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pkilkenny

Moth: Practice, practice, practice...

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I may be the worst Moth sailor in the history of the class. But like you (no matter what you sail), I aspire to get better. When I read Bora's admonition to seek "time in the boat" as the panacea path to Moth mastery, I fell into a deep existential crisis that had me thinking about easier dinghy's, red sports cars and the realities of competing at the highest levels.Knowing that much of what we practice in sailing is constructed on a foundation of pure mythology, I did some research around the notion of improvement without practice-

 

Here are four strategies for real measurable improvement that do not include actually putting on the wet suit:

 

1. Video and Mirror Neurons: movements that you can do that only roughly approximate mastery are improved (radically in some cases), by watching video of a master practitioner. Visual Neuroscience tells us that by watching video closely and repeatedly, we activate all of the same neural pathways used when we actually sail. One note of caution may be to be selective whom you watch (I'll not be posting on YouTube as an act of altruism to the class).

 

2. Visualization: Instead of daydreaming in the car- focused, vivid, first person visualization of specific scenario's when sailing. Reserach say's if linked with moderate practice you can sail as well as your monozygote twin while sailing 25% less!

 

3. Sleep:Hey the world champion is jetting around sailing in the far corners of the Earth, messing up his sleep cycle and denying his brain optimal imprinting of Procedural Memory (the stuff you do well if you practice). If you can't sail, take a nap.

 

4. Formative Causation:Ever wonder why you're able to complete the N.Y. times crossword if you do it at night rather than in the morning? How come nobody could run a sub four minute mile for decades and then one guy does it and wham, three more do the same within six months? How come flying gybes were so hard to do three years ago, but today eight year olds throw them routinely after only eleven minutes in the moth? Morphic resonance is the only plausible explanation and, the good part, this means anytime any sailor is practicing formative causation makes us ALL better.

 

As we refine the science, I wonder if practice in the boat will become only one equal aspect to sailing mastery?

 

PK

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wow so sitting in front of tv watching videos is better than time in the boat?

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I don't think he's suggesting that it is superior to time in the boat but that it is not worthless either.

 

I know early when learning my Swift, I would spend a lot of time analyzing 18's or 49er video for how the crew moved, boat trim, body movement, etc. I also use visualization a lot, even today though I don't think while driving 63 hours to Florida is a good time to do it. Sometimes I'd get to the next gas stop and not remember how I got there. I do think my gibes were better for it though. :ph34r:

 

I don't think you want to replace your time in the boat with these other methods but if you can't get in the boat, they are much better than watching "Dancing With the Starts" or "Whatever Idol".

 

I think if you have the chance, time in the boat is by far the best and time in the boat is much better than time at work. The idea is that if you don't have time to get on the water, watch video of Bora. Not just watch but really look at everything he does. Rest and clear your mind. And visualize your self doing what Bora is doing when he sails. Concentrate on how to cross the boat, where and when to move when you gibe. But then if that doesn't work, give the little lady a pinch and a wink.

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quite right I say (even if I don't fully understand everything you say, never went to uni see)!!

 

if you're forced to commute over two hours each way on the train every work day, what else is there but to i) sleep (tick) ii) work (cross) iii) visualise sailing - starts can be replayed constantly etc etc etc

 

works for me

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I should add that the only flaw in this process is when you actually do get 'water time' the old body has a lot of extra work to do. I'm in a great deal of pain after the weekends 14ft Cat Regatta at Manno!

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While I don't think you should be putting your faith in something as obscure as "morphic resonance" or "formative causation", your other points are very valid. They have been shown to significantly improve skills like ice skating and driving (yes, doing a little visualisation right before you go to bed and then sleeping 8 solid hours will measurably improve your chances of passing your license test!) so they're bound to improve your sailing chops as well.

 

Of course an even better way to use video of better sailors than yourself is to tape yourself while sailing and then compare the footage, that way you've got a play-by-play of your own screwups...

