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Dick Johnson

DOUBLE DAMNED 2009

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OK, so since it's only in it's second year, many of you may not know what this is!

 

42 miles downwind up the Columbia river from Cascade Locks, through Hood River to the Dalles Oregon. Last year all but one boat made it to the finish. Each sailor had huge smiles on their faces at the finish, the multi as well, even the boat that didn't make it to the finish got down to the Dalles for the awards! Started in 6 knots of breeze at Cascade Locks, up to 30 by Hood River (22 or so miles into the race) 45 near Dougs beach, then down to a reasonable 30 by the finish at the Dalles. I'm told there is a 1 in 4 chance of it being that windy again (but who really trusts the local sailors?). Course record was set at something like 4 hours 24 minutes; remember this is against a good bit of current. HRYC put on a great dinner friday night in Cascade Locks and a great dinner at the Dalles YC after the finish. This is a "Can't Miss" race my friends.

 

and if a Holder 20 can do it.....

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that does look like fun. wish we could make it

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Yes, it does look like fun, just found this race report from last years inaugural race, written by the lone multi hull.

Race Report

 

 

 

Well, we survived the inaugural Double Damned Race!

I can only say:

 

Oh!

 

My!

 

God!

 

 

Words could never be adequate.

 

What started as a race ended as a desperate attempt to just get there and stop the madness. It was beyond a doubt the toughest challenge I've ever faced on a boat and one of the most memorable events I will ever attend.

The Damned name is fitting, it was less a race and more an adventure/test of survival skills. Trent was so kind (I'll get him back somehow) as to offer to enter his F-27 in this race if I'd come along and helm. I'm not known for being overly bright, but I am known for leaping before looking - I gladly accepted.

 

The night before the race one of our crew cancelled, in the morning after seeing the weather conditions, another crew cancelled. Honestly, that probably wasn't a bad call... So we were 3. Hey it's only 42 miles, how hard can it be? We can do it!

 

My neck and shoulders are sore from 5 1/2 hours of the most concentrated driving I've ever done.

My face hurts from a full 4 1/2 hours with an ear to ear grin stuck on it.

My butt hurts from about 3 1/2 hours at full milspec pucker.

Oh, and have a huge scrape/bruise on my arm that came from I know not where.

 

We started very conservatively, with double reefed main and jib right from the start line. That was my call, and it was awful for a few miles as we got left behind. But knowing once we got to the windy areas there would be no way to reef, we left it reefed. The screecher went up almost immediately, jib down, and off we went. The monos were all far ahead already, but after a little bit we began gaining ground, overtaking boat after boat as they took down their spinnakers, blew up their spinnakers, or in one sad case, mast and all came down. Sorry Ryan, bad luck. Again. I might point out that we carried the screecher long after all the spins came down, and most every one of those monohullers in fact did take note of it! Once we got settled in at warp factor 7 they could not help but notice. Damn sure got our attention!

 

Those who told us to take a screecher made a good call, thanks for advising the screecher over the spin. Thanks also to Charlie for the loan of his screecher. You guys may well have saved our lives! We sheeted it outside the shrouds to the outer ends of the aft beams. The boat seemed to like it. We sure did!

 

Strong winds, huge puffs, sustained gusts, and runaway freightrain rides became commonplace, commonplace enough to lull us into a sense of security that was probably quite unwarranted. But I have to say, the F-27 is a most reassuring boat.On one particularly strong gust, the boat took off like a shot but heeled far enough to bury the lee bow and loaded up some serious weather helm, and gave me a few breathless seconds to see if I was going to lose it. The little voice in my head said "that's your first warning." Losing control in that river channel could be doubly disastrous, as there was often little or no room for recovery if needed.

 

After a while I got used to freight train rides, and again settled in to enjoy the ride. But then the waves got bigger, but we got used to it, big grins. The wind got stronger, we carried more speed, more on the edge of control, in bigger gusts, with bigger grins all around. More gusts, bigger and more sustained, sailing so close to out of control you sort of detach and just wait to see how it will play out, more white knuckle driving... I still get a little jittery just thinking about it. Sometimes a gust would heel us way over, monohull style, with so much weather helm pressure I'd need both hands to hold it, but we would take off and it would be fine. Sometimes a gust would just shake the boat like a rag doll, and then off we'd go, unbelievably fast, and with yahoos and yeehaws we'd ride it out, maybe auger into a wave and get firehosed, or bury an ama bow and get firehosed, or just attain a high enough speed we'd get firehosed anyway. Often, quite often, during the blasts we'd have to gybe - with no choice in the matter. We gybed 200 times at least, a few times in a bit of panic, but we never hit bottom and never lost control. And I have to give credit, Trent and Matt never blew one gybe, in spite of my erratic driving! The F-27 is a remarkably capable boat.

