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Rethinking Vivid vs Trinidad SR


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#1 Epi-sailor

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 11:40 PM

After months of sanding, barrier coating and more sanding we are ready for new bottom paint. Have already purchased Vivid but Pettit sales rep recommended Trindad SR for our J109 that will live in fresh water Columbia river but spend summer mths in the salt of Pudget Sound. Similar threads out there but not many on fresh and salt water use. Anyone using the SR in fresh water and does it make for a reasonably fast bottom?

#2 Chief Anarchist

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 09:26 AM

Dude!.... we dont go for " reasonably fast" around here!...

We go for Fucken Fast and no compromise.

In fresh water you want to go for a hard AF then sand with 400 in the direction of water flow. Then remove slimey shite regularly. Then race hard, take no prisoners and give plenty of verbal!

#3 DDW

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 05:16 PM

Trinidad will be as fast as you sand it smooth. You can wet sand it to 1200 grit if you want. My boat (cruising) had Trinidad SR on it in the Great Lakes for two seasons and then out into the salt. No problems either way. One problem with Trinidad is you cannot haul the boat for long periods of time, it will oxidize and quit working. 



#4 Epi-sailor

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 07:00 PM

Dude!.... we dont go for " reasonably fast" around here!...
We go for Fucken Fast and no compromise.
In fresh water you want to go for a hard AF then sand with 400 in the direction of water flow. Then remove slimey shite regularly. Then race hard, take no prisoners and give plenty of verbal!


Just to be clear I long boarded and faired 35' of shitty bottom solo last summer just to get to this point. It will be F Bomb fast And since you called me out I'm going to loose my local "sleeper" mode befor it hits the water. Nice anarchist work you have done your job.

Trinidad will be as fast as you sand it smooth. You can wet sand it to 1200 grit if you want. My boat (cruising) had Trinidad SR on it in the Great Lakes for two seasons and then out into the salt. No problems either way. One problem with Trinidad is you cannot haul the boat for long periods of time, it will oxidize and quit working.


Perfect this is what I was hoping to confirm.

#5 killapenguin

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 07:50 AM

My experience is in salt water, but I have used both paints - Trinidad SR and Vivid. I'm currently using the Vivid on my boat, and for one reason only - I like the color. You can't get Trinidad SR in yellow (it's a dumb reason, especially for the bottom, but it's a reason nonetheless). 

 

Hands down Trinidad SR is a better bottom paint, especially if you want a red or black bottom, or whatever color it comes in. Vivid needs a new bottom every 12-18 months, and it doesn't do such a good job of keeping the green slime at bay. 



#6 FastBottoms

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 03:27 PM

Vivid needs a new bottom every 12-18 months, and it doesn't do such a good job of keeping the green slime at bay. 

 

In my experience, Vivid is as good at retarding fouling as just about any other paint out there. The problem with Vivid is that it cannot stand up to regular cleaning (which it absolutely needs, here anyway) and much product is lost in the process. Thin or bare spots will appear relatively soon, and that's what will get foul. And of course, these bare spots need aggressive scrubbing which removes more paint, which means more fouling, which means more aggressive scrubbing... and so on and so on. You get the picture. I have yet to see a Vivid bottom that didn't need to be repainted within a year's time. Compare that to 3+ years we get from properly applied Trinidad bottoms.



#7 Epi-sailor

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 04:44 PM

Vivid needs a new bottom every 12-18 months, and it doesn't do such a good job of keeping the green slime at bay.

 
In my experience, Vivid is as good at retarding fouling as just about any other paint out there. The problem with Vivid is that it cannot stand up to regular cleaning (which it absolutely needs, here anyway) and much product is lost in the process. Thin or bare spots will appear relatively soon, and that's what will get foul. And of course, these bare spots need aggressive scrubbing which removes more paint, which means more fouling, which means more aggressive scrubbing... and so on and so on. You get the picture. I have yet to see a Vivid bottom that didn't need to be repainted within a year's time. Compare that to 3+ years we get from properly applied Trinidad bottoms.