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I may be the worst Moth sailor in the history of the class. But like you (no matter what you sail), I aspire to get better. When I read Bora's admonition to seek "time in the boat" as the panacea path to Moth mastery, I fell into a deep existential crisis that had me thinking about easier dinghy's, red sports cars and the realities of competing at the highest levels.Knowing that much of what we practice in sailing is constructed on a foundation of pure mythology, I did some research around the notion of improvement without practice-

 

Here are four strategies for real measurable improvement that do not include actually putting on the wet suit:

 

1. Video and Mirror Neurons: movements that you can do that only roughly approximate mastery are improved (radically in some cases), by watching video of a master practitioner. Visual Neuroscience tells us that by watching video closely and repeatedly, we activate all of the same neural pathways used when we actually sail. One note of caution may be to be selective whom you watch (I'll not be posting on YouTube as an act of altruism to the class).

 

2. Visualization: Instead of daydreaming in the car- focused, vivid, first person visualization of specific scenario's when sailing. Reserach say's if linked with moderate practice you can sail as well as your monozygote twin while sailing 25% less!

 

3. Sleep:Hey the world champion is jetting around sailing in the far corners of the Earth, messing up his sleep cycle and denying his brain optimal imprinting of Procedural Memory (the stuff you do well if you practice). If you can't sail, take a nap.

 

4. Formative Causation:Ever wonder why you're able to complete the N.Y. times crossword if you do it at night rather than in the morning? How come nobody could run a sub four minute mile for decades and then one guy does it and wham, three more do the same within six months? How come flying gybes were so hard to do three years ago, but today eight year olds throw them routinely after only eleven minutes in the moth? Morphic resonance is the only plausible explanation and, the good part, this means anytime any sailor is practicing formative causation makes us ALL better.

 

As we refine the science, I wonder if practice in the boat will become only one equal aspect to sailing mastery?

 

PK

Spot on Paul for spelling out the only alternative to time in the boat. I know for sure I would have been a lot worse had I not been constantly thinking and visualizing Moth sailing. Keep practicing those tacks Bora, mine need improvement.

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I may be the worst Moth sailor in the history of the class. But like you (no matter what you sail), I aspire to get better. When I read Bora's admonition to seek "time in the boat" as the panacea path to Moth mastery, I fell into a deep existential crisis that had me thinking about easier dinghy's, red sports cars and the realities of competing at the highest levels.Knowing that much of what we practice in sailing is constructed on a foundation of pure mythology, I did some research around the notion of improvement without practice-

 

Here are four strategies for real measurable improvement that do not include actually putting on the wet suit:

 

1. Video and Mirror Neurons: movements that you can do that only roughly approximate mastery are improved (radically in some cases), by watching video of a master practitioner. Visual Neuroscience tells us that by watching video closely and repeatedly, we activate all of the same neural pathways used when we actually sail. One note of caution may be to be selective whom you watch (I'll not be posting on YouTube as an act of altruism to the class).

 

2. Visualization: Instead of daydreaming in the car- focused, vivid, first person visualization of specific scenario's when sailing. Reserach say's if linked with moderate practice you can sail as well as your monozygote twin while sailing 25% less!

 

3. Sleep:Hey the world champion is jetting around sailing in the far corners of the Earth, messing up his sleep cycle and denying his brain optimal imprinting of Procedural Memory (the stuff you do well if you practice). If you can't sail, take a nap.

 

4. Formative Causation:Ever wonder why you're able to complete the N.Y. times crossword if you do it at night rather than in the morning? How come nobody could run a sub four minute mile for decades and then one guy does it and wham, three more do the same within six months? How come flying gybes were so hard to do three years ago, but today eight year olds throw them routinely after only eleven minutes in the moth? Morphic resonance is the only plausible explanation and, the good part, this means anytime any sailor is practicing formative causation makes us ALL better.

 

As we refine the science, I wonder if practice in the boat will become only one equal aspect to sailing mastery?

 

PK

Spot on Paul for spelling out the only alternative to time in the boat. I know for sure I would have been a lot worse had I not been constantly thinking and visualizing Moth sailing. Keep practicing those tacks Bora, mine need improvement.

