Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Editor

Bay Bea

Recommended Posts

Through a miraculous and intriguing series of events, the Bonneville School of Sailing and Seamanship has been the recipient of the impressive SORC ocean racing yacht, Bay Bea. Designed by Sparkman & Stephens, for Patrick Haggerty, (founder of Texas Instruments), this 50-foot, aluminum hull thoroughbred, has now found its way to the unlikely location of Utah Lake State Park, in Provo, Utah.

 

Built in 1968 for the Victoria to Maui International Yacht Race by Palmer Johnson of Sturgeon Bay, the boat was raced “aggressively” from 1968 to 1971. During that time, Bay Bea fought its way to 12 first-place finishes, eight second-place slots and 43 in the top 10.

 

We would like to request any information your expansive readership audience may have regarding Bay Bea, from past crew members, fellow competitors, shipwrights, riggers, sail makers, news reporters, historians, photographers, archivists, or fans.

 

Our plan is to bring Bay Bea back to her original 1968 racing configuration, and any historical information would be of great value to the project. To accomplish this restoration, we want to involve at risk youth, as well as our land locked inner city kids and underprivileged populations, who may never get to experience a maritime activity.

 

Todd Frye

Director

Bonneville School of Sailing and Seamanship

nowbringmethathorizon@sisna.com

www.nowbringmethathorizon.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haggerty's son, Mike lives in Texas and still regularly races J/22's. You can probably find contact information through the local fleet down there. He should be a good place to start.

 

Otherwise, keep your fingers crossed and maybe you will find Toad Murphy, Carter Wells, or the elusive Mark Ewing. They all sailed on the boat and have an assortment of stories and information. Otherwise, inquire of Mayhem, his old man had a share of PJ's and he can give you plenty of names for information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Haggerty's son, Mike lives in Texas and still regularly races J/22's. You can probably find contact information through the local fleet down there. He should be a good place to start.

 

Otherwise, keep your fingers crossed and maybe you will find Toad Murphy, Carter Wells, or the elusive Mark Ewing. They all sailed on the boat and have an assortment of stories and information. Otherwise, inquire of Mayhem, his old man had a share of PJ's and he can give you plenty of names for information.

Mongo's (Chuck) old man has a few stories as well. I'll forward this to Phyllis. Stay tuned for stories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wasn't Bay Bea the boat that was used for by the Pratt Project at MIT to develop the VPP used for MHS?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sailed on a later version of Bay Bea in the mid-eighties at the Naval Academy. If memory serves, she was a Chance 46. Bea Bea was a beautiful, cold-molded boat with a big tiller and lifting dagger board. It was way too technical for Navy, but what a cool boat. I met Mr. Haggerty's widow ('Bea') after the boat was donated. A very gracious and generous family. Best of luck with your project.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw it a couple times at the PJ yard in Sturgeon Bay. We tied up next to it in the family 4KSB for a few days on our summer cruises. My dad would make a big deal out of it to us kids and it is the only racing boat I remember from those days... Looks like it is still the same red it was back then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Toad Will Know! Check MMYC derectory

 

Or Ink, Eric Joans at World Yachts in Milwaukee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure she wasn't built for the Vic -Maui race but for Great Lakes and SORC racing. She was actually one of several boats built to the same lines including Scaramouche, Falcon and Aura which went on to represent the US in the Admirals Cup and became the first the World Ocean Racing Champion. Quite a cast of characters sailed her including Shuff Wellman, Mike Kelsey, Nut Bennett and Skip Novack.

 

By the time Pat Haggerty helped start the Pratt Project to develop a VPP based handicap system, she had been heavily modified including a new stern and the addition of considerable beam through tumblehome created with micro-ballons and ping pong balls. This was done at PJ's before the '74 SORC and the temperature change on the truck down to St. Pete left the topsides looking like a road map of the trip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Through a miraculous and intriguing series of events, the Bonneville School of Sailing and Seamanship has been the recipient of the impressive SORC ocean racing yacht, Bay Bea. Designed by Sparkman & Stephens, for Patrick Haggerty, (founder of Texas Instruments), this 50-foot, aluminum hull thoroughbred, has now found its way to the unlikely location of Utah Lake State Park, in Provo, Utah.

