Jump to content


Clipper round the world


  • Please log in to reply
708 replies to this topic

#1 14395

14395

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 69 posts
  • Interests:sailing

Posted 15 April 2011 - 08:09 PM

Has anyone competed in all or a leg of this race? Anything you could offer up about it would be great. Is it expensive? Is there a better program like this?

#2 Leeds at Sea

Leeds at Sea

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:Sailing
    Football
    Family
    Not in that order...

Posted 21 April 2011 - 12:34 PM

I did the race in 2002 and now work for Clipper so have seen both sides of the race. It is the only way, without getting onto a Volvo crew or starting a single or double handed campaign, that you can race around the world. Its also the only round the world race in a completely matched fleet. It isn't cheap to do - but hugely cheaper than your other options. Its also comforting to race knowing that there is an organisation in the background looking after all logistics - training, PR, branding, boat maintenance/repair, routing, sponsorship, victualling, safety. After over 2 million miles of ocean racing and taking more than 3,000 people on all or part of the race we've never lost anyone (3 man overboards - all recovered), the most serious injuries have been broken bones (skipper on the last race broke a leg). So this is a very safe race as well as hugely challenging race.

You'll race through the doldrums, southern ocean, north pacific tropics so somewhere between 0 and 70 mph winds. You will work every position on the boat and learn all aspects of ocean racing including weather and tactics as well as learning about life on a boat. You'll be the plumber, electrician, baker, sail repairer, weather man, bow man, chef, cleaner... If you send me you;re email address or fill out the form on the website we can send a brochrue to you. I can also put you in touch with other US based crew members if you like.

www.clipperroundtheworld.com The website will also show you the new fleet of 70ft boats we're having built for the 13-14 race, and new route for the 11-12 race.

#3 Leeds at Sea

Leeds at Sea

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:Sailing
    Football
    Family
    Not in that order...

Posted 03 May 2011 - 12:53 PM

Balls might work better for you Ferret - sounds like your "cup of tea".

Not coincidence at all - someone suggested I replied and so signed up and did. Its good to be helpful... :-)

#4 Across the Pond

Across the Pond

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 514 posts
  • Location:Belfast, Northern Ireland

Posted 03 May 2011 - 02:32 PM

I was involved with the Global Challenge, which is no more, but the Clipper is in the same mould and like every event will have its positive and negative sides.

I had a place on the 2000 BT Global Challenge as my dream was race around the world. I knew I would never be good enough to do the Volvo and at that time wanted to settle down afterwards with a ‘proper’ job. The Global Challenge seemed like the perfect ticket. Unfortunately serious illness prevented me from doing the race but I recovered and did two legs of the 2004 race from Boston to La Rochelle and on to Portsmouth.

I had a great time, met some fantastic people and forged some life long friendships. The sailing was a mixed bag and this is exactly what ocean sailing is like. We had the lot from miserable, frustrating, boring times to exciting and exhilarating days. I saw some sights that I still feel privileged to have seen and any ocean passage gives you a real sense of achievement at the end of it. Everyone who I spoke to thought it was worth the money.

The full Clipper race is now something like £40,000 and that is an awful lot of money. Is it worth it? It very much depends on what your goals are.

Do you want to have a great adventure, see the world and have some incredibly varied sailing experiences? If so then the Clipper may well be perfect for you.

Do you specifically want to race around the world and are an amateur or novice sailor? If so then the Clipper is the only realistic option for you.

Do you want to be a professional racer? If so there perhaps are better options, with the greatest of respect to Leeds at Sea!

Of course you could do the Clipper as a crew and subsequently come back as a skipper. Don’t forget that people such as Mike Golding, Dee Cafarri, Conrad Humphries, Pete Goss and Alex Thompson were skippers in the Global Challenge or Clipper races and used these campaigns as launch pads for their Vendee Globe careers. Admittedly all of them were professional skippers first and none sailed as a crew in previous races.

If you already are an experienced sailor then for £40,000 you could, for example, buy a Mini Transat 650 boat. Obviously you would have to pay for aspects that are included in the Clipper fee, such as training, logistics, food, marketing etc but a year or two on the Mini circuit would offer you an incredible challenge, improve you greatly as a sailor and (like the Clipper) give you the opportunity to meet people from a very diverse background.

The Clipper and Mini circuit are very, very different events and the Mini is clearly not for novices. I suppose the point I am tying to make is that at this stage you need to consider your experience, decide on your goals and plan accordingly.

Good luck in whatever path you choose!

#5 Leeds at Sea

Leeds at Sea

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:Sailing
    Football
    Family
    Not in that order...

Posted 04 May 2011 - 08:08 AM

I completely agree. If you have experience there are other things you could do, probably for a bit more money. And if you want to be competitive you need a bigger support team

Lots of people actually do Clipper, and previously Challenge, to gain experience. One of the ex Challenge crew is a Clipper skipper this time around and in 2007 a crew member from Clipper 2000 was a skipper. One of the Volvo media guys on the last race was a Clipper crew member in 2007. This isnt limited to racing of course. Clipper have introduced more than 3000 people to the world of sailing worldwide. Some go on to buy boats, work in the industry, charter yachts, enter local races etc. So the wider impact on the sailing world as a whole is huge.

I worked an office job before I did the Clipper race, now live on the coast and work in the industry. A crew member from the last race who used to work in a supermarket just got her first full time, paid job, in sailing - taking disadvantaged young people out to sailing. It can change your life if you want it to. Or it can "just" be a unique challenge.

#6 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 04 July 2011 - 12:02 AM

Has anyone competed in all or a leg of this race? Anything you could offer up about it would be great. Is it expensive? Is there a better program like this?

I'm doing Leg 5 on Qingdao - ask me in Feb!
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/the-race/the-route/
Lots of info about the training on their facebook/web sites - costs come with the brochures which only take a phone call

#7 mad

mad

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,050 posts

Posted 06 July 2011 - 12:49 PM


Has anyone competed in all or a leg of this race? Anything you could offer up about it would be great. Is it expensive? Is there a better program like this?

I'm doing Leg 5 on Qingdao - ask me in Feb!
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/the-race/the-route/
Lots of info about the training on their facebook/web sites - costs come with the brochures which only take a phone call

Ozee, wasn't that the really wet, cold, blowing dogs of chains leg that the Volvo guys did? That UK training might pay off.

#8 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 06 July 2011 - 09:58 PM



Has anyone competed in all or a leg of this race? Anything you could offer up about it would be great. Is it expensive? Is there a better program like this?

I'm doing Leg 5 on Qingdao - ask me in Feb!
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/the-race/the-route/
Lots of info about the training on their facebook/web sites - costs come with the brochures which only take a phone call

Ozee, wasn't that the really wet, cold, blowing dogs of chains leg that the Volvo guys did? That UK training might pay off.

No point in doing a leg with no challenge - so down hill & up hill taken care of, hope Queensland weather behaves too.
By the time I go from Gold Coast 30 degrees to China 4 degrees I'm gonna be loving my gear too.
I have the lat & long of "that" rock before anyone starts too :rolleyes:

#9 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 20 July 2011 - 09:30 PM

10 days to go - making me wish I was first up - only have to wait 5 months!

#10 LDH

LDH

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 603 posts
  • Location:'strailya

Posted 20 July 2011 - 10:01 PM

5 months to go and the scones are mastered already ... I can only dream about what other treats you will have up your sleeve by then :D

Do they have a crewperson of the yr award?

#11 Life Buoy 15

Life Buoy 15

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,240 posts
  • Location:The great southern land

Posted 20 July 2011 - 10:17 PM

I just wish the race was an IRC event. It would make this thread much more entertaining from one crewmembers lesser half!

#12 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 26 July 2011 - 03:03 AM

4 days to go - I can't do photos from work but the day bags of food are a really scary sight!

My skipper is threatening/promising to go up the rig naked if he can get 9 helpers/day for race prep!

http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/race-news?item=253

#13 Terrorvision

Terrorvision

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,843 posts
  • Interests:Taking 'the' out of Psychotherapist

Posted 26 July 2011 - 04:29 AM

I did a couple of legs on the Clipper Race- absolutely brilliant experience but frustrating if you are a 'real' racer though I suspect that will change a bit when the new boats hit the water.

#14 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 26 July 2011 - 04:49 AM

I did a couple of legs on the Clipper Race- absolutely brilliant experience but frustrating if you are a 'real' racer though I suspect that will change a bit when the new boats hit the water.

Which legs?
I've got a skipper who pushed my comfort zone & then pushed it again, did me the world of good, I feel like I stepped up - usually if our @ home skipper (hubby lydia) does that I just say no! :lol:
Mind you I didn't realise how much he (&LB) had trained me until I got here!

Did 2000nm in training alone

#15 180

180

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 27 July 2011 - 05:32 PM

I am signed up for leg 5 2013/2014.
Good luck. Stay safe.
Kevin

#16 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 27 July 2011 - 08:56 PM

I am signed up for leg 5 2013/2014.
Good luck. Stay safe.
Kevin

Too cool! When does training start for you?

#17 180

180

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 28 July 2011 - 01:37 PM

I can't start until early 2012. I will be following the race daily until then!

#18 schakel

schakel

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,044 posts

Posted 28 July 2011 - 02:03 PM

Sunday 31 July 2011 it starts in Southhampton,
Great, three nights of sleep and they are off.
Here's a blog from Ian Geraghty about the race.

http://en.wordpress....race-2011-2012/

#19 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 31 July 2011 - 09:03 PM

First corner of an 11 month race!
http://www.clipperro...ow/race-viewer/

Spectacular looking start!
http://www.clipperro....php/race-news/

#20 mad

mad

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,050 posts

Posted 31 July 2011 - 09:37 PM

First corner of an 11 month race!
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/follow/race-viewer/

Spectacular looking start!
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/race-news/

So how many days till you get on board? Are there any people doing the whole trip, not including skippers etc?

#21 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 31 July 2011 - 09:58 PM


First corner of an 11 month race!
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/follow/race-viewer/

Spectacular looking start!
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/race-news/

So how many days till you get on board? Are there any people doing the whole trip, not including skippers etc?

