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#601 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 02:28 AM

3 boats finishing wihtin a minute - how exciting for ocean race!

#602 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 07:16 PM

Exciting stopover ahead in Derry-Londonderry - 12 June 2012

After yesterday’s arrival in Halifax, Nova Scotia focus is already turning to the next stage of the Clipper 11-12 Race, the Atlantic Ocean crossing to Derry-Londonderry, where planning for a fantastic welcome is well underway.

“It’s massive, the next race for us is huge,” exclaims Mark Light, the skipper of Derry-Londonderry.

An exciting programme of events has been arranged by the city of Derry-Londonderry, which has been chosen as the UK City of Culture for 2013.

From Friday 29 June to Sunday 8 July a huge homecoming welcome will take place for the 200 Clipper Race crew members and their families who will make the Foyle their temporary home.

“We’ve been building for this since race start really. We took the boat up to Derry-Londonderry last year, over a year ago now and we had a fantastic welcome, they really looked after us,” continues Mark.

“We are so excited to be going back; I’m absolutely buzzing for it. The whole crew don’t need any kind of encouragement they’re all up for it. We’ve got a lot of people who live in Derry-Londonderry and it’s going to be fantastic!

As well as the Clipper Race fleet’s arrival, visitors will also be able to sample the flavours of the Foyle Seafood Festival and enjoy the finest musicians from the North Atlantic Fiddle Convention.

“We’re going to get a fantastic welcome! There might be this home port curse but we’ve got all our bad results out of the way now thankfully and we’re looking forward to this one, we’re going to get a great result on this race I can feel it.

“Where ever we finish we’ll get a great reception, the whole city is busy and they’re looking forward to the Clipper Race arriving!”

From Monday 2 July to Wednesday 4 July visitors will be able to board the Clipper Race fleet itself, meet the crews and learn all about their extraordinary experience.

But ahead of the fleet’s arrival in Derry-Londonderry is a 2,350 mile race across the Atlantic Ocean. Race 13 starts from Halifax on Friday at 1200 local time (1500 GMT).

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#603 v-max

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 05:50 PM

The gang had a great night here at RNSYS last night with a good load of beer/band/BBQ then downtown for late night. A bunch of them are racing with local boats tonight so hopefully we all learn a thing or two!

The race start for Friday looks good so far; sunny, warm, not bad wind either-possibly light though.

#604 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 07:16 PM

Crews prepare for final ocean race - 13 June 2012

The skippers and crews competing in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race are preparing for their final ocean crossing of the 40,000 mile adventure.

Race 13, from Nova Scotia to Derry-Londonderry starts at 1200 local time (1500 GMT) on Friday and sees the ten-strong fleet race 2,350 miles across the Atlantic Ocean.

“Leaving Nova Scotia the teams will quickly have the open North Atlantic to play with – or so they might think!” explains Assistant Race Director, Justin Taylor.

“On the classic race route across the Atlantic there is the potential for some very fast sailing. At the southern tip of Newfoundland are the Grand Banks, an area renowned for thick fog and light winds as the Labrador Current drags down cold water from the Arctic,” continues Justin, who himself has skippered during two previous editions of the race.

“If the yachts can clear Newfoundland without going too far north, staying over the lower third of the Grand Banks and in the Gulf Stream, they will sail just to the south of the Flemish Cap made famous in the book and film, The Perfect Storm.

“A word of warning, though. Although the prevailing westerly winds should make this a fast crossing, the north Atlantic high pressure system during the summer has a habit of shifting further north, allowing light winds to block progress. It means every team still has the chance to be the first to experience the hospitality of Northern Ireland.”

The Clipper Race fleet is expected to arrive in Derry-Londonderry between 29 June-1 July.

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#605 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 07:18 PM

The gang had a great night here at RNSYS last night with a good load of beer/band/BBQ then downtown for late night. A bunch of them are racing with local boats tonight so hopefully we all learn a thing or two!

The race start for Friday looks good so far; sunny, warm, not bad wind either-possibly light though.

Too cool!
Say Hi to Qingdao crew for me - purple shirts!

#606 NautiGirl

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 09:13 PM

I have to question why Clipper would berth at RNSYS this time around (not that it's not a great club, because it is). Last time they were in town, they docked along the waterfront. The boats were impressive, with lots of locals and tourists down on the boardwalk to check them out. My better half follows all things ocean racing, and had no idea they were here, and the first I heard of it was from him this afternoon. I've seen nothing in the local media about it at all.

Anyhow, it's a shame that they by-passed the opportunity to bring some attention to the race. Last time they were here, there were pictures of them on the front pages of the papers.

#607 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 07:17 PM

Henri Lloyd and Clipper Race launch the Henri Lloyd Clipper Race Seamanship Award - 14 June 2012

To honour its long term partnership with the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race and in recognition of the extreme challenges faced by the teams and crew, Henri Lloyd is launching the Henri Lloyd Clipper Race Seamanship Award for the 2011-12 edition of the biennial event.

The rules of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race are designed to encourage the crews to sail their yachts conservatively and to promote high levels of seamanship with safety at the forefront. Ocean racing is an extreme sport and inevitably incidents and damage to the yachts take place because of heavy sea states and strong wind conditions. The Henri Lloyd Clipper Race Seamanship Award has been created to recognise the lengths a crew member or team will go to help each other and/or preserve the equipment on board. The judging panel will include race founder; Sir Robin Knox-Johnston and Henri Lloyd Joint CEO Paul Strzelecki, the award presentation will take place at the race finish prize giving in July.

Clipper Race Chairman and Founder, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston said: “I’m extremely pleased that our longstanding sponsor Henri Lloyd is presenting this award with focus on good seamanship. Preserving equipment is a vital part of racing a yacht. All our Clipper Round the World Yacht Race crew members are worthy candidates for this prize, so I wish them all the best of luck.”

“We are very proud of our long standing partnership with the Clipper Round the World Race and delighted to be able to show our support to the race crews through the Henri Lloyd Clipper Race Seamanship Award,” said Paul Strzelecki, Joint CEO at Henri Lloyd.

This is the fourth consecutive race in which Henri Lloyd has supplied the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race crew with the latest GORE-TEX® Ocean Racing clothing technology and Henri Lloyd are already confirmed as the Official Technical Clothing Supplier for Clipper 13-14.

Nominations can be submitted by Clipper 11-12 crew, skippers, friends, family and supporters and must be sent to Laura Cowlishaw (lcowlishaw@clipper-ventures.com) by Friday 6 July 2012. Full details and terms and conditions can be found here.
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/assets/Uploads/The-Henri-Lloyd-Clipper-Race-Seamanship-Award.pdf

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#608 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 07:19 PM

I have to question why Clipper would berth at RNSYS this time around (not that it's not a great club, because it is). Last time they were in town, they docked along the waterfront. The boats were impressive, with lots of locals and tourists down on the boardwalk to check them out. My better half follows all things ocean racing, and had no idea they were here, and the first I heard of it was from him this afternoon. I've seen nothing in the local media about it at all.

Anyhow, it's a shame that they by-passed the opportunity to bring some attention to the race. Last time they were here, there were pictures of them on the front pages of the papers.

Bit of a shame the pubilicity didn't get thru normally they would be right on it!

#609 NautiGirl

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 08:26 PM


I have to question why Clipper would berth at RNSYS this time around (not that it's not a great club, because it is). Last time they were in town, they docked along the waterfront. The boats were impressive, with lots of locals and tourists down on the boardwalk to check them out. My better half follows all things ocean racing, and had no idea they were here, and the first I heard of it was from him this afternoon. I've seen nothing in the local media about it at all.

Anyhow, it's a shame that they by-passed the opportunity to bring some attention to the race. Last time they were here, there were pictures of them on the front pages of the papers.

Bit of a shame the pubilicity didn't get thru normally they would be right on it!


I did see a story about a wonderful woman who had a double lung transplant who is on the race, and heard it on the radio this morning as well. No one at the YC last night knew anything about it until we were introduced to 2 sailors that a member brought (not sure how they met originally, but they've been in touch for some time before the race).

The general consensus was that they did a really bad job of publicity this time around. Again, the Squadron is a great club, and i can see why they partnered with them, but having them downtown is far more visible and accessible to interested sailors and the general public.

Too bad.

#610 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 09:41 PM



I have to question why Clipper would berth at RNSYS this time around (not that it's not a great club, because it is). Last time they were in town, they docked along the waterfront. The boats were impressive, with lots of locals and tourists down on the boardwalk to check them out. My better half follows all things ocean racing, and had no idea they were here, and the first I heard of it was from him this afternoon. I've seen nothing in the local media about it at all.

Anyhow, it's a shame that they by-passed the opportunity to bring some attention to the race. Last time they were here, there were pictures of them on the front pages of the papers.

Bit of a shame the pubilicity didn't get thru normally they would be right on it!


I did see a story about a wonderful woman who had a double lung transplant who is on the race, and heard it on the radio this morning as well. No one at the YC last night knew anything about it until we were introduced to 2 sailors that a member brought (not sure how they met originally, but they've been in touch for some time before the race).

The general consensus was that they did a really bad job of publicity this time around. Again, the Squadron is a great club, and i can see why they partnered with them, but having them downtown is far more visible and accessible to interested sailors and the general public.

Too bad.

i Have emailed them to give feedback so they can change next time around - they probably knew anyway! Jussie is great, great leg for her to do with all the stops - I think 14 days is the longest stint this time :)

#611 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 09:43 PM



#612 v-max

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 03:33 PM

Wow! What a start! Beautiful day here in Halifax; sunny with a ton of breeze.
The boys are hauling ass with Glod Coast leading the pack out of the Harbour!

#613 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 08:01 PM

Fleet starts final ocean crossing destined for Derry-Londonderry - 15 June 2012

The atmosphere was highly charged today, as the ten strong fleet of racing yachts taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race started its last ocean crossing. The teams left Nova Scotia, Canada this afternoon (GMT) destined for Derry-Londonderry, where a ten day homecoming festival has been organised to celebrate the fleet’s stopover in Northern Ireland.

Richard Hewson, the Tasmanian skipper of Australian entry Gold Coast Australia, which is currently in first place, has set his sights on breaking the record for the most consecutive wins, “We’re going to be sailing upwind which will be tough on the crew. However, we have to be persistent and sail hard if we want to be successful and stand on that podium.

“Tactically we plan to organise our strategy around the great circle route in the Atlantic. The weather systems at the moment are unique; so rather than have a slow ride right across to Derry-Londonderry, as in previous races,we’re going to have to do everything we can to win again.”

In the 2,350-mile Atlantic crossing to Derry-Londonderry, a Scoring Gate has been added to the race route. This is not a compulsory gate, but the first three yachts racing through it will be awarded three, two and one points respectively. The teams will also be given the chance to take part in an 120 mile (approximately) Ocean Sprint, where the fastest team to sail between the lines of longitude 27 degrees west and 24 degrees west, will be awarded one additional point.

Round the world crew member John Harkin, from Derry-Londonderry describes his excitement at returning home after ten months at sea. His return home is made even more poignant by the fact that John’s daughter, Jodie who joined the Derry-Londonderry entry in New York, will be sailing with him back into their hometown together, “I’m feeling really positive about Race 13, back to Derry-Londonderry. Of course I have concerns about sailing the Atlantic but I’ve sailed around the world now, so I’ve seen and been in the thick of some pretty bad conditions. In this race, we will have to do whatever and go wherever we need to in order to bring ourselves up and I’m prepared for anything that the North Atlantic is going to throw at us.

“There is so much anticipation back home, and I know everyone is routing for us to do well. We have to be up there at the top of the leader board when we arrive in Derry-Londonderry.”

With only three races to go the current overall leader board is close, with just two points now separating second place Visit Finland and De Lage Landen which slipped into third place after Race 12 into Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Skipper of Singapore, Ben Bowley currently lies in fourth place just eleven points off a podium place in the world’s longest ocean race. Any extra points could mean the difference in winning a coveted podium position, “We are really looking hard at the positions on the leader board. Welcome to Yorkshire had an excellent result into Halifax and is now just six points behind us on the leader board.

“Not only do we need to make sure we have a good race, but we also need to focus on getting that podium position. We need to be on the podium for the next three races and if we can do that, we stand every chance of being on the podium in Southampton. We need to establish a decent lead from the start. With the fleet so tight in the middle of the table you need to make sure you’re one step ahead of everyone else.”

The winner of Race 13 into Derry-Londonderry will also be awarded the Hill Dickinson Cup, presented by the Clipper Race's official legal services partner. Tony Allen, the firm's Partner in Marine said, “Hill Dickinson is honoured to be right behind the Clipper Race crews, supporting them in this challenging stage of the Clipper Race."

The fleet is expected to arrive in Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland between 29 June and 1 July, where the UK City of Culture for 2013 will host a Clipper Race homecoming festival on behalf of the fleet from 29 June - 8 July.

The Daily Updates and Skipper Reports will start tomorrow however the Race Viewer has been set live and will update every three hours.

Photos
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/follow/photo-galleries/

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#614 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 06:58 AM

A competitive race start from Nova Scotia - 16 June 2012

After a short stop in Halifax, Nova Scotia, the ten-strong fleet taking part in the world's longest ocean race has set sail for Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland in Race 13 of the 15-race, 40,000-mile circumnavigation.

It was an exciting start to the 2,350-mile Atlantic crossing as the teams yesterday afternoon (GMT) lined up at the inshore start line with only minutes to spare. Aided by steady winds, as the gun sounded, all ten teams crossed together in a tightly packed charge out of the harbour with only metres between each yacht.

Jostling for position over competitors, each team has been using almost every sail in its wardrobe over the last 18 hours and as they head further into the Atlantic, choosing the right sail plan opens up the potential for some very fast sailing. If you look at the Race Viewer on the Clipper Race website you can see the fleet is still packed with only seven miles separating the front and back runners. Gold Coast Australia is currently in the lead while Visit Finland is second and Singapore is in third place.

With the Clipper Race crew getting back into the routine of rough ocean racing, on board Derry-Londonderry, skipper Mark Light reports that the mind-set on board is focused on achieving its first win, and the first home port win in the race series.

“We are all fired up to get the most important result that we can. A first place, a yellow pennant, a home port win – a victory would be an amazing achievement. We will do everything that we possibly can to make the city proud on our journey across and it will be absolutely fantastic to sight the shores of Northern Ireland ahead of our arrival. We are most definitely coming home.”

The fleet is expected to arrive in Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland between 29 June and 1 July, where the UK City of Culture for 2013 will host a Clipper Race homecoming festival on behalf of the fleet from 29 June - 8 July.


Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 1 – by Richard Hewson


A beautiful day in Halifax, Nova Scotia saw the start of Race 13 of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race to Derry-Londonderry. With pleasant and reasonably steady winds, and a start line and inshore course professionally set and executed by the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron the fleet of ten yachts lined up with only minutes to go.

Once again, skippers of the Clipper 68s handle the yachts like laser dinghies, and with only metres between each team we all hit the start line with seconds to spare.

Gold Coast Australia did not get the best start, as we were squeezed out with Derry-Londonderry sailing above us and New York coming up from under us there was nowhere to go but to slow the boat down and wait for some room to manoeuvre. As soon as the other yachts cleared we tacked onto port ahead of the committee boat and into clear air. Tacking back onto starboard we were lifted nicely with good winds to take us all the way to the top mark where we arrived in first place.

Our Gold Coast Australia medium weight spinnaker was quickly hoisted and before too long the whole fleet were flying their branded medium weight spinnakers behind us giving the Halifax spectators a beautiful sight.

After a couple of miles of running on port gybe, we were quickly running out of water and commenced our gybe onto starboard. This is a very good reminder why we do not regularly sail these big yachts in inshore races very often as they are not as agile as your average 40-foot inshore racer.

Our gybe was completed in good time, and we headed towards the southern shore before gybing back, passing the next couple of marks to port before rounding the bottom mark with our Yankee 1 and staysail were hoisted quickly before an expert drop of the spinnaker as we rounded the bottom mark and headed east.

Shifty conditions saw Gold Coast Australia and a few other yachts not being able to lay the next mark to starboard, so we were forced to put in a quick tack ahead of the other yachts and round the virtual mark before tacking again and setting course for Sable Island.

The decision to pass to the north or to the south of Sable Island was made when the wind veered another ten degrees making it very hard to lay the northern waypoint. As a result Gold Coast Australia is currently leading the fleet as we all head towards the virtual waypoint positioned 20 miles south of Sable Island sailing slightly off the wind.

The conditions for our first day at sea have been quite choppy, so for the crew who joined in New York and have not experienced heading to sea and these conditions there are a few wide eyes and a few people feeling the effects of the dreaded sea sickness.

Gold Coast Australia is expected to round Sable Island within the next few hours and will maintain our easterly course until it is possible to clear the ice gates set at 45 degrees north south of Newfoundland. Once clear of the gates (and the ice) we can make our course north to commence our great circle route towards Derry-Londonderry. With headwinds and light winds forecasted this race could take more time than originality predicted but we will endeavour to maintain our lead regardless.

Go Gold Coast Australia!

Visit Finland
RACE 13 – DAY 1 – by Olly Osborne


No skipper report received.


De Lage Landen
RACE 13 – DAY 1 – by Stuart Jackson


Our final ocean crossing is testing the crew one last time. After almost eleven months at sea, the crew has become a great team. Helping each other out in difficult times is how we'll make it and today is just another day where that is being applied. With half a watch down with seasickness and another half down with the flu, we are trying to sail safely past the Sable Island bank. For most of the crew, this race will bring them very close to home, so we are all very excited.

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#615 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 06:55 PM

Rough conditions for Clipper Race fleet in North Atlantic - 17 June 2012

The last 24 hours has seen the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race fleet beating up wind in the North Atlantic. After two days back at sea, the teams are getting used to the day-to-day challenges of ocean racing again.

“It's been a bouncy, wet and uncomfortable day on Welcome to Yorkshire today. Racing close-hauled at over 20 degrees of heel, on port tack in over 25 knots of true wind, has brought a dose of reality to all on board after the warm flat conditions of the past three races.

“Every movement and action takes not only planning, but three times the effort that it did before,” says Welcome to Yorkshire skipper, Rupert Dean.

The rough conditions have caused a lot of the crew members, who have swapped their day jobs for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to sail around the world, to be hit with sea sickness as they are re-adjusting to life on board.

In the last 24 hours the fleet has also split into two groups - a northerly and a southerly, with Visit Finland and New York opting to stay to the north of their other eight competitors, closer to the way point.

“We are hoping that our northerly route will allow us to stay above the fleet as we all tack for the way point, and essentially sail less miles. But a lot will depend on how the wind changes over the next couple of days and it will be interesting to see how things work out,” says Visit Finland skipper, Olly Osborne.

The Finnish entry has taken the lead overnight, while Gold Coast Australia has slipped into second and Welcome to Yorkshire is currently in third place.

The Clipper Race fleet still has more than 2000 miles to conquer, before arriving into Derry-Londonderry in Northern Ireland between 29 June and 1 July.

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 2 – by Richard Hewson


It has been a bumpy 24 hours for Gold Coast Australia as we punch our way upwind towards Derry-Londonderry with a reefed mainsail, number 2 Yankee and staysail into a confused and building sea.

The rough conditions have caused havoc with many crew members as they feel the effects of sea sickness. This is the first patch of rough weather we have encountered since we crossed the Pacific, and after over a month of calm conditions crew members feel the effects of the radically moving boat more intensely.

The wind has gradually begun to reduce in strength now and over the next few days we should see calmer weather which will hopefully allow everybody to recover and bring our team up to full force.

