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André

J22 Launching video part 1 of 2

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This is the crasiest way to save 100 $. Can't wait to see when they get it out in the fall.

 

http://prive.notairelettre.ca/play.php?v=vidpub/misealeau

 

Its in French but self-explanatory.

 

Andre - I bet your happy we talked out out of the J/80 ha ha.

 

Kidding aside - the wabbits - J/24's and many other fixed keel jobbers in CA do road trips and lake launches like that all the time only generally our lakes and ramps are deep enough they just do the tow line to the trailer and back down the ramp.

 

The power boat tow to deeper water - heck it works! Though perhaps they should sell both boats and just get a viper - U20 or other lifting keel sport boat and just launch it like a little fishing boat right off the trailer.

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This is the crasiest way to save 100 $. Can't wait to see when they get it out in the fall.

 

http://prive.notairelettre.ca/play.php?v=vidpub/misealeau

 

Its in French but self-explanatory.

 

 

either the most ingenious way or the dumbest way to get a boat into a lake......

 

bravo

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And I thought we had it bad using a 40' strap. The powerboat tow for the trailer is a nice touch.

 

I'll never forget the time I had to help a J24 trailer that had run off the side of the ramp while trying to launch with a strap The port side wheels were hanging off a three foot ledge with the axles resting on the ramp. It took over a dozen people, two 3/4 ton trucks, and a lot of stupid to get the thing into the water. In hindsight, we should have just walked away and called a crane. I don't think I've ever heard so many bursts of "OH SHIT!" Every little lurch or bump the trailer and boat made caused us all to jump back for fear it would all come down on us.

 

Strap launching blows.

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Standard Procedure as mentioned above for ramp launching keelboats- as long as the ramp goes underwater 50' or so. The trailer has to have

a front wheel assembly such as the one shown on the video- so that the trailer backs down in a straight line-- ours had the spare tire for the trailer on a mount that swiveled it for use.

 

Launch:

1. Back Trailer to the waterline.

2. Block the trailer wheels and then disengage the trailer from the hitch.

3. Drive tow vehicle 50' or so back up the ramp

4. Attached a line or strap from the tow vehicle back to the trailer- Tension and remove the blocks

5. Back down the ramp until boat floats clear.

 

Just reverse procedure to get the boat back on the trailer. It is actually a relatively stress free operation.

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It is actually a relatively stress free operation.

 

I agree if you have a good ramp but this looks like a swamp. I don't think the retreival will be easy. He will likely win the wheel spinning contest.

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Basically that is how I launch my santana 20 three times a week. It is easy and we can do it fast.

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As she floated off and spun, I wonder if they dinged the shit out of the keel on the supports???

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exactly....I don't really see the novelty here. This is essentially how a sailboat with a keel is launched from a trailer when a steep ramp is unavailable.

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From the audio commentary it seems this procedure was rather experimental in nature: they thought that the

trailer would get stuck in the mud but it didn't, they thought their waterski tow rope would probably

snap but it didn't etc. In the end, it worked rather well.

 

Bottomline: you do whatever you can with what you have to go sailing...

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as gouv says this is S.O.P. on lake travis and canyon lake

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Standard Procedure as mentioned above for ramp launching keelboats- as long as the ramp goes underwater 50' or so. The trailer has to have

a front wheel assembly such as the one shown on the video- so that the trailer backs down in a straight line-- ours had the spare tire for the trailer on a mount that swiveled it for use.

 

Launch:

1. Back Trailer to the waterline.

2. Block the trailer wheels and then disengage the trailer from the hitch.

3. Drive tow vehicle 50' or so back up the ramp

4. Attached a line or strap from the tow vehicle back to the trailer- Tension and remove the blocks

5. Back down the ramp until boat floats clear.

 

Just reverse procedure to get the boat back on the trailer. It is actually a relatively stress free operation.

 

We don't have any ramps deep enough for this kind of procedure around here, but I'm curious about the "reverse" operation. Let's see if I understand:

 

1. Boat floats into position above trailer

2. Boat and trailer maintain relative position, although the boat is level and the trailer at an angle, as the trailer is hauled up the ramp, jackstands contacting the hull from forward to aft, not quite where they should because of the angle.

3. Somehow the whole business settles into proper position as it clears the water.

 

No, I definitely don't understand. How do you get that to happen?