 

Built in 1968 for the Victoria to Maui International Yacht Race by Palmer Johnson of Sturgeon Bay, the boat was raced “aggressively” from 1968 to 1971. During that time, Bay Bea fought its way to 12 first-place finishes, eight second-place slots and 43 in the top 10.

 

We would like to request any information your expansive readership audience may have regarding Bay Bea, from past crew members, fellow competitors, shipwrights, riggers, sail makers, news reporters, historians, photographers, archivists, or fans.

 

Our plan is to bring Bay Bea back to her original 1968 racing configuration, and any historical information would be of great value to the project. To accomplish this restoration, we want to involve at risk youth, as well as our land locked inner city kids and underprivileged populations, who may never get to experience a maritime activity.

 

Todd Frye

Director

Bonneville School of Sailing and Seamanship

nowbringmethathorizon@sisna.com

www.nowbringmethathorizon.com

 

 

 

 

Todd I sailed on bay bea later named bay bear out of Chicago with the retired naval sailing association. I will try to get some information from one of the

former directors. I do know the boat was shorten about 3' at Palmer johnson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember sailing against Bay Bea in the '71 Admirals Cup. Have to dig through my bit and peices, see if I can find something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. Never thought I'd see that! My father, Wells Coggeshall bought that boat from Pat Haggerty I think in 1974. He had sailed on her since her launch. Great to see her still in one piece, but what the hell happened to the flush deck! I guess it's better than being turned into beer cans. It was the second of three boats Pat had built by the name Bay Bea. It was his first boat was renamed Bay Bear, not this one. This boat was built during the transition from the CCA rule to IOR. Pat did extensive modification to conform (beat?) the IOR but eventually built a third to the IOR (beautiful cold molded hull by Brit Chance) and sold the boat to my dad. Her home port during here second life was St. Petersburg, Florida. I did 4 SORC's, Newport-Bermuda, Isla Mujeres and many other races on her. She was subsequently sold to a west coast owner who renamed her Huckleberry Apple. The new owners are welcome to get in touch with me for more history. Pat even published a book about her first four years as one of the most succesful racers of here era. I may have it around somewhere. I've got a ton of pictures too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We would like to request any information your expansive readership audience may have regarding Bay Bea, from past crew members, fellow competitors, shipwrights, riggers, sail makers, news reporters, historians, photographers, archivists, or fans.

 

Our plan is to bring Bay Bea back to her original 1968 racing configuration, and any historical information would be of great value to the project. To accomplish this restoration, we want to involve at risk youth, as well as our land locked inner city kids and underprivileged populations, who may never get to experience a maritime activity.

 

Todd Frye

Director

Bonneville School of Sailing and Seamanship

nowbringmethathorizon@sisna.com

www.nowbringmethathorizon.com

 

This photo is from a news article in the St. Pete Times for the 1977? Mexico race. My brother John and I sailed on Cogg-nizant (her new name after Wells bought her) for many years in the 70's. I don't know if this represents the boat as she was in 1968, but my guess is it is the same or very close. I have several other photo's from the 1976-77 period showing the boat to follow this post.

 

Good luck in restoring her, and it's good to see she lives on ....

 

Larry Willis

Davis Island YC

Tampa, Fl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We would like to request any information your expansive readership audience may have regarding Bay Bea, from past crew members, fellow competitors, shipwrights, riggers, sail makers, news reporters, historians, photographers, archivists, or fans.

 

Our plan is to bring Bay Bea back to her original 1968 racing configuration, and any historical information would be of great value to the project. To accomplish this restoration, we want to involve at risk youth, as well as our land locked inner city kids and underprivileged populations, who may never get to experience a maritime activity.

 

Todd Frye

Director

Bonneville School of Sailing and Seamanship

nowbringmethathorizon@sisna.com

www.nowbringmethathorizon.com

 

This photo is from a news article in the St. Pete Times for the 1977? Mexico race. My brother John and I sailed on Cogg-nizant (her new name after Wells bought her) for many years in the 70's. I don't know if this represents the boat as she was in 1968, but my guess is it is the same or very close. I have several other photo's from the 1976-77 period showing the boat to follow this post.

 

Good luck in restoring her, and it's good to see she lives on ....

 

Larry Willis

Davis Island YC

Tampa, Fl

Cogg_nizant_1977.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I remember correctly,

 

Bay Bee I was a 40' yacht either designed by S&S or Bill Lapworth that was donated to the Naval Sailing Association and renamed Bay Bear.