 

Just when I thought we were at the limits, the wind would increase, or the waves would get bigger, and I'd realize we were just going to have to deal with even more, there's no pause button on this thrill ride, and again, things were okay. There came a time when I really did get a bit of genuine fright and readied the guys to dump the screecher, but then things got stable again and I called to keep it up for a while yet. Little voice: "second warning." We began a 'ready to dump and furl' at all times defensive posture. At this point we felt pretty challenged, but it wasn't even close to the epic wind and water conditions we would face in another hour... Incidentally, after the finish we found that windsurfers wind stations along this stretch of the course were recording 35 mph with higher gusts. (Dont forget those waves...)

 

Eventually we were running with only the double reefed main. Seeing speeds of 16-18 regularly (and certainly higher but there wasn't much time to look at the speedo) with only a double reefed main was sobering. Remember we weren't fun reaching, we were driving as close to dead down wind as could keep it without accidental gybes! Seeing the waves get even Bigger, and then wind even Stronger, was sobering. Eventually it became so difficult to maintain control I just knew we weren't going to make it, but we did. Then we began burying the bowsprit regularly. Then the bow itself, then all 3

bows. The waves were fully 6 feet high at times, the wind gusts unbelievable and the combination of both was surreal. There were many times when I silently said to myself "so this is it then" but, nope, we came through again. [you mono guys do realize a knockdown or a pitchpole is way more serious for a trimaran?] The F-27 just kept on, bringing her nose up and charging over, into, or through wave after wave. Very cool ride this boat. And Trent and Matt are great company, they're great guys to share a thrill ride with.

 

Toward the end I reached the point where neither surprise nor fear nor any amazement at all was possible any more, I just hung on and steered and watched things unfold like it was movie, not even real, and not happening to me. Like shell shock.

 

Finally, not much more than a mile from the finish, the wind had gone light (light being a relative term, I bet it was still 20+) and we discussed flying the screecher or maybe the spinnaker but finally decided to put up only the jib (I sorta vetoed the big sails, me being a coward and all.) Around the next bend, yep, you got it, the most wind we had seen yet hit us. Hard. Sustained. Merciless.

 

It took about 4 more gybes to make the finish, which we did, and then after a bit of discussion we dropped the jib while running, even though no one really wanted to go forward, I was not about to try to spin the boat up with the jib up in that wind... With the jib secure I spun us up into the wind, sheeted in with the intention of sailing close hauled and slow until the motor was running.... this is yet another example of how you get suckered in, we had gotten too accustomed to all this wind and waves, lulled into a false sense of security and control, when I turned upwind the fury that hit us in the face was literally stunning! I don't believe I have felt that much wind in my face while on a boat before, and there was NO sailing

in it, I tried but we couldn't go anywhere but sideways. We got the motor going, the main secured, and even then with 9.8 hp we could barely point the boat where we wanted, and the waves were huge! The bows were rising and falling at least 8 feet, and a couple times it felt like we were gonna blow over. Backwards.

 

They told us when we docked that the wind at the finish line was a sustained 45 mph with higher gusts!

We weren't even surprised.

 

My adrenal glands are sore!

 

Safe in the marina, (after a clown circus, err, stunningly brilliant docking maneuver) everyone who had endured the day swapped stories, beers, and generally all bonded in way somehow closer than the usual regatta afterparty. We all knew, and still know, that we have done something few will ever do, and it was EPIC! Not only that, but we got to do it first.

 

All in all, 9 boats started, 8 finished, no one was hurt, no protests, no fouls.

We were first multi to finish and first place in the Multihull Division! Well okay, we were the only multi entry.

We crossed the line mid pack, corrected to last, and we had an adventure we won't soon forget!

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That's a great write-up, forgot about that one. I'm sure that thing was flying by the mono's once they got moving, but he didn't mention the 3 Moore's tied to the dock with their sails put away when he finished.... Great times though.

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Well I sorta did! - "We crossed the line mid pack, corrected to last, and we had an adventure we won't soon forget! "

 

That last bit is true too - I still tell the story to anyone who will listen!

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we're looking forward to this years running of the bulls, should be fun, will we see you out again? I remember watching you try to motor in after the finish. I thought you where going to flip over backwards a couple of times! They should finish us to weather of the marina a bit so you can sail downwind into the marina easier. Although it will never be that windy again right?

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we're looking forward to this years running of the bulls, should be fun, will we see you out again? I remember watching you try to motor in after the finish. I thought you where going to flip over backwards a couple of times! They should finish us to weather of the marina a bit so you can sail downwind into the marina easier. Although it will never be that windy again right?

 

 

Sorry, no.

I am on a strict financial budget for the foreseeable future, and my last regatta this year will be Cow Bay in August. (Which puts me 2 regattas over-budget for this season. Don't tell Mrs Mask...)

 

Yeah, it was a tad bit windy, trying to get back up the marina and then stopped once inside, was ... interesting. But of course, it'll never happen again.

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I do a vacation in Hood R. every summer (windsurfing fix). Usually I do it in July but would consider switching to August if I could arrange a ride.

 

I know what it is like on that river with tiny freaking windsurfing sails... I can't imagine what blazing up through the swell with a spinnaker up would be like (although when I do try to imagine it, the blood rushes to my lower extremities)!

