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DTA

Member Since 01 Apr 2015
Offline Last Active Today, 07:12 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: do you think the melges 14 will catch on?

Today, 12:35 AM

 

 

The Aero halyard doesn't flap if you rig properly.

 

Those who sail in sandy places may not be too keen on zippers.

 

Plenty complain about the difficulty of rigging the sleeved Laser in big breeze and adding full-length battens is going to double that pain.

 

Don't get me wrong, I love the Aero. But my main complaint (which really isn't a complaint b/c there's an easy workaround) is that the halyard pops off  the cleat on hard, smashing capsizes (even if you don't pole-vault the mast on the ground beneath the water). Again, not really a "complaint" because I just shackle the head of the sail to the top of the mast and all is well. But there are some reasons to prefer a sleeved sail over a halyard.

 

On my Sabre (Aussie class) with a halyard most boats either have a v-cleat or a horn cleat and never pop out that I know of.  

 

 

Is the cleat at the tip of the mast, or at the base of the mast in the boats you mentioned? In the Aero, the halyard cleat is at the tip of the mast. So, if you have a really really hard capsize in heavy surf (which happens to me a lot, but is probably not a concern for most Aero sailors) that cleated halyard swings down like a baseball bat at the tip of the mast and slaps the water REALLY hard, and then gets throshed all around in the surf. If the halyard cleat is at the base of the mast, then the cleat is probably immune to this kind of throttling. But with the cleat out at the end of the mast, my personal experience is that this throttling at the tip of the mast knocks the halyard out of the cleat.

 

TO ANYONE INTERESTED IN THE AERO - this is not a big deal. If you're not routinely having lots of really really hard capsizes in big winds and surf that slap the mast down into the water really violently, then this is not going to happen to you. And if you *DO* do that kind of sailing w/ the Aero, then a shackle solves all the problems. But that being said, if I ever do buy a Melges 14 I'm going to trash it in the surf, for which it will be nice to have the sleeved sail.


In Topic: rs aero

Yesterday, 10:54 PM

It looks (looking at youtubes of races etc.) and sounds less comfy than drifting in a Laser....

Maybe drifting comfort is a bigger dinghy thing?

 

The Laser and the Aero are both pretty uncomfortable when drifting around in super light winds (what small, fast dinghy isn't?). I haven't been able to discern a distinction in comfort between the two in drifter conditions. The Aero is definitely more comfortable in hiking conditions. To me, they're both pretty much the same in comfort in low-to-medium winds (enough wind to sit out on the edge of the boat, but not enough to warrant hiking).


In Topic: do you think the melges 14 will catch on?

Yesterday, 09:58 PM

 

I like the sleeved sail - that's actually a selling point for me. But the thing that concerns me is that the layout of the boat prevents the sailor from sitting on the back 2 feet or so of the boat. The traveler line at the back basically prevents you from scooting your butt back to the very rear of the boat. From my experience w/ the Aero, that's not good. I need to be able to sit at the VERY rear of the Aero to keep the nose up in big wind and waves.

 

Is the design of the Melges 14 different? Does the sailor's weight not need to be situated in the very rear of the boat in big winds/waves to keep the bow up out of the water? Maybe it's fine, but I'd like to see video of someone smoking in the Melges 14 @ 20 mph or so in some sizeable chop so that I can confirm that they are doing so seated forward of the traveler. 

 

From my own experience sailing the Melges 14 in those conditions (18-20 knots, 4-5 ft chop), the furthest aft you'll ever need to sit is in line with the traveler. It seems to me that the boat even has early rise/rocker in the bow --- this picture kinda shows what I'm talking about:

 

ZfmAU0L.jpg

 

 

Thanks Mystique. Good to know.


In Topic: do you think the melges 14 will catch on?

Yesterday, 06:26 PM

The Aero halyard doesn't flap if you rig properly.

 

Those who sail in sandy places may not be too keen on zippers.

 

Plenty complain about the difficulty of rigging the sleeved Laser in big breeze and adding full-length battens is going to double that pain.

 

Don't get me wrong, I love the Aero. But my main complaint (which really isn't a complaint b/c there's an easy workaround) is that the halyard pops off  the cleat on hard, smashing capsizes (even if you don't pole-vault the mast on the ground beneath the water). Again, not really a "complaint" because I just shackle the head of the sail to the top of the mast and all is well. But there are some reasons to prefer a sleeved sail over a halyard.


In Topic: do you think the melges 14 will catch on?

Yesterday, 03:52 PM

I like the sleeved sail - that's actually a selling point for me. But the thing that concerns me is that the layout of the boat prevents the sailor from sitting on the back 2 feet or so of the boat. The traveler line at the back basically prevents you from scooting your butt back to the very rear of the boat. From my experience w/ the Aero, that's not good. I need to be able to sit at the VERY rear of the Aero to keep the nose up in big wind and waves.

 

Is the design of the Melges 14 different? Does the sailor's weight not need to be situated in the very rear of the boat in big winds/waves to keep the bow up out of the water? Maybe it's fine, but I'd like to see video of someone smoking in the Melges 14 @ 20 mph or so in some sizeable chop so that I can confirm that they are doing so seated forward of the traveler.