 

I reserve the preponderance of my daily boat-related cogitation for design and build methods, where I find visualization quite effective as it generally saves me about three screw-ups in the time it would take to commit only one. But my sailing shows the bias. Now I need apparently to feel guilty not only for not sailing, but for not thinking about sailing while I am thinking about building. Or blogging. Or writing forum posts. Sheesh! Any more guilt and I'll have to abandon the sport entirely in favor of a sailplane or some other poor substitute.

 

Oh and I am not new - just an abbreviated version of myself. So put it in the complaint box.

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I may be the worst Moth sailor in the history of the class. But like you (no matter what you sail), I aspire to get better. When I read Bora's admonition to seek "time in the boat" as the panacea path to Moth mastery, I fell into a deep existential crisis that had me thinking about easier dinghy's, red sports cars and the realities of competing at the highest levels.Knowing that much of what we practice in sailing is constructed on a foundation of pure mythology, I did some research around the notion of improvement without practice-

 

Here are four strategies for real measurable improvement that do not include actually putting on the wet suit:

 

1. Video and Mirror Neurons: movements that you can do that only roughly approximate mastery are improved (radically in some cases), by watching video of a master practitioner. Visual Neuroscience tells us that by watching video closely and repeatedly, we activate all of the same neural pathways used when we actually sail. One note of caution may be to be selective whom you watch (I'll not be posting on YouTube as an act of altruism to the class).

 

2. Visualization: Instead of daydreaming in the car- focused, vivid, first person visualization of specific scenario's when sailing. Reserach say's if linked with moderate practice you can sail as well as your monozygote twin while sailing 25% less!

 

3. Sleep:Hey the world champion is jetting around sailing in the far corners of the Earth, messing up his sleep cycle and denying his brain optimal imprinting of Procedural Memory (the stuff you do well if you practice). If you can't sail, take a nap.

 

4. Formative Causation:Ever wonder why you're able to complete the N.Y. times crossword if you do it at night rather than in the morning? How come nobody could run a sub four minute mile for decades and then one guy does it and wham, three more do the same within six months? How come flying gybes were so hard to do three years ago, but today eight year olds throw them routinely after only eleven minutes in the moth? Morphic resonance is the only plausible explanation and, the good part, this means anytime any sailor is practicing formative causation makes us ALL better.

 

As we refine the science, I wonder if practice in the boat will become only one equal aspect to sailing mastery?

 

PK

Spot on Paul for spelling out the only alternative to time in the boat. I know for sure I would have been a lot worse had I not been constantly thinking and visualizing Moth sailing. Keep practicing those tacks Bora, mine need improvement.

 

I agree, a lot of my improvement in boathandling came from thinking about it - thinking about foot placement & what my hands would be doing. Sailing then makes it second nature.

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Lets see if I have completely understood this. By implication, Druggie should be able to hop on a Moth and , if not win, be at least in the top 10 of a worlds fleet because of the amount of time he spends watching videos of Bora and Rohan even though he can't sail! However, he might be a little short of sleep with all the time he wastes thinking about foiling.wink.gif

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Oh and I am not new - just an abbreviated version of myself. So put it in the complaint box.

 

Did losing your identity have anything to do with getting married?

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I may be the worst Moth sailor in the history of the class. But like you (no matter what you sail), I aspire to get better. When I read Bora's admonition to seek "time in the boat" as the panacea path to Moth mastery, I fell into a deep existential crisis that had me thinking about easier dinghy's, red sports cars and the realities of competing at the highest levels.Knowing that much of what we practice in sailing is constructed on a foundation of pure mythology, I did some research around the notion of improvement without practice-

 

Here are four strategies for real measurable improvement that do not include actually putting on the wet suit:

 

1. Video and Mirror Neurons: movements that you can do that only roughly approximate mastery are improved (radically in some cases), by watching video of a master practitioner. Visual Neuroscience tells us that by watching video closely and repeatedly, we activate all of the same neural pathways used when we actually sail. One note of caution may be to be selective whom you watch (I'll not be posting on YouTube as an act of altruism to the class).