I get on Dec-March, 142 sleeps to go!
On Qingdao there are about 9 out of 45 doing the Round The World (RTW)

#22 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 01 August 2011 - 08:36 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk.../world-14357156

Last time I looked everyone was parked up in English channel - presumably for last fish & chips before setting off! as well as some bum tide calculations :(

Reoprters on board

#23 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 03 August 2011 - 12:52 AM

Day 2 - not out of the English Channel & anchors out all round!
Qingdao went from roosters to feather dusters (first to last) asserting independant tactics
10 months 28 days to go!

Anyone know how to keep the fleet on the AIS site - they keep dropping off!

#24 Leka

Leka

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,678 posts
  • Location:Tinh Gia, Central North Province, Vietnam, but I still call Australia home.

Posted 04 August 2011 - 08:33 AM

I noticed they have changed the color of the Gold Coast boat. Much easier to see now.

Ozee, Did you want to be on one of the Aussie boats? Do you have much choice?

#25 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 04 August 2011 - 06:55 PM

I noticed they have changed the color of the Gold Coast boat. Much easier to see now.

Ozee, Did you want to be on one of the Aussie boats? Do you have much choice?

I actually requested the Chinese boat... only a few thousand miles out but the thought of sailing home (brought up in HKG) on the Chinese boat seemed very auspicious!

Then add we are going into China at chinese new year (lunar), year of the dragon with a kick ass dragon on the side of the boat brought out the party girl in me!
The last part of my training I did with my own skipper on my own boat & actually some of the Chinese delegation who will be sailing so I now have my name written in Chinese on my Wet Weather gear - must get it written on my bum - we all look the same from the back!

I see the fleet are now about the Bay of Biscay, finally in wet weather gear & throwing up!
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/follow/crew-diaries/
We'll be on this side of the race course (Brisbane to Keppel race) hopefully NOT throwing up!

#26 schakel

schakel

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,044 posts

Posted 07 August 2011 - 05:23 PM

More then three days to go to Madeira and the Finnish didn't lose their first place.
Gold Coast Australia is far more east and in heavier wind. They might get in first place the next day.

The race viewer is somewhat annoying because when you click a boat it takes a lot of seconds before you get their statistics.

#27 Leka

Leka

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,678 posts
  • Location:Tinh Gia, Central North Province, Vietnam, but I still call Australia home.

Posted 09 August 2011 - 09:53 AM

Looking good for an Aussie first leg win.
Aussie boat first and last??
Seems the 2nd boat lost its way, they seemed to claw back after dropping injured crew, then tactics didn't work.

#28 schakel

schakel

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,044 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 01:57 PM

5 nautical miles for the leader to finish in Madeira.

Position Name of yacht Distance to finish
1 Gold Coast Australia 5nm
2 Visit Finland 65nm
3 Racing New York 111nm
4 Derry-Londonderry 117nm
5 Singapore 121nm
6 Welcome to Yorkshire 124nm
7 De Lage Landen 132nm
8 Geraldton Western Australia 176nm
9 Qingdao 195nm
10 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 204nm

#29 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 08:45 PM

Woo Hoo well done Gold Coast they are really going to enjoy the celebrations!
Webcams here
http://www.madeira-w...era/cam-11.html

#30 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 10 August 2011 - 09:52 AM

Qingdao 8th in leg 1 well done guys!

#31 Life Buoy 15

Life Buoy 15

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,240 posts
  • Location:The great southern land

Posted 10 August 2011 - 09:09 PM

I noticed they have changed the color of the Gold Coast boat. Much easier to see now.

Ozee, Did you want to be on one of the Aussie boats? Do you have much choice?


Since the Keppel race they have decided to put her on the least flameable boat.

#32 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 10 August 2011 - 09:21 PM


I noticed they have changed the color of the Gold Coast boat. Much easier to see now.

Ozee, Did you want to be on one of the Aussie boats? Do you have much choice?


Since the Keppel race they have decided to put her on the least flameable boat.

In my defence I told Clipper @ interview (12 months ago) that my area of weakness would be the galley!

#33 lydia

lydia

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,146 posts

Posted 11 August 2011 - 09:26 AM


I noticed they have changed the color of the Gold Coast boat. Much easier to see now.

Ozee, Did you want to be on one of the Aussie boats? Do you have much choice?


Since the Keppel race they have decided to put her on the least flameable boat.

No she is on the right boat, something about the invention of gunpowder!
Also there is a dragon on the side of the boat!

However it did give rise to line of the race "It is my fire and I will put it out how I want"

#34 mad

mad

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,050 posts

Posted 11 August 2011 - 12:53 PM



I noticed they have changed the color of the Gold Coast boat. Much easier to see now.

Ozee, Did you want to be on one of the Aussie boats? Do you have much choice?


Since the Keppel race they have decided to put her on the least flameable boat.

No she is on the right boat, something about the invention of gunpowder!
Also there is a dragon on the side of the boat!

However it did give rise to line of the race "It is my fire and I will put it out how I want"

:D :P

#35 180

180

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 11 August 2011 - 06:59 PM

2013/14 Crew Manual showed up today. That is a good read! Can't wait to start training.

#36 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 11 August 2011 - 08:50 PM

2013/14 Crew Manual showed up today. That is a good read! Can't wait to start training.

You know that over the 4 levels of training you'll clock up about 2000nm?
Roll on night watches at 90 degrees to traffic lanes doing bearings on anything that moves!

#37 180

180

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 11 August 2011 - 09:14 PM


2013/14 Crew Manual showed up today. That is a good read! Can't wait to start training.

You know that over the 4 levels of training you'll clock up about 2000nm?
Roll on night watches at 90 degrees to traffic lanes doing bearings on anything that moves!

Can not wait!

#38 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 15 August 2011 - 02:16 AM

Canary islands to port; flying fish on the deck; broken spinn poles - they're off again... Race 2 to Rio
Woo Hoo
http://www.clipperro...d.com/index.php

#39 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 15 August 2011 - 08:37 PM

Hilarious...
"It seems to be about the loaves and fishes on board today. With small luxuries like fresh baked bread to raise the morale, flying fish are causing a bit of a stink. It's the first time the teams will have encountered them - and if you don't get rid of them quickly from wherever they land, in this heat you soon know about it.

New York crew member, Andrew Priest, writes, "Already formed into two watches to split the 24- hour day into two sets of on and off times, now we have a 'fish watch'.

"This is not culinary in purpose - fish is not yet part of our diet, save for the omnipresent tins of tuna which accompany any expedition these days. Nor is it a formalisation of our constant scouring of the near horizon for bigger amphibious fellow travellers like dolphins, whales or indeed turtles.

"No, 'fish watch' has a single, but crucial mission - to clear our decks of still flapping or recently departed members of the flying fish family, which are now constant airborne hazards to New York and her crew. Our first sightings were several days ago but it was only on Saturday that the first daredevil, or was it kamikaze, fish, launched itself on one last mission from the waves of the Atlantic... into the shorts of Raghu."

You can find out what happened next by reading Andrew's report in full in the 'Follow' section of www.clipperroundtheworld.com.

#40 Leka

Leka

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,678 posts
  • Location:Tinh Gia, Central North Province, Vietnam, but I still call Australia home.

Posted 17 August 2011 - 08:08 AM

Yah, looks like 2 Aussie boats got points at the scoring gate.

#41 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 19 August 2011 - 08:16 PM

No points for Qingdao AND they ran outof biscuits!

#42 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 21 August 2011 - 09:35 PM

Downhill joy ride is over - all heading into it - throwing up & ripping things!
Roll on Rio
http://www.clipperro...w/crew-diaries/

#43 Icedtea

Icedtea

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,184 posts
  • Location:Ireland

Posted 22 August 2011 - 08:44 PM

Sounds great!

As an aside, is anyone doing the race on virtual regatta?

I'm around the halfway point, started a few days ago so pretty happy to be sitting mid fleet....

#44 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 25 August 2011 - 08:55 PM

Couple of HUNDRED miles behind leader <sob!>

#45 European Bloke

European Bloke

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,920 posts

Posted 26 August 2011 - 08:45 AM

Ozze I think you're going to have to chill out. If you try and treat this as a race at least one person on your boat will end up dead.

#46 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 26 August 2011 - 09:57 PM

Hahaha prolly good advice!

#47 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 29 August 2011 - 09:01 PM

nearly @ Rio...
"There are a lot more ships about these days and every once in a while we call them up just to check they have seen us. Every time they respond with same question: 'What are you doing out here?'"

"Heads need servicing, clothes need a fresh water wash and most of the crew need a very thorough high pressure hosing down,"

I can now drink powdered milk without gagging!
http://www.clipperro...w/crew-diaries/

#48 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 04 September 2011 - 06:45 AM

Woo Hoo - 6th place into Rio
22 days racing & stealing other peoples finishing positions... niiiiiiice B)

#49 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 05 September 2011 - 11:20 PM

We made October "Yachting World"

Attached Files



#50 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 08 September 2011 - 08:47 PM

Sewing sails in the sunshine before the next race - I like that!

Attached File  sails.bmp   786.98K   38 downloads

I hear also that training has strated for 13-14 race & they are getting 85K gusts in the Solent!

#51 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 10 September 2011 - 09:31 PM

Off to Cape Town - sail safe, have fun... look after your watch leaders & make sure the bus driver (skipper) gets his tea on time & peace & quiet in the head! :P

#52 Icedtea

Icedtea

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,184 posts
  • Location:Ireland

Posted 10 September 2011 - 10:21 PM

Sewing sails in the sunshine before the next race - I like that!

Attached File  sails.bmp   786.98K   38 downloads

I hear also that training has strated for 13-14 race & they are getting 85K gusts in the Solent!


Windows of my room are shaking at the moment....

#53 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 11 September 2011 - 08:52 PM

One guy from the Yorkshire boat got abdo pains so they had to turn back from the start line & get him to hospital (good job that wasn't 1/2 way to Cape Town), & we have left our 1/4 master in Rio, she sliped in the wet locker & slipped a disc :(

#54 DtM

DtM

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,283 posts
  • Location:Out of the Office

Posted 11 September 2011 - 11:06 PM

Ozee,

Am I right in thinking you are doing one of the later legs of this epic but that it is not this leg?

#55 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 12 September 2011 - 02:51 AM

Ozee,

Am I right in thinking you are doing one of the later legs of this epic but that it is not this leg?