 

Bay Bee II was a 49' sister ship of Aura and Scaramouche, designed by S&S and built in aluminum ~1970 by Palmer Johnson.

 

In March of 1971 Bay Bee II finished second in the Buenos Aires to Rio de Janeiro race.

 

I used to race on Jesse Philips' Charisma(s) and competed against them in Lake Michigan and SORC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The name Bay Bea was derived from Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin (then home of yacht builder Palmer Johnson, which I believe Haggerty became a principle owner of) and Haggerty's wife Beatrice.

 

Aura and Scaramouch were near sisterships,. They were credited to Sparkman and Stephens, but my recollection is that a young German Frers (then with S&S) was the primary designer of these three hulls. All 3 underwent changes to conform the the ever changing IOR rule. Bay Bea had thousands of ping pong balls encased in Microballoon added to the hull to build up her beam. May have helped the new IOR rating, but was a killer to maintain.

 

In addition to being named to the US Admirals Cup team (as was the third Bay Bea), Bay Bea finished second to Ted Turner's American Eagle (converted 12 meter) for the old World Ocean Racing Trophy. She had the lead with one race to go in this two year competition but Haggerty didn't feel like transporting the boat all the way to Australia to do the Sydney Horbart. Turner made the trip and earned enough point to win.

 

Renamed Cogg-Nizant she won the A Division of the FORA (Florida Ocean Racing Conference) an several occasion and finished third in the "Class A - old boat Divison" of the SORC on two occasions in the mid 70's. She also won the St. Petersburg to Isla Mujers Race.

 

My most memorable sail on the boat was the Miami to Nassau race during the 1976 SORC. See the article link below entitle "Reaching and Wretching to Nassau". Man, that sucked in an old IOR boat!

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/art...90820/index.htm

 

I'm sitting here looking at my dad's beautiful 1/12 scale half model of Bay Bea which is hanging on my study wall. Pretty classic lines. New owner has to get rid of that superstrucure!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I worked on her at Ross's in Clearwater in 77.

We made the IOR bumbs out of ping pong balls.

The same year the new "Bay Bea" a Chance cold molded take off of "Resolute Salomon" with a dagger board arrived from PJ.

They drove through a rain storm and the and the was full of rust spots.

And by the way it snowed on the Boca Grande race that year.

Good times!!

And a little boat showed up "Sweet Akole"

Damn My Ass is Old!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Through a miraculous and intriguing series of events, the Bonneville School of Sailing and Seamanship has been the recipient of the impressive SORC ocean racing yacht, Bay Bea. Designed by Sparkman & Stephens, for Patrick Haggerty, (founder of Texas Instruments), this 50-foot, aluminum hull thoroughbred, has now found its way to the unlikely location of Utah Lake State Park, in Provo, Utah.

 

Built in 1968 for the Victoria to Maui International Yacht Race by Palmer Johnson of Sturgeon Bay, the boat was raced “aggressively” from 1968 to 1971. During that time, Bay Bea fought its way to 12 first-place finishes, eight second-place slots and 43 in the top 10.

 

We would like to request any information your expansive readership audience may have regarding Bay Bea, from past crew members, fellow competitors, shipwrights, riggers, sail makers, news reporters, historians, photographers, archivists, or fans.

 

Our plan is to bring Bay Bea back to her original 1968 racing configuration, and any historical information would be of great value to the project. To accomplish this restoration, we want to involve at risk youth, as well as our land locked inner city kids and underprivileged populations, who may never get to experience a maritime activity.

 

Todd Frye

Director

Bonneville School of Sailing and Seamanship

nowbringmethathorizon@sisna.com

www.nowbringmethathorizon.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Smack Down" picture of Cogg-Nizant (Bay Bea II) taken during the 1976 Miami Nassau Race mentioned earlier (click to enlage). Perhaps we should have been on the rail, but kind of in survival mode as I remember. Didn't much matter anyway in these old IOR tubs. That's pretty much an overhead shot and not much of the boat left in the water. Excuse the flash reflection but best I could manage tonight of a framed picture.

 

post-40151-1254276920_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike Haggerty here. My Dad built the Bay Bea. I sailed on her for many/most of the races and we even cruised a few times. I can help you with any info you need. I think I can get you in contact with whomever for whatever info you need.

