian, I wanted to tell you the name of the 3.7 Class National Champion in 2001. You'd probably be able to guess, his name was Adam Beashel, so not really a big surprise.. Also Bruce Farr himself won this in 1975.

 

cheers

Chris.

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In true DA tradition - FUCK OFF NEWBIE!! You can now consider yourself an anarchist. Welcome to the crowd! :)

 

Thanks for the info Chris. I had a sneaking suspicion Ian was the builder - he's still in business making foils and other bits and bobs for 16s, MGs and NS14s, so the moulds may still be down the back of his shed next to Maxy Boats. http://www.dixonboats.com/ has his contact details. Even if the moulds have long since met the business end of a chainsaw and been sent to the loft in the sky, he'd know a thing or two if you're interested in getting something going again.

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sorry, profile is wrong!! i'm in sunny victoria now!!

 

i like the ye olde performance look of them!!

 

i wouldn't be all that competitive in either, so not too worried about racing, and busy racing big boats, more interested in the building and havin a wee bit of fun...... and the build loooks pretty straight forward??

Where are you in Victoria?

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Daryal Dignam ha a timber one sitting in his shead up here in Brisbane. He says thay are the most fun boat he has ever sailed in his life. (Also said that its still a 12 foot boat upwind)

 

The plan is to get it back on the water by june next year for the wooden boat regatta

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Anyone have any more info on plans and/or building? in oz not nz..

 

As I understand it, a number of fibreglass Farr 3.7's were built at some stage (in the 1980's) in Australia. I assume the builder was Ian Dixon as one of the other posters has pointed out (I don't have any better information). Every now and then you see one advertised on ebay or the like.

 

I actually picked up boat #300 ("Blade Runner") last year from a guy on the Gold Coast. After organising a few minor repairs, and spending a lot of time off the water this summer due to bad weather, I'm finally out and sailing the boat regularly - and I love it! As far as I can tell it's probably very similar to the original design - it's got a very unusually shaped centreboard and rudder (since the Farr 3.7 is a development class, it seems many of the boats now sailing in NZ have more conventional looking foils).

 

I bought the Farr 3.7 becuase I wanted a single-hander with a trapeze to learn on and having sailed a contender once I found that boat to be very "armstrong" and not without it's design quirks (e.g. a Boom you don't have a hope of getting under unless you let the vang right off - but a vang you need ripped on hard in order to keep the boat controllable upwind). I must say that contenders are beautiful *looking* boats though - really classy!

 

By comparisson the Farr is light, flighty, and has a much more manageable rig (as well as a boom you can get under quite easily). It planes *very* freely and it's a joy to sail. There's a video on Youtube of one being sailed in NZ with an asymmetric kite stuck on the front (

) - and once I've mastered the basic boat I think I'd be keen to make that modification myself - looks like a hoot :) You'll note the boat gets along pretty nicely even without the kite up.

 

Anyhow, I realise this is a very old thread now - but since I've actually had the pleasure of sailing one of these I thought I'd chime in for the class :) Btw, I'm in Airlie Beach, North Queensland. Incidentally, there are a few contenders up this way - three or four around townsville, and a couple down in Bundaberg.

 

Cheers

 

Danie

 

Oh, I should add - the other lovely thing about the Farr is that being so light it's a snap to get upright again after capsizing (very important for me) :) Contenders can be very hard work to right again (such a *huge* main). That said, I'll have to add the disclaimer that I *have* only sailed a contender once (on a 20knot day) and I was probably missing some very important "trick" to getting it back upright (by rights I *should* be heavy enough, I'm about 85kg's).

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For crist sakes, if you are going to put time and effort into the sport of sailing at least support an existing class that isn't totally washed up.

The Sabre fleet is growing rapidly and while not the most exciting boat in my opinion, is easy to build and will at least offer, close, competitive sailing.

Don't be another yet another loner that contibutes nothing to the sport.