We continue to sail the boat well and have increased our lead over the southerly pack to eight miles. Visit Finland shows signs of doing very well to the north and will no doubt continue to do so until the wind veers and abates. Hopefully when the new weather system comes through Gold Coast Australia will regain our lead over the fleet.

Visit Finland
RACE 13 – DAY 2 – by Olly Osborne


The rigours of hard upwind sailing are beginning to take their toll, as we find it hard to sleep as the boat slams into in the choppy seas. We have now passed off the Banquereau Bank into deeper water though and the sea state is starting to improve. Over the next few days the weather looks like it will be changing altogether though and some downwind sailing will be very welcome.

Nonetheless everyone is in good spirits, and the mothers even managed to produce a leg of roasted ham for dinner today which was very tasty. We are hoping that our northerly route will allow us to stay above the fleet as we all tack for the way point, and essentially sail less miles. But a lot will depend on how the wind changes over the next couple of days, and it will be interesting to see how things work out.

De Lage Landen
RACE 13 – DAY 2 – by Stuart Jackson


After the last few legs of being spoilt with gentle downwind sailing the beginning of this leg has been rather a rude awakening. We have been beating upwind in around 25 knots, so the boat is fully heeled over and there is plenty of water coming over the deck.

Sea sickness seems to have affected a few and around half of us have been trying to shake off a bug. The weather looks due to abate throughout the day today and hopefully within a couple of days it looks like we will be enjoying downwind sailing once again. It will be interesting to see whether the boats that have headed north early will make the gains they are hoping for.


Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Visit Finland 2020NM 0NM

2 Gold Coast Australia 2034NM 14NM

3 Welcome to Yorkshire 2041NM 21NM

4 Singapore 2041NM 22NM

5 Geraldton Western Australia 2043NM 24NM

6 New York 2047NM 27NM

7 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 2049NM 29NM

8 Derry-Londonderry 2049NM 30NM

9 Qingdao 2050NM 31NM

10 De Lage Landen 2057NM 38NM

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#616 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 07:44 PM

http://www.thisishul...tail/story.html

#617 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 09:40 PM

http://thechronicleh...iving-for-today
The article about Jussie that Nautigirl was talking about

#618 Leka

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 07:02 AM

http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/107016-so-i-m-living-for-today
The article about Jussie that Nautigirl was talking about


Nice story.
Thanks for the link.

Not good news that her body is rejecting the transplants now though.

Seems to have a great attitude.

#619 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 08:03 AM



#620 NautiGirl

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 11:13 AM


http://thechronicleh...iving-for-today
The article about Jussie that Nautigirl was talking about


Nice story.
Thanks for the link.

Not good news that her body is rejecting the transplants now though.

Seems to have a great attitude.


She sounds like a great girl. Good on her for raising awareness, and living her life to the fullest, and making the most of what time she does have. That's one girl that will go with no regrets I imagine.

#621 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 06:56 PM

Clipper Race teams consider tactics - 18 June 2012

It has been another eventful 24 hours for the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race fleet racing across the North Atlantic.

While the winds have eased off slightly along with the spur of sea sickness, thoughts have turned to tactics overnight. The ten yacht entries are considering when to head north towards the optional Scoring Gate, which could give them vital additional points in these final stages of the world’s longest ocean race.

Visit Finland’s skipper, Olly Osborne says, “As the weather changes over the next couple of days it will not only provide respite from the choppy upwind sailing, but should see the fleet turning northward toward the rhumb line route. This will hopefully be a chance for us to take advantage of our northerly position, and to get a head start in the dash for the Scoring Gate. But only time will tell who the weather will favour in this notoriously unpredictable region, and for the meantime it's still best course to windward.”

The Finnish entry has slipped back into second place, with only a couple of miles separating them and first-place Gold Coast Australia who remains in a more southerly position with the majority of the fleet.

Singapore has moved back up the leader board in third place ahead of Welcome to Yorkshire, currently in fourth. “We now have a couple of days of lighter wind up ahead of us and how we play the taking angles will be essential if we are to pop out the other side and get moving to the north again before our rivals,” says Singapore skipper, Ben Bowley.

The Clipper Race fleet is set to arrive into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland between 29 June and 1 July.

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 3 – by Richard Hewson


Gold Coast Australia continues to punch its way windward towards the Scoring Gate with good upwind speed and a now healthy crew.

Happy hour at midday today bought the entire crew on deck for air and a chance to share our thoughts on the race so far and improvements that can be made to make on board life more efficient and more enjoyable. All the crew members are now up and involved in the watch system, and while some remain feeling a bit queasy, they are over the worst of their sickness.

The day started under a reefed mainsail and Yankee 2, as we watched the weather moderate and the sea die down, making the ride more enjoyable, though there is still the odd big wave crashing over the boat leaving a trail of phosphorescence over the deck in its path. Shortly after midnight the wind moderated even further and we shook out a reef. An hour later it was time to change headsails and now Gold Coast Australia is sailing along in full flight with a large trail of phosphorescence behind us.

Apart from the phosphorescence marine life has been relatively sparse, which is quite sad considering our close proximity to the Grand Banks, one of the most famous fishing grounds in history. Apart from the odd dolphin, there has been nothing to indicate life outside our own 68-foot habitat.

Until recently we were experiencing very stable and consistent wind from the north east. Since midnight however, as the wind has moderated it has also become quite unstable and we are seeing thirty degree wind shifts indicating a change of weather that is imminent. We are also seeing signs of the Gulf Stream, it is so warm on deck that I was able to wear board shorts on deck after midnight. The warm water mixed with the cold air results in sea fog and saturated air leaving condensation all over the boat.

Weather patterns we have been receiving via email seem quite disturbed, and over the past few days there have been substantial variations in the predicted models. This makes our tactics very challenging. As the Azores high hopefully settles over the Azores over the next few days we are hoping for some more stability and better winds. Hopefully when then new weather files are received in a few hours we will have a few more answers to our questions and can make a more concrete tactical strategy.

Visit Finland
RACE 13 – DAY 3 – by Olly Osborne


Today has been a day of close reaching and variable winds for Visit Finland. We found ourselves busy shaking out reefs and then putting them back in again throughout the afternoon as the breeze began to become more variable. But in many ways this bodes well as a change in the weather is on the way, and this should give us the chance to head northward on our route to Derry-Londonderry.

Life on board at a constantly changing angle is sometimes likened to being in a washing machine, and it has certainly felt like that during the last couple of days. Every loose tin or packet seems to find its way out of the lockers, and anything that was not fully stored in port comes back to haunt you. Crew member ‘Delly Depp’ (Derek Baker) was showered with tins of tuna in his bunk this morning as a bag burst in one of the mast lockers under the strain of the constant slamming. He was luckily unhurt, and we have now found most of the tins.

As the weather changes over the next couple of days it will not only provide respite from the choppy upwind sailing, but should see the fleet turning northward toward the rhumb line route. This will hopefully be a chance for us to take advantage of our northerly position, and to get a head start in the dash for the Scoring Gate. Only time will tell who the weather will favour in this notoriously unpredictable region, and for the meantime it's still best course to windward

De Lage Landen
RACE 13 – DAY 3 – by Stuart Jackson


Well what a great day it has been, with the crew laying on birthday entertainment, although part of that was dressing me up!

A wave shaped cake - mainly from the angle of the boat and some amazing presents. So it certainly won't be a birthday to forget. Everyone has been making so much effort over the last few days and everyone is starting to eat proper meals and more importantly keeping them down!

The wind has already started to ease so living conditions are improving with a flatter boat. It looks like the wind will be pretty light for the next couple of days so hopefully where we have positioned ourselves will start to pay dividends.

Qingdao
RACE 13 – DAY 3 – by Ian Conchie


Another good day of sailing if not in the perfect direction. The wind has eased enough for us to shake out the reefs in the main sail but we need to head north at some point and so far the wind has not allowed us to do that.

Looking at the forecast each day it tells us that the wind should change in about 24 hours’ time, so hopefully at some point it will. In the meantime we are heading roughly east so at least in the direction of home if nothing else.

The easing of the weather has allowed the crew to find their sea legs. Last night one of the Yankee sheets failed forcing us to heave-to so we could get control of the sail and drop it. Once down we reattached the sheets and hoisted it back up but the manoeuvre cost us several miles to the boats around us. This morning however we crossed with Derry-Londonderry as they headed north and it was good to see them pass close to us again if ahead.

All eyes are now on the next forecast as we try to decide when to head north to follow the Great Circle Course (the shortest) round to Derry-Londonderry!


Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Gold Coast Australia 1890NM 0NM

2 Visit Finland 1891NM 1NM

3 Singapore 1902NM 12NM

4 Welcome to Yorkshire 1903NM 13NM

5 Geraldton Western Australia 1906NM 16NM

6 Derry-Londonderry 1914NM 24NM

7 Qingdao 1917NM 27NM

8 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 1922NM 32NM

9 De Lage Landen 1943NM 53NM

10 New York 1964NM 74NM

Attached Files



#622 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 06:57 PM

Infamous Grand Banks fog hits Clipper Race fleet - 19 June 2012

Four days into Race 13 in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race, the fleet has hit the infamous fog around the Grand Banks, Newfoundland in the North Atlantic.

The air is damp, skies are grey and visibility for most of the day has been less than 100 yards according to reports from the Clipper Race skippers. So while the teams are on full lookout to ensure they avoid any possible dangers ahead in low visibility, their eyes are also still on the weather reports defining their tactics.

Clipper Race Director, Jonathan Bailey, said, “The jet stream over the north Atlantic is a bit unstable at the moment which has kept the North Atlantic high further south than it historically would be at this time of year. Not only is this responsible for giving the UK some pretty poor weather over the last few weeks, it is also giving the Clipper Race yachts some challenging tactical decisions as they have had steady headwinds since departing Nova Scotia, rather than the more usual following winds that would be expected at this time of year. This has forced all of the yachts further south than they would probably wish and the navigators will be studying the weather closely to figure out when to make the move north.”

The Clipper Race fleet is around 400 miles from the optional Scoring Gate, which can give entries vital additional points as the end of the world’s longest ocean race comes closer.

“We will probably see most of the yachts tack towards the north to get to the Scoring Gate over the next 24 hours and it would not be surprising to see a few ‘Stealth Modes’ used to try to keep the other nine boats in the dark about tactics. When they tack will determine how successful they will be in the long run. What we are seeing on the race viewer now and what will occur over the next 24 hours will most likely be the major tactical moves of this race,” added Jonathan Bailey.

Currently in Race 13 Gold Coast Australia remains in the lead, Visit Finland in second and Welcome to Yorkshire in third.

Battle for points and places intensifies - 19 June 2012

The final leg of the Clipper 11-12 Race is already well underway and the ten teams competing in the world’s longest yacht race are fighting hard for the remaining race points in a final attempt to climb their way up the leader board.

Gold Coast Australia boasts a 37 point lead but just one point separates Visit Finland and De Lage Landen, currently second and third respectively. Even the crew and skipper of Singapore have not given up hope of finishing on the podium with eleven points between them and third place.

However the Singaporean crew also has to keep a close eye on Welcome to Yorkshire with just six points between them.

This is where it gets interesting! New York currently boasts 62 points, five behind the Yorkshire entry and five ahead of Geraldton Western Australia, after the Australia team suffered a recent points deduction.

The Race Committee deducted three points from Geraldton Western Australia following the Nova Scotia stopover, after the team failed to hand in its race declarations within the timeframe set out in the sailing instructions.

The deduction offers Derry-Londonderry an opportunity to leap frog its closest rival; the Northern Ireland entry currently sits just five points behind Geraldton Western Australia.

A further five points behind is Qingdao, currently in ninth position, ten points ahead of Edinburgh Inspiring Capital.

With three races still to be completed, the potential risk of further penalties and the opportunity to pick up valuable bonus points through the Scoring Gate and Ocean Sprint rapidly approaching in Race 13, all is still to play for in the Clipper 11-12 Race.

The race will finish in the Solent on Sunday 22 July, after taking almost a year to complete the 40,000 mile circumnavigation. The fleet will berth in Ocean Village, Southampton, around 1pm, followed by the Prize Giving ceremony.

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 4 – by Richard Hewson


Gold Coast Australia has defied the predicted light airs and manages to continue sailing towards the Scoring Gate at reasonable speeds.

It is hard to tell what the weather is going to do next. At one stage the wind backed all the way to the north, giving us some nice reaching conditions, before veering back to the north east, while the barometer remains steady indicating that we are travelling with the weather system as it moves eastward.

Sea fog reduces viability to one mile, and obscures the clouds that may give us more indication of what is going on in the upper levels and indicate what wind we may find over the horizon. At the moment it is almost like we are sailing by gut instinct and hope that Visit Finland does not gain the advantage by being further north.

Our plan at the moment is to sail east, sail fast and try to get into the new weather system as soon as possible and the crew are doing a fantastic job trimming the boat for maximum speed to achieve this goal. Until the weather patterns settle down there is undoubtedly some luck involved as to the best position to be on the course when the wind veers to the south and increases. Until this happens, all we can do is be thankful for the wind we have, hold on, sacrifice another virgin chicken and hope.


Visit Finland
RACE 13 – DAY 4 – by Olly Osborne


The Grand Banks of Newfoundland are living up to their reputation as we ghost along on a suitably foggy and eerie evening. The days are getting noticeably longer now, and the grey twilight gives the fog a strange translucent quality that plays tricks on the eye. No sightings of the Flying Dutchman yet though!

The breeze has become fluky and light now, as the forecast suggested, but with such vast distances involved we can really only wait it out and try to make the most of what we get. The settled conditions do provide a chance to get some rest and re-stow the provisions that were shaken all over the boat, as we have been having a bit of a sort-out today.

From a tactical perspective the next couple of days will be important, as with the wind becoming light and patchy it could well favour one boat or the next without any way of really knowing. The only thing for sure at the moment is that we need to position ourselves well for the incoming low to the south of us, as this may well get us most of the way across to Ireland.

Singapore
RACE 13 – DAY 4 – by Ben Bowley


We've had an eerie day of ghosting along in the fog banks south east of Newfoundland. The wind has been fairly light and variable over the last 24 hours and it has been essential to keep the focus aboard to ensure our ‘big red bus’ keeps moving.

Sheets and various other control lines have to be adjusted on a regular basis, all the while shrouded in thick, wet fog. We are trying to make as much ground to the east before the wind evades us completely as this, I feel, is our best hope for when the breeze fills in again.

With the forecasts changing on a daily basis it is hard to make definite calls on where best to place ourselves over the coming 48 hours but we have decided to stick to a more southerly route. We have tried a couple of tacks to the north today but the short term losses were too much to bear. For now we are trying to keep as much height as possible in an effort to keep hold of the dying zephyrs of wind for a little longer.

Welcome to Yorkshire
RACE 13 – DAY 4 – by Rupert Dean


The air is damp, skies are grey and visibility for most of the day has been less than 100 yards. The fog for which this area is so famous for has engulfed us and, as Welcome to Yorkshire ghosts along in light winds, we are all too aware of the danger it brings. Voices are kept low as ears tune in for the throb of ships' engines. Extra lookouts have been posted using radar, AIS (Automatic Identification System) and the naked eye. All crew have been reminded on the how to start the yacht's engine in a hurry and, heaven forbid, their responsibilities should an abandon ship procedure be required. Welcome to the Newfoundland Banks.

To be fair, the Welcome to Yorkshire entry has actually sailed 22 miles south of the 'Tail' of the Newfoundland Banks. She is floating in waters 2500 metres deep instead of the sub 100 metres for which the bank is known. Yet with the Titanic's stern resting on the seabed just 44 miles south of us, conditions should be treated with the same caution. As we progress further east, the Labrador Current, so famous for conveying icebergs south from the Arctic, will intercept us.

The sea temperature which has already fallen 5 degrees to 11degrees today, will fall further. As relatively warm air interfaces with this cold water, so the fog will remain at least until we sail another 300 miles east into the warmer North Atlantic Current.

In the meantime, Welcome to Yorkshire is racing hard in fourth place, just behind Singapore. Our courses describe a wiggly line between going north east and south east, depending on the variable winds at the time. We are still waiting for the opportunity to tack north, when Velocity Made Good to Northern Ireland will not be severely compromised. Until then, the team remains focussed on keeping Welcome to Yorkshire moving in these light winds, whilst keeping a wary eye out for icebergs and shipping!

Attached Files



#623 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 07:13 PM

RACE 13 - DAY 2 - by Mark Burkes (Qingdao)

We are now south east of The Grand Banks made famous by the book and film, 'The Perfect Storm'. I haven't seen George Clooney yet, but then again, we have no mirrors on board...

The seas seem to have flattened a little, probably due to us leaving the bank behind us. The wind has begun abating as forecast and everything is a little less violent.

We threw our second reef out earlier this evening and it will probably not be long before we throw out our first. We continue to hold the Yankee 2 which now feels more comfortable and is giving us good speed comparable with the immediate fleet surrounding us.

Conditions on board have been a little grim, with some of us suffering from another bug picked up by crew in New York and others enduring the ageless torture that is sea sickness. Without naming names, I am pleased to report that all crew have continued to stand watch, although with watch leaders both on mother watch today we were a little depleted of confident helms in what are 'lumpy' conditions. That said, it was impressive to see people clearly suffering just getting on with it and doing what had to be done, whether that was sailing the boat, cleaning the heads or making food for 15 people. Doing such things at 30 degrees is hard enough without being ill every 15 minutes as well.

The North Atlantic continues to grimace at us and we are returning the compliment. Thankfully, as yet, she has not bared her teeth and we can only hope that the forecast lull in wind and subsequent shifts fair well for us when they happen.

Certainly, catching the right moment to tack is going to be critical.

The ice gates, Jackson and Bowley, put in to keep us south of the summer ice flows coming down from the Arctic to the North, are approximately 200 miles north of us and once we tack we will have to make sure that we leave them to port. If the wind does as predicted the shift, when it comes, should allow us to steer the rhumb line to Derry-Londonderry; for a while at least.

The boats immediately south of us are De Lage Landen and Derry-Londonderry and, if one listens very closely, the faint lilt of Irish folk music and fiddles can be heard over the howling wind. I'm sure I can see Tom Way, Mark Light and the rest of the dingle berries, complete with pink bobble hats, jigging around the deck hand in hand with emerald clad leprechauns and pints of the black stuff - or perhaps that's just the effect of the chilli we had for supper?

Either way, we on Qingdao are looking forward to our arrival and wish our friends and competitors on Derry-Londonderry all the best for a successful home coming. A podium position next to us would be grand, although we both need to put in lots of work and perhaps get a little luck if that is to happen.

Until then 'slauncher' to you all.

Mark Burkes
Crew member, Qingdao

#624 sculpin

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 07:21 PM

I have to question why Clipper would berth at RNSYS this time around (not that it's not a great club, because it is). Last time they were in town, they docked along the waterfront. The boats were impressive, with lots of locals and tourists down on the boardwalk to check them out. My better half follows all things ocean racing, and had no idea they were here, and the first I heard of it was from him this afternoon. I've seen nothing in the local media about it at all.

Anyhow, it's a shame that they by-passed the opportunity to bring some attention to the race. Last time they were here, there were pictures of them on the front pages of the papers.


Last time they were in they did dock at RNSYS, but they also did a sailpast of downtown HFX on a Saturday, and tied up downtown for a while. At least I think that was the last time, two summers ago? I know they were at RNSYS 'cause I saw them there.