Yup just watching the clock (& race viewer) until leg 5 Gold Coast-Singapore-China, starts 24/12/11, Santa is seriously pissed off on the extra journey!

#56 lydia

lydia

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,146 posts

Posted 13 September 2011 - 07:08 PM

3days out & Gold Coast are having som problems!

Attached Files



#57 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 14 September 2011 - 03:37 AM

Tour of 68 footer by RTW crew member


#58 mad

mad

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,050 posts

Posted 14 September 2011 - 03:17 PM

Oz, are you getting confused with your logins? :P

#59 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 14 September 2011 - 09:13 PM

Oz, are you getting confused with your logins? :P

Haha thats twice in one day - his fault for leaving himself logged in on the laptop
- at 5 am I respond - I don't think!

#60 mad

mad

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,050 posts

Posted 16 September 2011 - 11:42 AM


Oz, are you getting confused with your logins? :P

Haha thats twice in one day - his fault for leaving himself logged in on the laptop
- at 5 am I respond - I don't think!

Oh, the opportunities available with a logged in computer :P

Did you ever read the Franklins Tower coming out thread?

#61 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 17 September 2011 - 07:51 AM



Oz, are you getting confused with your logins? :P

Haha thats twice in one day - his fault for leaving himself logged in on the laptop
- at 5 am I respond - I don't think!

Oh, the opportunities available with a logged in computer :P

Did you ever read the Franklins Tower coming out thread?

haha I do remember that!
We got extra points in this race but Gold Coast are at the front of the fleet again!

#62 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 19 September 2011 - 08:56 PM

DAY 10

* Winds moderate to provide teams with welcome respite
* Race to get south to pick up westerlies underway
* Gold Coast Australia comes out of Stealth Mode with extended lead
* ? Broken ribs on Fin boat
* Some leaking foulies on DLL

#63 Leka

Leka

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,678 posts
  • Location:Tinh Gia, Central North Province, Vietnam, but I still call Australia home.

Posted 20 September 2011 - 08:27 AM

Gold Coast seem to be consistently fast.
Maybe the skipper is a seasoned ocean racer?, or he has lucked on with a good racing crew?

Have been away for a few weeks and missed the news, but seems an interesting race atm.

#64 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 20 September 2011 - 08:48 PM

* Fleet splits as distinct tactics play out
* Welcome to Yorkshire hopes high risk strategy will pay off
* Gold Coast Australia maintain lead despite steering problems


Life is also uncomfortable on the most northerly boat, Qingdao. Skipper
Ian Conchie reports that the conditions have continued to take their
toll on crew and the boat as they push upwind.

"Every job takes longer and more effort simply because of the angle of
the boat. It is still a bizarre sight to see someone hanging on whilst
brushing their teeth," Ian said.

"What I am most grateful for is the morale and grit of my crew on
Qingdao. Come what may weather wise everything has been greeted with fun
and good banter, he added.

#65 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 20 September 2011 - 08:50 PM

Gold Coast seem to be consistently fast.
Maybe the skipper is a seasoned ocean racer?, or he has lucked on with a good racing crew?

Have been away for a few weeks and missed the news, but seems an interesting race atm.

I haven't sailed with him but I think he's good at playing the weather & using fronts to make strategy

#66 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 22 September 2011 - 12:48 AM

RACE 3: RIO DE JANEIRO TO CAPE TOWN
DAY 12

* Gold Coast Australia approaches Ocean Sprint (which
starts on a line on longitude 5 degrees west and finishes at a line on
longitude 2 degrees east. The team which covers the distance of
approximately 420 miles in the fastest time will be awarded a point)
* Teams to pass close to world's most remote inhabited island (Tristan da Cunha)
* Edinburgh Inspiring Capital scrubbed down to banish tummy bug - eeek I think thats the boat that has the crews that have had transplants!

#67 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 22 September 2011 - 09:22 PM

I notice we are getting about 50 in here each day so thought I'd pout the whole email in...

CLIPPER 11-12
RACE 3: RIO DE JANEIRO TO CAPE TOWN
DAY 13

* Edinburgh Inspiring Capital gets surprise visit from HMS Edinburgh
* First boats begin Ocean Sprint for extra point
* Welcome to Yorkshire sails between stunning Tristan da Cunha islands

The crew of Edinburgh Inspiring Capital had an unexpected rendezvous
with HMS Edinburgh overnight in a fitting location close to Edinburgh,
the world's most remote settlement, in the Tristan da Cunha group of
islands.

The team representing the Scottish capital was paid a visit by the Type
42 Destroyer, currently patrolling the South Atlantic, at around 0100
UTC.

Skipper Gordon Reid reports that, without warning, HMS Edinburgh
appeared on AIS, the automatic identification system fitted on all of
the Clipper 68s to identify nearby vessels.

"Suddenly she appeared 1.5 miles off our port quarter doing 17 knots
straight towards us and then stopped very quickly and very close to us,"
he said.

The Royal Navy deployed a Zodiac rib in order to carry out an exchange
of gifts with their namesake taking part in Clipper 11-12.

Following a bad run of the "tartan trots" on Edinburgh Inspiring
Capital, HMS Edinburgh took the opportunity to replenish their stocks of
oral rehydration sachets and anti-diarrhoea tablets during their
rendezvous.

Commander Paul Russell also gave Gordon and his team a signal flag
'Mike', similar to a Scottish Saltire, and accepted a box of chocolate
and an Edinburgh Inspiring Capital cap on behalf of his crew.

"It was awesome to have such a big ship that close in the pitch black
night rolling up and down on the ocean swell. One last fast drive by and
she disappeared into the pitch black night just as quickly as she had
appeared," Gordon said.

"Many thanks to Commander Paul Russell and his fine ship's company for
their continued support and taking the time to pay us a visit out here
in the middle of nowhere, it is greatly appreciated and means a lot to
us," he said, adding that the wind was filling and his crew was smiling
and enjoying the ride.

With over 500 miles now separating Edinburgh Inspiring Capital from the
leaders, crews, friends and family will inevitably be trying to
calculate their estimated time of arrival into Cape Town. In yacht
racing, especially on transoceanic legs, the fleet can spread over long
distances as the teams pick up different weather systems.

"Yachts have destinations and not arrival times, and that is an
essential part of ocean racing that the crews will be starting to
appreciate," Clipper Chairman Sir Robin Knox-Johnston said. When he
became the first person to circumnavigate single-handed and non-stop in
1969, Sir Robin spent 312 days at sea.

The Clipper Race Team monitors the fleet around the clock and is keeping
a close eye on the weather as they make their way to Cape Town in the
3,300-mile transatlantic race.

"As always, we are closely monitoring the progress of all the teams in
the fleet and will ensure that everybody has sufficient time in Cape
Town to prepare for the next race to Geraldton," Race Director, Joff
Bailey, said.

Meanwhile, the leading three boats have begun the Ocean Sprint which
starts at a line on longitude 5 degrees west and finishes on longitude 2
degrees east. The team which covers the distance of approximately 420
miles in the fastest time will be awarded a point, regardless of their
relative position in the fleet so every team is up with a chance of
clinching the extra point.

The first boat to start the Ocean Sprint was Gold Coast Australia, who
crossed the line at 5 degrees west at 2334 UTC, followed by Visit
Finland at 0531 UTC.

"In the hours leading up to the Ocean Sprint we were flying our medium
weight spinnaker and the wind had started to moderate significantly. But
as soon as we entered the Ocean Sprint the wind magically increased by
about 5 to 10 knots and our boat speed shot up to over 10 knots
significantly increasing our chances of winning the extra point,"
skipper, Richard Hewson, said.

On Visit Finland, the team are keeping up the pressure on Gold Coast
Australia and skipper, Olly Osborne, reports that his team is taking
advantage of the more comfortable sailing conditions to have a bit of a
"spring clean".

"The watch on bilge duty removed a good few dozen buckets of sea water
from the rope locker and various nooks and crannies of the bilge, and we
sent all the sole boards on deck for a good scrub too so life is now
much more civilised on board," Olly said.

The Visit Finland team also enjoyed a fleeting visit from HMS Edinburgh
overnight, a welcome diversion after almost two weeks at sea.

"In true British Navy style she gave us warm greeting over the VHF radio
and wished us well on our journey. It's good to know that we have
friends down here and the encounter did much to boost crew morale," Olly
said.

On De Lage Landen, Stuart Jackson said his crew was now enjoying flatter
conditions with the wind on the beam.

"We are still doing reasonable boat speed despite the decreasing wind
and we're looking forward to the wind filling in, which the forecast
predicts in around 24 hours time for the whole fleet," Stuart said.

The De Lage Landen crew's gratitude for the flatter conditions will be
partly due to their lack of a functioning toilet after blocking both of
the marine heads on board.

"We have managed to block both heads overnight, so buckets are in use
which has brought much hilarity to the morning," Stuart said. Such
blockages raise the prospect of taking apart all the plumbing that
transfers waste from the toilet into the sea, one of the least popular
but most important jobs on board when it needs to be done.

The group to the south has been plagued by light airs overnight, and the
team on New York logged just 34 miles in 12 hours.

"We spent most of the day bobbing around doing zero boat knots stuck in
the middle of a high. We went south a couple of days ago to skirt around
a high, except the next one caught up with us before we could get out of
there," New York skipper, Gareth Glover, reports.

"We even had the lightweight spinnaker up in the morning trying to
outrun the high moving in, but after about an hour or so the wind
completely died, flogging the spinnaker around and damaging the foot
before we could get it down," he said.

Gareth said his crew took advantage of the windless day to do some
maintenance and one of the priorities was to free a broken Yankee sheet
that had fallen in the water and wrapped around the rudder.

"One of our crew dove in with a snorkel, figured out the best approach
and we were able to put the free end on a winch and pull it out," he
said.

On Welcome to Yorkshire, skipper Rupert Dean is frustrated that the
forecasted westerlies have not materialised. But even though his
decision to head south failed to propel his team up the leader board, it
gave them an opportunity to sail though the remote Tristan da Cunha
group of islands.

Rupert had anticipated that his team would pass within 25 miles south of
the group of islands, home to the world's most remote permanent human
settlement, but all that changed due to the light airs.