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Wow. So by the logic that is the book of hypocrisy Poida, it's Sharpies or the highway? A 100+ year old, heavy thing that forces you to find a shaved gorilla for a wirehand and a garden gnome for a sheethand before you can even think about going for a sail? Before I go on, I'll qualify that statement by saying I've been racing sharpies on and off now for about 12 years now and do love them for the sheer looseness that happens at nationals. They're the ultimate party dinghy... but there's a lot of people who don't want that looseness for various reasons, and there's also a lot of people who actually like to just go for a sail on a quick little singlehander for fun. That is where the 3.7 has a lot of merit, and offers a very good alternative to foiler moths (as much as I hate to say it) and also provides a wide range of people with an affordable and yet pretty quick way to go sailing. So, how is that not contributing to the sport?

 

Also, I gather you're a WA Sharpie sailor (and not one of the really good ones either according to the WA states results) from your witless remarks over in the Sharpie thread - has it occurred to you that there's a new (max 18 months old) 3.7 that sails from Mounts Bay, with a kite rig on it? The bloke who built it (in fact, he was the really good photographer for your states back in Feb) made it from a laser-cut ply kit and it cost him barely more than a new sabre hull, including a c-tech carbon stick from NZ. There has been enough interest from that one boat to have a number of people seriously looking into either getting a new mould flopped off the WA boat and a couple of foam sandwich hulls knocked out from there or some more ply kits up and going in order to get the class restarted in Aus. There's also been an import job of a boat from NZ into the UK with similar views to getting racing going there, potentially culminating in some international competition organised in the next few years. Any chances of sharpies (your favourite fast boat) or sabres (your favourite slow boat) doing that any time soon?

 

I guess the point is, a bloke who clearly enjoys his boat wants to chime in with his 2c worth about something people have clearly been interested in, should be allowed to have his 2c instead of being shut down out of pure ignorance... real nice work there. Remind me when I get back home to go show you the fast way to get around a course on the swan; it's not on a sharpie or sabre by any means.

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My my after 17 different name changes the young Foiler has come of age.

 

Well said.

 

Poida, you defend the Sharpie rightly, why knock the little 3.7.

 

I remember wanting one nearly 30 years ago!

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I owned one of the ex-Dicko 3.7s in the mid 90s and loved it. Paid $500 for it, and it was immaculate ( as most of them were that Dicko built).

Sold it a couple of years later (too many boats), to a guy up at Pittwater. Last I saw it, it was sitting on the beach behind the Alfreds.

 

Awesome boat, great rides, surprisingly forgiving for a singlehanded trap boat. Once you got it in the groove on a reach you just didn't want to stop!

I grew up at Connells Point SC when they had 8-10 boats. As a whipper snapper, it was always my dream to race them, but the fleet never picked up the numbers needed to prosper and faded away...

 

Closest thing nowadays would be the musto skiff.

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17? Might be blowing it just slightly out of proportion there, TD, I mean E7... or was that Steve? Hard to tell.

 

Scary that you and I seem to actually agree on something for once.

 

Rohan, you're one of Dicko's mates, any idea if he's still got the moulds down the back of the shed somewhere?

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This has nothing to do with Sharpies and not what this thread is about.

Judging people by their sailing results is also well below the belt and not good form in my opinion.

 

I just have an issue when the majority of the sailing faternity complains about dwindling fleet sizes, yet prevents to direct new sailors (or sailors who want to build a new boat) toward existing, supported classes in Australia. And there are plenty of classes that deserve support.

 

So, what would you say to me if I had designed a really cool 3.8m dinghy and wanted to start a brand new class in Australia. Like the Farr 3.7 of not, but it is effectively the same thing.

 

Our sport has enough issues without having 100 different hockey sticks on the pitch.

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Your right Poida, this thread is about yet another cool boat that fits someone. Look at what JS has done in the Sharpie thread, don't be the one to do that here.