 

Is there a web site for this event?

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http://www.hoodriveryachtclub.org/

 

Don't know if they have the 2009 stuff up yet, but they will soon.

 

if you can find a Moore they are also doing a OD regatta there the weekend before. Saturday in Cascade Locks, last race saturday will be a downwind run to Hood River (21 miles), then Sunday in Hood River. Should be a HOOT!

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there was a thread on this last year with some good advice

 

couple of ones remembered here

 

pre run the route by car just to get a feel for it

 

do not sail in the flat water - flat water means shallow rock shelf

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NOR and Registration forms have been posted on the HRYC website at:

 

https://hryc.clubexpress.com/content.aspx?p...module_id=40623

 

Check it out, it is one heck of a good time!

 

 

OK, so since it's only in it's second year, many of you may not know what this is!

 

42 miles downwind up the Columbia river from Cascade Locks, through Hood River to the Dalles Oregon. Last year all but one boat made it to the finish. Each sailor had huge smiles on their faces at the finish, the multi as well, even the boat that didn't make it to the finish got down to the Dalles for the awards! Started in 6 knots of breeze at Cascade Locks, up to 30 by Hood River (22 or so miles into the race) 45 near Dougs beach, then down to a reasonable 30 by the finish at the Dalles. I'm told there is a 1 in 4 chance of it being that windy again (but who really trusts the local sailors?). Course record was set at something like 4 hours 24 minutes; remember this is against a good bit of current. HRYC put on a great dinner friday night in Cascade Locks and a great dinner at the Dalles YC after the finish. This is a "Can't Miss" race my friends.

 

and if a Holder 20 can do it.....

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We ran that story last year, right OM?

 

Naw, I think you ran the RC write up on the front page, not OM's write up (and OM's captures the race really well, gives me chills down my back at certain points when I'm remembering our part in the race).

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To help get more boats out, here is my course notes and course charts I set up for last year. After my first experience in the delta ditch years ago (not knowing what was around the next turn) I put this together to help me know what is coming up in the Columbia river. I've added things to the course notes after last years race.

 

These are not official from the RC, just something I put together for myself.

 

Course Notes

 

Course Maps

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And here is the full PDF slide show of the pictures from last year

 

Full Double Damned 2008 PDF slideshow (photos courtesy of Hood River Bed and Breakfast and Sean Trew)

 

And if you want to show up the weekend before, the 1st weekend is August, this is what you will find at the Moore 24 OD regatta (as well as the CGOD regatta being held in Cascade Locks)

 

Moore 24 OD at Hood River (photo's courtesy of Sean Trew)

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The DD organzer just got back from Texas with his new Moore last night and now he get's this plug for his race today, Thanks Guy's, you made his day!

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Good. Now be sure to get some cool video this year!

 

 

I am down for that. Going to work on waterproofing the camera....lol.

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I was just thinking about this race as I was windsurfing at The Wall yesterday fully wound on a 3.5m sail. Nuking and big waves + a shit ton of current.

 

If the wind sensors are saying 35, you can add 5 knots to that, cause that's what the current is pushing you upwind.

 

At least for the double damned, current will be more like 2kts on those sections of the river.

 

I think the distance of this race, the wind, the waves plus the challenge of navigating all the sections of such a big river, do make this a challenge. It really depends on the conditions of the day.

 

I just hope last year doesn't scare everybody away. It's not always that crazy windy. At least the water is very warm that time of year and the sun will surely be out.

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I was just thinking about this race as I was windsurfing at The Wall yesterday fully wound on a 3.5m sail. Nuking and big waves + a shit ton of current.

 

If the wind sensors are saying 35, you can add 5 knots to that, cause that's what the current is pushing you upwind.

 

At least for the double damned, current will be more like 2kts on those sections of the river.

 

I think the distance of this race, the wind, the waves plus the challenge of navigating all the sections of such a big river, do make this a challenge. It really depends on the conditions of the day.

 

I just hope last year doesn't scare everybody away. It's not always that crazy windy. At least the water is very warm that time of year and the sun will surely be out.

 

 

Musta been blowin down the river yesterday? For the DD it was blowing UP the river - those waves get to be mean bastards. And the water was farkin COLD! :blink:

 

Navigating was a big challenge as well, especially since we were essentially shorthanded. Those course notes were a huge help, and even then a couple of times we had Aw Shits and made a frantic gybe back to deeper water...

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... It's not always that crazy windy. At least the water is very warm that time of year and the sun will surely be out.

 

Never trust a local!

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... It's not always that crazy windy. At least the water is very warm that time of year and the sun will surely be out.

 

Never trust a local!

Water was almost 70! thats like bathtub water for us in the PNW.

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Musta been blowin down the river yesterday? For the DD it was blowing UP the river - those waves get to be mean bastards. And the water was farkin COLD! :blink:

 

Nope. Blowing Westerlies like normal. Current flows west against the wind, which gives you those big steep waves and current against wind increases the apparent wind speed. The waves are mean bastards.