I agree they didn't do the best PR work here on this visit - leaving on a Friday at noon, kids still in school, does not get the best turnout. Waiting a day would have been better.

#625 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 07:43 PM


I have to question why Clipper would berth at RNSYS this time around (not that it's not a great club, because it is). Last time they were in town, they docked along the waterfront. The boats were impressive, with lots of locals and tourists down on the boardwalk to check them out. My better half follows all things ocean racing, and had no idea they were here, and the first I heard of it was from him this afternoon. I've seen nothing in the local media about it at all.

Anyhow, it's a shame that they by-passed the opportunity to bring some attention to the race. Last time they were here, there were pictures of them on the front pages of the papers.


Last time they were in they did dock at RNSYS, but they also did a sailpast of downtown HFX on a Saturday, and tied up downtown for a while. At least I think that was the last time, two summers ago? I know they were at RNSYS 'cause I saw them there.

I agree they didn't do the best PR work here on this visit - leaving on a Friday at noon, kids still in school, does not get the best turnout. Waiting a day would have been better.

I think (not sure) that they now have to get home before olympics start in Uk so they don't lose their press there - I know alot of dates where move due to the 'getting home' factor

#626 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 07:31 PM

Fleet pray for prevailing winds - 20 June 2012

The ten internationally backed teams competing in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race continue to tack their way across the North Atlantic Ocean, hard going through the fog and light headwinds that have plagued the fleet over the last 24 hours.

With a firm eye on the weather reports to define their tactics, each team has been working carefully through its sail wardrobe in a bid to catch the breeze and head further north where there is potential for some fast sailing.

The teams to the south have experienced a short burst long awaited wind overnight which has seen Singapore overtake two of its rivals and move into second place. As the Scoring Gate draws closer the teams will have to consider whether to go for the extra points on offer or concentrate on a more favourable position on the leader board.

In his 0600 report, skipper Ben Bowley, says, “Finally we found some good current and the wind started to veer more rapidly. This has allowed us to tack over and head on the great circle route straight to Derry-Londonderry.

“Conveniently, this course takes just through the southern end of the Scoring Gate too. Over the next 24 hours we shall have to see how we get on with our more easterly course and decide whether to go for the gate at all or to head further east still and set ourselves up better for the next patch of strong winds. The breeze is already filling in nicely and we are currently charging along at around ten knots with single reefed mainsail and Yankee 2. Come on ‘Singas!’

Meanwhile, on board Visit Finland, skipper Olly Osborne reports, “Today has seen a change of fortunes as we have seen the miles slipping away sched by sched to our competitors.” At 0000 UTC last night, the Finnish entry played its Stealth Mode card, which allows its position to be concealed from the rest of the fleet for a period of 24 hours.

You can visit the Race Viewer on the Clipper 11-12 Race website to see what tactical moves the fleet make in the next 24 hours


Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 5 – by Richard Hewson


It has been four seasons in one day for Gold Coast Australia, ranging from hot and sunny with no wind to cold and wet sail changes and reefs in the rain as squalls pass over.

The day began as we concentrated on making ground to the east in moderate variable wind conditions under a cloud of dense fog. As the sun rose we saw the amazing shape of a sun trying to burn through the fog, and to top it off, even a bit of blue sky. By mid-morning the sun was out in force, and the sky was clear giving us a fantastic story of the weather surrounding us.

The wind began to veer in oscillations at midday, and we spent the next few hours taking our way towards the Scoring Gate with every change in wind direction. Finally the wind dropped out altogether leaving us becalmed and rolling in the ocean.

Some maintenance was required on the mainsail to reinforce some battens and adjust the leach line, so we took the opportunity of the lull to carry out this maintenance while we sailed slowly along with only the wind seeker up, assisted by about two knots of current. With everybody allocated a separate task it wasn’t long before all the maintenance was done and the mainsail re-hoisted, our kangaroo displaying proudly.

An hour later the wind began to fill in from the south east, and we hoisted our lightweight spinnaker and charged north towards the clouds. Just before we hit the squally looking clouds, down came the spinnaker and up went the Yankee 1, which was shortly replaced by the Yankee 2 and a reef.

Throughout the night Gold Coast Australia has been pounding towards the Scoring Gate on the rhumb line to Derry-Londonderry with a Yankee 2 headsail and a reefed mainsail. It is amazing to think that earlier today we were sat becalmed in mirror seas and now we display a show of breaking waves and power as we charge to windward.

It has defiantly been a busy day on board but the miles made on the rest of the fleet have undoubtedly been worth it.


Visit Finland
RACE 13 – DAY 5 – by Olly Osborne


Today has seen a change of fortunes for Visit Finland as we have seen the miles slipping away sched by sched to our competitors. During the light airs before the incoming low takes hold we are doing our best to keep moving, but positioning ourselves anywhere beyond our immediate locality now looks unlikely.

A problem with the steering last night held us up for a couple of hours as we had to readjust the quadrant fastenings to the rudder stock. It had slipped out of position during the heavy slamming of the previous few days, but once back in place it is working well and there seems to be no lasting damage.

Singapore
RACE 13 – DAY 5 – By Ben Bowley


Another slow day while we kept moving to the east, south east. Finally we found some good current and the wind started to veer more rapidly. This has allowed us to tack over and head on the great circle route straight to Derry-Londonderry.

Conveniently, this course takes just through the southern end of the Scoring Gate too. Over the next 24 hours we shall have to see how we get on with our more easterly course and decide whether to go for the gate at all or to head further east still and set ourselves up better for the next patch of strong winds. The breeze is already filling in nicely and we are currently charging along at around ten knots with single reefed mainsail and Yankee 2. Come on ‘Singas!’



Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Gold Coast Australia 1600NM 0NM

2 Singapore 1640NM 40NM

3 Welcome to Yorkshire 1647NM 46NM

4 Geraldton Western Australia 1714NM 114NM

5 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 1717NM 117NM

6 Visit Finland 1728NM 127NM Stealth Mode: position at 0000 UTC 19 June 2012

7 Derry-Londonderry 1731NM 131NM

8 New York 1747NM 146NM

9 Qingdao 1747NM 147NM

10 De Lage Landen 1751NM 150NM

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#627 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 10:21 AM

RACE 13 - DAY 5 - by Justine Laymond and Darius Mirza (Edinburgh Inspiring Capital)

Wow! Where do I start? It certainly has been a roller-coaster for me and perhaps for the other leggers who joined Leg 8. The first part of the race from New York to Halifax was like a smooth introduction to get back into the swing of things. Weather and sea like a dream. But, I guess good things don't last forever.

We all only had a few days to enjoy Halifax and I saved one day to combine Media/PR worked I had organised. Not realising I would make front page news of their National newspaper, and appearing on two TV shows. It was great fun and definitely raised the profile of Organ Donation, LAM disease (the rare condition I have) and naturally for the Clipper race itself. I was quite overwhelmed on race departure, as a lady came to see me to say her husband died and she consented for his organs to save the lives of others, and wanted to meet me, as a recipient of donation. Needless to say we both cried -it was very moving. Even on a day out to Peggy’s Cove, I had people coming up to talk to me – you are the lady on the newspaper....I saw you on TV etc... And lots of people wished me luck. I am grateful for all this as my nerves for a two week journey sailing across the Atlantic fills me fear, and all I want is to keep well. So, with that in mind...Goodbye Halifax and welcome the Atlantic Ocean.

So here we go.....woohoo! All wearing our sexy kilts with underwear (was a tad windy) ;)

I seemed OK up until eating dinner, then oh dear running for the heads and vomiting like crazy. The next two days I was so poorly & bed bound unable to eat, drink and lost my appetite for three days. True to say, I felt crap and really hoped I would pass this corner and get better. Thankfully, I had Darius (transplant surgeon) and Niamh (Paramedic) keeping tabs on me. Well – what an intro to the rough seas ahead. But, I am a fighter and wanted to get through this and make land! (Just a lot of days still to go).

Hurray...mmmmm...food! Finally, I felt able to eat again and stuffed a delicious lunch and dinner cooked by Paul and Martyn. Jussie is BACK!! It is quite difficult adjusting to the watch systems, lack of sleep, and if I'm honest I am feeling quite drained and exhausted (and it really does take it of me and my body). But, I am also lucky that my crew are very supportive. On some occasions I have found myself out of breath (hard to explain for people who don't what it is like to have a lung condition).

But, again, I am stubborn and continue forward and want it all to be rock and roll!! So watch this space.....come on Ireland – I am ready for YOU!

Being ill again is NOT an option...so with all my Grrrrrrrr...I WILL complete this part of the race and make Ireland bouncing around with my usual smiles. Xx

Thanks Jussie, Darius now completing the blog on behalf of the “Transplant Ambassadors”. As a new legger, there was a lot to learn fairly quickly.

The hard fought fourth place finish into Halifax from New York was a massive boost to us all (maybe the new leggers brought along some much needed luck to team Edinburgh Inspiring Capital?), and we received huge support from the round the world crew.

Life on board is settling into a fairly well set routine – some sleep, lots of damp and condensation (seems worse in the “ghetto section” where we “rest”), cool nights on deck, whale +/- dolphin sightings, coupled with excellent nosh conjured up daily by the “mothers”. In these circumstances, one's true individual material needs are very minimal – the mad world of Liver Units at the QE and Children's hospitals seem far away. Hope you are all busy transplanting in good old Birmingham! At least this way Moira cannot give me any more negative points on the star chart!

It is a privilege to be sailing with the crew of Edinburgh Inspiring Capital, with special words of praise and admiration for Scarlett (Nick) and Jussie! More tomorrow for the next edition from the “Transplant Ambassadors”.

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#628 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 07:10 PM

Fleet prepares as tropical storm ’Chris’ looms - 21 June 2012

What a difference a day makes in the life of an ocean racer as the ten international teams talking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race have been doing all they can to keep approaching tropical storm ‘Chris’ at bay.

In the last 24 hours, the fleet has received warning that ‘Chris’, which was expected to pass by, has been moving closer towards them and could produce further challenging conditions. Meteorologist and winning skipper of the Clipper Race in 2002, Simon Rowell, reports, “Today should be the strongest day of tropical storm ‘Chris’, with it forecasted to start curving northwards, reaching its furthest point east by midnight tonight. Depending where each team is positioned the centre could get pretty close to them, and even though the winds won't be more than they have seen many times before, the speed of change in wind direction and the confusion will add to the sea state which will make helming quite challenging.”

With the tropical storm in sight, the teams have been busy plotting their best course to move away from its path whilst not jeopardising their position on the leader board, as well as carrying out preparations on board for the potential heavy upwind sailing.

Gold Coast Australia, Singapore and Welcome to Yorkshire continue to lead the pack, whilst Visit Finland has emerged from its period in Stealth Mode in the middle of the leader board.

At 0500GMT this morning, Qingdao crew member Lynn Harmer had a fall below decks and sustained an injury. Lynn is in a stable condition and is being looked after by a medically qualified crew member on board. The yacht is in contact with Falmouth Coast Guard and the Clipper Race Office.

As a precaution Qingdao has changed course towards Newfoundland (approx. 450 miles north west) to get Lynn closer to shore based medical support if it is required. If her condition improves, a decision may be taken to resume racing towards Derry-Londonderry. Further updates will be posted on the website.

The Clipper Race fleet is set to arrive into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland between 29 June and 1 July.


21 June 2012
RACE 13 – DAY 6 – by Ian Conchie


An up-to-date report on Qingdao 's progress will follow, as it is currently diverting

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 6 – by Richard Hewson


Gold Coast Australia continues to sail comfortably towards the Scoring Gate with the wind just forward of the beam in relatively moderate seas and the barometer continues to drop as we monitor tropical storm ‘Chris’ as she curves her way to the north behind us.

Yesterday’s weather information warned that the low pressure system that we have been monitoring for the past few days has been up graded tracking to the east. While ‘Chris’ is forecasted to curve its way to the north, I did not want to risk being caught on the wrong side of her if she did not curve to the north as predicted. As a precaution we altered to a more easterly course yesterday, which is now based on following the wind around as she approaches to ensure that we do not find ourselves close hauled and consequently loose boat speed. This strategy is working well and keeps us in the safe quadrant of the tropical storm, and while Welcome to Yorkshire has made good ground on us to the north we will hopefully make this back as the wind continues to back.

Yesterday morning was spent preparing for the possible storm like conditions, removing sheets and guys from the deck, checking for chafe, checking the lower areas of the rig and tightening up all halyards to prevent chafe on the spreaders. At ‘happy hour’ we discussed the predicted weather and the importance to remain vigilant, check for chafe regularly, keeping bilges dry and move around the boat safely. We discussed the importance of keeping the yacht ship shape to make life on board more comfortable and also safer.

For the best part of yesterday Gold Coast Australia found itself going against an eddie of current that is spinning off the Gulf Stream. At times we had two knots of current against us which slowed our progress considerably allowing Singapore and Welcome to Yorkshire to gain some miles on us. Thankfully now we are finally out of the eddie and while winds are not as strong as predicted, we still find ourselves nicely powered up with a reefed mainsail and Yankee 2 making a good ten knots towards the finish.

Our course also takes into consideration the position of the Scoring Gate, and we plan to pass through the northern end later on this morning and should hopefully gain another three points to our tally. The Scoring Gate has taken us slightly further east than I would have liked to have gone, but at the same time leaves us in a safe position for ‘Chris’ to pass to the east of us.

As the summer solstice nears the hours of daylight increase and yesterday we did our second last time zone change for the trip and we are now use the same local time as the Azores (GMT -1). This is quite a significant achievement in time, and highlights that we are nearing the end of our circumnavigation as we have now sailed through every time zone throughout the world.

Visit Finland
RACE 13 – DAY 6 – by Olly Osborne


Today has been a very different story to the last 24 hours as we have enjoyed a good sailing breeze and smooth sea conditions throughout the day. With the approach of the tropical low ‘Chris’ there is a slight sense of anticipation on board, and the thought of heavy upwind sailing ahead has made the mood more subdued than usual. But more recent forecasts look more promising, and we are certainly making the most of the current conditions.

Our time in Stealth Mode has not been as successful as we had hoped, and the decision to play the Stealth Mode card was mainly based around being able to get away from the light airs that hampered us through the night. Nick Brook, our navigator, pointed out today that throughout the course of the year we have always lost at least one position when in Stealth Mode! But none the less we are still in a good position, and I am sure there will be opportunity's to better our position during the next week.


Welcome to Yorkshire
RACE 13 – DAY 6 – by Rupert Dean


It's all systems go on Welcome to Yorkshire at present as we race to keep on the east side of tropical storm 'Chris' and towards the Scoring Gate just 118 miles away. To achieve the former is particularly important to us as we try to hook into the south easterly winds on this side of the depression for as long as possible. We also wish to avoid as much of the worst weather as we can, bearing in mind that this has been categorised as a proper North Atlantic storm.

At the crew meeting at noon today, we focussed on the storm and developed contingencies to manage it over the next two days. Atmospheric pressure reported and forecasted positions of the storm centre received from the SatCom (satellite), are being religiously plotted as they arrive. The trysail is hanked on ready, with lashings applied to our spinnaker poles on deck.

Down below, a cobweb of lines in the living quarters has been strung to prevent nasty falls and kit has been re-stowed to stop it from flying around. The crew is ensuring they have the things they need at hand for the period and are stocking up on sleep wherever possible.

To those following our progress back home, the measures we are employing may seem a little excessive. Bear in mind, however, that several months have passed since the boat and crew was last put through their heavy weather paces out in the North Pacific. Despite our 'relative' proximity to home, we must remember that the North Atlantic can be a treacherous place. It should be treated with respect


Singapore
RACE 13- DAY 6 – by Ben Bowley


Today has been a good day. This morning saw us gradually regain position over our competitors by virtue of having better wind strength and angles than the majority of the fleet. It also seems that the extra easting we have made should set us up well for being on the correct side of tropical storm ‘Chris’ when it hits us. If all goes according to plan we shall be reaching on the eastern side of the centre whilst the rest of the fleet is beating into a minimum of 30 knots of wind. This does mean we shall have to sacrifice the potential of points at the Scoring Gate but I think this is a price worth paying for a podium and less of a kicking over the coming two days.

All preparations have been made for dealing with the blow that is coming our way. There is an air of nervous expectation about the boat and although we know we have seen conditions like those forecast over the next couple of days before, no one is relishing the prospect of sailing through the tail end of a hurricane. Let's just hope that our plan pays off and the following few days bring some fast reaching, what we should have for this trip back across the pond; we're bored of going upwind now!

Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Gold Coast Australia 1406NM 0NM position at 0800 UTC

2 Welcome to Yorkshire 1432NM 26NM position at 0800 UTC

3 Singapore 1435NM 29NM

4 Geraldton Western Australia 1483NM 77NM

5 Visit Finland 1533NM 126NM

6 Qingdao 1555NM 149NM

7 Derry-Londonderry 1576NM 170NM

8 De Lage Landen 1595NM 189NM

9 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 1608NM 202NM

10 New York 1646NM 240NM

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#629 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 01:17 AM

Lynn is strapped to her bunk & on the way to St Johns - thanks a squillion to Coast Guard

#630 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 01:19 AM

Winning skipper's book on Clipper Race released - 22 June 2012

This week sees the release of ‘Team Spirit’, the inspiring book written by Brendan Hall, who skippered Spirit of Australia to victory in the Clipper 09-10 Race.

After leading the Australian entry to a runaway victory during Clipper 09-10, Brendan has turned his hand to writing and his book, ‘Team Spirit’, is a firsthand account of his gruelling 35,000-mile circumnavigation of the globe.

The youngest and least experienced skipper taking part in the race, Brisbane-born Brendan not only guided the Australia entry to victory, he was also involved in rescuing an injured skipper on a competing yacht before leading both teams across the mighty Pacific Ocean.

‘Team Spirit’ is Brendan’s honest account of his unique experience and includes valuable lessons in leadership and team management which he honed while moulding a group of everyday people into a victorious round the world yacht racing team.

The book also includes a forward from Clipper Race Chairman, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston.

“Brendan shows how he dealt with it all, and brought in his boat and crew as winners. This is a thoughtful read for anyone contemplating a long ocean voyage, whether as crew of skipper,” explains Sir Robin.

“It has many lessons for how to get the best out of a group of people. Brendan did his research, worked out what he thought would be best, and then put it into practice. As the story of Spirit of Australia’s odyssey unfolds, we share the successes and failures as he and his crew worked together to achieve their final, well-deserved victory.”

The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race offers people from all walks of life the chance to take on some of the most challenging sailing conditions known to man no matter what their previous sailing experience.

“On board you can have a student sitting next to a farmer sitting next to a structural engineer sitting next to a chief executive and a mix of approximately 60 per cent men to 40 per cent women. This is what makes it so fascinating and it’s the human side of the race," explains Brendan.

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#631 Leka

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 08:51 AM

Bit of a book review here
http://issuu.com/blo...spirit?mode=a_p

#632 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 08:11 PM

Tropical storm ‘Chris’ continues to dictate strong upwind sailing - 23 June 2012
It has been another 24 hours of tough upwind sailing for the ten strong fleet of racing yachts taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race. As the teams continue to fight it out in the toughest of sailing conditions brought on by a tropical storm in the Atlantic Ocean, nothing could dampen the team’s determination to win valuable extra points at the Race 13 Scoring Gate.

Visit Finland, which is currently in second place on the overall leader board, was the third entry to reach the optional Scoring Gate yesterday to win the final point up for grabs.