"In order to keep the boat moving we had to alter our course and go
right through the middle of the islands. To see the jagged peaks of
Nightingale Island, the sinister block citadel of Inaccessible and the
majestic volcanic cone of Tristan, with snow on top, bathed in bright
sunlight, was amazing. What a privilege to see something so remote, that
so few in the world have or will ever see," Rupert reported.

"Whilst the Clipper Race is fundamentally about pushing our boats and
ourselves to the max in order to win those vital points over our
competitors, there are times when there is a lot more to it than that,"
he added.

The team on Geraldton Western Australia is also experiencing lighter
winds to the south.

"As we approached Tristan da Cunha, the wind went all light again. But
it was a great sight to see, as this was the first land we have come
across in days," skipper, Juan Coetzer, said.

On Singapore, skipper Ben Bowley, said that life is made "all the more
frustrating" by knowing that the boats to the north have not experienced
the same wind hole and continue to make excellent progress toward Cape
Town.

"It has taken all my humour to stop myself from retiring to my cabin and
screaming profanities very loudly into my pillow," Ben admits.

"At least we are now moving, making a course over the ground of about
040 which is less than ideal but the sails are full and no longer trying
to flog themselves to death," he said.

On Qingdao, still the most northerly boat, the mood of the crew has
improved after the wind backed to allow them to point at Cape Town,
according to skipper, Ian Conchie.

"The boat is also now sailing a lot flatter allowing people to move
around more easily and giving everyone a chance to catch up on lost
sleep," he said.

Ian has also taken advantage of the conditions to attempt to sort out
the team's wind instruments which involved a trip up the 89-foot mast.
He said he was not able to repair them in the sea state, so they are
waiting for calmer conditions to try again.

After spending 24 hours in Stealth Mode, Derry-Londonderry has
re-emerged in fourth position.

"We have all taken off our black balaclavas, switched our torches back
on and began talking to each other on deck as we come out of Stealth
Mode and back into the real world," skipper, Mark Light, said.

"Our strategy seems to be paying off at the moment although it is very
interesting to see the progress of the other Clipper 68s. There is so
much interest in the four position updates that each boat receives on a
daily basis and every time there are quick calculations of mileage to
determine ground gained or lost," he said.

Mark said his team was being "ever vigilant" to maintain best course and
speed whilst still looking after their boat.

"We're in fourth place at the moment but desperately want to get onto
that podium. At the same time protecting our current position is very
important as we have worked extremely hard to get where we are and we
are not about to give it away easily," Mark added.

ENDS//

Positions at 1200 UTC, Thursday 22 September

Boat DTF*
1 Gold Coast Australia 1038nm
2 Visit Finland 1199nm (+61nm DTL*)
3 De Lage Landen 1138nm (+100nm)
4 Derry-Londonderry 1204nm (+166nm)
5 Qingdao 1235nm (+197nm)
6 Singapore 1288nm (+250nm)
7 New York 1366nm (+328nm)
8 Welcome to Yorkshire 1412nm (+374nm)
9 Geraldton Western Australia 1430nm (+392nm)
10 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 1573nm (+535nm)

*DTF = Distance to Finish DTL = Distance to Leader
Full positions are updated every three hours and can be found at
www.clipperroundtheworld.com.

Become a fan of the Clipper Race on Facebook:
www.facebook.com/clipperroundtheworld

#68 Leka

Leka

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,678 posts
  • Location:Tinh Gia, Central North Province, Vietnam, but I still call Australia home.

Posted 25 September 2011 - 06:43 AM

Wouldn't the visit and supplies drop by HMS Edinburgh be classed as outside assistance?

#69 Leka

Leka

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,678 posts
  • Location:Tinh Gia, Central North Province, Vietnam, but I still call Australia home.

Posted 25 September 2011 - 06:48 AM

Nice picture, but what is that sheet/knot thingy?

Attached Files



#70 lydia

lydia

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,146 posts

Posted 25 September 2011 - 07:02 PM

Preventer

#71 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 25 September 2011 - 08:53 PM

CLIPPER 11-12
RACE 3: RIO DE JANEIRO TO CAPE TOWN
DAY 16

* Welcome to Yorkshire set to claim Ocean Sprint bonus point
* Teams appreciate the majesty of racing across open oceans
* Gold Coast Australia expected to arrive in Cape Town on Tuesday

Welcome to Yorkshire looks set to claim the bonus point for the Race 3 Ocean Sprint, covering the distance between longitude five degrees west and longitude two degrees east in 32 hours and ten minutes, 29 minutes faster than New York and 40 minutes quicker than Singapore.

Geraldton Western Australia has also declared their Sprint time as 33 hours and 17 minutes, the fourth fastest in the fleet. Edinburgh Inspiring Capital is just over half way into the time trial having started at 1206 UTC on Saturday 24 September.

Skipper of the English entry, Rupert Dean, says, "We've had some fantastic sailing on Welcome to Yorkshire averaging nearly 10.5 knots during the Ocean Sprint. The crew have done themselves proud. Time will tell if we have done enough to win this valuable point."

The changing wind conditions have allowed most of the teams to fly their spinnakers in the closing stages of the race across the South Atlantic from Rio de Janeiro to Cape Town - something they haven't been able to do for a while.

Rupert continues, "Last night saw more heavyweight kite action. Helming for the crew was quite a challenge in disorientating, moonless conditions, with wind on the beam. However, now daybreak has arrived things are a little easier. As the miles click down, all of us are looking forward to a warm reception in Cape Town."

"Well done to Rupert and his crew, a fine effort," says Ben Bowley, Singapore's skipper. He and his team are also flying spinnakers again, albeit after something of a false start. "We spent most of the day yesterday sailing on a beam reach with the Yankee 1 up. At one point we tried to use the heavy spinnaker but the angle was still a bit tight for the wind strength. The kite came back down and the Yankee 1 back up. As the afternoon wore on however, the wind backed round a little and we were finally able to hoist our Vicky, giving us an extra knot to knot and a half of boat speed."

Singapore's crew have nicknamed their heavyweight spinnaker 'Sticky Vicky' because of the amount of tape used to repair the sail in Rio de Janeiro.

"All credit to the crew, they did an excellent job of helming and trimming the kite in pitch black conditions; not bad considering we have not had a spinnaker up at night for a couple of weeks. We have been making excellent course and speed all night and were delighted to see that we got past Qingdao in the early hours of the morning; Derry-Londonderry may be a slightly tougher nut to crack however as they are sailing in much the same conditions as us. We can only hope that once again our more southerly position comes to fruition in the closing stages of this hard fought race," continues Ben.

The teams are enjoying the change in conditions, Gareth Glover, skipper of New York, remarking after a trip up the mast to repair a broken halyard, "When I was up there I took five minutes at the top looking down at New York and the stars and sea. It was so quiet and peaceful and I was thinking how lucky I was to be a part of the New York team and Clipper."

Second quickest in the ocean sprint, Gareth and his team have enjoyed, "a great few days on New York. We have been sailing at around 10 knots for the past three days, white sail reaching, and after placing third in the last Ocean Sprint we were hoping to do better."

De Lage Landen's crew have also been able to appreciate the majesty of racing across the open ocean, according to skipper, Stuart Jackson.

He reports, "The crew welcomed the change in wind conditions that allowed us to hoist our heavyweight spinnaker yesterday morning and we've enjoyed good speed under both sunny skies and starry nights. Everyone is in good spirits, looking forward to arriving in Cape Town in a comparatively good position relative to Leg 1 and, of course, sampling some famous South African wine!

"At the same time, we can't let up, and the crew well understands the importance of continuing to work hard to protect our position. At present, we're looking closely at the approaching high pressure system, seeking to avoid the lighter wind conditions, and to circumvent as much of it as is possible as we move toward the final few hundred miles to Cape Town. We've already encountered some diminished wind and changed down to our medium weight spinnaker but continue to make good speed. Night watches blend sharp focus on helming and trim with an aesthetic appreciation of a beautifully illuminated kite."

In between the fleet and the finish line in Cape Town is an area of light winds which will have to be negotiated before they reach their destination. In addition, Edinburgh Inspiring Capital's crew may well have to endure some tough headwinds in the next few days.

It hasn't been plain sailing for the team representing Scotland's capital. "While we were doing 14 knots we hit something in the water and it damaged the speed and log transducer, leaving the sea to flood in under the galley sink, where the transducer was located," skipper Gordon Reid told the Race Office this morning. "On a boat moving fast, the water floods in at a fair old rate and, if unattended, within two minutes the boards are floating!"

Gordon manoeuvred himself under the galley sink to replace the broken transducer with a blank - a plastic bung the same size and shape as the transducer - before he and his crew emptied the bilges and prepared to hoist the medium weight spinnaker.

"We had been flying it rather nicely for a few hours doing around 10.5 knots, nice and steady with no gusts, wind angle around 110 to 120 degrees, pole around two feet from the forestay and very stable. The sail had no contact with any of the rigging and was flying well, when suddenly it just pulled apart at the port seam, just above the top of the clew reinforcements, around two feet from the actual clew. We got it down very quickly and it is unfortunately in shreds. We're not sure why it ripped, so adapt improvise, overcome."

On Derry-Londonderry skipper Mark Light and his crew seem to have shaken off the bad luck that dogged them in the last race.

"I am a great believer in things balancing out in the end and I am certain that we are now getting a little chunk of the luck that deserted us on the last leg where everything seemed to conspire against us!" says Mark. "The ocean is a great leveller. We have been flying our largest Yankee 1 headsail along with our staysail and full main for the last 20 hours or so and the wind has been a fraction forward of the beam - perfect for this sail plan. Now at night the wind is showing signs of backing from the north to north northwest and we have our medium weight spinnaker all prepared, up on deck, with the port spinnaker pole rigged and ready to go. All we need now is Mother Nature to allow us and we will be off again downwind at pace."

Mark paid tribute to the team's Mother Watch which yesterday served up a feast fit for King Neptune himself: tuna with pasta, garlic bread and a potato, onion and mushroom bake all followed by homemade fruit crumble with orange cake and hot custard.

"The on watch have taken charge of the deck and the off watch have gone to sleep happy and with full bellies!" Mark notes.