 

Shouldn't be cold water in August. We windsurf/kite in boardshorts and rash guards.

 

As far the "Never trust a local". Damn straight!

 

I just have to add that it should be an awesome race and boats shouldn't be scared off. We have really amazing wind forecasting all along the river through iWindsurf. If it's looking like it's shaping up to be Nuclear, you can always not race, and you can also bail out along the way.

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Thinking about coming up from PDX but my 4 ksb might have a tough time for that last few miles below the damn making it up-current. I've only come downstream through that section and it seemed like it was rolling at 5-6 knots (early June). Have any of you guys delivered a sailboat upstream through that stuff and how fast is the current in early August? How long did it take you from Beacon Rock to the locks and in what kind of boat?

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Thinking about coming up from PDX but my 4 ksb might have a tough time for that last few miles below the damn making it up-current. I've only come downstream through that section and it seemed like it was rolling at 5-6 knots (early June). Have any of you guys delivered a sailboat upstream through that stuff and how fast is the current in early August? How long did it take you from Beacon Rock to the locks and in what kind of boat?

 

Last year the organizers asked the Corps to fill up the pond a bit so the trailerable boats coud get out at the finish on the ramp. My guess would be that the spill over at cascade locks would be less if their filling up the section between the damns. And J24's make it up river to cascade locks, you should be able to make it no problem!

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The section from Beacon Rock into the Locks definately has some current, but you can stay out of the worst of it on the North side (full on river on the right side), and the couple times we've done it there was a nice breeze pushing us up, throw the motor on, and Bob's your uncle your in the Locks - also cool. Fun trip, and lot faster the other way (duh)... The J24s are coming up for CGOD, curious if any of us will have the nuts to pull this off, hmmm... Quote from the partner on my ride, "Sounds like a kick-ass race to do on someone else's boat." Where is the crew list?

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Quote from the partner on my ride, "Sounds like a kick-ass race to do on someone else's boat." Where is the crew list?

 

Nice, I don't know if he has a crew list set up, but if you show up the day of, I'll be someone will take you along.

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Quote from the partner on my ride, "Sounds like a kick-ass race to do on someone else's boat." Where is the crew list?

 

Nice, I don't know if he has a crew list set up, but if you show up the day of, I'll be someone will take you along.

We will try to get a crew list going on the website. In the mean time we can start compiling names and contact info. If you are interested in crewing or are looking for crew you can send us a message using the contact us page at If a Holder 20 can make it in one piece a J24 should be up for it. Just make sure those lazarettes are duct taped closed!

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I was just thinking about this race as I was windsurfing at The Wall yesterday fully wound on a 3.5m sail. Nuking and big waves + a shit ton of current.

 

If the wind sensors are saying 35, you can add 5 knots to that, cause that's what the current is pushing you upwind.

 

At least for the double damned, current will be more like 2kts on those sections of the river.

 

I think the distance of this race, the wind, the waves plus the challenge of navigating all the sections of such a big river, do make this a challenge. It really depends on the conditions of the day.

 

I just hope last year doesn't scare everybody away. It's not always that crazy windy. At least the water is very warm that time of year and the sun will surely be out.

 

 

Musta been blowin down the river yesterday? For the DD it was blowing UP the river - those waves get to be mean bastards. And the water was farkin COLD! :blink:

 

Navigating was a big challenge as well, especially since we were essentially shorthanded. Those course notes were a huge help, and even then a couple of times we had Aw Shits and made a frantic gybe back to deeper water...

 

The water was cold? Huh? August is board short season on the river. Water should be in the 70s.

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The section from Beacon Rock into the Locks definately has some current, but you can stay out of the worst of it on the North side (full on river on the right side), and the couple times we've done it there was a nice breeze pushing us up, throw the motor on, and Bob's your uncle your in the Locks - also cool. Fun trip, and lot faster the other way (duh)... The J24s are coming up for CGOD, curious if any of us will have the nuts to pull this off, hmmm... Quote from the partner on my ride, "Sounds like a kick-ass race to do on someone else's boat." Where is the crew list?

 

Everyone wants to do it on someone else's boat, but really we didn't have much damage last year. One mast (Melges 24) and a blown Kite. I think that is it. Big deal! We didn't even sink our Holder 20! The thing is, it is a different kind of race. If it is as windy as it was last year (which the odds are against) you just go into a really conservative mode and take it all in.

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The section from Beacon Rock into the Locks definately has some current, but you can stay out of the worst of it on the North side (full on river on the right side), and the couple times we've done it there was a nice breeze pushing us up, throw the motor on, and Bob's your uncle your in the Locks - also cool. Fun trip, and lot faster the other way (duh)... The J24s are coming up for CGOD, curious if any of us will have the nuts to pull this off, hmmm... Quote from the partner on my ride, "Sounds like a kick-ass race to do on someone else's boat." Where is the crew list?