As the remnants of tropical storm ‘Chris’ continue to dictate challenging upwind sailing conditions for most of the fleet, tactical decisions are never far from the teams’ minds. At 11.55 UTC yesterday Singapore entered into Stealth Mode, desperately chasing De Lage Landen for third place on the overall leader board.

For sixth placed Northern Ireland entry Derry-Londonderry skipper Mark Light described the harsh conditions, “Last night was more about survival and self-preservation but today our focus is firmly back with racing and this is definitely a team game. The North Atlantic Ocean is an unforgiving place and not for the faint hearted. Looking at the weather ahead of us and the sheer amount of upwind sailing expected, I have made it clear to my crew that there will be further tough times ahead.”

Qingdao reached St John’s Newfoundland this morning so that crew member Lynn Harmer can receive a full medical assessment for a potential back injury. Lynn fell in heavy weather earlier this week and hit her head. After consulting with Falmouth, US and Canadian coastguards the skipper was recommended to divert to St John’s for a full medical assessment as a precautionary measure in case of spinal injury.

We have just heard that Lynn has no broken bones or nerve damage and is fit to continue. The crew will take the opportunity to top up the yacht's fuel tanks and leave St John's to resume racing as soon as possible this morning.

Today the fleet will be celebrating the ‘Summer Sailstice' - not to be confused with the solstice earlier this week. Summer Sailstice is a global celebration of sailing and is held on the weekend closest to the summer solstice, the longest day to be on the water! Over 17,000 sailors’ participated last year from more than 40 countries, all connected in the global celebration of sailing which was established 12 years ago.

For more information please visit www.summersailstice.com

Derry- Londonderry
RACE 13 – DAY 8 – by Mark Light


We continue to travel on a fairly northerly course tracking away from tropical storm ‘Chris’. The winds moderated a little during the day but have picked up again since and we are seeing sustained 30 to 35 knot headwinds. This is forecast and unfortunately the grib files (our daily weather information) are proving to be very accurate. I say unfortunately because the long term situation suggests substantial headwinds for the next five days or so!

On board morale is still good and my crew is putting in everything it has. We have the usual array of tiredness and walking wounded with bumps, bruises and secondary sea sickness but are covering as and when needed to keep ourselves moving.

Last night was more about survival and self-preservation but today again our focus is firmly back with racing and this is definitely a team game. At our pre-race team briefing we spoke all about this being our home port race into Derry-Londonderry and how we must carry our motivation with us and all work harder than any other boats to succeed, but we also spoke about the fact that this is not a small last leg home. This is another Ocean crossing and not to be underestimated.

The North Atlantic Ocean is an unforgiving place and definitely not for the faint hearted. Looking at the weather ahead of us and the sheer amount of upwind sailing expected, I have made it clear to my crew that there will be further tough times ahead. We must all dig deep and when they step off the boat in Northern Ireland they will have to go some way to experience a harder crossing of the North Atlantic Ocean!

We have a great team of people on board; this is one hell of a thing to take on and they should all be very proud of themselves at the end of it all.

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#633 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 09:15 PM

“The North Atlantic Ocean is a living breathing animal” - 24 June 2012

It’s been ‘another day in the office’ for the Clipper Race fleet over the past 24 hours with 25 knots of headwind, slamming into waves and living at a 30 degree angle the norm for ocean racing in the North Atlantic.

“The North Atlantic Ocean is a living breathing animal, who seemed particularly angry today, not friendly at all, but now she seems quietly content to let us go, making our lives hard but not desperate,” says Derry-Londonderry skipper, Mark Light, as he continues to push his yacht home to its home port.

Crewed by ‘people like you’ the Clipper Race offers the challenge of a lifetime to circumnavigate the world for people from all walks of life. Mark continues, “The ocean has no respect for us or our boat; she does not differentiate between amateur or professional, young or old, sailor or landlubber.”

Despite Welcome to Yorkshire maintaining the lead, further south Gold Coast Australia, currently in second place, celebrated being the first yacht to cross the line of latitude marking the start of the Ocean Sprint at 0317GMT this morning; the crew will be aiming to set a sprint time for the rest of the fleet to beat for a valuable extra point. Meanwhile, Singapore skipper Ben Bowley was left frustrated as complications with sails brought the yacht to a halt for some hours during the night.

“What started as a broken guy and a swiftly dropped kite has turned into a disaster on the ‘Big Red Bus’. We have ended up with such a mess of halyards that we have been unable to raise any headsails or kites since midnight. If we don't get moving soon then we shall miss our express ride to the north west and the whole point of sailing more miles to the east will be negated,” reports a frustrated Ben Bowley.

Time is valuable at sea and with fierce competition breathing down their necks, every minute counts. In a tactical move New York, currently in eighth place, is playing its Stealth Mode card and will ‘disappear’ from competitors and the Race Viewer from 12noon GMT for 24 hours. Only the Clipper Race Office will know its position.

Geraldton Western Australia is currently in third place and with the frontrunners just over 900 miles from shore, the Clipper Race fleet is set to start arriving into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, between 29 June and 1 July.

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#634 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 09:32 PM

Fleet revises North Atlantic racing tactics - 25 June 2012

Ten days into Race 13 to Derry-Londonderry, the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race fleet is busy studying weather files and contemplating tactics once again, in a bid to find the fastest route to the finish line in Northern Ireland.

Clipper Race Director, Jonathan Bailey said, “Over the weekend the Clipper Race fleet has been navigating its way around ex-tropical storm ‘Chris’ which has given headwinds to many of the yachts and slowing progress rather than the more traditional downwind conditions associated with this leg of the race.

“Some of the yachts have stayed north of the eye of the tropical storm but several have managed to get below the eye into stronger winds from a more favourable direction. This tactical decision to go south of the eye has opened up some interesting scenarios as the fleet approach the Irish coast, so the next few days will be very interesting.”

Echoing the race director’s thoughts, Welcome to Yorkshire skipper, Rupert Dean explains, “Of all the ocean legs to date on the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race, the race across the North Atlantic appears to be the most complex and unusual from both a meteorological and tactical perspective. Whilst this 'game' makes great viewing for the fans back home, from the navigator's perspective I can tell you it's a real headache!”

The Yorkshire entry was overtaken by Gold Coast Australia overnight and is currently in second place, while Singapore is back in third place after sorting its tangled halyards that caused frustration yesterday.

Frontrunner Gold Coast Australia completed the Ocean Sprint in 13 hours 31 minutes 31 seconds, setting the current time to beat, bettering rival Singapore’s time by 30 minutes. The team sprinting the distance the fastest will get an additional point which can have huge influence in the overall leader board, as the race is nearing completion.

With only four weeks to go until Race Finish in Southampton on 22 July, preparations are in full swing. The Ageas Bowl, the home of Hampshire Cricket is offering Clipper Race followers the chance to win tickets to Hampshire Royals vs. Essex Eagles, Friends Life t20 game on Sunday 8 July. Click here for more details.

With the leading the frontrunners just over 700 miles from shore, the Clipper Race fleet is set to start arriving into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, between 29 June and 1 July.


Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Gold Coast Australia 707NM 0NM

2 Welcome to Yorkshire 775NM 68NM

3 Singapore 819NM 112NM

4 Geraldton Western Australia 829NM 122NM

5 Visit Finland 916NM 209NM

6 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 1045NM 338NM

7 De Lage Landen 1110NM 403NM

8 Derry-Londonderry 1178NM 471NM

9 New York 1200NM Stealth Mode at 24/6/12, 1400 GMT

10 Qingdao 1402NM 695NM


Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 10 – by Richard Hewson


Gold Coast Australia has had an outstanding day of downwind sailing in reasonable wind and foggy conditions. At the start of the day (0600 UTC) we were 28miles behind Welcome to Yorkshire, and at the last schedule we were over 35 miles ahead. It is fantastic to see our tactics pay off so handsomely in such a short amount of time.

Visibility today has been very poor, and we have not seen blue sky now for over a week, but the energy of flying down wind with the spinnaker up washes away any sense of misery. Visibility is so poor that a ship observed to pass only two miles away on radar was not visible from our deck. We are keeping regular radar watches as a ship can easily come up on radar and be upon a yacht in less than 20 minutes if one is not observant.

There are jokes on board now that some crew would have sailed across the Atlantic Ocean yet have only seen the one mile of water surrounding the boat due to the fog. Perhaps we could develop a ‘Clipper Atlantic Simulator’ (CAS) that simulates this voyage. Placed in a small pond with a wave and wind making device it would easily be achievable.

There are a few things that the ‘CAS’ would not be able to simulate. It would not be able to simulate the beauty of the phosphorescence as we charge our way down wind, lighting up our wake in neon lights, and lighting up the white caps that surround out boat, blue crests shining brightly against the black night. The ‘CAS’ would have no chance of simulating the sperm whale that surfaced close to our boat yesterday, or the countless common dolphins that swim past us daily, making us look like we are standing still. The beauty of our environment, though we can only see one mile around us is enough in itself to make this experience life changing and wholly gratifying.

The CAS would most certainly not be able to simulate the variety of weather that the fleet is experiencing at the moment. One yacht may be becalmed, drifting without a breath of wind, another has storm sails up and 40 knots of gusts, while another has their medium weight spinnaker up and is charging downwind. This is a race against the weather as well as the other yachts. The faster we go, the longer we stay with fresh prevailing winds and the closer we will be to the finish when the wind moves away.


Welcome to Yorkshire
RACE 13 – DAY 10 – by Rupert Dean


Of all the ocean legs to date on the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race, the race across the North Atlantic appears to be the most complex and unusual from both a meteorological and tactical perspective. Whilst this 'game' makes great viewing for the fans back home, from the navigator's perspective I can tell you it's a real headache!

Like an unwelcome house guest, tropical storm ‘Chris’ has been overstaying his welcome for far too long. Tracking north east straight for north western Ireland, before heading up over the Orkneys in five days’ time. It's looking like an upwind slog for the likes of Visit Finland, Geraldton Western Australia and ourselves on Welcome to Yorkshire. For those to the north but further back, namely Qingdao, New York and Edinburgh Inspiring Capital, the situation is upwind too, but this will change as the North Atlantic High becomes re-established, bringing northerlies instead of the current east north easterlies. This should enable them to make up many miles.

Making up miles is very much on De Lage Landen’s agenda, given her position underneath ‘Chris’, enabling her to steer north east and achieve great Velocity Made Good (VMG). The same is true for both Gold Coast Australia and Singapore, again on the correct side of the depression.

Returning to Welcome to Yorkshire, Geraldton Western Australia, Visit Finland and Derry-Londonderry far south, the situation appears, at least from where I'm sitting as more complex. It's a choice between bludgeoning on upwind choosing the tack which makes maximum Velocity Made Good or diving south east to the favourable side of ‘Chris’, locking into the southerlies to the north east of the 'eye.' If all goes well, the latter probably presents less miles to sail than the former with better wind angles, but is dependent on ‘Chris’ doing what he is forecast to do . By diving south east there is also the risk of running into northerly headwinds as ‘Chris’ tracks up the west coast of Scotland. Then there is the issue of covering the boats behind. High risk high reward or low risk low reward. What's it to be?


Singapore
RACE 13 – DAY 10 – by Ben Bowley


Well the pool of frustration in which I sat typing yesterday has well and truly dried out, along with the rest of the boat and crew. Shortly after writing yesterday’s update, crew member Sherlyn Chen managed to free the tangled knitting of halyards and we were able to get underway again. Top marks to both her and crew member Jonathan Pickering for their valiant nocturnal aerobics in less than ideal conditions.

With the source of the problem identified the kite was re-hoisted and for the last 24 hours we have been charging along generally in excess of tenknots. Another advantage to being that bit further south is the temperature down here seems to be that bit warmer than the guys up north are experiencing by the sounds of it; I was still in flip flops yesterday! It is wonderful to finally start to see the fruits of our labour come good as we reach our way to the east north east and it would be fantastic if we could regain second place from Welcome to Yorkshire over the coming 24 hours.

The test then will be to see if we can get up the coast of Ireland before the centre of this low we are riding expands and blocks our path. As I sit here typing we are just coming to the end of the Ocean Sprint. It will be hard for us to gain a point over the boats to the north due to them having to sail less miles than us however, as I have already mentioned, our Speed Over Ground (SOG) for the last 12 hours has been rarely less than ten knots, so we shall have to wait and see.


Visit Finland
RACE 13 – DAY 10 – by Olly Osborne


We are sailing well again after spending most of the day yesterday using our emergency tiller. Working in the confined space at the back of the boat above the steering great is a pretty tricky task when beating to windward and it took several hours to remove the quadrant and tighten the bolts through the support beam beneath. But we are back to full steering now, and it is good to have the peace of mind that the steering will get us all the way to Derry-Londonderry.

The weather forecast is starting to look a bit more promising now as well, and as the low pressure system moves north we should be able to make a good course. I think this will be a welcome change across the fleet too, especially for the northerly boats as it spells a change from the relentless upwind sailing.

Qingdao
RACE 13 – DAY 10 – by Ian Conchie


We have discovered one advantage of our diversion to St. John’s and that is the weather! While we sail along hard on the wind on a port tack we are almost pointing at the finish and for the most part making reasonable speed (as I type this we have encountered some strange chop which is slowing us down). We were even bathed in sun shine for most of the afternoon and this is all in contrast to the reports from some of the other boats battling their way through the remains of tropical storm ‘Chris’.

Our goal at the moment is to try and keep up with the remains of tropical storm ‘Chris’ as filling in behind it is a huge high pressure coming in which will bring light winds! And that would slow us down.

We are keen to not fall any further behind the fleet and also have a little time to enjoy the festivities and culture of Derry-Londonderry – the 2013 City of Culture.

At the moment it looks like we are managing to keep up with the weather as the barometer has actually dropped slightly today which should indicate that we are a little bit closer to it.

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#635 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 09:43 PM

Leg 8, Race 13, Day 2 - Me not well!
17/06/2012
Sorry this email is arriving a bit later than I planned, but unfortunately I have been struck down with the curse of the mariner... the dreaded seasickness! I know, this far round to finally succumb to it is almost a crime! I have eaten my first food in almost 42 hours and am feeling a little more human so have risked the Nav station to send an email to my baby! Mother watch was the cause, along with the 45 degree angle and bashing waves, all in all its a bit miserable here at the moment!

Ah well, It was my choice! silly me!

I'm gonna keep it sweet and short for now to not risk me feeling ill again!

Leg 8, Race 13, Day 3 - I am Alive!!!
19/06/2012
Again sorry for not replying sooner, I am all mended now and after not eating for so long have been busy eating my way through everything on the boat, so situation normal! oh and what was written in race news?, some were ill with a flu type thing (James and Cath) but me just ill with the motion of the ocean! Things have settled down for now but it does mean that it has been rather slow going and again we are at the back of the fleet! (I really do not know what we have to do to catch a break in this!?!)

We are still on Halifax time and are not sure when we will time shift as we are only having about 6 hours of darkness anyway! well we will before Derrry anyway!

Not much else going on on Q at the moment, just getting into routines and the like. Its cold and damp (nothing like the southern ocean or Pacific yet though. The area around the grand banks has been foggy too so extra lookout required, No ice though so thats cool! get it... COOL! Ha ha! sea madness has set in! I NEED LAND!!!!

Leg 8, Race 13, Day 4 - Have you met Chris yet?
20/06/2012
Well we never get a rest here on Q and this race is no different! The low pressure system we were going to use to push us nice and north now has a name!.... Chris!, well its actual name is Tropical Storm Chris! So it means lumpy bumpy for the next three or four days. This is not all bad though as it may just give us what we need to pull off a bit of a shuffle!, lets see what happens!

Well the long and short is that I may not be able to email much and if I do they may be short as it will be difficult to type in nav. but no matter what I will be thinking of you all and would love to read emails from you (lot easier to read than type!)

Leg 8, Race 13, Day 6 - Visit Foundland
22/06/2012
Yeah I'm fine and so is the crew (well most of them) Hopefully it is just precautionary for lynn but with necks and backs you have to play on the safe side.

So another destination on the list... Newfoundland (perhaps we should rename our boat 'Visit Foundland' we may have more luck!

So things are a bit muted here not sure if the diversion will give us any time in Derry or even if we go at all? too many variables to tell at the moment *about 30 hours from NF so we will know more then!

Well its a very quick one for now, lots been going on and little sleep so i'm on catchup at the moment, the only good thing is that our diversion has taken us away from Chris, bloody good job, I don't like hurricanes!

anyway will type more very soon I promise, All I can think about is getting home and stuff, although my watch and I said happy birthday to mum with the walnut whips and some Les Miserables on the radio (she would have enjoyed it!) little emotional but nice!

Leg 8, Race 13, Day 6 - The Grand Banks Take Two...
22/06/2012
Well I said i would try and write more soon so here it is. I got caught up on sleep and have half an hour below during watch to warm up. It is getting cold as we head north! We are about 18 -20 hours from St. Johns where we will drop Lynn off. It is such a shame. I really feel for her. The Atlantic is not her ocean! I have passed on your best and she says thanks. She feels bad for diverting us from racing (silly billy) I just don't think we were meant to have pennants! Its not the main reason for doing this though so we will live with it. and we have at least 1 more chance!!!!

Not sure at the moment how the other boats are doing with Chris, hopefully all safe. we are having our first morning with sun since we left Halifax, which is nice! How is your summer going (as if I needed to ask)? Hopefully it will pick up when I'm home!

Speaking of home I really must stop imagining all the things we will do when I get home, it is just making it all seem so far away, I cant help it though.

well I'll get off for now and will speak when I have more news, thinking of you all...all the way from the Grand Banks!

Leg 8, race 13, Day 8 - Nice Place names!
24/06/2012
Well it is the morning after my mother watch (I'm lazy mother so I still have some time off!) I was so tired last night that it was shower, bed and went to sleep straight away. I slept through till breakfast when Terry woke me offering a bacon butty!... I was so tired i said no!! !!!! That's how tired I was, lunch soon though so my poor tummy does not have to go without for long!

We are still sailing (resumed racing) and are for the moment making reasonable progress 1527nm to go! We are off the Grand Banks heading north of the Flemish Cap, to the north of us is a n area called Orphan Knoll.... Nice eh!

Well spirits are remarkably good on board despite how far we have still to go and how cold it is, just the thought of getting back on land is keeping us all going (well the things land offers anyway, food, showers and beer)

Well Off to get ready for 6 hours on watch BBBBBBBBBRRRRRR!!!!! and I will be in touch soon!

http://www.jimmysailsworld.com/blog.html

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#636 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 09:51 PM

RACE 13 - DAY 4 - by Vesna Rendulic (Gold Coast Australia)

Well what a time it's been since leaving the good and extremely hospitable folk of Halifax last week. The North Atlantic has challenged us with wind, waves, fog, cold and damp - and we saw our first glimpse of Atlantic sunshine yesterday which promptly invited derobing to the Aussie favourite attire of shorts and t-shirts on deck.

As an avid observer of people, I am constantly entertained by watch-change antics and always get a smile when I am around to witness the next watch get out of bed - with ruffled hair, foggy looks, robotically making their way in the general direction of the heads (if nature calls) or the wet-locker to find their respective foulies - and then what makes me really chuckle is the acts of contortion as everyone wrestles their way into mid layers, then damp foulies, whilst trying to stay absurdly balanced as the yacht pitches side-to-side and back and forth all at the same time.

Somehow it all works out and everyone makes their way on deck for watch changeover - the commotion and chaos in the saloon over for a few short moments until the off-watch descends the companionway to cause another burst of commotion as foulies and other gear are removed - all with equal hilarity that rivals a first-class comedy skit. I put myself in the absolutely inept and ungraceful category of getting my gear on and off - and moving around on deck - and balance - well, that's just not a word in my vocabulary or my being on a yacht beating into the wind.