 

Ummm yeah, you notice I left those former names on my signature, well done Spark.

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...toward existing, supported classes in Australia. And there are plenty of classes that deserve support... Our sport has enough issues without having 100 different hockey sticks on the pitch.

Something I have noticed is that a significant percentage of sailors, if given the choice between sailing a boat they don't like or not sailing at all won't sail. After all, you do it for the fun, so if you ain't having fun why do it. This tends not to apply to the fiercely competitive top of the fleet who would sail tea crates if there was nothing else to sail, but it seems to apply to a lot of the mid fleet recreational sailors, the ones who race to because it makes sailing more fun, rather than about winning. A lot of people here get sniffy about that sort of less committed sailor, but they are the ones who give the sport the critical mass it needs to survive.

 

Here in Pomland it seems to be reckoned that they have as good a sailing scene as any english speaking country, and better than most, and they also have bloody dozens of different classes. Go figure... So bagging up on someone else's enthusiasm probably isn't that great an idea.

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Rohan, you're one of Dicko's mates, any idea if he's still got the moulds down the back of the shed somewhere?

 

To be be perfectly honest, I haven't looked that closely at all the stuff lying around Dicko's!

But, 99% certain those moulds have gone to god. Either that or under his parents house...

 

Give Dicko a call - even if he doesn't still have them, he will definitely talk to you about them for a few hours!

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Yep, all fair criticism, but perhaps I'm not making my point well enough.

 

I'm not saying the Farr 3.7 isn't a fabulous boat, nor am I saying that someone hell bent a on building a one off dinghy isn't entileld to do so.

 

My issue is with the advice that is given to people who are UNDECIDED about what they should sail or build.

 

When someone comes to me and is toying with the idea of building a one off dinghy, for a class that has little or no local support, then I am going to encourage them to consider other established classes instead. There is a huge variety of fun and enjoyable established classes and arguing that we need another one just doesn't fly in my opinion. Look, I'm not a one design fanatic (I've sailed in a number of development classes), but it makes sense to keep sailors in a more concise group of sailing classes, generating larger fleets and allowing for better financial support of the class and national/world events.

 

Is anybody here saying that sailing in a fleet of boats less fun than by yourself? Surely not.

 

So to clarify my point - to those who are about the enter the sport and are UNDECIDED about what type of boat to sail/build, I recommend they look toward more established classes.

 

To those hell bent on building a Farr 3.7, go for it and enjoy it. I have known PK for a long time (since we sailed Moths together by the way foilermothguy), and have never held his Farr 3.7 against him because he is genuinely enthusiastic and unwavering about what he likes and what he wants to do.

 

Is that clear enough?

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This page may be useful on the build: http://www.csse.uwa....rr37/index.html

I'm dying to know - was it quicker than the Cherub?

 

I've been wondering what I'd get when my Mothing days are over (a little while off yet), this thing looks perfect. Musto, Contender, etc. are ruled out for the same reasons as Peter. I was considering going back to a low-rider (and may still do that).

 

I am the only Moth at a club full of skiffs, if one of these can beat a 13 then I'm sold!

 

--

Rob

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Hadn't seen those photos before Pete - good stuff. Looks like fun.

Am I right in saying 390 were made? Wow, more than I expected - where did they all go? Must be a lot of sheds with old boats sitting in them in Australia.

Looks like the young one has the hang of the camera too!

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Does anybody have a clue of what VYC these would run off?

 

There main looks big enough and the boat looks a bit of fun in the blow, still think I am way to heavy for the boat though so I will stick with my contender.

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http://www.yachtingn...l/Handicaps.pdf

 

same as a Flying 15 so 109

 

 

HA! I wouldn't put much weight in those numbers!

 

Faster than a Laser? YES.

Faster than an R-Class? NO WAY. (Especially as the R's are now on foils...)

 

I have seen Jollyboats and Lasers sailing together, and they DO NOT go the same speed, yet according to that list they do.