 

2. Visualization: Instead of daydreaming in the car- focused, vivid, first person visualization of specific scenario's when sailing. Reserach say's if linked with moderate practice you can sail as well as your monozygote twin while sailing 25% less!

 

3. Sleep:Hey the world champion is jetting around sailing in the far corners of the Earth, messing up his sleep cycle and denying his brain optimal imprinting of Procedural Memory (the stuff you do well if you practice). If you can't sail, take a nap.

 

4. Formative Causation:Ever wonder why you're able to complete the N.Y. times crossword if you do it at night rather than in the morning? How come nobody could run a sub four minute mile for decades and then one guy does it and wham, three more do the same within six months? How come flying gybes were so hard to do three years ago, but today eight year olds throw them routinely after only eleven minutes in the moth? Morphic resonance is the only plausible explanation and, the good part, this means anytime any sailor is practicing formative causation makes us ALL better.

 

As we refine the science, I wonder if practice in the boat will become only one equal aspect to sailing mastery?

 

PK

 

Paul,

 

As ever, your posts are insightful and inspirational. As the rain and cooler weather roll into California's central valley, I'll be employing your non-practicing techniques more and more.

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Youtube is your friend!

 

 

 

I learnt to gybe watching Sams Fast Times video and going through the manuever in the lounge.

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Some time ago, there was an experiement done by some US university that look at some of this. They took a group of college basketball players and divided them into 3 groups. One group practiced shooting hoops every day of a given period of time. Another group were asked to spend the same amount of time "visualising" shooting hoops in a quiet, darkened room. The 3rd group were asked to specifically not practice or think about shooting hoops.

 

2 weeks later, they tested the players to see how well they were shooting hoops. The group that had done nothing was the worst, which is no suprise. What was a suprise is that the other 2 groups showed the same level of proficiency, suggesting that, at least over the time period involved, visualisation was as effective as practice.

 

Another example of this came from the skier Jean-Claude Killy who won 3 Golds at the 1968 winter Olympics. He claims that the night before each race, he went through the course in his mind to "practice" how to ski it. For the downhill, which was the first race, he claims to have kept imagining himself falling at a particular point in the course and he wouldn't let himself go to sleep until he had worked out hwo to avoid the fall. He won the event by eight hundreths of a second.

 

In short, I do believe that visualisation does work, but only as part of the training.

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Visulisation works when the base level is not very high. When you get to the top end you have to practice a lot more to make even the smallest change stick. Its impossible to visualise pressure in the sheet from apparent wind and gust response or things like that.

 

Saying that, when coming in for a must stick tack i talk to myself to make sure i do everything correct and get my hands and feet right. Don't really think about gybing unless it is in marginal conditions.

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yep, i guess im not too far above the base level! pretty much learned to foil jibes by thinking it through about 100 times. when you go out and try and wing it in the boat, you crash so much you do about 10, get tired and go in and gain nothing. trying to do the same for foiling tacks!

 

but yeah im sure it gets second nature. actually i reckon im more likely to stick jibes at the start of the session when i visualised them the night before, than towards the end when i practised.

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I made my first offshore passage in the mid '70's. The winter before I spent a lot of time planning, dreaming, getting my act together. Inevitably a lot of time sitting in an armchair imagining what it might be like, deriving pleasure from the anticipation.

 

In the end, we finally sailed...one night, in the middle of the Atlantic, with a fair breeze, warm temperatures and food in my belly I realized something important. It was exactly the way I had imagined, not similar, but exact. The pleasure was the same, the feeling was the same.

 

What I realized was that I really didn't have to actually go on the trip. The pleasure I'd received in the armchair was identical to the pleasure I'd received on the water. Go figure.

 

Regards

aa

 

PS I am glad I actually went on the trip.

aa

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...thanks ~ one of the best/funniest posts in a while...

 

and totally true (for those of us who've spent the winter months

hashing over sailing books, rules, and vids)

 

...and, yeah it works for dance, and playing piano as well ;)

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Oh and I am not new - just an abbreviated version of myself. So put it in the complaint box.