Yesterday I was on mother duty from 4am and had another go at baking a loaf of bread. This loaf certainly looked impressive with a drizzle of mixed herbs and which aroma was wonderful to emanate from below deck, but alas, it was still rather dry and chewy. Nevertheless it still was consumed by the ever-hungry crew. After four days of seasickness it's good to start feeling a bit more 'normal' again and start regaining an appetite.

Who needs diets or some other weight loss program when a few days of adventure on the high seas work so well to shed a few kilos!

Until next time...

Vesna Rendulic


RACE 13 - DAY 6 - by Sherlyn Chen (Singapore)

"It has a name," I pointed out, when Ben expressed surprise that I was taking a seasickness tablet so late in the race. "It has a name, and I don't know how rough it's going to get."

I was referring to Tropical Revolving Storm Chris, the third of this hurricane season. We've weathered many storms over the past eleven months, but never before any with a name. The fact that it had a name elevated it above the storms that we'd encountered previously. Especially because I live so close to the Equator where the Coriolis effect is insufficiently pronounced for hurricanes to form, they are for me the stuff of distant news reports, not an imminent reality.

I was therefore suitably apprehensive, especially after reading a forecast that went something like this:

HURRICANE CHRIS FORECAST/ADVISORY NUMBER 8

NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL032012

1500 UTC THU JUN 21 2012

HURRICANE CENTER LOCATED NEAR 41.1N 43.2W AT 21/1500Z POSITION ACCURATE WITHIN 10 NM

PRESENT MOVEMENT TOWARD THE NORTHEAST OR 45 DEGREES AT 17 KT

ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE 987 MB MAX SUSTAINED WINDS 65 KT WITH GUSTS TO 80 KT.

64 KT....... 20NE 20SE 0SW 0NW.
50 KT....... 40NE 40SE 40SW 30NW.
34 KT....... 70NE 90SE 60SW 50NW.
12 FT SEAS.. 90NE 180SE 420SW 120NW.

WINDS AND SEAS VARY GREATLY IN EACH QUADRANT. RADII IN NAUTICAL MILES ARE THE LARGEST RADII EXPECTED ANYWHERE IN THAT QUADRANT

My Yachtmaster Ocean theory course instructor's parting words regarding hurricanes had been these: Semper in excreta, solo profundum variat - and recalling that was no consolation either.

The general atmosphere on board after Ben broke the news at the five o'clock meeting yesterday was a little subdued, but I'd like to think with a steely determination that we'd get through on the other side alright, just a bit wet and shaken from the upwind beating we were about to receive.

The sail plan was gradually reduced throughout the night and most of today, going from Yankee 2 and full main down to Yankee 3 and third reef. At one point we even dropped the staysail because it was getting too windy, but that was re-hoisted an hour or so later.

There is still no sign of the storm jib being needed, much less the trysail, and it appears that we have managed to evade the worst of TS Chris. The centre did not pass over us, thankfully, and even at its closest was about 300 miles away.

Now we're just hoping that our decision to keep south and miss the scoring gate pays off in the long run, because obviously it's further from the Great Circle Route and means that we'll have more miles to cover than other boats which have gone further north.

Sherlyn Chen

RACE 13 - DAY 7 - by Tom Ross (De Lage Landen)

Well it certainly has got windy in the last 24 hours. We have gone from having a frankly mundane 15 knots to beating into a screaming 40.

Last night we were told when coming on deck that the low that was forming had been upgraded to a tropical storm. Our plan was to cut through the centre of the system so that we would have the winds behind us rather than battering into us. Cunning. This was all fine until a few hours later when we got a warning that the friendly tropical storm had been upgraded again to hurricane. Our cunning plan then came screeching to a halt as we tacked back started running away from the predicted 80 knots of terrifying wind.

Whilst on the run we have had our fair share of little mishaps. Just after we came on deck for our first night watch, bellies full of spag bol and still in bunk mode, the strop attaching the storm stay sail to the deck snapped sending the sail shooting up the fore stay and out of control. So off we waddled, half in a carb coma to try and drag the tiny sail down on a soaking foredeck. Being such a small sail this task should have been fairly easy but it was being held up by the crazy wind and kept shooting back up the fore stay. However we persevered and finally got the tiny pest under control and lashed to the deck.

Our next bit of excitement came in the form of the stay sail sheet snapping. Always a lovely surprise. So again off we waddled to tack the sail over before attaching another sheet. The final drama of the watch was when the same thing happened again. This time we gave up on the usually trusty stay sail and dragged that down and lashed it to the deck too.

Even with all the drama on deck, the way-too-much-wind and water spay that feels like being stung by a swarm of angry we bees I can’t control the thoughts of how much I’m going to miss this. So with only two more weeks (ish) left at sea for me on the big blue canoe I'm going to waddle once again on deck and have a wrestle with the helm.

By Tom Ross

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#637 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 09:36 PM

Gains made as fleet commits to revised tactics - 26 June 2012

It has been an interesting 24 hours for the ten 68-foot ocean racing yachts taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race which has seen new tactics come into play on the approach to the finish line.

The tactical decision to go south of the eye of ex tropical storm ‘Chris’ which has been dictating the fleet’s progress over the past few days has paid off for Singapore, which has taken a 19-mile lead over its more northerly positioned rival Welcome to Yorkshire. Meanwhile yesterday’s frontrunner Gold Coast Australia has played another tactical card, as it entered into its 24 hour Stealth Mode and will reappear to the public at 1200 UTC today.

De Lage Landen and Geraldton Western Australia have entered the Ocean Sprint where the team sprinting the distance the fastest will be awarded an additional point.

On board the Dutch entry, skipper Stuart Jackson, reports, “We have finally started making decent ground now after taking ourselves so far south to stay on the southern side of the low. It has also been a relief not to be beating constantly, so is a lot more comfortable for everyone too.

“We have just entered the Ocean Sprint, so we'll see if we can rival the times already set. The next few days is looking interesting as the northern group and southern group will start to merge together, we just have to hope that we can continue to make some ground on the others. So there is every chance that the mid-fleet positions could change hands a few times before the finish line.”

The leading yachts of the Clipper Race fleet are set to start arriving into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, between 29 June and 1 July. Keep a close eye on the Race Viewer on the Clipper Race website to see which tactics pay dividends

Gains made as fleet commits to revised tactics - 26 June 2012

It has been an interesting 24 hours for the ten 68-foot ocean racing yachts taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race which has seen new tactics come into play on the approach to the finish line.

The tactical decision to go south of the eye of ex tropical storm ‘Chris’ which has been dictating the fleet’s progress over the past few days has paid off for Singapore, which has taken a 19-mile lead over its more northerly positioned rival Welcome to Yorkshire. Meanwhile yesterday’s frontrunner Gold Coast Australia has played another tactical card, as it entered into its 24 hour Stealth Mode and will reappear to the public at 1200 UTC today.

De Lage Landen and Geraldton Western Australia have entered the Ocean Sprint where the team sprinting the distance the fastest will be awarded an additional point.

On board the Dutch entry, skipper Stuart Jackson, reports, “We have finally started making decent ground now after taking ourselves so far south to stay on the southern side of the low. It has also been a relief not to be beating constantly, so is a lot more comfortable for everyone too.

“We have just entered the Ocean Sprint, so we'll see if we can rival the times already set. The next few days is looking interesting as the northern group and southern group will start to merge together, we just have to hope that we can continue to make some ground on the others. So there is every chance that the mid-fleet positions could change hands a few times before the finish line.”

The leading yachts of the Clipper Race fleet are set to start arriving into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, between 29 June and 1 July. Keep a close eye on the Race Viewer on the Clipper Race website to see which tactics pay dividends
Gains made as fleet commits to revised tactics - 26 June 2012

It has been an interesting 24 hours for the ten 68-foot ocean racing yachts taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race which has seen new tactics come into play on the approach to the finish line.

The tactical decision to go south of the eye of ex tropical storm ‘Chris’ which has been dictating the fleet’s progress over the past few days has paid off for Singapore, which has taken a 19-mile lead over its more northerly positioned rival Welcome to Yorkshire. Meanwhile yesterday’s frontrunner Gold Coast Australia has played another tactical card, as it entered into its 24 hour Stealth Mode and will reappear to the public at 1200 UTC today.

De Lage Landen and Geraldton Western Australia have entered the Ocean Sprint where the team sprinting the distance the fastest will be awarded an additional point.

On board the Dutch entry, skipper Stuart Jackson, reports, “We have finally started making decent ground now after taking ourselves so far south to stay on the southern side of the low. It has also been a relief not to be beating constantly, so is a lot more comfortable for everyone too.

“We have just entered the Ocean Sprint, so we'll see if we can rival the times already set. The next few days is looking interesting as the northern group and southern group will start to merge together, we just have to hope that we can continue to make some ground on the others. So there is every chance that the mid-fleet positions could change hands a few times before the finish line.”

The leading yachts of the Clipper Race fleet are set to start arriving into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, between 29 June and 1 July. Keep a close eye on the Race Viewer on the Clipper Race website to see which tactics pay dividends


Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Singapore 621NM 0NM

2 Welcome to Yorkshire 641NM 19NM

3 Gold Coast Australia 678NM 57NM Stealth Mode: position at 1200 UTC 25 June 2012

4 Geraldton Western Australia 715NM 94NM

5 Visit Finland 791NM 170NM

6 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 853NM 232NM

7 De Lage Landen 913NM 292NM

8 New York 925NM 304NM

9 Derry-Londonderry 1035NM 414NM

10 Qingdao 1240NM 619NM

Singapore
RACE 13 – DAY 11 – by Ben Bowley


Another day of charging north east on the ‘Big Red Bus’ and we have been making some excellent progress. Another time zone changed and a whole day without having to change kites, bliss! We've had our medium weight up for nearly 24 hours now and ‘Mabel’ has been serving us well.

Initially, whilst the sea was still rather confused, she was very tricky to fly but over the last 12 hours things have been working nicely. I do wish the wind would back a little more however as it would be excellent to be making a bit more progress north in our course. Presently, we are being forced a little to the east which may be no bad thing in the long run, but for now it would be good to be making slightly higher VMG (Velocity Made Good). Looking at the end game tactically, it there could be a nasty wind hole opening up over north west Ireland around the time we are due to get there. This will take some careful negotiation if we are to emerge the other side still clutching a podium place - either that or some drastic manoeuvring, but we shall see a little nearer the time.

This race has challenged the entire fleet for a number of reasons and I for one am rather looking forward to a pint of Guinness and some famous Northern Irish hospitality!

Welcome to Yorkshire
RACE 13 – DAY 11 – by Rupert Dean


The meteorological situation in this part of ex-tropical storm ‘Chris’ remains complex for us on Welcome to Yorkshire. Yesterday saw us heading south east in a bid to punch through a patch of variable winds at the north east corner of the depression into southerlies. This would have enabled us to head east before reaching off towards the coast of Ireland, just as Singapore is doing now. Unfortunately, by the time we arrived at the location of the predicted variables this morning, it became obvious that they had moved further east, putting a spanner in the works of our grand plan.

Tacking north, north east on a header has seen us on starboard tack since then and we have made surprisingly good VMG (Velocity Made Good) with it. We've been joined by numerous dolphins which is always good for morale. Our bow wave has also been putting on a display, throwing up an eerie green hue due to the high phosphorescence in it, as the bow slices through the

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 11 – by Richard Hewson


Gold Coast Australia slipped into Stealth Mode yesterday just prior of the point of no return had we decided to take a route through the Irish Sea, around the east coast of Ireland and into Derry-Londonderry rather than the more obvious west coast.

After receiving the latest GRIB weather files yesterday it appeared that the low pressure system formally known as ‘Chris’ was travelling slightly to the north west of Ireland rather than settling over the top of the middle of the country. This will allow us a small wind corridor to get through before the wind drops out provided we can maintain predicted speeds.

It has been a fantastic few days of running downwind with medium and heavy weight spinnakers, and only now has the wind begun to abate slightly as the low pressure weakens. From now on our job to keep Gold Coast Australia moving will increase in difficulty as lighter winds make it a challenge to keep the spinnaker full.

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#638 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 01:12 AM

De Lage Landen sets new time to beat in Ocean Sprint - 27 June 2012

As the depression caused by ex-tropical storm ‘Chris’ continues to slowly move north west of Ireland, the ten-strong fleet of ocean racing yachts participating in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race has had a mixed bag of weather in the last 24 hours. Potential still remains for a re-shuffle of positions on the leader board.

Drawing closer to the ‘Emerald Isle’ on a scattered course through the North Atlantic, Gold Coast Australia, Singapore and Welcome to Yorkshire are clinging on to their respective current podium positions.

Yesterday, De Lage Landen completed the Ocean Sprint and has stripped Gold Coast Australia of its time to beat, finishing the sprint an hour and 30 minutes faster than the Australian entry. The new time to beat is 11 hours 57 minutes and 41 seconds and the team to complete the set course the fastest will be awarded the additional point on offer.

Meanwhile home port team Derry-Londonderry’s decision to change its tactics and head south east has had the desired effect, enjoying strong winds and closing the gap on its rivals.

On board, skipper Mark Light, reports, “We came south in search of wind and boy have we found it! Our plan was to chase the low pressure system all the way to Ireland ‘hanging onto the coat tails’ as it were. Well, we have been clinging on with clenched fists, white knuckles, every sinew and bit of strength we have.

“Roller-coaster ride does not do this justice at all. We have seen gusts just over 50 knots true and established 40 knot gradient winds on the beam and just aft of us.

“So far we have eaten up the miles, just what we need in order to improve our race position and ETA into Derry-Londonderry. I know we will have special people waiting for us (all ‘Legenderry’) and we are doing all we can pushing very hard to make sure we catch them before they leave!”

To conceal its tactics Edinburgh Inspiring Capital entered into Stealth Mode overnight and will race under the cloak of invisibility until midnight, where its position will be revealed to the rest of the fleet.

The leading yachts of the Clipper Race fleet are set to start arriving into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, between 29 June and 1 July.

De Lage Landen sets new time to beat in Ocean Sprint - 27 June 2012

As the depression caused by ex-tropical storm ‘Chris’ continues to slowly move north west of Ireland, the ten-strong fleet of ocean racing yachts participating in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race has had a mixed bag of weather in the last 24 hours. Potential still remains for a re-shuffle of positions on the leader board.

Drawing closer to the ‘Emerald Isle’ on a scattered course through the North Atlantic, Gold Coast Australia, Singapore and Welcome to Yorkshire are clinging on to their respective current podium positions.

Yesterday, De Lage Landen completed the Ocean Sprint and has stripped Gold Coast Australia of its time to beat, finishing the sprint an hour and 30 minutes faster than the Australian entry. The new time to beat is 11 hours 57 minutes and 41 seconds and the team to complete the set course the fastest will be awarded the additional point on offer.

Meanwhile home port team Derry-Londonderry’s decision to change its tactics and head south east has had the desired effect, enjoying strong winds and closing the gap on its rivals.

On board, skipper Mark Light, reports, “We came south in search of wind and boy have we found it! Our plan was to chase the low pressure system all the way to Ireland ‘hanging onto the coat tails’ as it were. Well, we have been clinging on with clenched fists, white knuckles, every sinew and bit of strength we have.

“Roller-coaster ride does not do this justice at all. We have seen gusts just over 50 knots true and established 40 knot gradient winds on the beam and just aft of us.

“So far we have eaten up the miles, just what we need in order to improve our race position and ETA into Derry-Londonderry. I know we will have special people waiting for us (all ‘Legenderry’) and we are doing all we can pushing very hard to make sure we catch them before they leave!”

To conceal its tactics Edinburgh Inspiring Capital entered into Stealth Mode overnight and will race under the cloak of invisibility until midnight, where its position will be revealed to the rest of the fleet.

The leading yachts of the Clipper Race fleet are set to start arriving into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, between 29 June and 1 July.

De Lage Landen sets new time to beat in Ocean Sprint - 27 June 2012

As the depression caused by ex-tropical storm ‘Chris’ continues to slowly move north west of Ireland, the ten-strong fleet of ocean racing yachts participating in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race has had a mixed bag of weather in the last 24 hours. Potential still remains for a re-shuffle of positions on the leader board.

Drawing closer to the ‘Emerald Isle’ on a scattered course through the North Atlantic, Gold Coast Australia, Singapore and Welcome to Yorkshire are clinging on to their respective current podium positions.

Yesterday, De Lage Landen completed the Ocean Sprint and has stripped Gold Coast Australia of its time to beat, finishing the sprint an hour and 30 minutes faster than the Australian entry. The new time to beat is 11 hours 57 minutes and 41 seconds and the team to complete the set course the fastest will be awarded the additional point on offer.

Meanwhile home port team Derry-Londonderry’s decision to change its tactics and head south east has had the desired effect, enjoying strong winds and closing the gap on its rivals.

On board, skipper Mark Light, reports, “We came south in search of wind and boy have we found it! Our plan was to chase the low pressure system all the way to Ireland ‘hanging onto the coat tails’ as it were. Well, we have been clinging on with clenched fists, white knuckles, every sinew and bit of strength we have.

“Roller-coaster ride does not do this justice at all. We have seen gusts just over 50 knots true and established 40 knot gradient winds on the beam and just aft of us.

“So far we have eaten up the miles, just what we need in order to improve our race position and ETA into Derry-Londonderry. I know we will have special people waiting for us (all ‘Legenderry’) and we are doing all we can pushing very hard to make sure we catch them before they leave!”

To conceal its tactics Edinburgh Inspiring Capital entered into Stealth Mode overnight and will race under the cloak of invisibility until midnight, where its position will be revealed to the rest of the fleet.

The leading yachts of the Clipper Race fleet are set to start arriving into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, between 29 June and 1 July.


Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Gold Coast Australia 296NM 0NM

2 Singapore 386NM 91NM

3 Welcome to Yorkshire 489NM 193NM

4 Geraldton Western Australia 580NM 285NM

5 Visit Finland 651NM 356NM

6 De Lage Landen 705NM 409NM

7 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 724NM 428NM Stealth Mode: position at 0000 UTC 27 June 2012

8 New York 725NM 429NM

9 Derry-Londonderry 820NM 524NM

10 Qingdao 1018NM 722NM

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 12 – by Richard Hewson


Gold Coast Australia has passed the southernmost tip of Ireland and is now running up the Irish west coast towards Derry-Londonderry in foggy conditions, light following swell and consistent wind.

It seems that the team on Gold Coast Australia has not seen further than one mile from the boat for nearly a week now. The fog is relentless, however under it we sail in some fantastic wind allowing us to fly full mainsail and medium weight spinnaker and make good speed towards the finish.

The conditions are also perfect for helming practice under spinnakers at a variety of wind angles. Without a horizon things become more difficult and it forces the helmsmen to rely on their senses more. Last night we had midnight helming practice in pitch black night which was a good orientation for those who have never helmed at night time before.

Our current planned route takes us up the Irish west coast, but we will most likely be too far off to be seen from shore. Once around Tory Island we will be able to alter course to the east and coast towards the finish in what will no doubt be very light conditions.

Singapore
RACE 13 – DAY 12 – by Ben Bowley


We've had another cracking 24 hours of charging straight at the finish line covering over 240 miles towards Derry-Londonderry in the period between yesterdays and today's blog.