Do you have thoughts beyond what Pettit recommends re "Properly applied"?

#8 FastBottoms

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 04:47 PM

 

 

Vivid needs a new bottom every 12-18 months, and it doesn't do such a good job of keeping the green slime at bay.

 
In my experience, Vivid is as good at retarding fouling as just about any other paint out there. The problem with Vivid is that it cannot stand up to regular cleaning (which it absolutely needs, here anyway) and much product is lost in the process. Thin or bare spots will appear relatively soon, and that's what will get foul. And of course, these bare spots need aggressive scrubbing which removes more paint, which means more fouling, which means more aggressive scrubbing... and so on and so on. You get the picture. I have yet to see a Vivid bottom that didn't need to be repainted within a year's time. Compare that to 3+ years we get from properly applied Trinidad bottoms.

Do you have thoughts beyond what Pettit recommends re "Properly applied"?

 

 

Not sure what Pettit recommends, but I recommend two coats everywhere with a third at the waterline and leading/trailing edges of the appendages.



#9 ordkhntr

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 09:19 PM

Vivid needs a new bottom every 12-18 months, and it doesn't do such a good job of keeping the green slime at bay. 

 
In my experience, Vivid is as good at retarding fouling as just about any other paint out there. The problem with Vivid is that it cannot stand up to regular cleaning (which it absolutely needs, here anyway) and much product is lost in the process. Thin or bare spots will appear relatively soon, and that's what will get foul. And of course, these bare spots need aggressive scrubbing which removes more paint, which means more fouling, which means more aggressive scrubbing... and so on and so on. You get the picture. I have yet to see a Vivid bottom that didn't need to be repainted within a year's time. Compare that to 3+ years we get from properly applied Trinidad bottoms.
I thought Vivid was suppose to be one of the harder ablative paints? They advertise it as one of Tehran hybrid paints that's kind da of between a hard and ablative paint.

#10 FastBottoms

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 09:34 PM

Vivid needs a new bottom every 12-18 months, and it doesn't do such a good job of keeping the green slime at bay. 

 
In my experience, Vivid is as good at retarding fouling as just about any other paint out there. The problem with Vivid is that it cannot stand up to regular cleaning (which it absolutely needs, here anyway) and much product is lost in the process. Thin or bare spots will appear relatively soon, and that's what will get foul. And of course, these bare spots need aggressive scrubbing which removes more paint, which means more fouling, which means more aggressive scrubbing... and so on and so on. You get the picture. I have yet to see a Vivid bottom that didn't need to be repainted within a year's time. Compare that to 3+ years we get from properly applied Trinidad bottoms.

I thought Vivid was suppose to be one of the harder ablative paints? They advertise it as one of Tehran hybrid paints that's kind da of between a hard and ablative paint.

It is a hybrid but hardness is not one of the traits it shares with modified epoxies. Try cleaning it in the water and you'll see what I mean.

#11 ordkhntr

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 10:29 PM

Vivid needs a new bottom every 12-18 months, and it doesn't do such a good job of keeping the green slime at bay. 

 
In my experience, Vivid is as good at retarding fouling as just about any other paint out there. The problem with Vivid is that it cannot stand up to regular cleaning (which it absolutely needs, here anyway) and much product is lost in the process. Thin or bare spots will appear relatively soon, and that's what will get foul. And of course, these bare spots need aggressive scrubbing which removes more paint, which means more fouling, which means more aggressive scrubbing... and so on and so on. You get the picture. I have yet to see a Vivid bottom that didn't need to be repainted within a year's time. Compare that to 3+ years we get from properly applied Trinidad bottoms.
I thought Vivid was suppose to be one of the harder ablative paints? They advertise it as one of Tehran hybrid paints that's kind da of between a hard and ablative paint.
It is a hybrid but hardness is not one of the traits it shares with modified epoxies. Try cleaning it in the water and you'll see what I mean.
Wow, how did spell check change "the" to "Tehran"?




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