 

Did losing your identity have anything to do with getting married?

I like to think I am still around somewhere...

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I may be the worst Moth sailor in the history of the class. But like you (no matter what you sail), I aspire to get better. When I read Bora's admonition to seek "time in the boat" as the panacea path to Moth mastery, I fell into a deep existential crisis that had me thinking about easier dinghy's, red sports cars and the realities of competing at the highest levels.Knowing that much of what we practice in sailing is constructed on a foundation of pure mythology, I did some research around the notion of improvement without practice-

 

Here are four strategies for real measurable improvement that do not include actually putting on the wet suit:

 

1. Video and Mirror Neurons: movements that you can do that only roughly approximate mastery are improved (radically in some cases), by watching video of a master practitioner. Visual Neuroscience tells us that by watching video closely and repeatedly, we activate all of the same neural pathways used when we actually sail. One note of caution may be to be selective whom you watch (I'll not be posting on YouTube as an act of altruism to the class).

 

2. Visualization: Instead of daydreaming in the car- focused, vivid, first person visualization of specific scenario's when sailing. Reserach say's if linked with moderate practice you can sail as well as your monozygote twin while sailing 25% less!

 

3. Sleep:Hey the world champion is jetting around sailing in the far corners of the Earth, messing up his sleep cycle and denying his brain optimal imprinting of Procedural Memory (the stuff you do well if you practice). If you can't sail, take a nap.

 

4. Formative Causation:Ever wonder why you're able to complete the N.Y. times crossword if you do it at night rather than in the morning? How come nobody could run a sub four minute mile for decades and then one guy does it and wham, three more do the same within six months? How come flying gybes were so hard to do three years ago, but today eight year olds throw them routinely after only eleven minutes in the moth? Morphic resonance is the only plausible explanation and, the good part, this means anytime any sailor is practicing formative causation makes us ALL better.

 

As we refine the science, I wonder if practice in the boat will become only one equal aspect to sailing mastery?

 

PK

 

Paul,

 

As ever, your posts are insightful and inspirational. As the rain and cooler weather roll into California's central valley, I'll be employing your non-practicing techniques more and more.

 

 

Hey Doc!

 

Yeah, I can still conjure the dexterity to type with tongue firmly implanted in cheek, no visualization required...

 

You tired of winning all the time yet? Moth, Moth, Moth,...

 

PK

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I started sailing 29ers two weeks ago. I had been waiting months to sail them and in anticipation I watched lot of 29er videos. I think that helped me in the end because it allowed me to be a little more prepared and see what to do and not to do. I would replay videos of gybes countless times and analyze what the skipper and crew were doing and then replay it in my head at school the next day. When the time came to sail, I knew what to except as well as the basics. I still agree with everybody that time in the boat is probably the most crucial part, but in my opinion, watching videos can show what to except as well as the basics.

Cheers

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Oh and I am not new - just an abbreviated version of myself. So put it in the complaint box.

 

Did losing your identity have anything to do with getting married?

I like to think I am still around somewhere...

 

DROP THE a

You're just like us now ... pouaaaaaahahaha

Working on kid #1 yet?

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There is some method in all the madnes!! Valentino Rossi, yes him of Moto GP fame, can sit down with a stop watch close his eyes and mentally ride a lap of any of the GP tracks, and stop the watch within a sec of his actual lap times..... F1 drivers commonly train for tracks using Play staion etc...

 

So PK, we've the up coming Halloween regatta at ABYC at end of the month. That gives you roughly 4 weeks of visualization and sleeping. IF we get 2 more boats we get a Moth start, 4 races on the Sunday 25th, plus a trainng day with me Nat and Karl on the Saturday. See you, and any other Mothies that can make it, on the start line!

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Oh and I am not new - just an abbreviated version of myself. So put it in the complaint box.

 

Did losing your identity have anything to do with getting married?

I like to think I am still around somewhere...