 

 

Edit: A quick search suggests that handicap is accurate for the 3.7 versus the laser and NSW has it listed as 109 vs Laser 113. Even so, that pdf has some very strange rankings.

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maybe he can build his boat in NZ so he can maybe find another one to race against

 

good logic as the airfare to NZ might be cheaper than a 1000km car trip

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Looking for one of these in the Brisbane area, anyone know of one? If not for sale, then at least to look at?

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I don't know of a 3.7 in the Brisbane area, but I've just imported a Farr 3.7 into the UK. You can read about how I'm getting on with it ( establishing a fleet etc... ) in my blog if anyone is interested.

 

http://www.ukfarr37.blogspot.com/

 

 

Farr 3.7 UK Magazine test sail going ahead.

 

LINK

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Looks a lot skippier than a contender, but that probably has a lot to do with being nearly 4' shorter and a lot lighter. Seems like a sweet ride, though I'm curious how it handles big waves being short (in the movie, just off some wake the bow went down pretty hard)...

 

I definitely want to try one out in a blow...

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5 boats built or being built in the UK. More interested builders and purchasers.

 

Pro boat builder Butler Boats of Hull have made a mold to produce boats from.

 

Fully booked test sail this weekend in Essex.

 

Things are looking good for the Farr 3.7 in the UK.

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Any chance of taking one over here for a sail?

 

Err maybe... we are over in Ireland, Co Kerry fishing in the Summer. I'll think about it.

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Well you should at least get decent wind this weekend Daryl.

 

@Poida, there'll always be a place for custom or highly niche boats. But in the main I agree with you, if folks are undecided about a boat for racing, then probably best to recommend an appropriate class that's at least actively sailing as the risks are far less and the reward on your time invested, in my opinion, can be greater.

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UK Farr 3.7 update:

 

The Farr 3.7 now has a builder in the UK:http://www.butlerboats.biz/farr.php

And the beginnings of a UK Class Association: http://www.uk3-7class.org

As well as 2 boats currently being home built: http://davesfarr37project.weebly.com

There were 3 but one got destroyed by flood over Winter.

 

There is a demo boat being built by the builder which should be ready in 2/3 months. It would have been done by now if not for an injury sustained by the builder.

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The video says "ideal youth transition boat"—from what to what?

 

Also "physically less demanding"—than what?

 

Looks like a fun boat though.

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1971?

Surly dinghy design has moved on since 1971. Why revitalize a vintage design. Bruce Farr was not even a well known name in 1971.

Its a small class in NZ, never took off in Aust, and certainly UK has enough classes already.

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looks a slightly modern version of a contender. I'm sure its great to sail but why another class?

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looks a slightly modern version of a contender. I'm sure its great to sail but why another class?

 

If I was designing it, I'd make it at least 600mm longer. Still to short at current length!

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1971?

Surly dinghy design has moved on since 1971. Why revitalize a vintage design. Bruce Farr was not even a well known name in 1971.

Its a small class in NZ, never took off in Aust, and certainly UK has enough classes already.

Isn't that for sailors in the UK to decide? Looks a decent, fun boat to me but presumably you have to be on the small side?

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I would have to disagree with that statement he was very well known just not approved of by the establishment Hell he had even won the odd race at the 18 worlds in Brisbane driving the famous 3 handed 18 Guiness lady after Frank Blackburn was tragically killed ,The 3.7 was designed as a 12 foot skiff but beat the 12s by so far in its first couple of race's it was outlawed .

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It wouldn't have beaten the 12s for long. It wouldn't be even be close now.

 

This was the earlier point. Things have moved on from the 1970s.

 

But each to their own. If people want to sail old designs then that's their prerogative.

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was designed as a 12 foot skiff but beat the 12s by so far in its first couple of race's it was outlawed .