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I'm just stunned that the tow rope didn't part. The ski boat was not exactly taking it easy when it hit that breeze block. Mind you it would have added a nice twist to the video to show the search and rescue for the trailer...... :blink:

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Standard Procedure as mentioned above for ramp launching keelboats- as long as the ramp goes underwater 50' or so. The trailer has to have

a front wheel assembly such as the one shown on the video- so that the trailer backs down in a straight line-- ours had the spare tire for the trailer on a mount that swiveled it for use.

 

Launch:

1. Back Trailer to the waterline.

2. Block the trailer wheels and then disengage the trailer from the hitch.

3. Drive tow vehicle 50' or so back up the ramp

4. Attached a line or strap from the tow vehicle back to the trailer- Tension and remove the blocks

5. Back down the ramp until boat floats clear.

 

Just reverse procedure to get the boat back on the trailer. It is actually a relatively stress free operation.

 

We don't have any ramps deep enough for this kind of procedure around here, but I'm curious about the "reverse" operation. Let's see if I understand:

 

1. Boat floats into position above trailer

2. Boat and trailer maintain relative position, although the boat is level and the trailer at an angle, as the trailer is hauled up the ramp, jackstands contacting the hull from forward to aft, not quite where they should because of the angle.

3. Somehow the whole business settles into proper position as it clears the water.

 

No, I definitely don't understand. How do you get that to happen?

 

 

This is how my Martin 241 gets into the water each year. Getting her out is almost as easy, but we have a trailer with a front support for a winch that hooks onto the bow eye which stays above water when retrieving the boat. We also have keel guides between the support arms to get the boat centered on the trailer. Sure beats hundreds of $$ to get it in and out each year.

 

JM

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I'm just stunned that the tow rope didn't part. The ski boat was not exactly taking it easy when it hit that breeze block. Mind you it would have added a nice twist to the video to show the search and rescue for the trailer...... :blink:

 

The bottom must be pretty firm. Pulling a trailer downhill across firm bottom would not be much of a load compared to what tournament water skiiers do when throwing up huge walls of water at 40+ knots.

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I'm curious about the "reverse" operation. Let's see if I understand:

 

1. Boat floats into position above trailer

2. Boat and trailer maintain relative position, although the boat is level and the trailer at an angle, as the trailer is hauled up the ramp, jackstands contacting the hull from forward to aft, not quite where they should because of the angle.

3. Somehow By moving slowly and carefully with people guiding the boat, the whole business settles into proper position as it clears the water.

 

No, I definitely don't understand. How do you get that to happen?

Fixed it for you. This is a very common form of launching. People do it all the time. It is not much different than positioning a trailer under the hoist where "somehow" the crane lines up and "the whole business settles into proper position". I've seen an entire fleet of 27-foot keelboats launched and recovered like this at Huntington Lake. Used bipods home-made from 2x4s to raise and lower the masts. Due to many operations proceeding in parallel, the entire process took less time than if there had been a single hoist.

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I have seen this done at ramps - the novelty here was the fact that it was a random beach next to a random house, all very gently sloping. Good times.

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I'm curious about the "reverse" operation. Let's see if I understand:

 

1. Boat floats into position above trailer

2. Boat and trailer maintain relative position, although the boat is level and the trailer at an angle, as the trailer is hauled up the ramp, jackstands contacting the hull from forward to aft, not quite where they should because of the angle.

3. Somehow By moving slowly and carefully with people guiding the boat, the whole business settles into proper position as it clears the water.

 

No, I definitely don't understand. How do you get that to happen?

Fixed it for you. This is a very common form of launching. People do it all the time. It is not much different than positioning a trailer under the hoist where "somehow" the crane lines up and "the whole business settles into proper position". I've seen an entire fleet of 27-foot keelboats launched and recovered like this at Huntington Lake. Used bipods home-made from 2x4s to raise and lower the masts. Due to many operations proceeding in parallel, the entire process took less time than if there had been a single hoist.

 

 

I have seen strap launching pictures and videos before (though never a tow to deep water by a powerboat), but had never seen a recovery. Are these people guiding the boat in the water?

 

Have done the sling onto a trailer and other methods of getting boats on and off trailers on land many times, but it's different to me in that you can see the trailer and the boat, unlike in deep water (at least around here). Also, as I mentioned the trailer and boat being level means they mate up in position easily. Would not be so easy to sling a boat onto a tilted trailer, even with helpers on land, and get it in the right spot.

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I have seen strap launching pictures and videos before (though never a tow to deep water by a powerboat), but had never seen a recovery. Are these people guiding the boat in the water?