 

DROP THE a

You're just like us now ... pouaaaaaahahaha

Working on kid #1 yet?

 

Just remember - there is no spoon.

 

I have you on video with nice nautical sideburns.

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There is some method in all the madnes!! Valentino Rossi, yes him of Moto GP fame, can sit down with a stop watch close his eyes and mentally ride a lap of any of the GP tracks, and stop the watch within a sec of his actual lap times..... F1 drivers commonly train for tracks using Play staion etc...

 

So PK, we've the up coming Halloween regatta at ABYC at end of the month. That gives you roughly 4 weeks of visualization and sleeping. IF we get 2 more boats we get a Moth start, 4 races on the Sunday 25th, plus a trainng day with me Nat and Karl on the Saturday. See you, and any other Mothies that can make it, on the start line!

 

 

Pearl,

 

I'm 94% sure I'll be there (24th practice with ATG and Sunday 25th) and will try to bring Kirk with me. I've sailed out of ABYC a few times and know the courses inside the wall pretty well. I'll visualize with my stopwatch in hand...

 

 

Paul

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Lets see if I have completely understood this. By implication, Druggie should be able to hop on a Moth and , if not win, be at least in the top 10 of a worlds fleet because of the amount of time he spends watching videos of Bora and Rohan even though he can't sail! However, he might be a little short of sleep with all the time he wastes thinking about foiling.wink.gif

 

 

Am I Druggie (lost me)...?

 

I'm not at the stage of offering criticism of the many Moth video's, but don't watch Bora's vids anymore- the champ is what mentors / coaches term a Creative Insubordinate: brilliant, fun to watch, impossible to emulate. Others are not as fast but seem technically more consistent.

 

PK

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I may be the worst Moth sailor in the history of the class. But like you (no matter what you sail), I aspire to get better. When I read Bora's admonition to seek "time in the boat" as the panacea path to Moth mastery, I fell into a deep existential crisis that had me thinking about easier dinghy's, red sports cars and the realities of competing at the highest levels.Knowing that much of what we practice in sailing is constructed on a foundation of pure mythology, I did some research around the notion of improvement without practice-

 

Here are four strategies for real measurable improvement that do not include actually putting on the wet suit:

 

1. Video and Mirror Neurons: movements that you can do that only roughly approximate mastery are improved (radically in some cases), by watching video of a master practitioner. Visual Neuroscience tells us that by watching video closely and repeatedly, we activate all of the same neural pathways used when we actually sail. One note of caution may be to be selective whom you watch (I'll not be posting on YouTube as an act of altruism to the class).

 

2. Visualization: Instead of daydreaming in the car- focused, vivid, first person visualization of specific scenario's when sailing. Reserach say's if linked with moderate practice you can sail as well as your monozygote twin while sailing 25% less!

 

3. Sleep:Hey the world champion is jetting around sailing in the far corners of the Earth, messing up his sleep cycle and denying his brain optimal imprinting of Procedural Memory (the stuff you do well if you practice). If you can't sail, take a nap.

 

4. Formative Causation:Ever wonder why you're able to complete the N.Y. times crossword if you do it at night rather than in the morning? How come nobody could run a sub four minute mile for decades and then one guy does it and wham, three more do the same within six months? How come flying gybes were so hard to do three years ago, but today eight year olds throw them routinely after only eleven minutes in the moth? Morphic resonance is the only plausible explanation and, the good part, this means anytime any sailor is practicing formative causation makes us ALL better.

 

As we refine the science, I wonder if practice in the boat will become only one equal aspect to sailing mastery?

 

PK

 

Paul,

 

As ever, your posts are insightful and inspirational. As the rain and cooler weather roll into California's central valley, I'll be employing your non-practicing techniques more and more.

 

 

Hey Doc!

 

Yeah, I can still conjure the dexterity to type with tongue firmly implanted in cheek, no visualization required...

 

You tired of winning all the time yet? Moth, Moth, Moth,...

 

PK

 

PK,

Since joining the A-class I've been seeing myself more as a B-class sailor. Moth looks very fun. I might be a bit big though.