I fear that has to be a myth. A 3.7 wouldn't have beaten a contemporary Cherub (and the Farr ones were/are extremely close in shape) let alone a Q class.

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I have to say:

If i'd live at a windy venue or one of the unpredictable south uk lakes i've been to (weirwood reservoir),

i'd be sailing one of these.

than one for my self, and a N12 with my wife. (140kg?)

maybe the rs200

I love the looks. Sexy boat, easy setup...

a fleet of those each weekend, what more would you want….

fact is, that i don't live near a windy small lake venue in the uk, but at a lake in switzerland with hardly any wind at all and no fleet of nothing what-so-ever. except maybe some overpowered and overpriced lake-sportsboats.

that's why i love my old Flying Dutchman!

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I have to say:

If i'd live at a windy venue or one of the unpredictable south uk lakes i've been to (weirwood reservoir),

i'd be sailing one of these.

than one for my self, and a N12 with my wife. (140kg?)

maybe the rs200

I love the looks. Sexy boat, easy setup...

a fleet of those each weekend, what more would you want….

fact is, that i don't live near a windy small lake venue in the uk, but at a lake in switzerland with hardly any wind at all and no fleet of nothing what-so-ever. except maybe some overpowered and overpriced lake-sportsboats.

that's why i love my old Flying Dutchman!

 

I've lived near a windless lake in Switzerland, have now left there. My advice is go somewhere else where wind is a common occurrence and the people are open and friendly (Australia is a good bet on those fronts)

 

Happy sailing,

 

Fish

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If I find enough time for sailing to justify the expense then this will be the boat that I buy.

 

As a light sailor who is looking for a singlehander that is a bit more exciting than a laser radial I don't understand the comments above about too many classes already. About the only existing option for me is a Moth, but that is not a practical choice in a lot of venues.

 

The only problem with the Farr (or any more demanding boat for very light crews) is that I suspect that it is unlikely to ever build a huge following because there just aren't that many of its target sailors :(

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The only problem with the Farr (or any more demanding boat for very light crews) is that I suspect that it is unlikely to ever build a huge following because there just aren't that many of its target sailors :(

 

 

Better than being on the other end of the bell curve at 6ft/95kg my options to be competative are keelboats (impractical and no local fleets), or designs that have progressively erroded the advantage of big guys to make them more appealing to the mass market (Finn's with a carbon mast). And whereas "easily handled", "responsive" etc are seen as good things. What I really need is an RS600 (or Farr 3.7), with another foot (or three) on the length to boost upwind speed in sub planeing conditions, a few inches on the draught to round it a little and reduce the wetted area to keep it comparable to the lightweights boats, and lob a ft or two off the beam/wings to make it uncontrolable for short/skinny people, and a rear/off the boom sheeting system with minimal advantage so it can be tacked with the weight foreward rather than walking the extenions round the back. The problem is that's then reviewed as horificaly unstable, hard to handle, and unresponsive. When in reality that's what's needed, a sledgehammer not a glass cutter.

 

The Halo concept looks promising, a Blaze with 15% more (upto 11.5sqm) sail added to the roach. But they're talking about a 90kg min (equalized) crew weight, which makes me think it's still possible for a lightweight to handle it, whereas I'd like something as physicaly demanding as I think a big boat should be.

 

Basicly I want the moon on a stick, a boat for heavyweights that doesn't just become a bandit on handicap for light helms when the wind drops (basicly average UK inland conditions). And equaly is overpowered for a heavy helm in above average conditions, rather than once a year conditions, comparable to lighter crews/classes.

 

 

 

 

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Sounds like you and I feel the pain of being at the opposite ends of the spectrum.

 

To be honest I can deal with being noncompetitive in anything more than a F2. The real issue for me is that after while, trying to hold a boat flat when you just don't have the weight is simply not enjoyable.

 

Is the answer to both of our woes the IC? you could probably sail one with a very short seat, allowing a short tiller extension and improved efficiency when tacking. The long hull would probably be more forgiving for you in light airs...