The next 24 hours will be crucial if we are to maintain our hard won second place over the rest of the fleet. With the wind due to go lighter throughout the day, we shall struggle to make course and inevitably shall have to gybe back and forth a little to keep the pace on. We need to get around Eagle Island on the north west side of Ireland before the wind gives up too, so right now every mile counts. COME ON ‘SINGAS’!

Welcome to Yorkshire
RACE 13 – DAY 12 – by Rupert Dean


As Welcome to Yorkshire approaches 500-miles to go to the finish of Race 13, it's still very evident that there's all to play for in this unusual North Atlantic race.

As ex-tropical storm continues to slowly make its way towards the north west coast of Ireland, plenty of potential remains for a re-ordering of fleet positions.

Since our long tack south east yesterday, when Welcome to Yorkshire tried unsuccessfully to punch her way across the north east corner of ‘Chris’ to find southerly winds, the 'Pink Lady' has spent a day on starboard tack going north east. Our new position, well to the north east of Geraldton Western Australia, Visit Finland and Edinburgh Inspiring Capital should hopefully allow us to cover them, giving us a better angle as the winds gradually back to the north. It's not entirely that simple though, for ahead of us lies an area of light winds, which will remain in our path until the northerlies from the north west part of ‘Chris’ establish themselves. As the fleet compresses, it will be at this time when we feel most vulnerable.

Meanwhile, for fans of the movie 'Lord of the Rings', the seabed is starting to resemble the set from that great film. Seamounts with names such as Rohan (city of horse riders), Eriador (town) and Gondor (citadel) share the area with Fangorn Bank (forest of giant talking trees) and Lorien Knoll (where the elves lived). Presumably all were named by a hydrographer fan of Tolkien’s great book. If it all reads like this writer has gone a bit loopy, it’s because I probably have, as one would expect after beating to windward for eleven days on the wrong side of a slow-moving depression. Suitable medication is required. Roll on Derry-Londonderry, where the streets are fair and the Guinness flows!

Geraldton Western Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 12 – by Juan Coetzer


This morning we had whales doing some spy hopping next to the boat, check what the crew was having for breakfast. The breeze started off light and throughout the day increased. As a result we changed head sails from the Yankee 1 to 2 to 3 and ended up with the storm stay sail and 3 reefs in the main.

The swell has been short and bouncy, resulting in the crew not getting enough sleep. Thankfully they all have their sea legs now, so they were all in top racing form. Visibility is poor, with a light drizzle, causing everything to be damp and wet on deck and below. Wonder what today is going to have in store for us. Will the wind be kind, will it start to warm up, only time will tell.

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#639 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 09:57 PM

Battle of the trimmers is underway as wind turns off for leading teams - 28 June 2012

As the Clipper 11-12 Race fleet closes in on the finish line for Race 13 to Derry-Londonderry, its progress continues to be shaped by the low pressure system dominating the North Atlantic. In the 0600 reports to the Clipper Race Office, the front running teams report that the wind has turned off.

On board Gold Coast Australia, sail changes have been the order of the day in a bid to keep moving and maintain its poll position. Following in the Australian entry’s wake, second place Singapore skipper Ben Bowley adds, “I have a feeling it shall not be long before the low that has given us such a decent sleigh ride across the Atlantic catches us and we see the centre pass overhead. This is likely to bring light and variable winds and rather confused seas. The next 12 to 24 hours could be make or break for us.”

Edinburgh Inspiring Capital emerged from Stealth Mode yesterday and the gap continues to tighten between the mid-fleet pack, with only 66-miles separating seventh and fourth place. New York finished the Ocean Sprint at 2330 GMT last night in a time of 11 hours 59 minutes, missing the chance for the coveted additional point on offer by a meagre minute and 19 seconds, De Lage Landen remaining as the fastest yacht so far.

Meanwhile, on board home port team Derry-Londonderry, thoughts have turned to the stopover ahead, and the journey the crew members have taken as it chalks off the miles towards the end of its final ocean crossing, completing 39,250-miles of the 40,000-mile circumnavigation.

The Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race is made up of men and women of all ages, nationalities and backgrounds who have taken up the year-long challenge to race around the world under sail on a fleet of ten 68-foot racing yachts.

The leading yacht is expected to arrive into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, tomorrow morning with the rest following over the weekend, where the UK City of Culture for 2013 will host a Clipper Race homecoming festival.

All set for Derry-Londonderry! - 28 June 2012

Excitement is continuing to grow in Derry-Londonderry ahead of the Clipper Race fleet’s arrival, with Gold Coast Australia expected to arrive tomorrow morning after it completes Race 13 from Halifax, Nova Scotia.

With a programme of events filled to the brim in celebration of the fleet’s arrival in the Northern Ireland city, all ten yachts will arrive from tomorrow until late Monday afternoon.

The Race 13 finish line is approximately two to three hours away from the fleet’s temporary home in Foyle Marina in Derry-Londonderry. Once each team has crossed the finish line at Green Castle, they will then transit Lough Foyle before joining the River Foyle ahead of their warm welcome into Derry-Londonderry.

We’ll keep you updated with any changes to the ETAs.

Current ETAs (All times BST – GMT+1):

Gold Coast Australia
Friday 29 June. Finish: Early AM. (Arrive in Derry-Londonderry 0800)

Singapore
Friday 29 June. Finish: PM. (Arrive in Derry-Londonderry late PM)

Welcome to Yorkshire
Saturday 30 June. Finish: AM. (Arrive in Derry-Londonderry PM)

Geraldton Western Australia
Saturday 30 June, Late PM

Visit Finland
Saturday 30 June, Late PM

De Lage Landen
Saturday 30 June, Late PM

Edinburgh Inspiring Capital
Saturday 30 June, Late PM

New York
Sunday 1 July, PM

Derry-Londonderry
Sunday 1 July, Late PM

Qingdao
Monday 2 June, Late PM


Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Gold Coast Australia 118NM 0NM

2 Singapore 175NM 57NM

3 Welcome to Yorkshire 344NM 226NM

4 Geraldton Western Australia 421NM 303NM

5 Visit Finland 471NM 353NM

6 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 488NM 370NM

7 De Lage Landen 489NM 372NM

8 New York 514NM 396NM

9 Derry-Londonderry 594NM 476NM

10 Qingdao 786NM 669NM

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – DAY 13 – by Richard Hewson


Gold Coast Australia has hit light wind in the final stages of the race as we become sandwiched between two low pressure systems and the Irish coast.

After a fantastic reach up the coast yesterday the wind backed to the east in the evening forcing us to drop our spinnaker in exchange for our biggest white sail the Yankee 1.

We have done a number of sail changes this morning to try to keep the boat moving, including hoisting our newly repaired light weight spinnaker. The shape looked perfect and one would not even know it has been repaired. Well done crew members Deborah Miller, Barbara Yendell, Gina Gourlay and Vesna Rendulic for their expert repair.

We are now left becalmed 30-miles north east of Eagle Island in the approaches of Donegal Bay where the surfers are no doubt taking advantage of the glassy swells produced by this low pressure system.

It is quite tactical and quite tricky sailing up a coast line that I am unfamiliar with and I don't want to go too close for fear of being caught amongst the strong tidal systems and also fear of getting into the lee of the Irish hills. This wind (or lack of) was expected and will undoubtedly hit the yachts behind us to the east as well, so hopefully we can maintain our lead as we coast the final 150-miles towards the finish.

I am expecting Gold Coast Australia to finish sometime early tomorrow morning and we are all very excited about our arrival in Derry-Londonderry and look forward to morning breakfast Guinness.

Singapore
RACE 13 – DAY 13 – by Ben Bowley


It was inevitable that the surfing down waves at 12 to 16 knots had to come to an end at some stage. We are currently close hauled in only ten knots of true wind making decent progress toward Eagle Island still and watching the barometer fall like a stone.

I have a feeling it shall not be long before the low that has given us such a decent sleigh ride across the Atlantic catches us and we see the centre pass overhead. This is likely to bring light and variable winds and rather confused seas. Our hope now is that we have been able to build up enough of a buffer between us and the boats behind so that we can afford a few hours going nowhere while we wait for the wind to fill in again! The next 12 to 24 hours could be make or break for us.

Welcome to Yorkshire
RACE 13 – DAY 13 – by Rupert Dean


Why don't I ever learn from my mistakes? After two failed attempts to break through to the eastern side of depression ‘Chris’ to get into south easterly winds, we've tried futilely again losing loads of miles in the process.

Before we decided to head back north on starboard tack we were bobbing in light winds with a choice of either sailing on 15 degrees True or 135 degrees True. Yes, you read that right, the tacking angle really was that bad. With the former option being the only means of sustaining positive VMG (Velocity Made Good), that's the one we are using now in our bid to find stronger winds again.

On a less frustrated note, today has been a colourful day in more ways than one, despite the fog, overcast skies and constant drizzle. Today we celebrated crew member Wendy Fail's birthday and passing through the 500-miles to go mark.

So on we go, back on our upwind journey. The distance to finish of 380-miles has never seemed so far away.

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#640 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 09:59 PM

RACE 13 - DAY 11 - by Dimitri Guvakov (Qingdao)
(OA note this guy is an anaesthetist that does cardiac surgery & quite frankly makes me look boring & tame!)

(Editors' note - for best results read in a Russian accent)

Hello Boyzzz!

All right, everything has been written and read by this stage of the race.

There are no secrets left.

We are racing and sailing and are tired and are having fun! The ever present water in forms of drizzle, almost frozen fog, rain and, of course, ocean itself is a constant. We are variables. Our world is 68 feet long - not much - but it does have all variety of characters and feelings. We live together, we sail together, we trust each other, we race.

Our oriental express Qingdao is a very quick boat; we cross almost an ocean and a half while the rest of the fleet struggles with just one ocean! For us, 600 miles divert for medevac is not a big deal - zoom zoom and back to racing! By the way we take transatlantic parcels - so prepare your shipment, ladies and gents, and open your wallets - we deliver everything quick and safe, little wet though, but not too much. No worries at all!

Hello boys on the East Continent! Hello Boys on the West Continent!

On a personal scale this ocean crossing has a galactic scale to me.

Imagine when Sun dies off, Earth becomes dry grey rock orbiting dead star, very sad! Also when trans-galactical expedition will assess the large plains of our planet as the former ocean floor - they will understand how big were the oceans! They shall imagine that people were sailing in fresh winds and sun across these vast oceans, just being part of the planet, living in harmony with the whales and dolphins! These galactical travellers shall realise and imagine how we sailed the boats on a blue surface of the ocean toward green land full of joy, family and friends! At this particular moment we will begin living again, and memory of us will be again passed to unknown-to-us civilisations. They will say to each other: "You know, those people were brave and full of fun!" And I am sure one of them will shout through the wind to others: "HELLO GALACTICAL BOYZ!!!"

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#641 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 10:01 PM

Gold Coast Australia wins Race 13 into Derry-Londonderry - 29 June 2012

Crossing the finish line off Greencastle on the north Irish coast at 0237 GMT this morning, Gold Coast Australia secured its eleventh win in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race after a 2,350 mile tough upwind battle across the North Atlantic.

In the early hours of the morning the Australian entry made its way from the finish line at Greencastle, County Donegal, through Lough Foyle before arriving into Derry-Londonderry in Northern Ireland this morning where hundreds of spectators awaited them.

Upon arrival, Tasmanian skipper, Richard Hewson said, “The worst part for us as a team was the lack of sleep and we didn’t see sunshine for about two weeks. It was all worth it though as we had head winds behind us the whole way up here and before we knew it we were in Northern Ireland being welcomed by a flotilla of ships. Incredible!”

Reflecting on the tough conditions of the North Atlantic, Richard continued, “As tropical storm ‘Chris’ developed, the tough conditions really tried to batter the fleet, but I saw it as an opportunity for us to take advantage of the strong winds and head to the south. Once we managed that, we put the kite up and we were flying along ahead of the rest of the fleet, especially those who chose to go to the north."

Singapore is expected to finish in the next few hours, with the rest of the fleet still fighting the final miles to secure the best possible finish in this tough final ocean crossing.

Despite bad luck early on in the race, diverting to gain medical attention for an injured crew member, Qingdao managed to win the Ocean Sprint overnight, subject to verification by the Race Committee. The Chinese entry completed the sprint in 11 hours 38 minutes 09 seconds, beating De Lage Landen’s time by just under 20 minutes, securing them a vital additional point.

Welcome to Yorkshire currently remains in third place, while Geraldton Western Australia played its 24 hour Stealth Mode card at midnight, in a final tactical battle, hiding from its competitors until midnight tonight.

The rest of the fleet is expected in Derry-Londonderry over the weekend with the final yacht arrival expected Monday afternoon. Keep an eye on the website for the latest arrival times.

Busy weekend of arrivals ahead as Singapore secures second place - 29 June 2012

Singapore today equalled their best finish in the Clipper 11-12 Race after they secured second place in Race 13, from Halifax to Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland.

Crossing the line at 0908 GMT, the Singaporean team claimed second place after Gold Coast Australia finished just a few hours ahead of them.

“We had a really good start as we normally do; we were sailing very well from the beginning. Even before we left for Race 13 I was looking at the best tactical approach. So I decided to take a more southerly route after we left Halifax,” explains skipper Ben Bowley.

“A lot of the boats decided to tack north towards the Scoring Gate and we had to decide whether we were going to go for the gate or try to get ourselves on the right side of the low pressure system. Had the Scoring Gate not been where it was, there would have been no reason for us to go north.

“Judging by our position in the fleet and the ground that entries such as Welcome to Yorkshire made by tacking north, it seemed a no brainer once we saw the tropical storm starting to develop. So our intention was to make sure we were on the south east side of the storm, which meant taking a bit of a hit VMG (Velocity Made Good) to the Scoring Gate and finish. Crossing the finish line ahead of the other teams who went to the north just goes to show, that we made the right decision.”

Welcome to Yorkshire is expected to cross the Race 13 finish line at around 0300 GMT and will arrive in Derry-Londonderry at 0700 GMT (0800 local time).

The whole Clipper Race fleet is expected to arrive over the next two days with the final entry expected Monday afternoon.

Home port entry, Derry-Londonderry is currently expected to arrive in Derry-Londonderry Sunday afternoon, berthing with the rest of the fleet at Foyle Marina.

Latest ETAs – Local times BST:

Team ETA Finish Line ETA City Pontoon (EARLIEST)

Welcome to Yorkshire 0400 Sat 30/6 0800 Sat 30/6

Geraldton Western Australia 1200 Sat 30/6 1500 Sat 30/6

Visit Finland 1600 Sat 30/6 1900 Sat 1/7

Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 1900 Sat 30/6 2200 Sat 1/7

De Lage Landen 2300 Sat 30/6 0800 Sun 1/7

New York 0001 Sun 1/7 0800 Sun 1/7

Derry-Londonderry 1200 Sun 1/7 1500 Sun 1/7

Qingdao 1200 Mon 2/7 1500 Mon 2/7

Derry-Londonderry will be the inaugural UK City of Culture for 2013 and has organised a full programme of events during the ‘Clipper Race Homecoming Festival’. The Clipper Race crew members will enjoy a week of cultural visits, concerts and excursions, allowing them to soak up the unique Northern Irish culture and hospitality during their stay.

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#642 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 10:04 PM

Highlights At Clipper Homecoming Festival This Weekend!

28/06/2012




The city is buzzing as the final preparations for the much anticipated Clipper Homecoming Festival gets underway in Derry~Londonderry. For those of you walking along the Quay, you will see the area is a flurry of activity as the final touches are put into place to give the 10 yachts and their crews a memorable welcome when they arrive on the River Foyle on board their 68-foot cutters, for a 10 day fun-filled festival of activities never seen before in the North West.
Other boats on the Quay this weekend will include a Severn Class all-weather lifeboat tour boats such as the ‘Maid of Antrim’ and ‘Wee Blue Boat’. Over 100 visiting boats will also begin to dock on the marina creating a unique maritime atmosphere.

Those inspired by the Clipper yachtsmen can have a go at sailing for themselves at the Foyle Pontoon. ‘Get on Board’ with Ocean Youth Trust who will be on hand to give you the opportunity to book a sailing ‘taster session’; whilst Foyle Paddlers will be offering ‘Try Canoeing’ sessions. Ardglass Vikings will be recreating Viking folklore and stories, as well as offering the public the chance to row their longboat along the river.

The ‘Flavours of the Foyle’ Seafood Festival (Saturday and Sunday, 1pm – 6pm), located along the quay will features a series of live cookery demonstrations by 14 local chefs from across the North West and further afield, including; The Beech Hill, Browns, Mourne Seafood Bar, Watts and Co, and more. There is also a special Theatre of Food Experience with NI Good Food and celebrity chef Paula McIntyre.

At the creativity zone, there will be a daily programme of interactive workshops, performances and storytelling. The environment marquee will give you the chance to learn about the River Foyle - see and touch the creatures that live there, with Riverwatch Aquarium and Visitor Centre. Take part in the ‘Legenderry’ Geocache Trail; an outdoor treasure hunt in which players have to find hidden treasures using GPS enabled devices and share experience online.

In addition to all this we have fire-eaters, lots of weird and wonderful maritime characters and performers, and music along the quay!

Highlights this weekend at Clipper
•The Clipper Yachts will be coming in at various times over the weekend – to keep up to date, and to view three 3 hour notice, go to Facebook Derry~Londonderry Clipper 11-12
•Flavours of the Foyle Seafood Festival: Saturday (12pm – 8pm), Sunday (1pm – 6pm)
•Tour boats: Friday – Sunday (10am – 8pm)
•Ardglass Vikings: Saturday – Sunday (10am – 6pm)
•Foyle Paddlers: Saturday – Sunday (and during the week) (10:30am – 5:30pm)
•Try Sailing: Saturday – Sunday (and during the week), (10am – 8pm)
For more information on the huge range of free entertainment, food, performance, water and land-based activities which are on offer, click on www.whatsonderrylondonderry.com or www.derrycity.gov.uk/clipper.

The Clipper Homecoming Festival is organised by Derry City Council in partnership with Londonderry Port with funders Northern Ireland Tourist Board, Loughs Agency, Ilex, FG Wilson, Invest Northern Ireland and Malin Waters. The event is made possible with the support of many partners including Translink, Tourism Ireland, Chamber of Commerce, Department for Social Development and local business.

For full details of when each activity will be on offer and for more details of other activities, go to our programme at www.derrycity.gov.uk/clipper

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#643 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 10:06 PM

With a couple of major upsets yesterday it was nice to see some normality in the world of competitive global sporting events. Italy were definitely under dogs but dominated Germany and are now set to play Spain in the football Euro 2012 finals on Sunday and Rafa Nadal was knocked out of Wimbledon by the 100th seed. And so with Gold Coast winning Race 13 into Derry-Londonderry at least one result went with the form book. This is their 11th win out of 13 races and I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a more dominant display in my time at Clipper (which spans 5 circumnavigations). The margins between crossing the finish line in first place, second place and even tenth place are really small in ocean racing. One bad tactical decision, one bad sail change or one piece of equipment damage can cost you the race. This is one of the reasons the Clipper Race is so mentally challenging and so appealing. The mental strength needed to stay focused and competitively race for over 5,000 miles cannot be over stated. Couple that with the physical demands placed on your body by enormous seas, gale force winds and living life in such extreme conditions for prolonged periods of time and you have a completely unique experience and one that is probably the most demanding thing you can ever put your mind and body through. Bear in mind that ordinary people take on this enormous challenge. The Clipper Race isn’t competed by professional sailors who have trained their bodies and honed their skills over many many years. Mother nature doesn’t know that of course and so whether you’re a nurse, fireman, housewife, doctor, actor, student, lawyer or any of the other professions we see on the Clipper Race, you can expect exactly the same punishing conditions as the professional round the world sailors.