 

Everyone wants to do it on someone else's boat, but really we didn't have much damage last year. One mast (Melges 24) and a blown Kite. I think that is it. Big deal! We didn't even sink our Holder 20! The thing is, it is a different kind of race. If it is as windy as it was last year (which the odds are against) you just go into a really conservative mode and take it all in.

 

So that being said, as the topic started, Who thinks they can grow a pair by August and try their luck ripping up 40 miles of the mighty Columbia.

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Looking at the website, no PHRF certs required, J24 sailed in One Design config would roll with a rating of 168. That's handy, not many of us with certs, or setup in non-OD config.

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The section from Beacon Rock into the Locks definately has some current, but you can stay out of the worst of it on the North side (full on river on the right side), and the couple times we've done it there was a nice breeze pushing us up, throw the motor on, and Bob's your uncle your in the Locks - also cool. Fun trip, and lot faster the other way (duh)... The J24s are coming up for CGOD, curious if any of us will have the nuts to pull this off, hmmm... Quote from the partner on my ride, "Sounds like a kick-ass race to do on someone else's boat." Where is the crew list?

 

Everyone wants to do it on someone else's boat, but really we didn't have much damage last year. One mast (Melges 24) and a blown Kite. I think that is it. Big deal! We didn't even sink our Holder 20! The thing is, it is a different kind of race. If it is as windy as it was last year (which the odds are against) you just go into a really conservative mode and take it all in.

 

So that being said, as the topic started, Who thinks they can grow a pair by August and try their luck ripping up 40 miles of the mighty Columbia.

 

I AM IN!!!

...... Anyone volunteering a boat?

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Looking at the website, no PHRF certs required, J24 sailed in One Design config would roll with a rating of 168. That's handy, not many of us with certs, or setup in non-OD config.

 

 

I don't think you want them to roll...

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??? Don't follow. Agree it's a tough boat choice for a downwind race, but as much of a "been there, done that" opportunity? Or is this thread going to take one of the J turns...

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Any of you P-Town Martin 241/242's up to the challenge. Pile everybody in the back of the buss, keep that bow above water and you should be fine.

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??? Don't follow. Agree it's a tough boat choice for a downwind race, but as much of a "been there, done that" opportunity? Or is this thread going to take one of the J turns...

 

No man, joke eh, rolling a boat is not good???????? Man, sensative crowd.....

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??? Don't follow. Agree it's a tough boat choice for a downwind race, but as much of a "been there, done that" opportunity? Or is this thread going to take one of the J turns...

 

Would be great to see some J24s make the race, especially considering the fleet will be in Cascade Locks the prior weekend for CGOD. Seriously, why wouldn't you stay??

 

I have heard some of the Cal 20s down in Portland say they are interested. Any of you guys out there planning to come out this way?

 

What about you Wavelengths down in Eugene?? National champions Ryan and Erica Mitchell will be here sailing the Double Damned and I know some of you guys want to sail those boats in breeze!

 

We will also have a Martin 241 on the line, so for sure some of the Portland Martin fleet should make the trip.... actually I think there should be a rule stating that any planing keelboat within an hour of Cascade Locks should be required to attend. Seriously, why wouldn't you come? It is like having a sports car that you never take on the highway...

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??? Don't follow. Agree it's a tough boat choice for a downwind race, but as much of a "been there, done that" opportunity? Or is this thread going to take one of the J turns...

 

No man, joke eh, rolling a boat is not good???????? Man, sensative crowd.....

 

Misunderstood, get it now, agree - rolling in FOR the race good, rolling in the race bad. Lazerettes sealed, check, hatchboard in, check, extra beer holders installed in the back of the boat...

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We're in.

 

Open 5.70 "Manic"

 

Hi Doug! Good work on the organization. 40+ miles of epic scenery on 70+ degree fresh water with waves. Sounds epic!!

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We will also have a Martin 241 on the line, so for sure some of the Portland Martin fleet should make the trip.... actually I think there should be a rule stating that any planing keelboat within an hour of Cascade Locks should be required to attend. Seriously, why wouldn't you come? It is like having a sports car that you never take on the highway...

 

I think I will wait to hear how the 241 does this time. I bet that every 241 on the Columbia has a mast with at least one welded up break in it cause the rig is so bendy. I know that our mast makes interesting shapes when the kite is up in more than 20k of breeze!

 

JM

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Is there a count yet for the total number of entries?

 

It's an awfully long drive for us - but Manic might want the company...

 

M

 

 

 

We will also have a Martin 241 on the line, so for sure some of the Portland Martin fleet should make the trip.... actually I think there should be a rule stating that any planing keelboat within an hour of Cascade Locks should be required to attend. Seriously, why wouldn't you come? It is like having a sports car that you never take on the highway...

 

I think I will wait to hear how the 241 does this time. I bet that every 241 on the Columbia has a mast with at least one welded up break in it cause the rig is so bendy. I know that our mast makes interesting shapes when the kite is up in more than 20k of breeze!

 

JM

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Is there a count yet for the total number of entries?