 

I'd like to give one a go, but I suspect that I'll still be struggling with some kind of circus act at the end of the plank in anything more than light airs :(

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Have you considdered an RS600? Similar concept to a Farr, but with wings, equilised wings so 65-80kg

 

IC does look like a hoot! On my to sail list allng with foiling moths and assorted skiffs, really should get on with loosing some weight!

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Sounds like you and I feel the pain of being at the opposite ends of the spectrum.

 

To be honest I can deal with being noncompetitive in anything more than a F2. The real issue for me is that after while, trying to hold a boat flat when you just don't have the weight is simply not enjoyable.

 

Is the answer to both of our woes the IC? you could probably sail one with a very short seat, allowing a short tiller extension and improved efficiency when tacking. The long hull would probably be more forgiving for you in light airs...

 

I'd like to give one a go, but I suspect that I'll still be struggling with some kind of circus act at the end of the plank in anything more than light airs :(

You may have found the answer yourself.

The IC supports the widest crew weight range of any dinghy class that I know of or have sailed in.

Over the years I've been beaten by lighter weights in heavier conditions and by heavier skippers in light conditions, and have turned the tables a few times as well..

I wouldn't be too concerned about the " circus at the end of the plank" it's actually pretty stable out there, in the same way being fully extended on a trapeze is, compared to the transition. In an IC, light air is when things like the long tiller extension tend to ' get in the way' . Give it a try, the most that can happen is you get wet!

As for the 3.7 I had an opportunity to sail one in NZ a number of years back. It impressed as a light and nimble small dinghy. A lot of fun to sail, it just seemed a little short and I expected it would be a real hand full in a seaway with any kind of breeze on.

Cheers

Del

IC USA 253

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@spoon - yes I owned a 600 for about 3 years. Great fun, but I did struggle to hold it flat (although I was only about 60kg at the time). I know that people down to about 70Kg can do well in them but I suspect that you have to be an exceptional sailor/gymnast. I now have a 300 which if it had 25% less sail would probably be my perfect boat.

 

@DelOlsen - The amount of chandlery and the faff of the sliding seat put me off somewhat, but I must give an IC a try at some point - I guess I might like it. What is the sensible lower limit for crew weight on the newer development boats?

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@spoon - yes I owned a 600 for about 3 years. Great fun, but I did struggle to hold it flat (although I was only about 60kg at the time). I know that people down to about 70Kg can do well in them but I suspect that you have to be an exceptional sailor/gymnast. I now have a 300 which if it had 25% less sail would probably be my perfect boat.

 

@DelOlsen - The amount of chandlery and the faff of the sliding seat put me off somewhat, but I must give an IC a try at some point - I guess I might like it. What is the sensible lower limit for crew weight on the newer development boats?

So reading between the lines you weigh somewhere in the 60kg/132 pound range, plus a bit?

I'd venture to say that your in the range, towards the lower range true but remember you can have a mast and sail combination suited to your weight and predominant sailing conditions. Something the "one size fits all " SMODs can't do, one reason they are more weight specific.

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More thoughts from people judging the boat without ever sailing them. I'm too light, I'm too heavy, the seat scares me, there's too much gear. BS It is not a physical boat. I sailed the boat at over 140KG. Didn't win any races but could sail it just fine. Have been beaten by wormy lightweights for years. Just try one already and then come to your conclusions. Oh and if it isn't fast enough you can get one with a kite. Or pay to play with the big boys in a new rules boat. Lots of options. Just saying. Let me know if your ever in Dallas. I will let you ride two of the options. AC and IC. Later DG

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BigD - I hope that I did not give the impression that I was passing judgement on the IC without trying. I thought that I made it clear that the IC could well be the answer for me, and that I would be keen to give one a go to see if I would like it.

 

Texas is a long haul for me but if I find myself over that way then I'll take you up on your offer.

 

B.

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