Because Clipper gives you the opportunity to compete on exactly the same race course as the worlds elite sailors, demand for places always exceeds availability. Clipper 13-14 is now close to 80% full and places are being snapped up on a daily basis. This week alone I’ve interviewed people in Australia, American, Papua New Guinea and Singapore. Places are still available on every leg of Clipper 13-14 and there are round the world berths available, but not for long. Please let me know if you would like more information about how you can take on the challenge of a lifetime.

The Clipper Race will be in Derry-Londonderry over the coming week and there are recruitment presentations and opportunities to tour the boats and meet the crew between 3 – 6 July. Presentations about Clipper 13-14 and 15-16 are taking place at the City Hotel in the city centre at 1800 on 4 and 6 July. The boats are open for public tours between 1000 and 1700 on 3, 4, 5 and 6 July. Please let me know if you would like to come along to one of the presentations, it would be great to meet you.

Then on 11 July we move onto Clipper’s first ever official Dutch Race Stopover. The fleet will be in Den Helder between 11 – 19 July. There are Clipper Race presentations daily at 1500 and over the weekend at 1100 and 1600. As well as the Clipper Race fleet there is an International Food Festival, Culture Market, Street Theatre and Alternative Energy Displays.

If you cant get to either Ireland or Holland, please don’t worry. The Clipper Recruitment Roadshow will continue through the Summer and Autumn. Let me know where you are and which leg/legs of the Clipper Race you are interested in and we can start making plans to help you start an amazing journey. One that will test you emotionally, physically and mentally. The Clipper Race is without doubt the most unique and extreme thing you will ever do. So start your adventure now -

http://www.clipperro...ex.php/sign-up/

David Cusworth
Recruitment Manager


T: +44 (0) 2392 526000
F: +44 (0) 2392 526252
M: +44 (0) 7884 490645
E: dcusworth@clipper-ventures.com
Skype: david_cusworth

#644 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 10:13 PM

Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF

1 Gold Coast Australia Finished 29/6/12, 0237GMT

2 Singapore 2NM

3 Welcome to Yorkshire 137NM

4 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 267NM

5 New York 291NM

6 Geraldton Western Australia 294NM Stealth Mode position at 28/6/12, 2300GMT

7 Visit Finland 294NM

8 De Lage Landen 312NM

9 Derry-Londonderry 375NM

10 Qingdao 567NM

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 13 – ARRIVAL REACTION – by Richard Hewson


How incredible to be here. This is now our fifth consecutive win. If we win the next race, we’ve will have matched the current record of the amount of consecutive wins ever achieved in the race's history. If we win the final race, we would have set a new record. As a team we will be doing everything we can to make sure we make it happen - we won’t slow down for anyone.

We saw tropical storm ‘Chris’ developing, the tough conditions really tried to batter the fleet, but I saw it as an opportunity for us to take advantage of the strong winds and head to the south. Once we managed that we put the kite up and we were flying along ahead of the rest of the fleet especially those who chose to go to the north.

The worst part for us as a team was the lack of sleep and we didn’t see sunshine for about two weeks. It was all worth it though, as we had head winds behind us the whole way up here, and before we knew it we were in Northern Ireland at the finish line being welcomed by a flotilla of ships.

I’m from Australia, and having never done any sailing in the North Sea, I think the other entries could have the upper hand, so I’ll be doing a lot of research on this stopover to find out as much as I can about where we’re going, so hopefully I can pull a few tricks out of my sleeve.

Singapore
RACE 13 – DAY 14 – by Ben Bowley


Today should be a rather good day. We are currently 12 miles from the finish gently tacking our way north along the north shore of the ‘Emerald Isle’.

We have had our first glimpse of the sun in ten days and what a sight. The early dawn lights the scene with a wonderful warm glow and there is an air of general excitement aboard, and not just for the imminent arrival of beer! I'm so proud of each and every crew member for bringing home another red pennant.

They have worked tirelessly and kept the focus pretty much one hundred per cent of the time; no mean feat for two weeks at sea in at times, very challenging conditions. I also now feel finally justified about our decision to avoid the Scoring Gate and instead strive to get the correct side of 'Chris.'

It was a tough decision at the time but ultimately we backed the right horse! A huge thanks to all our supporters around the world, we feel proud to be able to bring another podium home for you. This result will bring the closing stages of the series to a nail-bitingly close climax. All we can do is keep pushing, keep the focus and hope that the wind gods keep smiling on the ‘Big Red Bus’ and her crew of badgers for another two races!

Welcome to Yorkshire
RACE 13 – DAY 14 – by Rupert Dean


What a difference a day makes. Yesterday Welcome to Yorkshire was struggling to make any progress in light winds, with horrendous tacking angles. Today she has been reaching along across flat seas, flying full main, staysail and Yankee 1.

The damp and dark conditions outside are doing little to dampen the enthusiasm of the Welcome to Yorkshire team, all of whom are looking forward to a warm welcome in Derry-Londonderry and the chance to dry out!

To have the freedom at last to make good progress in the direction we want is an absolute joy to behold. So very different, from the relentless upwind slog which, up to now, we have had to endure since leaving Halifax, Nova Scotia. Our next challenge is to keep this wind to the finish, hoping that the light stuff ahead which slowed Gold Coast Australia will move on and, that we will clear Malin Head before the gale force northerlies roll in.

As ex-tropical storm ‘Chris’ winds himself up for a final fillip across the British Isles, evidence abounds that something big is on the way. Our barometer has been steadily falling by 0.5 millibars for the past two days. Its current reading of 989 millibars matches the predicted centre of the depression in 24 hours’ time, so perhaps the system is arriving ahead of schedule. Certainly the swell is getting up which would confirm this.

Derry-Londonderry, here we come!


Qingdao
RACE 13 – DAY 14 – by Ian Conchie


Well we decided to go for the Ocean Sprint to try and claim an extra point which could be crucial as things get close in the final few races! So we set a course of 90 degrees to sail the shortest route through the sprint. As the wind dropped we shook out reefs and changed head sails until we were flying the Yankee 2 and a full main sail.

We have now returned to our original course to try and get to Derry-Londonderry as soon as we can. So we’ve put one reef back in and of we go. Everyone is looking forward to arriving as we have heard so much about the preparations we are looking forward to enjoying the hospitality.

Our faithful little water maker also continues to soldier on all be with a greatly reduced output which has allowed us ease the water rationing a bit so the crew can have more milk on their breakfast cereals!

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 02:39 AM



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Posted 01 July 2012 - 02:43 AM







#647 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 06:38 PM

‘Legenderry’ welcome in Derry-Londonderry - 01 July 2012

The Northern Irish entry, Derry-Londonderry, taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race, has arrived in its home port to a rapturous reception after completing the final ocean crossing of the race. A tough 2,350 mile upwind battle across the North Atlantic Ocean.

Derry-Londonderry crossed the finish line at 0422 local time, arriving in Derry-Londonderry just before midday after 15 tough days at sea.The crew were treated to a heroes’ welcome by thousands of spectators, friends and family who lined the quayside. The team was ninth to cross the finish line and was escorted up the Foyle by a flotilla of ships eager to catch a glimpse of the transatlantic crew.

John Harkin, a round the world crew member from Derry-Londonderry described his feelings at returning home after nearly a year at sea, “It’s just been so overwhelming. This is by far the best reception we have had during this race. Thousands of people have come out today to welcome us home; we feel like rock stars!”

Mark Light, the skipper of the Derry-Londonderry yacht described the conditions and his elation at arriving in Derry-Londonderry, “We had a really tough race. The Atlantic was never going to be an easy crossing but when tropical storm ‘Chris’ developed we had even more to contend with. We had a few minor injuries, some seasickness, but everyone pulled together as a team and made it work.

“It’s extremely overwhelming arriving in Derry-Londonderry after looking forward to coming here for so long,” added Mark.

With just two races left until the Clipper 11-12 Race finish in Southampton on Sunday 22 July, the top of the overall leader board has never been tighter. Currently in eighth place, Derry-Londonderry is focusing on improving its position on the leader board.

John Harkin was joined by his daughter Jodie in New York for the last leg of the Clipper Race. She described the tough Atlantic Ocean crossing, “It was a really, really tough race. This is my third ocean crossing and it was a relentless battle day after day. We had a lot of new crew join us in New York, everyone worked so hard I couldn’t fault anyone for their effort. Obviously we would have liked to have got a better result, but for me it’s about completing a journey, and here I am.”

To welcome the international fleet of racing yachts Derry-Londonderry, the UK City of Culture for 2013, has organised a full programme of events during the ‘Clipper Race Homecoming Festival’. The crew members will enjoy a week of cultural visits, concerts and excursions allowing them to soak up the Northern Irish culture during their stay.

The penultimate race, an 800-mile sprint from Derry-Londonderry to Den Helder in the Netherlands, will start on Saturday 7 July

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#648 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 06:40 PM



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Posted 02 July 2012 - 07:14 PM

Get up close and personal to a Clipper Race yacht - 02 July 2012

Anyone interested in seeing a Clipper Race yacht up close and personal will have the opportunity to do so this Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Foyle Marina in Derry-Londonderry.

Two of the entries in the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race, which arrived in Derry-Londonderry over the weekend, will be open to members of the public for tours by current crew members taking part in the 40,000-mile race.

Each day from 10am-5pm, the racing yachts will be available with members of the public being able to experience how the crew live on board and learn about the conditions they go through while racing at sea.

The Clipper Race is a unique event and allows people from all walks of life to take up the challenge of a lifetime and sign up to race around the world.

From students to doctors, accountants to plumbers, the crew of the Clipper Race come from a diverse mixture of backgrounds, nationalities and sailing experience. Forty percent of crew who take part in the race have never stepped on board a yacht before starting their Level 1 training and go onto to take on some of Mother Nature’s most extreme conditions.

For those interested in taking on a unique challenge and testing themselves against some of the world’s harshest environments, the Clipper Race’s Recruitment Manager, David Cusworth, is in Derry-Londonderry this week.

David, who circumnavigated the world during Clipper 2002, will be holding presentations at the City Hotel in Derry-Londonderry on Wednesday (4 July) and Friday (6 July).

Clipper Race Presentations:

4 July - 1800-1900
6 July - 1800-1900

City Hotel, Queen's Quay, Londonderry, County Londonderry BT48 7AS

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#650 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 07:14 PM

Crews celebrate success at Derry-Londonderry prize giving - 03 July 2012

All ten teams competing in the last leg of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race came together for the Race 13 prize giving last night at Derry-Londonderry’s Millennium Forum.

Welcome to Yorkshire was delighted to reach the podium in third place with Singapore taking second.

First place Gold Coast Australia deservedly celebrated their eleventh win and also received a special trophy for Race 13 presented by Hill Dickinson, the official supplier of legal services for the Clipper 11-12 Race.

The Hill Dickinson Cup depicts two racing yachts and was presented by David Ferris, from the company, who has won a competition with Hill Dickinson’s global offices to take part in the race. David joins the race in Derry-Londonderry to Southampton, UK via Den Helder in the Netherlands.

David is also planning to raise money for Marie Curie Cancer Care, a charity close to his heart.

The Mayor of Derry City Council, Councillor Kevin Campbell was present throughout and congratulated all the crews. He presented the Derry-Londonderry team with new ‘Legenderry’ polo shirts reflecting the city’s attest branding.

The evening concluded with a light hearted talent contest called ‘Clipper’s got Talent’ which went down well with all the crews.

The next few days continue with open boats, sponsor guest sailing and essential maintenance. However, the Clipper Race crew, friends and family are also having the opportunity to see the local tourist attractions and cultural venues in a series of organised tours.

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#651 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 07:48 PM

Gold Coast Australia targeting place in Clipper Race history - 04 July 2012

With just two races left in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race, the top of the leader board continues to be fiercely contested. Although Gold Coast Australia is the clear leader, the fight for second and third place in the world’s longest ocean race is still anyone’s for the taking.

In Race 13 Gold Coast Australia secured its eleventh victory after a 2,350-mile tough upwind battle across the North Atlantic. The Queensland entry celebrated its win into Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, all but guaranteeing overall victory in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race.

Barring massive penalties or disqualification, Gold Coast Australia cannot be beaten on points with a massive forty point advantage over current second place entry, Visit Finland.

The fight for second and third place continues to be fought out as only a handful of points separate the contendersfor the remaining podium positions on the leader board. With two races left until the Clipper 11-12 Race finish in Southampton, just six points separates second place Visit Finland and third place De Lage Landen. Singapore, sponsored by Keppel Corporation, is snapping at their heels while Welcome to Yorkshire is just four points behind the Singaporean entry.

Tasmanian skipper Richard Hewson was composed and focused when discussing his domination of the overall race, and has his sights set on another challenge,“This is now our fifth consecutive win, and trust me when I say every win is as important to us as the next. If we win the next race, we will have matched the current record. If we win the next and final race we will break the record for the most consecutive wins ever achieved in Clipper Race history. I want this for my team.”

With the last two races foremost in everyone’s minds, Ben Bowley, the skipper of Singapore, discussed his determination ahead of the Race 14 start on Saturday 7 July, “We’ve always said we have to be at the top of the leader board. We’re really chasing De Lage Landen which is just five points ahead of us at the moment. With just one great race we could be looking at third place which would be brilliant.”

Race Director, Jonathan Bailey has a few words of warning for those who think Race 14, the short sprint to Den Helder will be an easy race to navigate, “The race from Halifax, Nova Scotia to Derry-Londonderry was much harder than expected due to a tropical storm that was created in the Atlantic which gave all of the teams significant head winds. The unsettled weather in the UK is also likely to make the 800-mile race to Den Helder very challenging as the teams go over the top of Scotland into some strong northerly winds.”

The penultimate race, an 800-mile sprint from Derry-Londonderry to Den Helder in the Netherlands, will start at 1600 GMT on Saturday 7 July.

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 07:00 PM

Challenging conditions ahead in penultimate race - 05 July 2012

“This next race could prove to be a challenging one if conditions deteriorate or it could equally be a test of light wind sailing skills,” explains Race Director, Jonathan Bailey.

This is the penultimate competition in the Clipper 11-12 Race. It starts at 1700 (local time) on Saturday 7 July.

“The Clipper Race fleet will head north and round the top of the British Isles before heading into the North Sea and setting a south east course towards Den Helder on the northern coastline of the Netherlands.

“This race will be heavily influenced by the depressions that come across the Atlantic much further north during the summer months and also the strong tidal flows around the coastline,” continues Jonathan.

The departure ceremony on Saturday starts at 1130 with crew taking to the stage at the Clipper Homecoming Festival Village.

The ten-strong fleet will leave the Foyle Marina at 1300 and perform a Parade of Sail on the River Foyle before transiting to the Race 14 start line in Greencastle.

Race 14, to Den Helder, Nwill start at 1700 (local time).

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#653 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 08:52 PM





#654 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 08:56 PM

Under starter’s orders - 06 July 2012

With Race 14 starting tomorrow, the crew taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Race have been using the final few days on dry land to make sure they experience everything Derry-Londonderry has to offer.

Last night crew members of all ten yachts competing in the race attend the ‘Legenderry’ Concert which saw The Undertones headline.

The band from Derry-Londonderry performed to a ‘sell-out’ crowd which had snapped up all 10,000 free tickets. But stars of the show were definitely the crew of the Derry-Londonderry yacht who were introduced on stage to huge cheers.

“Being on stage in front of so many people was absolutely unbelievable,” explains skipper of the Derry-Londonderry yacht, Mark Light.

“The welcome into Derry-Londonderry has been spectacular and we’re all very proud of this city and the local people should be too!”

Race 14, to Den Helder, Netherlands, starts tomorrow 1700 local time at Greencastle following a departure ceremony at Foyle Marina in Derry-Londonderry starting at 1130.

The penultimate race of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race is an 800-mile sprint that will see the fleet head north over the top of the British Isles before heading towards their destination of Den Helder.

The Clipper 11-12 Race will finish in Southampton on 22 July.

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#655 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 06:18 AM

Life LAM & Lovely Lungs
"always smiling and always will"...a moto of mine that has stuck with me for years. Loving life since my transplant! Taking on various challenges from a 1/2 marathon; UK, European & World Transplant Games in various sports; travelling the globe & the most recent Clipper 11-12 Race.


Friday, 6 July 2012Atlantic Ocean blog #Clipperrace History made + 6years celebration
Tears running down my face as I step onto LondonDerry's pontoon in Ireland. I've done it! About 15-16 days crossing the Atlantic Ocean, an achievement that over a week into the venture - I was unsure I could actually complete. History made, as the 1st double-lung transplantee in the world to have sailed the Atlantic Ocean.



Cameras and all the media in my face filming my watery eyes, when all I wanted was me time alone to cry by myself and enjoy a bottle of Pepsi given to us in a complimentary goodie bag given (for every crew member by Sainsbury) and to savor the taste of fizzy pop.


So many memories:- highlights, highs, lows..... Where to start? What to say first? Maybe, this blog will be jumping about as I try to recall excerpts from my memory on this voyage of challenges.


I guess, part of the clipper venture is not just the sailing, but the mental aspect cooped up like hens in a cage & if you don't get on with someone - you still have to live and breathe in that tiny space. Learn to deal with it and carry on in a harmonious environment for the sake of the crew. It's true to say, you see different sides to people's personalities when stressed, hungry, or even sleep deprived. Also, all the crew were fabulous and understanding to my condition and my struggles became evident after departing from Nova Scotia.


The first part of the race from New York to Nova Scotia as I've said in a previous blog, was sun and calm seas. Now this was not to be the same course on the books. The few days starting across the Atlantic were of sea sickness and about 3 days of no eating. Then that awful feeling of trying to throw up and as no food/fluids consumed, the constant reaching and stomach pains. A worry that my immuno suppressants were not staying down and some dosages being missed. So, early into the journey and I was already unwell. I did turn that corner and began the strenuous watch systems again and throughout the night too. Initially all seemed ok, then I realised on top of being sleep deprived, my body was really starting to struggle and I felt as every shift/day passed I was getting weaker and weaker. One night watch sitting in the cold, my lungs felt tight and hurt, and my bones were literally shaking with cold. I knew this was no good for me and would see me get very unwell with chest infections/further lung complications and I was so upset and tearful with no one seeing. I knew then that I was going to keep struggling and be unable to keep this up. I emailed my parents saying, 'this is killing me' and thought game over and I would need fly home to recuperate/recover.
I did confide in someone, who said I should speak to our skipper. An alternative shift was created just for me to work from 6am-12noon on the first watch and then 12-6 pm on the second watch with breaks in between. Hurray! What a god send. Time to let my body repair and sleep. I tried to explain to Piers (our skipper) that if my body can't repair, I cannot function/improve. No night watch systems, and a chance to try and sleep through the night.


Being questioned onboard by Della filming for the Clipper series and media upon arrival...I was asked if everyone was supportive, I said yes. Sadly, that wasn't true - only one person confronted me with their opinion who basically said I had no right to be on the boat and other stuff. Again, this experience challenges you mentally how to deal with issues like this, confront and talk about them. I went back on deck and was so hurt cried my eyes out. Then put my smiley face back on and carried on. Everyone IS entitled to their opinion, that is fair to say. My opinion is that I have every right to be onboard regardless of how much I can do with any strengths/weaknesses. Also, knowing this person is older than me and has lived life - an opportunity I know will never happen. My lungs are rejecting and every day for me is a bonus, and I DESERVE the chance to achieve whatever I can whilst I can. Rant over, sorry. However, I have learnt one other person feels the same way too. So, in life not every one will get you/understand you/situation/health etc and that is another challenge to deal with and carry on.