 

It's an awfully long drive for us - but Manic might want the company...

 

M

 

 

 

We will also have a Martin 241 on the line, so for sure some of the Portland Martin fleet should make the trip.... actually I think there should be a rule stating that any planing keelboat within an hour of Cascade Locks should be required to attend. Seriously, why wouldn't you come? It is like having a sports car that you never take on the highway...

 

I think I will wait to hear how the 241 does this time. I bet that every 241 on the Columbia has a mast with at least one welded up break in it cause the rig is so bendy. I know that our mast makes interesting shapes when the kite is up in more than 20k of breeze!

 

JM

 

 

 

Please please do come. That would be fantastic. I'm printing off the entry form right now...meaning I have not officially entered but it is imminent. I think probably a lot of others will register last minute.

 

There will be plenty of boats for sure. No doubt about that. We need to show the Moore's some competition this year.

 

The drive from SF is not all that bad. Done it too many times. We'd have to return the favor of course.

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Please please do come. That would be fantastic. I'm printing off the entry form right now...meaning I have not officially entered but it is imminent. I think probably a lot of others will register last minute.

 

There will be plenty of boats for sure. No doubt about that. We need to show the Moore's some competition this year.

 

The drive from SF is not all that bad. Done it too many times. We'd have to return the favor of course.

 

That river is competition enough, but it would be great to see more boats out giving it a shot. Not a long drive at all from the bay area. Takes us 16 hours to get from Seattle to Richmond for the DDR, should be about 12 hours to the DD.

 

Last year we had 9 boats I think, should be very easy to double that eh! I know there are 5 Moore's in so far....

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We're in.

 

Open 5.70 "Manic"

 

Hi Doug! Good work on the organization. 40+ miles of epic scenery on 70+ degree fresh water with waves. Sounds epic!!

Hey barnone,

 

Given the expected all downwind nature of the event, are you going in shallow(er) draft mode?

 

- Varan

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We're in.

 

Open 5.70 "Manic"

 

Hi Doug! Good work on the organization. 40+ miles of epic scenery on 70+ degree fresh water with waves. Sounds epic!!

Hey barnone,

 

Given the expected all downwind nature of the event, are you going in shallow(er) draft mode?

 

- Varan

 

 

Seems like a catch-22.

Given the shallows and shelves along the river, shallower can be nice.

Given the number of broaches expected, deeper recovers more reliably.... :huh:

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@varan

>Given the expected all downwind nature of the event, are you going in shallow(er) draft mode?

Shhh!...yes we are. :ph34r:

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DD nuts hung for WIRW

 

 

Stop looking at my nuts!

 

hell yah!! GO DA UFF DA!!

 

Those nut are hang'n pretty low :o you hope'n for a t-bag :lol:

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Doug made the nuts and sent them up for a bit of promotion for WIRW. They sure made for good jokes on our boat!

 

like this one, fondeling... or Joe's nuts...

post-11482-1248129338_thumb.jpg

post-11482-1248129344_thumb.jpg

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Doug made the nuts and sent them up for a bit of promotion for WIRW. They sure made for good jokes on our boat!

 

like this one, fondeling... or Joe's nuts...

Did your nuts manage to convince anyone to come on down

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Hey, both my regular crew are out for this race. One is out of town and the other I think dropped their nuts in the drink.

 

A good friend of mine visiting from Australia and no stranger to this sort of thing (an Irishman who sails Aussie 18s) is my #2 and we are looking for one more crew with reasonable strong skills and a good attitude that hopefully doesn't cry like a baby and go into a fetal position when things get a little wild. I don't think it will be that bad but you can't really predict this race. It could be one hell of a good time, but I guarantee nothing .

 

PM me if you are interested. Ideal if you are available for a little prerace practice Fri night as well.

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Oh yeah, if anyone wants to crew for us tommorrow Wed night (Hood River) racing, we need one more. We meet at the boat ramp at 5 pm.

 

Could be a good way to decide whether you want to do Double Damned on such a vessel.

 

Open 5.70 "Manic"

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Photos of the boat or our nuts before and after the race?

 

Honestly though, if it's shaping up to be a true nuker on the river, as in 3.5m Windsurfing day, we won't start the race. I know what that wind is like on a windsurfer and I'm not super keen on destroying my boat.

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Photos of the boat or our nuts before and after the race?

 

Honestly though, if it's shaping up to be a true nuker on the river, as in 3.5m Windsurfing day, we won't start the race. I know what that wind is like on a windsurfer and I'm not super keen on destroying my boat.

 

 

There's an Open 5.70 on our lake, such a sweet looking boat.

Never once seen it on plane and it's usually behind the Ultimate 20 and even the Capri 22. Hopefully he'll get it sorted and "up to speed" one day. (In his defense he's a fair novice, and we do have a lot of light air..)

Maybe you should bring your's down here sometime. (Eugene Fern Ridge)

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>There's an Open 5.70 on our lake, such a sweet looking boat.

That's Scot I think. "Euphoric". Yeah light winds are tough PHRF, esp downwind.