An army marches on its stomach according to the old adage and it's no different for an ocean racing team. Tasty and filling food served up to a tired and cold crew is the biggest morale booster possible.

Geraldton Western Australia's crew were also able to bring some cheer to birthday girl, Hilly Bouteloup, who suffered suspected cracked ribs in the gruelling conditions of the early stages of this race. Now on the mend and able to move around the boat again, the crew sang to her while she was on deck during happy hour.

All of the teams have an hour or two during each day, usually referred to as 'happy hour', when both watches overlap, the skipper holds a team briefing, birthdays and special occasions are marked and it provides an opportunity to air any concerns that people on board have. In the close confines of a 68-foot ocean racing yacht with little in the way of personal space, small niggles can soon turn into full blown rows if grievances are not aired and addressed as soon as they arise.

Early yesterday evening a rope attached to Geraldton Western Australia's spinnaker broke free.

"Sadly we had to drop our heavyweight spinnaker and re-run a new guy and hoist the medium weight spinnaker. We lost an hour doing all this," says skipper, Juan Coetzer. "On the flip side the crew worked extremely hard and sailed the boat really well. Now the race is on for Cape Town."

Now, with the leading teams counting down the hours until their arrival in Cape Town, there are still tactics to play out and the African land mass will also begin to influence local conditions as the boats close in on the finish line.

"It looks like the tactical decisions of the fleet are once again divided as each boat decides how to negotiate the fickle winds nearer the South African coast," says Olly Osborne, skipper of Visit Finland. "Those that opt for the more southerly course will see the better breeze, but stand to sail extra miles, and those that stick to rhumb line will take their chances in the lighter and less predictable air stream. We are in a more northerly position and will have to make the right choices if we are to maintain our position in the pack, and with the setbacks earlier in the leg due to sail damage a podium position is on everyone's minds."

The same question is being mulled over by Ian Conchie and his crew on Qingdao. "After several days of great sailing the wind continues to drop and has allowed Singapore to continue to reel us in and then overtake us through the night. The crew continue to work hard to try and keep the dragon moving but until the next system catches us up we know we will continue to lose time to the boats south of us. We hope that sailing the rhumb line (shortest route) will pay dividends later when the wind fills in again," he says.

Meanwhile, at the front of the fleet, Gold Coast Australia is on "the homeward strait" according to skipper, Richard Hewson.

"The seas out here at the moment are incredibly flat for open ocean and we are awaiting the swells from the large depression far to the south west that is slowly catching up to us. Hopefully by the time the swell catches us the wind will have increased making for good surfing conditions for the final stretch. While our southerly course has taken a big loop around the high pressure to the north it has given us more wind and we are hoping that it will result in good pressure all the way to Cape Town," he says.

Already the first signs of life outside of the yacht are beginning to come through, this morning's atmospheric conditions allowing transmissions from Cape Town to reach the team's VHF radio which crackled into life for the first time in more than a week.

"This was the first time we had heard any noise from our radio since our last communication with Singapore over a week ago and it was very nice to hear a friendly voice from the outside world.

"Sunrises as we get closer to Africa are amazing and can only be graded as a ten out of ten every morning. Now we have the sunrise on the starboard bow it rises up just under our Gold Coast Australia spinnaker providing what can only be described as a beautiful scene."

Gold Coast Australia is expected to arrive at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town on Tuesday 27 September with a further six teams expected to finish by the evening of Wednesday 28 September.

Race 3 Ocean Sprint

Welcome to Yorkshire: 32 hours 10 minutes
New York: 32 hours 49 minutes
Singapore: 32 hours 52 minutes
Geraldton Western Australia: 33 hours 17 minutes
Derry-Londonderry: 35 hours 8 minutes
Visit Finland: 36 hours 30 minutes
Qingdao: 37 hours 47 minutes
Edinburgh Inspiring Capital: started at 1206 UTC, 24 September
Gold Coast Australia: ineligible
De Lage Landen: ineligible


Positions at 0900 UTC, Sunday 25 September

Boat DTF*
1 Gold Coast Australia 420
2 Visit Finland 484 (DTL*64nm)
3 De Lage Landen 511 (+91nm)
4 Derry-Londonderry 563 (+143nm)
5 Singapore 612 (+192nm)
6 Qingdao 643 (+223nm)
7 New York 676 (+255nm)
8 Welcome to Yorkshire 719 (+299nm)
9 Geraldton Western Australia 760 (+339nm)
10 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 1,005 (+585nm)

*DTF = Distance to Finish, DTL = Distance to Leader
Full positions are updated every three hours and can be found at www.clipperroundtheworld.com.

Attached Files



#72 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 26 September 2011 - 08:40 PM

Injuries in the Night
http://www.lisablairsailstheworld.com/blog/?p=283
This lady is on Gold Coast & has raised money to send herself around the world.

The evening of the 7th day at sea found me helming with 4-5 meter swell, beating upwind with driving winds of 40-50 knots throwing spray in your face making it very hard to see anything as we flew a sail plan of three Reefs in the Main Sail, Yankee 3 and Stay Sail.

The concentration required to predict the waves on a dark night is exhaustive but add to this weather so cold that you are wearing all the layers you own and are so puffed up that it becomes hard just to move around the deck or to simply raise your arm. Your fingers are frozen even through the thickest and toughest of gloves, so much so that they ache and send shooting pain up your arm when you move them.

We are sailing at 35 degrees South following the strongest winds to help rocket us to Cape Town so far the plan is working as we are in first place with a 30 nautical mile lead and increasing.

The wear is not only on the crew but also the boat as we lost the Raymarine wind instrument from the top of the rig as we flew off a wave, now we are sailing blind just guessing at the wind by the way the boat feels and how many white cap’s we can see. By the end of Day 8 the strong winds had reduced allowing us to catch our breath for a moment as we shake out reef after reef until we are sailing with the full Main once again and the Yankee 2.

Unfortunately when the watch shook out the last reef they did not hold the other reefing pennants secure causing the leach of the Main Sail to flog so violently that it snapped a batten in half. Once again I was called to go up the rig and retrieve it as we did not want to loose anything else overboard however this time it was not a very fun experience.

It was a routine procedure to be carried out at night, requiring me to hold the leach of the Main Sail as I was hoisted up, laying against the windward side of the sail. I was attached by a safety line around Reefing Pennant 3 so that should I fall off the main I would not swing out to the blue yonder.

Unfortunately once I was level with the broken batten it became evident that the batten had snapped in such a way that there was now a lethal weapon jutting out from the back of the sail formed of sharp fibreglass spikes that were not going to be removed.

As I was making this assessment the boat lurched below me as it fell of a wave flinging me first towards the bow along the Main Sail until my safety line stopped me short and than towards the back of the boat until I fell right off the back of the Main Sail into the inky blackness of the darkness beyond.

I am now getting flung around like a rag doll completely out of control where all I can do is try to grab the batten to stop it taking out my eye. I felt it scratch my face and then slice my hand as I fly from one side of the main to the other shouting to be lowered.

The boat kept on crashing through a series of waves and I kept getting tossed around so hard that it felt like my arms were going to tear off, a few choice words later and I was finally being lowered away from that dreadful batten. Once I was safely on the deck I told Skipper Richard Hewson what a stupid idea that was, to his credit he agreed.

Later that evening after I had removed all the fiberglass splinters from my hand and taken some time to calm down I was once again on-deck for watch. The primary focus at the moment is trim as we strive to increase our lead on the rest of the fleet, recently we had hoisted the Yankee 1 and it was yet to be fine tuned so Andrew Ryan my watch leader asked for me to adjust the trim to suit. After a quick inspection I decided that the car position on the Yankee 1 needed to be moved Aft as the foot of the sail was slack. Using the chain strop and working with Rob Chester we maneuvered the car back into position and began to grind on the Yankee sheet again.

I was standing down on the leeward side next to the sheet when all of a sudden the car flew aft smashing into and sheering the pin that locks it into place freeing up the track so that it could travel to the end of the track. This resulted in the Yankee Sheet flying up and striking me hard in the face. At the last second I moved my head just a little so that it was not a full blow but it was enough of a strike to turn me 180 degrees. One second I was facing in-board and the next I was laying over the guard wires looking at the black ocean rushing below me wondering what just happened. If I was not tethered to the boat with my safety line I could have easily gone overboard in that second.

In complete shock I was taken below to be checked with my hands shaking and tears running freely I was told that there was no broken skin just some light swelling on my left cheek, enough to make eating uncomfortable for the next few days, not even a bruise to show for it but what a shock.

Later Andrew came down and said that he was shaking for at least half an hour later because he saw the whole thing and thought that I had major injuries simply because of how hard I was flung around. Not wishing to chance a third incident for the night I decided I had better get some sleep and hopefully tomorrow will be a better day.

The next day I was feeling a lot better after some rest and a surprise visit from some active whales. There were two of them and they were so close to the boat that I needed to keep bearing away so that I didn’t hit one of them as they surged through the water effortlessly over-taking us only to dive and come back up behind us ready to do it again. They were playing with us just showing us who really rules the oceans and there was really no competition once you saw the power of them when they thrust through the ocean with spray flying off in all directions as they carve ahead. But whales aside Gold Coast Australia increased our lead to 50 nautical miles with the nearest boat being Visit Finland.

The South Atlantic High is to the south of us at the moment and is proving to be just as unpredictable as always. Stretching more than 700 nautical miles wide this is one stretch of ocean that we did not wish to sail into as it would be filled with little or no wind. Unfortunately for us the High was tracking north looking like it would settle directly above us however on day 10 when things were looking dire there was a little section that broke away creating two highs allowing us to ride the very narrow wind belt through and out of the danger zone, other boats were not so lucky.

The boat takes on a rhythm and the days roll into one. We sleep, go on standby, eat, go on watch, complete some maintenance, eat, sleep and complete the cycle all over again.

With less than two days until we arrive in Cape Town, Gold Coast Australia is a hive of activity as we ready her for port by conducting a very extensive spring clean. This evolves all the food bags to be removed, washed and audited, all the lockers wiped and disinfected, all the bunk cushions aired on the deck, all the top sides polished and including the stainless steal and any other maintenance tasks completed. This is great because the more that we can get completed now the less that we need to complete in port.