I sailed on many ocean racers,some of the best in their day, in many oceans for 30+ years. I have ALWAYS said of ALL of them, the 49' SS Bay Bea was the best to sail. Responsive, delicate to fine tuning yet able to perform equally in any weather and always able to win if we didn't mess up. The list of victories was very impressive.

Not sure where the info of why she was built came from. But the truth was she was built to win on the Great Lakes, SORC, Admirals Cup and others. She won on every lake and ocean that she competed on.

I can go on too long. Contact me and I can fill in what is needed. My Father actually wrote a book in 1972 that he gave to all his crew members 'Salute to an Ocean Racer'. It chronicled the Bay Bea, the races, competitiors, accomplishements and the great crew that sailed her. In the end it is all about the people we share our experiences with.

Get your hands on a copy and many of the blanks will be filled in.

Mike Haggerty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mike Haggerty here. My Dad built the Bay Bea. I sailed on her for many/most of the races and we even cruised a few times. I can help you with any info you need. I think I can get you in contact with whomever for whatever info you need.

I sailed on many ocean racers,some of the best in their day, in many oceans for 30+ years. I have ALWAYS said of ALL of them, the 49' SS Bay Bea was the best to sail. Responsive, delicate to fine tuning yet able to perform equally in any weather and always able to win if we didn't mess up. The list of victories was very impressive.

Not sure where the info of why she was built came from. But the truth was she was built to win on the Great Lakes, SORC, Admirals Cup and others. She won on every lake and ocean that she competed on.

I can go on too long. Contact me and I can fill in what is needed. My Father actually wrote a book in 1972 that he gave to all his crew members 'Salute to an Ocean Racer'. It chronicled the Bay Bea, the races, competitiors, accomplishements and the great crew that sailed her. In the end it is all about the people we share our experiences with.

Get your hands on a copy and many of the blanks will be filled in.

Mike Haggerty

 

 

Haggerty,

Great to see you made an appearance. I thought you might. Just curious, do you still have my dinghy boots in your sea bag?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mike Haggerty here. My Dad built the Bay Bea. I sailed on her for many/most of the races and we even cruised a few times. I can help you with any info you need. I think I can get you in contact with whomever for whatever info you need.

I sailed on many ocean racers,some of the best in their day, in many oceans for 30+ years. I have ALWAYS said of ALL of them, the 49' SS Bay Bea was the best to sail. Responsive, delicate to fine tuning yet able to perform equally in any weather and always able to win if we didn't mess up. The list of victories was very impressive.

Not sure where the info of why she was built came from. But the truth was she was built to win on the Great Lakes, SORC, Admirals Cup and others. She won on every lake and ocean that she competed on.

I can go on too long. Contact me and I can fill in what is needed. My Father actually wrote a book in 1972 that he gave to all his crew members 'Salute to an Ocean Racer'. It chronicled the Bay Bea, the races, competitiors, accomplishements and the great crew that sailed her. In the end it is all about the people we share our experiences with.

Get your hands on a copy and many of the blanks will be filled in.

Mike Haggerty

 

My old man, Shuff Willman was at Palmer Johnson and sailed with "The Old Man" for many a mile. Bjorn Johanson BJ from PJ was probably also involved. i'll be home in a couple weeks and dig through the attic to see what i can find.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Haggerty's son, Mike lives in Texas and still regularly races J/22's. You can probably find contact information through the local fleet down there. He should be a good place to start.

 

Otherwise, keep your fingers crossed and maybe you will find Toad Murphy, Carter Wells, or the elusive Mark Ewing. They all sailed on the boat and have an assortment of stories and information. Otherwise, inquire of Mayhem, his old man had a share of PJ's and he can give you plenty of names for information.

 

 

DUDE!!! good to see your still participating!! enjoy your winter!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Smack Down" picture of Cogg-Nizant (Bay Bea II) taken during the 1976 Miami Nassau Race mentioned earlier (click to enlage). Perhaps we should have been on the rail, but kind of in survival mode as I remember. Didn't much matter anyway in these old IOR tubs. That's pretty much an overhead shot and not much of the boat left in the water. Excuse the flash reflection but best I could manage tonight of a framed picture.

 

post-40151-1254276920_thumb.jpg

 

 

That is an outstanding picture. Too cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites