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warbird

4:1 to 3:1

12 posts in this topic

I put a snap shackle on the becket of my mainsheet fiddle block so I can release it in light air , go to 3:1 from 4:1, to get better feel and quicker release. I am thinking of going 6:1, triples, but then I only release down to 5:1. Triple on the bottom with a double (with a becket) on top and a single shackled to the becket released would give a 4:1. Down sizing the main sheet and going free running single braid might be as good as the 3:1 in the fiddle block set-up. Thoughts? I am racing a Laser 28 and I would rather trim and keep all the bodies on the rail and the stationary 8:1 mounted to cockpit floor messes up traveller setting so I almost never use it.

 

WarBird

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I have a standard Harken gross/fine tune on a 25 footer, I trim my own main. Mainsheet is cored for the upwind part, no core for the rest, which helps run free when let out -might help to get the better feel and quicker release you are looking for

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210,

what line are you using for the mainsheet?

 

Cotesi Alpharopes. The cored area is very stiff, the non-cored runs really well. I believe it's 9 or 10MM, not sure of the product name. Before this I had FSE Racing Sheet which was nice but ribboned out in the cam. New stuff doesn't do that

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I'm considering the Harken two speed mainsheet system 210 or 207 recommends.

 

I'll probably get the #332 system for my Hobie 33 to replace the 5:1 cat block system currently on the boat.

 

Harken catalog

 

I'm not sure I would go cored/coreless but I am thinking about splicing the ends together for a continuous loop of line.

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You dont really want to go anymore than a 6:1, mainly due to amount of string you have to shift. The smallest purchase you can have the better really.

 

String wise i've gone really anti coreless ropes after thinking they were the best for a little while. Coreless ropes are nice on the hands but they kink like nothing else and certain variations of them wear out very quickly.

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why not just add a fine tune on the end of a 4:1 for upwind work?

 

I have a 6:1 primary main sheet with a 4:1 fine tune that can be trimmed from both rails for upwind work. Works great, that 24:1 gives you very precise control of the leach of the main. If I were to change anything I would change my primary sheet to 4:1 and have a 16:1 upwind purchase. But since it is all working, no pressing need to change it now.

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I'm considering the Harken two speed mainsheet system 210 or 207 recommends.

 

I'll probably get the #332 system for my Hobie 33 to replace the 5:1 cat block system currently on the boat.

 

Harken catalog

 

I'm not sure I would go cored/coreless but I am thinking about splicing the ends together for a continuous loop of line.

 

I have the 3:1 6:1 harken double-ended system on a S2 7.9 (26 foot boat). I have near end-boom sheeting, and I often wonder if it was a mistake. When pulling in the line (at 3:1 ratio) you end up with a HUGE pile of spaghetti on the cockpit sole - far more than you would think. Consider, fully out that 6:1 on a 13 foot boom is going to be 13 * 1.41 * 6 or around 110 feet of line! Which means, when you pull it in, you've got about 80 feet of line laying in the cockpit, tangling up.

 

It WORKS mind you, but I get sick of kicking all of the line out of the way, and easing around the windward mark isn't as easy as I would like, especially in lighter air. I would recommend a 4:1 or 3:1 with a 2:1 fine tune to cut down on the clutter and generaly ugliness. I may go back to that just to get rid of the ungainly large blocks and the mess.

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I tried to go 3:1 with a 2:1 fine tune on my last boat but the geometry gets all screwed up with the 3:1 - you end up with one end being trimmed up on the boom as far as I can tell. 4:1 and 2:1 fine tune for most boat under 30' is probably plenty if you use good gear and keep the friction down, and then it eases out easy too. On the Martin 242 (slightly bigger main than a J24) I used 4:1 on windy days and 3:1 on light air days with no fine tune.

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I have the 3:1 6:1 harken double-ended system on a S2 7.9 (26 foot boat). I have near end-boom sheeting, and I often wonder if it was a mistake. When pulling in the line (at 3:1 ratio) you end up with a HUGE pile of spaghetti on the cockpit sole - far more than you would think. Consider, fully out that 6:1 on a 13 foot boom is going to be 13 * 1.41 * 6 or around 110 feet of line! Which means, when you pull it in, you've got about 80 feet of line laying in the cockpit, tangling up.

 

It WORKS mind you, but I get sick of kicking all of the line out of the way, and easing around the windward mark isn't as easy as I would like, especially in lighter air. I would recommend a 4:1 or 3:1 with a 2:1 fine tune to cut down on the clutter and generaly ugliness. I may go back to that just to get rid of the ungainly large blocks and the mess.

 

 

Grrr..ood points there. Haven't sailed the boat yet but my thinking is switching from existing 5:1 to 6:1 is not that much more line (20%) and I gain rapid trim 3:1.

 

I've sailed with independent gross & fine tune before. One problem is getting caught with too much fine tune out so you lock the gross before you are in as far as you would like. Another concern is that dead ending one fall of the gross tune to a fixed (cockpit floor) fine tune system reduces the effectiveness of the traveler compared to the entire system moving with the car. I'll have to take another look at the options for mounting the fine tune over the cleat of the gross tune.

 

From that I have read, it pays to keep the Hobie on her feet and moving so I imagine a lot of traveler play in the puffs even though it is a short traveler. Maybe I'm mistaken.

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Lake boy, I'm thinking of adding a 2:1 on my current 4:1 and hate the cockpit floor mounting idea as well. A trip hazard in an already tight cockpit and it changes sail shape. I'm looking at harkens 6:1/24:1 but using it w/ a fidle block and adding a 2:1 to it. Making it a 4:1/8:! without changing out my current 4:1 fiddle block set up.

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I have the 3:1 6:1 harken double-ended system on a S2 7.9 (26 foot boat). I have near end-boom sheeting, and I often wonder if it was a mistake. When pulling in the line (at 3:1 ratio) you end up with a HUGE pile of spaghetti on the cockpit sole - far more than you would think. Consider, fully out that 6:1 on a 13 foot boom is going to be 13 * 1.41 * 6 or around 110 feet of line! Which means, when you pull it in, you've got about 80 feet of line laying in the cockpit, tangling up.

 

It WORKS mind you, but I get sick of kicking all of the line out of the way, and easing around the windward mark isn't as easy as I would like, especially in lighter air. I would recommend a 4:1 or 3:1 with a 2:1 fine tune to cut down on the clutter and generaly ugliness. I may go back to that just to get rid of the ungainly large blocks and the mess.

 

 

Grrr..ood points there. Haven't sailed the boat yet but my thinking is switching from existing 5:1 to 6:1 is not that much more line (20%) and I gain rapid trim 3:1.

 

I've sailed with independent gross & fine tune before. One problem is getting caught with too much fine tune out so you lock the gross before you are in as far as you would like. Another concern is that dead ending one fall of the gross tune to a fixed (cockpit floor) fine tune system reduces the effectiveness of the traveler compared to the entire system moving with the car. I'll have to take another look at the options for mounting the fine tune over the cleat of the gross tune.

 

From that I have read, it pays to keep the Hobie on her feet and moving so I imagine a lot of traveler play in the puffs even though it is a short traveler. Maybe I'm mistaken.

 

 

I was concerned about the effect on the traveller effectiveness when I set up my fine tune. I already had one end of the 6:1 on a swivel block that is mounted at the center of the traveller bar and the fine tune is anchored on the cockpit sole. That puts 2/6 of the 6:1 legs that remain on centerline the other 4 legs moving with the traveller. However after sailing with the set up I stopped worrying about it. I find the only time the reduced traveller effect is an issue is in light air when we want to let the main twist off but still want the boom on center line or higher. In those conditions we just let the fine tune 2 block so the system becomes a 5:1 with 4/5ths of the purchase moving with the traveller. Also since the fine tune is anchored on the sole just a few inches in front of the traveller it is not a tripping hazard at all.

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