We have now crossed three time zones and sailed over 2,000 nautical miles across the Atlantic Ocean testing our limits and endurance levels but also having a lot of fun. On day 13 Rich decided that it would be a great idea to start the Gold Coast Australia Choir with choir practice at lunch time during the happy hour meeting. This is a real laugh because there is not one person on-board who can carry a tune but it always brings a smile to our faces as we belt out the tune ‘Africa’ by Toto.

Just visualise it for a second, you have lawyers, teachers, sailors, accounts, diplomats and a whole big mixture of different people all singing their hearts our in the South Atlantic Ocean where profession or social status holds no meaning. We as a team have come far together, laughed and cried together. I can see no better way to cross an ocean than with a group of strangers who have become your family.

Finland is still 60 nautical miles behind with the last boat over 500 nautical miles back as Gold Coast Australia closes the gap to Cape Town with the Full Main and Medium Weight Spinnaker to aid her to her podium position.

Attached Files



#73 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 26 September 2011 - 08:57 PM

Whats the Aus version of Sudocream?

CLIPPER 11-12

RACE 3: RIO DE JANEIRO TO CAPE TOWN

DAY 17

* Gold Coast Australia leads the charge to finish line in strong breeze

* Welcome to Yorkshire secures Ocean Sprint bonus point

* Spinnaker dramas on Derry-Londonderry

Gold Coast Australia has cleared lighter winds to get into stronger breeze to the south to commence the charge to the finish line off Cape Town.

The Australian team logged the joint best 12-hour run of 116 miles with Singapore overnight putting them within 200 miles of the finish of the 3,300-mile race from Rio de Janeiro.

"Gold Coast Australia is now clear of the patch of lighter winds caused by the South Atlantic High and is sailing along with good speed directly towards Cape Town," skipper, Richard Hewson, said.

Richard added that he was expecting the wind to drop off as his team approaches land, so he cautioned that he was not getting his hopes too high.

"The last few miles of a race always take longer than you think," he said.

With a third win in his sights, the Australian skipper is feeling confident.

"The crew is sailing the boat really well and everyone has come a long way since the start of the race. Helming and trimming techniques are developing and are now definitely above my expectations for this stage of the race," he said.

De Lage Landen has also been making good progress as one of the four boats to post a triple digit 12-hour run. Skipper Stuart Jackson and his team are now 92 miles behind Gold Coast Australia after clawing their way up the leader board.

On Welcome to Yorkshire, skipper Rupert Dean and his team have secured the bonus point for the Ocean Sprint between 5 degrees west and 2 degrees east.

Yesterday Welcome to Yorkshire declared a provisional time of 32 hours and ten minutes, the fastest to date. Edinburgh Inspiring Capital has declared their time at 46 hours and 46 minutes this morning.
"I would like to credit my crew for our success in the Ocean Sprint. They worked hard, maintained their focus and did our Welcome to Yorkshire sponsor proud," Rupert said.

Olly Osborne and his team on Visit Finland have opted to go into Stealth Mode as they close in on the finish. They will emerge from the invisibility shield at the midnight UTC position reports tonight and until then they will keep everyone guessing about whether they have managed to keep the pressure on Gold Coast Australia and see off the challenge from De Lage Landen.

"It is beginning to look like this could be a really close finish with the leading boats converging again on the rhumb line. We are desperately trying to hold off De Lage Landen at present but she is sailing well and no amount of trimming and spinnaker peels seem to open the gap between us," Olly said.

"This may well be due to her more southerly position, but it is a great incentive to hunt for the last ounce of boat speed and keeps the watches focused. With more than 400 miles of spinnaker work ahead of us it promises to be a fantastic finale to this race," he added.

On Derry-Londonderry, Mark Light said his crew was also looking forward to the downwind conditions despite some "spinnaker shenanigans" in the early hours of this morning.

Mark said his team had been carrying out regular checks for chafe on the loaded lines and hoisting or lowering the halyard by a few inches on an hourly basis, a practice known as 'exercising the halyard' to prevent excessive heat build up and pressure which can lead to failure.

"As night fell we had double checked everything and even secured a second spinnaker guy onto the end of our pole so that the pole would stay in position if our existing guy was to break. All these checks and measures are routine on boats these big and powerful Clipper 68s with oversize spinnakers that can exert massive forces on lines and huge
stresses on the boat," he said.

Despite all the checks and precautionary measures, the 'all hands on deck' call was made in the early hours of the morning. In the darkness, Mark worked out that the spinnaker guy snap shackle that attaches to the sheet had opened and allowed the spinnaker to detach from the pole.

"Our LegenDerry crew once again excelled themselves by getting the sail down very quickly and with no damage, and after a thorough inspection of all lines, we found nothing untoward, so re-hoisted, trimmed and carried on at a steady 10 knots of boat speed," Mark said.

Following their success is the Ocean Sprint, Rupert and his team on Welcome to Yorkshire are hunting down Qingdao and New York.

"Right now on Welcome to Yorkshire, we have a race within a race. We're hunting down New York and Qingdao ahead of us, whilst looking over our shoulder at Geraldton Western Australia behind," Rupert said, acknowledging that more "twist and turns" were likely before the finish.


On Qingdao, Ian Conchie and his team are doing everything they can to hold their position. As the wind swung round to the west, the Chinese team headed south and hoisted their biggest spinnaker to maximise boat speed.

"With each position report we have been looking at the rest of the fleet wishing we had the same wind and finally this morning we have," Ian said.

However, this morning the team is paying the price for flying the biggest but most delicate of its spinnakers. "During the night we managed to rip our lightweight spinnaker all the way from top to bottom giving Dave, our sail repair crew member, a huge amount of work to do in
Cape Town," Ian said.

With just two miles separating them from Qingdao, New York is keen to hang onto this small lead. At the time, skipper Gareth Glover is aware of the threat posed by Welcome to Yorkshire after posting the fastest time in the Ocean Sprint thanks to their southerly position.

"There is big wind developing in front us and at this point looks like the lead boats might just get through but we'll to keep up our speed above 10 knots to squeak through," Gareth said, adding that he hoped he would be able to hold the medium weight spinnaker to the finish.

On Geraldton Western Australia, Juan Coetzer said his team had dealt with a tear on the leading edge of one of their spinnakers. He said he called for an immediate drop and opted for a guy-run drop, keeping the guy attached to prevent flogging, to avoid further damage.

"This was something the crew had never done before but they listened to the orders I gave and we managed to save a really big disaster," Juan said. Adding that crew member, Pete Phillips, had spent four hours doing a repair. "It's now up and flying again so happy days," he said.

On Edinburgh Inspiring Capital, Gordon Reid and his team are alternating between a poled out headsail and the heavyweight spinnaker as they endeavour to make best speed towards Cape Town.

"In the dynamic game of ocean racing, nothing ever stays the same and especially not the wind on the edge of two South Atlantic pressure systems," Gordon said.

The Edinburgh Inspiring Capital team is taking advantage of the downwind conditions to gets some maintenance done ahead of their arrival in Cape Town.

"Being on a downwind or beamy course means the boat is invariably flatter allowing the crew to crack on with our never ending jobs list. On any yacht your jobs list should never be empty as there is continual ongoing maintenance and there are always improvements and efficiencies to be discovered," Gordon said.

Singapore is making good progress and along with race leaders, Gold Coast Australia, logged the best 12-hour run overnight. Skipper Ben Bowley said his team had changed down from the heavy weight spinnaker to the medium weight kite as the wind abated giving them an extra 1.5 knots of boat speed.

"As the wind had slowly backed round through the night we are happy with our position for our final run into Cape Town having gybed over this morning. We are still making sure we stay a little south of the rhumb line to ensure that we don't end up going upwind on the final 100 miles into the finish," Ben said.

As their second transatlantic race of the two-month series draws to a close, Ben and his team are looking forward to making landfall in Africa.

"As we enjoy a wonderful sunrise just in front of our sponsored spinnaker with fresh coffees in hand, all thoughts are turning to our imminent arrival in Cape Town after what had been a challenging leg. Fingers crossed that this wind holds for just long enough," Ben said.

The Clipper Race Team has now arrived in Cape Town and is busy preparing for the arrival of the Clipper fleet over the coming days. The ten boats will be berthed in the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront until the start of Race 4 to Geraldton in Western Australia. Gold Coast Australia is
expected to finish not before 1000 local tomorrow, and further estimated arrival times will be posted in due course.
ENDS//

Positions at 0900 UTC, Monday 26 September

Boat DTF*

1 Gold Coast Australia 187nm

2 De Lage Landen 279nm (+92nm DTL*)

3 Derry-Londonderry 346nm (+159nm)

4 Visit Finland 351nm (+164nm) Stealth Mode
until 2355 UTC

5 Singapore 379nm (+192nm)

6 New York 463nm (+275nm)

7 Qingdao 465nm (+277nm)

8 Welcome to Yorkshire 503nm (+316nm)

9 Geraldton Western Australia 570nm (383+nm)

10 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 834nm (+646nm)

*DTF = Distance to Finish DTL = Distance to Leader


Full positions are updated every three hours and can be found at
www.clipperroundtheworld.com.

#74 lupedelupe

lupedelupe

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 30 posts

Posted 27 September 2011 - 05:13 PM

Caught Gold Coast purely by chance earlier today.
Wrong side of the pier, what the hell.

Posted Image

#75 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 27 September 2011 - 08:50 PM

Caught Gold Coast purely by chance earlier today.
Wrong side of the pier, what the hell.

Posted Image

Cool - thanks for that I'm going to hope you are around for the dragon lady's entrace too!

#76 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 27 September 2011 - 08:53 PM

CLIPPER 11-12

RACE 3: RIO DE JANEIRO TO CAPE TOWN

DAY 18

* Gold Coast Australia secures hat-trick with third victory into Cape Town

* De Lage Landen to take fight for second place to last mile

* Edinburgh Inspiring Capital to dive on rudder to free entanglement

Gold Coast Australia secured their third consecutive win in Clipper 11-12 crossing the finish line off Cape Town at 1056 UTC on Tuesday.

The Australian team remains unbeaten after the first three races of the year-long series with their latest victory keeping them firmly at the top of the leader board.

Richard Hewson said his team struggled to keep the boat moving in less than 5 knots of breeze as they approached the finish.

"After the sun rose the wind became so light that our lightweight spinnaker would no longer fill but we managed to hoist the Yankee 1 and staysail to keep us moving towards the finish," Richard said.

Arriving in the V&A Waterfront, Richard was thrown overboard by his celebrating crew. The dripping but jubilant skipper said, "Third time lucky - a fantastic race by all the crew. The finish was very challenging. We had light airs at the beginning and end and some really tough conditions in the middle, so the dunking and the finish really reflected the whole race!"

"We had the Traffic Separation Scheme [shipping lanes] on one side and Table Mountain on the other side taking away our wind and we just sat there. We had been hoping to finish two hours earlier but without wind sailing boats don't move!" continued Richard, whose uncle was on the quay to welcome him.

Visit Finland emerged from Stealth Mode overnight, but was unable to catch the Australians before they crossed the finish line and had 35 miles to run to the finish at 1200 UTC.

Meanwhile, De Lage Landen is keeping the pressure on Visit Finland and Stuart Jackson said his crew is giving the best of themselves in the duel for second place.

"After chasing Visit Finland for days now, everyone is aware that it will be a fight until the last mile. Focus is the key word today both on deck and down below," Stuart said.

On Singapore, Ben Bowley and his crew are feeling buoyed after overtaking Derry-Londonderry.

"It was very satisfying seeing that by midnight we had managed to overhaul Derry-Londonderry. If we can maintain our fourth place until the finish then we would retain our second place overall, which would be an excellent starting point for Leg 3," Ben said.

Despite coping with light fickle winds and a spinnaker wrap overnight, Ben said that his Singaporean team, backed by Keppel Corporation, has continued to make "reasonable progress" under white sails.

"Our hope now is that the wind holds just long enough for us to make it to Cape Town in the next couple of days as there would be nothing more frustrating than being within striking distance of cold beer, rare steaks and chips only to be becalmed for another 24 hours," Ben said.

Mark Light reports that his team endured a "tough night" on Derry-Londonderry after the wind died allowing Singapore to sneak ahead.

"The wind deserted us and we have struggled to make progress since, reminding us that the race is never over until that line is crossed," he said.

Mark said he had hoped that his team's decision to head in a north easterly direction to create a little more apparent wind would pay off, but the wind to the south had been stronger than forecast allowing the southerly boats to continue flying their spinnakers and achieve greater boat speeds through the night.

"Whether it was a brave move or foolish, it's hard to say. We always had the chance of catching the boat ahead and the lure of a third place and a podium finish is a hard one to resist, but in doing so we might have jeopardised our own fourth place," he conceded.

Gareth Glover and his team on New York are also pushing hard despite also battling with lighter winds. With just 81 miles separating them for Derry-Londonderry and Qingdao snapping at their heels, Gareth is hoping that the boats up ahead have run out of wind too.

"There are still over 250 miles to go on this race and it's never over until you have crossed that line, so we will keep pushing until we are there," he said.

As they approach Cape Town, the teams are discussing maintenance programmes for the stopover. Gareth said his team just has two major jobs for the next stopover, replacing three battens in the main and taking off the main traveller to undertake repairs, as their three spinnakers remain undamaged.

On Edinburgh Inspiring Capital, Gordon Reid and his crew have been dealing with their latest round of challenges, this time in the form of a rope or fishing net caught around the rudder.

"It's a straightforward matter of diving under the boat with a knife in hand to cut it free. In a marina it's an easy job but in 20 knots of breeze on big ocean swell, swimming three meters under a slamming 40-tonne boat is no walk in the park, so for now we let the rope stream. With very little impact on the steering, it is no real drama, but it must be removed before we start the engine and engage the prop, so we're waiting until conditions are more favourable for the skipper to take a dip in his tartan trunks," Gordon said

With almost 600 miles to the finish, the Edinburgh Inspiring Capital team faces the prospect of another few days at sea whilst the first teams enjoy the trappings of life ashore but Gordon's team remains positive.

"Although everyone is looking forward to getting to Cape Town, Dave Gallagher, one of our leggers, suggested that we be thankful and consider ourselves lucky to have had the experience we have had both as individuals and a team, and we decided to come up with ten reasons to be thankful for staying on the boat longer. When we asked everyone to contribute we ended up with a lot more than ten reasons," Gordon reports.

"The crew of Edinburgh Inspiring Capital has proved that they've got what it takes to cross the South Atlantic, ride the storm and look after the Purple Beastie and each other to overcome challenge after challenge. They have what it takes and I am proud of each and every one of them," he said.

Rupert Dean said his team on Welcome to Yorkshire had decide not to fly a spinnaker overnight in light winds to avoid the risk of damage to the precious sails by getting caught in the rig.

"As we near the end of a long, challenging leg, Cape Town cannot arrive fast enough for all on Welcome to Yorkshire. It dominates conversation, with estimations of calculations of our ETA varying as wildly as our boat speeds over the past few days, as our VMG [velocity made good] has ranged from 2 to 11 knots!" Rupert said.

With just over 300 miles to the finish, Rupert said there is still a lot of racing to be done. "Positions can be lost and won in the final few yards, so there is everything to play for," he said.

Ahead of Welcome to Yorkshire, Qingdao is threatening New York's sixth place, with just two miles separating the two teams.

Qingdao's skipper, Ian Conchie, said his team had enjoyed another good day's sailing as the wind backed through the day allowing them to change to their heavyweight spinnaker to "reach nicely towards the finish line".

"The toll of ocean racing is now showing on the boat. We only have one Yankee halyard and one spinnaker halyard which forces the crew to rethink how we carry out each evolution, making best use of what we have and all the winches," he said.

Along with changing wind conditions, Ian reports that the temperature has been fluctuating too as they approach South Africa.

"Just like we have to change the sail plan to suit the wind, the crew have to change clothes to suit the conditions. During the day we have lovely sunny conditions allowing the brave to go down to shorts but then as the sun sets the temperature drops and the thermals hats and gloves come out, quite a contrast day to night," Ian said, adding that he had picked up the "crew cold" just in time for Cape Town and spent the whole day in thermals as a result.

On Geraldton Western Australia, skipper Juan Coetzer said he is looking forward to arriving in Cape Town, a city where he lived and worked before moving to the UK to work for Clipper Ventures.

"It has always been a dream of mine to sail around the world and I feel overwhelmed and ecstatic to be arriving in Cape Town as part of this opportunity of a lifetime," Juan said.

"I'm really looking forward to seeing Table Mountain and Lion's Head, and after nearly three weeks at sea I'm looking forward to a medium-rare fillet steak, fries and ice cream," he said.

Yesterday brought more frustrations for Juan and his crew. First their heavyweight spinnaker started to develop another tear along the luff tape and then they made a hole in their medium weight as the wind dropped and shifted.

After a day of spinnaker dramas, the Geraldton Western Australia team switched to white sails as the wind built and everyone is now focused on getting to Cape Town as soon as possible.

One of the crew on Geraldton Western Australia who is particularly looking forward to arriving is South African Tony Welton. A semi-retired financial director from Durban, Tony is taking part in Leg 1 and Leg 2 of Clipper 11-12.

"I'm most looking forward to a bath, clean clothes, a good meal and seeing my wife who I last saw on 18 July when I left South Africa for Gosport," Tony said.

"After nearly three weeks at sea I can't wait to tuck into biltong, Windhoek beer, rump steak, lots of vegetables and droëwors [a popular South African snack food made by drying the traditional coriander-seed spiced boerewors sausage]," he added.

Following Gold Coast Australia's arrival, the Visit Finland team is expected to finish around 1700 UTC today and then De Lage Landen at around 2100 UTC. Singapore and Derry-Londonderry are expected to arrive tomorrow at 1600 UTC and 1700 UTC respectively. Estimated arrival times for the rest of the fleet will be posted in due course.

The ten boats will be berthed in the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront until the start of Race 4 to Geraldton in Western Australia on 5 October.

ENDS//

Positions at 1200 UTC, Tuesday 27 September

Boat DTF*

1 Gold Coast Australia Finished at 10:56 UTC 27/09

2 Visit Finland 35nm (+35nm DTL*)

3 De Lage Landen 50nm (+50nm)

4 Singapore 184nm (+184nm)

5 Derry-Londonderry 191nm (+191nm)

6 New York 272nm (+272nm)

7 Qingdao 274nm (+274nm)

8 Welcome to Yorkshire 301nm (+301nm)

9 Geraldton Western Australia 351nm (351+nm)

10 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 595nm (+595nm)

*DTF = Distance to Finish DTL = Distance to Leader

Full positions are updated every three hours and can be found at www.clipperroundtheworld.com.
Become a fan of the Clipper Race on Facebook:
www.facebook.com/clipperroundtheworld

Attached Files



#77 Swanno (Ohf Shore)

Swanno (Ohf Shore)

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,782 posts
  • Location:Perth, Western Australia

Posted 27 September 2011 - 11:45 PM

I was reading about some one being taken off a boat injured? Thought it was you for a moment until i realised that it wasnt from a galley fire :ph34r:

#78 DtM

DtM

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,283 posts
  • Location:Out of the Office

Posted 28 September 2011 - 01:24 AM

Very mean !!! :rolleyes:

#79 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 28 September 2011 - 02:28 AM

I was reading about some one being taken off a boat injured? Thought it was you for a moment until i realised that it wasnt from a galley fire :ph34r:

hahaha - so you'll be really concerned & supporting lydia if someone gets taken off between Gold Coast & China - or if we all have to get off & stand on a rock & wait for the next boat! :lol:

#80 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 28 September 2011 - 02:29 AM

Very mean !!! :rolleyes:

thanks for the hug m8 :(

#81 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 28 September 2011 - 08:57 PM

Crew diary from the guys at the back
RACE 3 - DAY 19 - David Gallagher and Nick Barclay (Edinburgh Inspiring Capital)

Dear all, Scarlet and David calling from Edinburgh Inspiring Capital. Ten more days to go, spirits are high, and we are rocketing along to darkest Africa. We’ve picked up some good winds, and spirits are buoyant, as the crew is beginning to think of the attractions of the mother city.