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Lets see if I have completely understood this. By implication, Druggie should be able to hop on a Moth and , if not win, be at least in the top 10 of a worlds fleet because of the amount of time he spends watching videos of Bora and Rohan even though he can't sail! However, he might be a little short of sleep with all the time he wastes thinking about foiling.wink.gif

 

 

Am I Druggie (lost me)...?

 

I'm not at the stage of offering criticism of the many Moth video's, but don't watch Bora's vids anymore- the champ is what mentors / coaches term a Creative Insubordinate: brilliant, fun to watch, impossible to emulate. Others are not as fast but seem technically more consistent.

 

PK

 

Sorry, PK, I was not referring to you but to the idiot who clutters up evey foiling forum with the same pictures and rubbish on a daily basis.

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Lets see if I have completely understood this. By implication, Druggie should be able to hop on a Moth and , if not win, be at least in the top 10 of a worlds fleet because of the amount of time he spends watching videos of Bora and Rohan even though he can't sail! However, he might be a little short of sleep with all the time he wastes thinking about foiling.wink.gif

 

 

Am I Druggie (lost me)...?

 

I'm not at the stage of offering criticism of the many Moth video's, but don't watch Bora's vids anymore- the champ is what mentors / coaches term a Creative Insubordinate: brilliant, fun to watch, impossible to emulate. Others are not as fast but seem technically more consistent.

 

PK

 

Sorry, PK, I was not referring to you but to the idiot who clutters up evey foiling forum with the same pictures and rubbish on a daily basis.

 

Major Tom,

 

Got it. Hey, while I have you, do you find the Mirror Neuron strategy helps you avoid floating in a most peculiar way?

 

Damn, sorry...

 

Paul

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Lets see if I have completely understood this. By implication, Druggie should be able to hop on a Moth and , if not win, be at least in the top 10 of a worlds fleet because of the amount of time he spends watching videos of Bora and Rohan even though he can't sail! However, he might be a little short of sleep with all the time he wastes thinking about foiling.wink.gif

 

 

Am I Druggie (lost me)...?

 

I'm not at the stage of offering criticism of the many Moth video's, but don't watch Bora's vids anymore- the champ is what mentors / coaches term a Creative Insubordinate: brilliant, fun to watch, impossible to emulate. Others are not as fast but seem technically more consistent.

 

PK

 

Sorry, PK, I was not referring to you but to the idiot who clutters up evey foiling forum with the same pictures and rubbish on a daily basis.

 

Major Tom,

 

Got it. Hey, while I have you, do you find the Mirror Neuron strategy helps you avoid floating in a most peculiar way?

 

Damn, sorry...

 

Paul

 

 

Hey Paul,

Sometimes, problems are screws! :blink:

Sorry, just needed to post something.

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Noticed the same thing about a lot of activities - major advances in skill somehow developed while taking time off to do other things. Eventually you do have to hit the water to see the results, but it appears that the more you develop as a person (lol) the more skilled you become at doing what you do.

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There is some method in all the madnes!! Valentino Rossi, yes him of Moto GP fame, can sit down with a stop watch close his eyes and mentally ride a lap of any of the GP tracks, and stop the watch within a sec of his actual lap times..... F1 drivers commonly train for tracks using Play staion etc...

 

So PK, we've the up coming Halloween regatta at ABYC at end of the month. That gives you roughly 4 weeks of visualization and sleeping. IF we get 2 more boats we get a Moth start, 4 races on the Sunday 25th, plus a trainng day with me Nat and Karl on the Saturday. See you, and any other Mothies that can make it, on the start line!

 

 

Pearl,

 

I'm 94% sure I'll be there (24th practice with ATG and Sunday 25th) and will try to bring Kirk with me. I've sailed out of ABYC a few times and know the courses inside the wall pretty well. I'll visualize with my stopwatch in hand...

 

 

Paul

 

Awesome, 5 of us out of training on the Saturday and then racing Sunday. I'll see if we cant get some of the SD boys up....

 

Richard

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