 

>Got any shots of your 5.70 in a blow, we'll compare it to the ones after the race!

 

Well last night was a bit of a DD precursor. We had some monster gusts @35 with big direction changes and lots of crazy squirreley wind and we paid a few times and screwed up a lot. Once losing it out of a gybe just as a big gust hit and it pinned us with the shrouds in the water for what seemed like an eternity. Flogging the shit out of the chute, until it laid down enough to get our feet under us again. Btw, I saw a Moore with bottoms up too, so it was just one of those nights.

 

But we also had some epic planes, so the race was a disaster but it turned out well and learned a lot.

 

1. Make sure the vang is not on hard in the gybes

2. The mainsheet/traveler sheeting position on the Open is not ideal, especially for heavy air. Actually, the traveler itself is awesome but the loads on the cam actually bent the plate that the cam is mounted on and it has totally fatigued from the stress. So the traveler could NOT be uncleated when you really needed to uncleat it which resulted in no recovery when a wiper out was imminent. So that needs changing and I'm moving the mainsheet to the boom like some other people have done.

 

It's a bummer cause we had the video running (GO PRO) but it only taped like 5 minutes and died. No idea why. I'm pretty sure we had fresh batteries.

 

I may have to rethink shallow draft mode as well now that we've been on or side. :blink:

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I've found that in the big wind down there if I have my middle undo the Vang as the boom crosses center it ends up perfect. Undo it to early and the boom won't come across, to late and you round up. Our keels seen some good Oregon air down there before we figured that out.

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>There's an Open 5.70 on our lake, such a sweet looking boat.

That's Scot I think. "Euphoric". Yeah light winds are tough PHRF, esp downwind.

 

>Got any shots of your 5.70 in a blow, we'll compare it to the ones after the race!

 

Well last night was a bit of a DD precursor. We had some monster gusts @35 with big direction changes and lots of crazy squirreley wind and we paid a few times and screwed up a lot. Once losing it out of a gybe just as a big gust hit and it pinned us with the shrouds in the water for what seemed like an eternity. Flogging the shit out of the chute, until it laid down enough to get our feet under us again. Btw, I saw a Moore with bottoms up too, so it was just one of those nights.

 

But we also had some epic planes, so the race was a disaster but it turned out well and learned a lot.

 

1. Make sure the vang is not on hard in the gybes

2. The mainsheet/traveler sheeting position on the Open is not ideal, especially for heavy air. Actually, the traveler itself is awesome but the loads on the cam actually bent the plate that the cam is mounted on and it has totally fatigued from the stress. So the traveler could NOT be uncleated when you really needed to uncleat it which resulted in no recovery when a wiper out was imminent. So that needs changing and I'm moving the mainsheet to the boom like some other people have done.

 

It's a bummer cause we had the video running (GO PRO) but it only taped like 5 minutes and died. No idea why. I'm pretty sure we had fresh batteries.

 

I may have to rethink shallow draft mode as well now that we've been on or side. :blink:

 

Gust to 35!? I didn't think it was that windy. Some BIG, SHIFTY puffs fo sure with some great rides and yes we did bare our bottom, not a vang issue though more of a total clusterf#$k attempt at a jibe! lesson, If things aren't going that great at the beginning of the jibe chances are the're not going to improve any during or immediately after the maneuver. Just another Wed. night in the Hood. Can't wait for the DD.

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Bout time someone called my bluff on windspeed! Yeah 35 is pushin it, 30 isn't though, especially on the one that was pinning us for a F$#%^in eternity it seemed.

 

Yeah the Hood is a great place to learn some lessons for sure.

 

The vang thing is a non-starter for us.

 

Basically....

 

1. Have regular crew who know the boat

2. Learn to drive

3. Plane through the damn jibe

 

If this sounds like a therapy session, yep it is. :P

 

And onto Double Damned be Damned! Now who else is joining us!!!

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I've found that in the big wind down there if I have my middle undo the Vang as the boom crosses center it ends up perfect. Undo it to early and the boom won't come across, to late and you round up. Our keels seen some good Oregon air down there before we figured that out.

When we did the race in Melges 24'S in '97 we put a fiist class Laser sailor on easing the vang during the mid gybe, and retrimming soon after.

And never letting it out of his hand during the whole race. Be sure the tail reaches the transom and that it can be released from there.

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it was breeze on all weekend, took a little boat ride this morning and it was blowing a steady 20 before 10:00 around Viento park

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Yeah, well today is millpond and oppressive heat 100+ (yesterday too). Which means by the time the Moore fleet gets here this weekend, should be time for the wind gods to flush the toilet and blow it out with a few nuker days.

 

103 forecast for tomorrow... :blink:

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yeah I looked at the hatch cam yesterday and it looked very glassy, glad the temps are changing for this weekends regatta, but I didn't notice temps getting cold enough in portland and further west for a nuker, I'm guessing for 20's with a few puffs in the 30's this weekend and then who knows for the double damned weekend.