The Neaps watch, are on deck at present. Consisting of the four musketeers – Shaggy, Trinning, Baz and the illusive Scarlet, they are accompanied by Dorris, our resident rose amongst the thorns. On this leg we’ve been joined by, David our resident chocolatier, who keeps us topped up with goodies keeping a paternal eye on all our activities, making sure rules 2 and 6 are never broken. Aunty Pru our songstress keeping us all fortified with plenty of tea. While Kay counts down the days until we reach land.

Last night was a doozy, with a gybe, a shaking out of a reef, and a riding turn on our primary winch to whittle away the hours until Shaggy and Scarlet dash of to bed, seeing if they can break the illusive three minute barrier, of disrobing and hopping into bed, before the rest of the watch has had an opportunity to come down the companion way. Whilst Rich manages to take half an hour to join our motley crew, in the bachelor pad at the pointy end of the ghetto. What is he doing? Probably best not to ask.

Sadly this is our last blog of Leg 2, and although we did not take pole position, friendships were forged, and we managed to have a whale of a time in the process.

To those leggers joining us on Leg 3 we are really looking forward to your company, but be warned the bar has been set high. So we advise researching toilet humour, and brining lots of treats as the musketeers have an amazing ability to consume twice their body weight in sweetie goodness in a single watch.

Keep smiling, best wishes all on Edinburgh Inspiring Capital, AKA the purple beastie.

Scarlet would like to add, “Mommy I’ll be home soon”

Positions at 0900 UTC, Wednesday 28 September

Boat DTF*

1 Gold Coast Australia Finished at 10:56 UTC 27/09

2 Visit Finland Finished at 18:22 UTC 27/09

3 De Lage Landen Finished at 21:30 UTC 27/09

4 Singapore 118nm (+118nm)

5 Derry-Londonderry 142nm (+142nm)

6 Welcome to Yorkshire 142nm (+272nm)

7 Qingdao 145nm (+145nm)

8 New York 147nm (+147nm)

9 Geraldton Western Australia 341nm (+341nm) Stealth Mode until 1155UTC 29/07

10 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 428nm (+428nm) Stealth Mode until 0559UTC 29/07

*DTF = Distance to Finish DTL = Distance to Leader

Attached Files



#82 Leka

Leka

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,678 posts
  • Location:Tinh Gia, Central North Province, Vietnam, but I still call Australia home.

Posted 29 September 2011 - 06:52 AM

They all write about the friends and fun with other crew memebers.
Surely there must be issues sometimes.
We want to hear about the bitch slapping, name calling knock down arguments, not all this lovey dovey stuff.

Ozee, we need good quality blogs from you. Relying on you to give us the dirt...........!!

#83 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 29 September 2011 - 08:07 AM

They all write about the friends and fun with other crew memebers.
Surely there must be issues sometimes.
We want to hear about the bitch slapping, name calling knock down arguments, not all this lovey dovey stuff.

Ozee, we need good quality blogs from you. Relying on you to give us the dirt...........!!

hahaha I have to say with so many nationalities doing the same thing a different way its like living in an episode of Star Trek - everyone is SERIOUSLY tolerant of each other.
They just get over themselves - even I did it!

#84 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 29 September 2011 - 08:28 PM

Safely in Cape Town 6th to boot!
Isn't she beautiful <sigh>!
When you are helming & surfing she does this wobbly fat bottom girl thing like you can feel bubbles under your boots - is there a name for that?

Attached Files

  • Attached File  CT2.jpg   71.02K   8 downloads


#85 DtM

DtM

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,283 posts
  • Location:Out of the Office

Posted 30 September 2011 - 03:26 AM

The mind boggles !! :D

#86 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 30 September 2011 - 10:03 AM

Hey Leka this guy has done some sailing before...
RACE 3 - DAY 20 - by Tony Welton and Desmond Saayman (Geraldton Western Australia)

It was in November 2007 that I first saw the Clipper Race fleet when they arrived in Durban. I was doing a day skipper course at the time and seeing the yachts in the marina stirred an excitement. What was really interesting was seeing the crews working on the yachts. Little did I realise that this was essential maintenance needed to keep the yachts racing! Today I am one of those crew who do essential maintenance - “REPAIRED BY PEOPLE LIKE YOU”. The pounding which the yachts take when racing through storms is massive and without this maintenance at every port, much would go wrong.

So I signed up for Clipper Race and did my Levels 1 to 4 training and arrived in Gosport on 18 July for race prep and for Leg 1 and 2. Prep week can only be described as “frenetic” - with much to be done and we were grateful when the day of departure for Southampton arrived.

No amount of L1 to 4 training can prepare you for the great oceans and the storms that they throw at you. The trip to Madeira was a good build up to the real thing having to anchor at night in windless conditions to avoid the tide taking us back to Gosport. Biscay was also mild apart from Finistere. And the full ten days to Madeira was pleasant but the grind of the shift system took getting used to. The trip to Rio was also fairly benevolent with only a few hard beats, the longest being 4 days to reach Cabo Frio. But the South Atlantic was heavy going – the relentlessness of a 5 hour shift system around the clock for 19 days is something to be experienced, combined with high winds, wind holes, beating and running with the kites.

But it is almost over – another 15 hours or so. I will be glad to be home with my wife and family who I have missed a lot and to who I owe gratitude for having allowed me to do the 2 legs. This journey has been an immense challenge for me, especially at the age of 63, having to contribute fully to all sailing activities (except bow and up the mast activities – how I admire the courage of those who do this) as well as to all maintenance and mothering.

I say goodbye to my fellow crew members in Cape Town, having sailed home, to Skipper Juan and to Geraldton Western Australia. Thanks all for a challenging experience.

Tony Welton
Crew, Geraldton Western Australia

WOW, what an experience! This has been one hell of a roller coaster ride, from the highest high to the lowest low. From the hot and humid days around Cape Verde Islands to the ice cold wind and rain in the Southern Atlantic and squall after squall drenching us with rain until our base layers are soaking wet. And sailing in winds of more than 50 knots with the biggest waves I've ever seen was an experience on its own that all of us will never forget!

Working in watches, maintaining the boat, being on mother watch, sleeping in either a really hot and sticky or cold and wet bunk and sharing a 68 foot yacht with people you only met a few days before the start of the legs were physically and mentally hard work and all part of this great experience.

I've signed up for Leg 1 and 2 as my family and I were returning back to SA after three and a half years in the UK and I thought that this will be a great way to get home. I've always wanted to sail across the Atlantic and the Clipper Race gave me the opportunity to do it twice in two months.

I can't wait to sail into the V&A Waterfront and have my wife, son and the rest of my family waiting there. This will be the first time in more than two and a half years since I've last been in Cape Town and can't wait to share this experience with my family and friends and show them the yacht that was my home for the last two months.

I can't believe that I signed my Clipper Race contract in May 2010 and in a few hours it is all over. I would like to thank Juan (the skipper) and all the crew that shared this journey with me and also wish everyone all the best for the remaining legs.

And a special thanks to my wife for letting me do this, I really appreciate it and know it was just as tough for you as for me. See you and Du Toit soon!

Desmond Saayman
Crew, Geraldton Western Australia

#87 Leka

Leka

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,678 posts
  • Location:Tinh Gia, Central North Province, Vietnam, but I still call Australia home.

Posted 02 October 2011 - 05:20 AM

I'll be interested to watch the next few legs.

What's the chances Gold Coast skipper will be told to back off a little?
Can't kill the moral of the rest of the fleet that quickly.

Will be interesting to see how the next few legs play out.

#88 Potter

Potter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,020 posts

Posted 02 October 2011 - 07:11 AM

I'll be interested to watch the next few legs.

What's the chances Gold Coast skipper will be told to back off a little?
Can't kill the moral of the rest of the fleet that quickly.

Will be interesting to see how the next few legs play out.

He may well get told to back off a little, but probably more to do with the sheer volume of sail damage that he has already done. He has been pushing them hard, and getting deserved results, but there is a long way to go, and they get point and financial fines for too much damage.

#89 Icedtea

Icedtea

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,184 posts
  • Location:Ireland

Posted 02 October 2011 - 09:12 AM

So? It claims to be a race, the sail damage must be slowing him down a little.

I think good on the fucker for driving hard, that's what racing's alll about :)

#90 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 02 October 2011 - 10:35 AM

I don't think anyone will be "told" to do anything - I do think that he who looks after the wardrobe will win over 11 months. I believe if you have to replace things you loose all the points you gained. Terrorvision might remember

#91 DtM

DtM

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,283 posts
  • Location:Out of the Office

Posted 02 October 2011 - 08:57 PM

I recall that there are penalties but I am not sure they are that harsh.

Off to have a look.

#92 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 02 October 2011 - 09:04 PM

More action on Gold Coast from Lisa


#93 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 03 October 2011 - 07:52 AM

Qingdao boys up the rig & out on the pole


#94 lupedelupe

lupedelupe

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 30 posts

Posted 05 October 2011 - 07:19 AM

Posted Image

#95 lupedelupe

lupedelupe

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 30 posts

Posted 05 October 2011 - 07:24 AM

"Oi you, take the stern spring there mate."

Posted Image

#96 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 05 October 2011 - 07:44 AM

OMG is that wildlife in the marina

#97 thetruth

thetruth

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,467 posts

Posted 05 October 2011 - 10:35 AM

The funny thing is I have NEVER wondered why there was an entry from NZ. I guess we treat women better

OMG is that wildlife in the marina



#98 Leka

Leka

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,678 posts
  • Location:Tinh Gia, Central North Province, Vietnam, but I still call Australia home.

Posted 05 October 2011 - 12:49 PM

START OF RACE 4. Order across the start line: Gold Coast Australia, Derry-Londonderry, Geraldton Western Australia, Welcome to Yorkshire, Singapore, De Lage Landen, Qingdao, New York, Edinburgh Inspiring Capital and Visit Finland

#99 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 05 October 2011 - 07:14 PM

The funny thing is I have NEVER wondered why there was an entry from NZ. I guess we treat women better


OMG is that wildlife in the marina

:o Not enough anarchy in the thread for you hon?

#100 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:08 PM

START OF RACE 4. Order across the start line: Gold Coast Australia, Derry-Londonderry, Geraldton Western Australia, Welcome to Yorkshire, Singapore, De Lage Landen, Qingdao, New York, Edinburgh Inspiring Capital and Visit Finland






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users