Sometimes. An experienced crew can push/pull the boat laterally from a pier next to the hauling area. Only if a surge or current or other water movement is present does one need to get wet and then it is usually only waist deep. But that is usually limited to the first-timers.

 

Have done the sling onto a trailer and other methods of getting boats on and off trailers on land many times, but it's different to me in that you can see the trailer and the boat, unlike in deep water (at least around here). Also, as I mentioned the trailer and boat being level means they mate up in position easily. Would not be so easy to sling a boat onto a tilted trailer, even with helpers on land, and get it in the right spot.

I think you are over-thinking this. The hardest part of the recovery is moving the trailer out of the water at the same speed as the boat. Having a single part of the boat make contact first, it is actually easy to position the bow in the center of the forward chock. In the early stages the boat's weight is supported by the water and is easy to maneuver. As the trailer and boat are eased out of the water the boat is incrementally centered as you go. By the time you are at the keel you are pretty much done while 50% of the boat's weight is still floating.

 

This is very close to the "marine railway" method of hauling boats where railroad tracks run into deep water [at an angle] and the cradle [at an angle] rolls down the tracks to be mated with the boat. Can you fuck it up? Sure. Any method of launching can be fuct up. But this method is very old and thousands of sailors perform this type of launch and recovery every weekend. Even in murky water you can see down several feet to see what's happening as it's occurring. The lake where I have launched this way is a reservoir and you can see everything all the way down.

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you can also have flags/guides sticking up from the trailer to let you know where it's located underwater.

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I did a j-24 regatta in the keys once and the crane guy went home before we got there. Local dude said the cement ramp would work fine. It was actually easier than the crane launch. we tied guide lines on the trailer for the keel. Not good for the electric but we were floating in 20 seconds and docked in under 1 min after tying long line to the trailer.

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Are these people guiding the boat in the water?

Sometimes. An experienced crew can push/pull the boat laterally from a pier next to the hauling area. Only if a surge or current or other water movement is present does one need to get wet and then it is usually only waist deep. But that is usually limited to the first-timers. ...Even in murky water you can see down several feet to see what's happening as it's occurring. The lake where I have launched this way is a reservoir and you can see everything all the way down.

 

 

Thanks for further explanation on how that works. It looks like the crew will have to get very wet to get that J-22 in the video back. No pier, and it looks a bit more than waist deep where that thing finally floated off.

 

There's murky and then there's murky. You're lucky to see a foot through the water down here, two on a really clear day. If you could find a ramp deep enough and a pier long enough in this part of the world, you would be doing this operation by feel, not sight.

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No, I definitely don't understand. How do you get that to happen?

 

 

The real answer?? Go watch a few, do a few with help and then maybe when you feel ready, do it yourself.

 

This is what happens to those who do not understand the process....

 

ramp%20J24%20off%20trailer.jpg

 

Idiots delight

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No, I definitely don't understand. How do you get that to happen?

 

 

The real answer?? Go watch a few, do a few with help and then maybe when you feel ready, do it yourself.

 

This is what happens to those who do not understand the process....

 

ramp%20J24%20off%20trailer.jpg

 

Idiots delight

There are very few deep draft trailerables down here, and even fewer ramps where you could launch one. I doubt I'll be learning this skill, or needing it for that matter. Just curious how they get 'em back. Getting boats of all kinds off trailers is always easier than getting them back on, and this looks like a far bigger challenge than anything I have done, or will do.

 

According to the web page, that J-24 left the trailer in the usual way: unsecured boat when backing down, brakes work on vehicle and trailer, boat keeps going. Absurdly common with powerboats on roller trailers, and happening to folks with those new slick bunk liners.

 

I do wonder about the rock in front of the tire. I don't think the boat is going to push that trailer uphill, but why else would it be there?

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Wow GOV that is some entertainment My worst nightmare actually. I can just see it, 5:00 after racing, 20 boats stacked up behind + power boaters wondering wtf everyone is doing, then you do that.:( It is actually really easy. These guys look to be new to it or the bow guy had one too many. We actually had a trailer that had a swim platform on the front at the top of the ladder. Didn’t even get your feet wet. The hardest part is maneuvering the trailer (with caster wheel) back down into the h20 after making the exchange. The rest is cake. (I need to get a spare set up like everyone else) ;) BTW, a S20 can be repositioned with 3 guys underneath once it is hauled. Just make sure the bow is attached.

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