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I just put a Long sleeve and 2 short sleeve GOTB t-shirts in the van that I'm donating for the Double damned prizes. I've got the old sails in the van along with the sissy chute, in case god tells us to give up on the big one again, heading out tomorrow morning to the gorge for a weekend of practice! I'm gonna be nervous all next week waiting for this one....

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Looks like a cooling (sort of) trend WEST but staying hot inland.

 

Look for continued gradual cooling west of the Cascades on Friday. 80s and 90s will take over where 90s and 100s prevailed.

The high heat will spread east of the Cascades. Heat advisories are up through the weekend for the lower Columbia Basin, the foothills of the Blues and the Yakmia Valley.

Portland 88

The Dalles 102

 

Is there enough of a difference in temp to make it really blow?

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Yeah, getting nervous myself. The Moore's are smart to get in a half double damned this Sat. to get the butterflys out of your stomachs and survey the course.

 

I'm tempted try to hitch a ride for the weekend, problem is, it's the last weekend to get my own boat sorted, so probably not gonna workout unless someone is losing a crew and needs an extra hand for the downwinder.

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Forecast for moderate westerly flow favoring Stevensen to Hood River corridor.

 

I wish this weekend was Double Damned. Sounds almost pleasant. Almost 20's at Stevensen to low 20's Hatch.

 

You never know though...she's a fickle beast.

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Bout time someone called my bluff on windspeed! Yeah 35 is pushin it, 30 isn't though, especially on the one that was pinning us for a F$#%^in eternity it seemed.

 

Yeah the Hood is a great place to learn some lessons for sure.

 

The vang thing is a non-starter for us.

 

Basically....

 

1. Have regular crew who know the boat

2. Learn to drive

3. Plane through the damn jibe

 

If this sounds like a therapy session, yep it is. :P

 

And onto Double Damned be Damned! Now who else is joining us!!!

 

Can you do safety jibes on the 5.70 where you over sheet the kite before the turn, complete the turn, the kite plasters against the jib, release sheet and pull on the new sheet?

 

Looking forward to the this one!

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I think it might be tough because the stock kite is low and wide but we don't have a super long sprit like the skiffs, so the gap is a lot smaller to get between the pole and the headstay. We usually don't have the jib up, but it might be worth leaving it up.

 

That night my trimmer was actually kinda doing this and overtrimming the kite before the gybe and it wasn't working for us. But we didn't have the jib up, so it might be a totally different scenario. I told him to instead pull on the new then lazy sheet before the turn as we start heading down and aim the get the clew coming towards the headstay, once that pregybe action was happening, then when the boat flips a bitch hopefully planing the chute comes right through the gap with ease.

 

After we changed to that technique we had no more issues and we were popping out of the gybes.

 

Hopefully we have a bunch of gybes in not crazy weather in the beginning to get a feel.

 

Really glad you are coming.

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Ahh, the no jib thing, forgot about that.

 

After this race I'm going to have to change my SA signature for falling off the wagon...

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We are up to 9 Moore's now, should be a blast!

 

I love this fleet! It's gonna be a battle! Ya convince another Seattle boat to come down?

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We are up to 9 Moore's now, should be a blast!

 

I love this fleet! It's gonna be a battle! Ya convince another Seattle boat to come down?

 

Yep, #108 committed last night, committed may be a good word for it. What's up with the people in the Moore fleet?????

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We are up to 9 Moore's now, should be a blast!

 

I love this fleet! It's gonna be a battle! Ya convince another Seattle boat to come down?

 

Yep, #108 committed last night, committed may be a good word for it. What's up with the people in the Moore fleet?????

 

The race trophy should be a straightjacket.

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NOR and Registration forms have been posted on the HRYC website at:

https://hryc.clubexpress.com/content.aspx?p...module_id=40623

Check it out, it is one heck of a good time!


OK, so since it's only in it's second year, many of you may not know what this is!

42 miles downwind up the Columbia river from Cascade Locks, through Hood River to the Dalles Oregon. Last year all but one boat made it to the finish. Each sailor had huge smiles on their faces at the finish, the multi as well, even the boat that didn't make it to the finish got down to the Dalles for the awards! Started in 6 knots of breeze at Cascade Locks, up to 30 by Hood River (22 or so miles into the race) 45 near Dougs beach, then down to a reasonable 30 by the finish at the Dalles. I'm told there is a 1 in 4 chance of it being that windy again (but who really trusts the local sailors?). Course record was set at something like 4 hours 24 minutes; remember this is against a good bit of current. HRYC put on a great dinner friday night in Cascade Locks and a great dinner at the Dalles YC after the finish. This is a "Can't Miss" race my friends.

and if a Holder 20 can do it.....

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Forecast for the weekend doesn't look all that strong. I'm not bringing my boat up but if the forecast kicks up to at least 20 and someone needs an extra trimmer, I can join on short notice. 6'9", 210, very experienced, happy to do any job on board, but only if it's honking. PM me for phone # and we can decide on Friday.

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