Onwards and upwards, days and days of sea and nothing but waves, reefs in/out, sails up/down. Sitting on the high side, days withs lots of chatter and laughter. Then times getting soaked on shift as waves crash over, little or no conversation just wishing the shift to be over or consume lunch/dinner and sleep. Moments eating whatever you can - time has no function and days get lost. Eating biscuits at 9.30am or 4am, crisps, sweets at any hour - overdosing on sugary boosts to keep you going. Excitement when dolphins swim by and chase with us as we pound through the water. Or, the occasional whale spotting! Nature at its best and raw habitat, stunning and awe inspiring. Even seeing birds sweep across the waves like surfing and chasing the ocean at a speed only one can imagine. Beauty. Life. It's happening right in front of my eyes and that feeling of deja voux as it repeats itself again and again.


Capturing every moment before my eyes, like a camera...click... click. I have taken many photos and something to organise when back in the UK and put some on here too! Savouring every breathe, deep breaths in and smiling :)


On one occasion, Doris (Lesley) was on the helm, and the yacht came to an almighty halt for precisely 1 second. Doris hit a whale, or the whale swam passed us at the bow as untimely and unlucky. Woooooo surreal and shaky experience, still intact the wind in the sails moving us through the sea.


So, what about the food - you may query? Well, fresh meals and fruit/vegetables are for the taking until supplies run out. Then tinned food, noodle sachets, and space food (boil hot water into food and leave for few minutes) and then options such as:- lasagne, chicken teraki, sweet & sour pork, sweet & sour chicken, and so on. Generally, not too bad - but, it gets to a point whereby burgers, steak, chips, bacon, fresh veggies/salad, and all other delights become far fetched imaginations and cravings that are still like weeks away. My body was craving real food, but, consumption is that mostly of carbs, bread made daily,cakes/crisps/biscuits and sweets. For some reason leaving Halifax (Nova Scotia), the water tanks filled had a heavy influence of chlorophyll added - the taste making me sick and reaching every time. I asked my parents for any bottles of water as a slight taste before departure (I noticed this twang). These few bottles became my lifeline crossing the Atlantic and tiny sips rationed as best as I could. I was dehydrated at times and didn't drink enough - only when the water cooler tank was turned on and fresh water was being filtered. Eventually, lemon and ginger tea was my only option for little sips somewhat disguising that awful taste. Other crew members also felt the same, but managed to drink it. I guess my body is very sensitive and it just said, NO! Sometimes, when we were having tinned fruit as dessert, it was like I was begging for any syrup juice left (even if 1/4 cup) to try and rehydrate my body!


I also started to become very homesick. I'm so glad I set up satellite email and was also able to have updates done for me on Facebook + Twitter. Thank you to all those who tweeted/replied and messaged me back whether emails or via Facebook . My PA's ...hahaha..(one of my brothers, Gavin and friend, Andy - have been superstars in orchestrating the delivery of these. In my low times, these gave me strength to continue and I am extremely grateful :)


So, as you can see the Atlantic became a struggle for me with good and bad days, determination to keep going and hope and pray for land soon. It wasn't happening fast enough...and I really had to dig deep. It was hard for most of the other crew too at times and pulling together as best as possible is necessary. We even went through a storm, an experience that filled me with fear and relief when it was over. The last couple days were of rain and stormy seas until land came in view. WOW! LAND! Smiles all around, joy, amazement that we - I had done it...........and as we pulled up onto the pontoon I became overwhelmed, and that is when the tears started. I stepped off the yacht and burst into tears. Cameras, filming, media...all a buzz among my teary face and stuttered words of OMG I've done it.


Justine Laymond has sailed across the Atlantic Ocean...anyone contacting the Guinness Book of Records please for me! Giving up almost an option - became NOT an option!


I have spent some time now in LondonDerry and a day in Belfast, making many new friends also from this Clipper trip. More media buzz from Irish TV, radio, Scottish newspapers, CNN news, ITV news, and apparently newspapers back home - that I didn't even know had been done. I am trying to get as many links from whatever articles possible and will publish once home on my blog or as and when I can. Amazement from recognition again being out and about having people approach me like in Nova Scotia. Also, for other crew on Clipper yachts talking to me, and for me saying oh I'm Justine......"we all know who you are" was the regular reply.


One day was spent doing a corporate sail this week in Ireland with breathing support groups, (British Lung Foundation and Breathe Easy) and the NHS UK Blood and Transplant Group, and a couple people also joined with lung conditions. It was a great day out and more photos done and further media articles to follow up (again to which I have asked for any links). I also met another lady who had a double lung and heart transplant of almost 8 years, needless to say we got on very well! It was an inspiring day for me too, and I have been asked to visit and do a talk for these groups sometime.


My blog is jumping from topic to topic as I remember things, but time to call it a night, as I'm departing again to sail to Netherlands 5-8 days at sea. I hope it goes well and I'm not sea sick or feeling unwell. I have had early nights most nights and socialized to a minimum to get much needed rest still for the next voyage.


We depart 7th July, and on Monday 9th July at sea, it will be my 6th double lung transplant anniversary. Thanks to my donor letting me breathe and relish every new day. Breathing for you, I hope you are proud of me.


Lotsa love everyone xx

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#656 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 06:34 PM

Race 14 underway as fleet spars for final positions on leader board - 08 July 2012

After a spectacular visit and farewell ceremony held in Derry-Londonderry the UK City of Culture 2013, thousands of spectators flocked to wish the fleet well as it performed an impressive parade of sail on the River Foyle to mark the start of Race 14 to Den Helder in the Netherlands.

As the teams settle back into life at sea thoughts about the amazing visit to Derry-Londonderry are now turning to what lies ahead and the fleet is back into full race mode, pressing north to round the top of the British Isles before heading into the North Sea.

Clipper Race Director Jonathan Bailey, says, “This race could prove to be a challenging one if conditions deteriorate or it could equally be a test of light wind sailing skills. It will be heavily influenced by the depressions that come across the Atlantic much further north during the summer months and also the strong tidal flows around the coastline.”

Following an unfavourable start to the race Gold Coast Australia has chased down the lading pack in the last few hours, sparring with Singapore and Welcome to Yorkshire over a distance of two miles. With only 30 miles separating the fleet, it will be interesting to see how the positions change over the next few days of this challenging race.

To add to the challenge Stealth Mode periods, Scoring Gate and Ocean Sprint points do not apply in this short 800-mile race, putting the pressure on to secure those all-important podium points.

Race 14 to Den Helder in the Netherlands is the penultimate competition in the Clipper 11-12 Race, the fleet is expected to arrive between 11-13 July and will be berthed at the Willemsoord Marina. The fleet will set off on its final race back to Southampton on 19 July, finishing in the Solent on Sunday 22 July.

Race 14 underway as fleet spars for final positions on leader board - 08 July 2012

After a spectacular visit and farewell ceremony held in Derry-Londonderry the UK City of Culture 2013, thousands of spectators flocked to wish the fleet well as it performed an impressive parade of sail on the River Foyle to mark the start of Race 14 to Den Helder in the Netherlands.

As the teams settle back into life at sea thoughts about the amazing visit to Derry-Londonderry are now turning to what lies ahead and the fleet is back into full race mode, pressing north to round the top of the British Isles before heading into the North Sea.

Clipper Race Director Jonathan Bailey, says, “This race could prove to be a challenging one if conditions deteriorate or it could equally be a test of light wind sailing skills. It will be heavily influenced by the depressions that come across the Atlantic much further north during the summer months and also the strong tidal flows around the coastline.”

Following an unfavourable start to the race Gold Coast Australia has chased down the lading pack in the last few hours, sparring with Singapore and Welcome to Yorkshire over a distance of two miles. With only 30 miles separating the fleet, it will be interesting to see how the positions change over the next few days of this challenging race.

To add to the challenge Stealth Mode periods, Scoring Gate and Ocean Sprint points do not apply in this short 800-mile race, putting the pressure on to secure those all-important podium points.

Race 14 to Den Helder in the Netherlands is the penultimate competition in the Clipper 11-12 Race, the fleet is expected to arrive between 11-13 July and will be berthed at the Willemsoord Marina. The fleet will set off on its final race back to Southampton on 19 July, finishing in the Solent on Sunday 22 July.

Race 14 underway as fleet spars for final positions on leader board - 08 July 2012

After a spectacular visit and farewell ceremony held in Derry-Londonderry the UK City of Culture 2013, thousands of spectators flocked to wish the fleet well as it performed an impressive parade of sail on the River Foyle to mark the start of Race 14 to Den Helder in the Netherlands.

As the teams settle back into life at sea thoughts about the amazing visit to Derry-Londonderry are now turning to what lies ahead and the fleet is back into full race mode, pressing north to round the top of the British Isles before heading into the North Sea.

Clipper Race Director Jonathan Bailey, says, “This race could prove to be a challenging one if conditions deteriorate or it could equally be a test of light wind sailing skills. It will be heavily influenced by the depressions that come across the Atlantic much further north during the summer months and also the strong tidal flows around the coastline.”

Following an unfavourable start to the race Gold Coast Australia has chased down the lading pack in the last few hours, sparring with Singapore and Welcome to Yorkshire over a distance of two miles. With only 30 miles separating the fleet, it will be interesting to see how the positions change over the next few days of this challenging race.

To add to the challenge Stealth Mode periods, Scoring Gate and Ocean Sprint points do not apply in this short 800-mile race, putting the pressure on to secure those all-important podium points.

Race 14 to Den Helder in the Netherlands is the penultimate competition in the Clipper 11-12 Race, the fleet is expected to arrive between 11-13 July and will be berthed at the Willemsoord Marina. The fleet will set off on its final race back to Southampton on 19 July, finishing in the Solent on Sunday 22 July.


Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Gold Coast Australia 633NM 0NM

2 Singapore 634NM 1NM

3 Welcome to Yorkshire 635NM 2NM

4 Visit Finland 637NM 3NM

5 De Lage Landen 654NM 21NM

6 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 659NM 26NM

7 New York 661NM 27NM

8 Geraldton Western Australia 661NM 28NM

9 Derry-Londonderry 663NM 29NM

10 Qingdao 663NM 29NM

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#657 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 09:54 AM



#658 lydia

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 10:49 AM

RACE 14 - DAY 4 - by Catherine Draper (Qingdao)

Hello Everyone Somewhere Out There,

Well this will be my last blog onboard Qingdao! It is amazing I have lasted this long a) with my calamities along the way and B) with the ribbing/banter I get from the crew. Not only do they tie me up with safety lines (without me realising - thanks Terry) they call me ' a deaf old bat' and other similar comments. When you have a snood, wind proof hat, foulie collar and hood up, it is hardly surprising I can't hear!

I hasten to add, these comments are usually from the male crew on board, but recently, even my 'old' friend Lynn (or so I thought she was) has joined in. So there will definitely be a gap in my life to such kindness. I may need Ian to book some counselling sessions, so I can recover from the abuse and bullying I have had to endure over the year.

Although, apparently, the round the worlders have sessions booked already, so they can recover from the trauma of having 'me' on board. Someone should make a lot of money out of us all...only joking.

What will the end of this most amazing, challenging, exhilarating, wonderful and sometimes overwhelming experience mean to me and indeed the rest of the crew. There will no doubt be untold changes for us all...which route/path do we take now? What gaps will it leave in our lives, how will we settle back into so called 'normal' life, if we ever do. For all the RTWs (round The worlders), apart from Terry who is back to his 'diving' job, the rest of us do not have any jobs to go back to. Some, have discovered they do not want go back to their original jobs but want to try something completely new, maybe, even become a 'skipper'. Others, are still thinking of what the change might be for them.....so all to play for and very exciting. I'm not sure if I will ever be able to walk on the flat, without leaning at 45 degrees, but I guess that would appear quite weird walking the streets of Barkingside.

I must say the biggest 'thank you' ever to all of our family and friends who have loved and supported us over this past year, we would not have made it this far without your ongoing encouragement, love support and prayers.

A big thank you to Hazel, who, so generously and kindly brought out packages for individual crew, not only for Qingdao but other crew members on other boats also. She has been so kind and on many an occasion, taken home packages for individuals too (Hazel you are my star). Sarah too, has brought out the extra suitcase(s) with 'required extra's for the boat or crew including the most amazing Christmas Cake, from Christine her mum...yummy.. Crew members sent out flags, bivvy bags, made gaiters (thank you Bill....also our best 'Head(s)'(toilets) Boy.) Others have provided tins of butter (thank you Simon), sent out sweets, biscuits & chocolate (thanks Joan & Lynne) for our watches and much more besides. Home-made Scottish tablet made by Pauline, Marjorie and Kerr - truly, truly scrumptious. Carrington marmalade, simply the best. Kevin and Bill for all the extra items. If I have missed out somebody, my sincere apologies it has not been intentional and I am sure I am not aware of everybody's kindness and generosity. Hilary our fan, sent us Christmas presents, so kind and thoughtful. Hilary if you live in or near London, I would love to meet up with you for a coffee sometime so I can thank you personally.

I must take this opportunity to thank my long (41 years)suffering husband Ian. The male members of the crew, are not sure how you have put up with me for so long! Well, I guess I have not been too bad, for you to have stayed with this old gal. He has been my PA this past year, so encouraging and loyal whilst I have been away. He has continued to raise funds for my charities, Stand By Me and School Home Support. Added to this, he and my dear daughter Alison has looked after my dear old dad of 91 years. Ian came out to Derry (which was a surprise) but he came to tell me that Ginge (my dear old dad) had passed away on the 22 June. So tears all round. Dad, I am going to finish this race...you was not a quitter and neither will I be.

Ian, secretly brought my lovely daughter Alison and grandson Caleb out to Cape Town; I will never forget the surprise of seeing them on the pontoon; I still get overwhelmed thinking about it. A huge thanks to Rich for being such a supportive son-in-law and staying at home to look after dear Jessica and Anya.

Seeing Phil in Qingdao was a special time too and more surprises in New York when my lovely cousin Marion & her husband John came out.

I have been overwhelmed with everyone at home thinking and praying for me. I have received so much post (Gillian tells me I have had the most post in the whole fleet)letters, cards, emails, texts and gifts and parcels from people I do not even know. Donations to my charities showing your sincere kindness and generosity. There are so many people to thank and I do not have the space here, but, I must say a big grateful thank you to Sue, your thoughtfulness often made me cry, even though the little gifts/cards were meant to make me laugh, I truly do not know where you found the time to write to me so often. I will be eternally grateful to you one and all and hopefully will be able to meet up with you at some time in the future; but, be prepared to be bored with all my tales. Thanks too, to those of you who had friends in some of the countries we visited. You told them about our race & on more than one occasion, folk I never knew, turned up on the pontoon asking for me.

I am guessing that if we the crew will have some gaps and changes in our lives, then, when this race is over, there will no doubt be a gap left in your life and maybe you too, will face some changes. For a start, there will be no race viewer to follow and I know for sure, some of you have been up following it every 4 hours, what dedication; hence a definite gap in your life.

Maybe, you have been thinking of something to fill this gap, a new challenging experience for you.......not necessarily a crazy one like sailing round the world but, perhaps, learning to swim/drive, joining a choir, running the marathon, starting a business etc etc etc.

You are never too old and don't let your ailments put you off. I have had the privilege of meeting the most inspirational & interesting people this past year. Amongst them, those who have had major heart surgery, liver & lung transplants. Those who have had cancer & never thought they would come out of hospital alive. Others, have had limb replacements or had a stroke and many more ailments besides. So, if you really want to do something, it truly is possible. I believe, it was Henry Ford who said, 'if you think you can, you will. If you think you cannot then you won't'. As sir Robin says we only have one life.

So, as we all, landlubbers and crew alike, come to the end of this great adventure, let us all look forward to filling the gaps and making changes into something positive.

Should you be considering taking part in the Clipper 13-14 Race then make sure you check out more of the website.

Oh by the way, I am practising singing, 'Show me the way to go home I'm tired and I want to go to bed' etc. I am also singing the 'posh' version, 'Indicate the way to my abode I'm fatigued and I wish to retire' etc., to my posh mates aboard. If you don't know it, I will teach you some time. Also practising, 'Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner'. They can't wait for me to get off, so, they don't have to listen to my howling! Still it won't hurt them to suffer a little, I have had a year of putting up with their abuse...my way of getting my own back.

I love you one and all, so farewell from this old East End Gal, born and bred in the now infamous Stratford Olympic City. Hey, what fun I shall have seeing old Stratford town revolutionised...it's a pity I have no tickets to attend the games, but at least I will be able to soak up the atmosphere on my old stomping ground.

Love, thanks & prayers to you one and all wherever you are.

Catherine (aka Hotlips) xxxxxxxxxxxx

Qingdao (RTW)

Give us a Q....give us a I....give us a N....give us a G....give us a D....give us a A....give us a O....What have we got QINGDAO

South East of the Butt of Lewis - Scotland and North Sea

(Cath turned 60 on the boat just after taiwan)

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#659 lydia

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 10:52 AM

Fleet in tight duel upwind in race to Den Helder - 09 July 2012

Day 3 of Race 14 to Den Helder in the Netherlands has seen the fleet of ten 68-foot ocean racing yachts competing in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race tussle in a tight duel upwind where positions remain close.

Gold Coast Australia continues to fight to maintain its lead whilst Visit Finland has made gains on its rivals and moved two places up the leader board into second. With only 12 miles separating the leading five teams, there is still all to play for.

De Lage Laden skipper Stuart Jackson explains, “The racing has been fantastic throughout the night with boats tacking within a few boat lengths of each other. So everyone has had to stay on their game and their seamanship skills have been exemplary.” With two miles currently separating the team from third place, the Dutch entry will be keen to secure a podium win on its return home to the Netherlands.

However this will be no mean feat as the last 24 hours have seen trial and tribulation for the fleet with reports of strong winds and the choppy sea state likened to being in a washing machine. Seasickness has also swept across the fleet and in the upwind conditions, the crew members on board have been working hard on double watches, performing relentless sail changes in a bid to keep pace.

Crewed by ‘people like you’ the Clipper Race offers the challenge of a lifetime to circumnavigate the world for people from all walks of life. The fleet is expected to arrive in Den Helder in the Netherlands between 11-13 July and will set off on its final race back to Southampton on 19 July, finishing in the Solent on Sunday 22 July.

Fleet in tight duel upwind in race to Den Helder - 09 July 2012

Day 3 of Race 14 to Den Helder in the Netherlands has seen the fleet of ten 68-foot ocean racing yachts competing in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race tussle in a tight duel upwind where positions remain close.

Gold Coast Australia continues to fight to maintain its lead whilst Visit Finland has made gains on its rivals and moved two places up the leader board into second. With only 12 miles separating the leading five teams, there is still all to play for.

De Lage Laden skipper Stuart Jackson explains, “The racing has been fantastic throughout the night with boats tacking within a few boat lengths of each other. So everyone has had to stay on their game and their seamanship skills have been exemplary.” With two miles currently separating the team from third place, the Dutch entry will be keen to secure a podium win on its return home to the Netherlands.

However this will be no mean feat as the last 24 hours have seen trial and tribulation for the fleet with reports of strong winds and the choppy sea state likened to being in a washing machine. Seasickness has also swept across the fleet and in the upwind conditions, the crew members on board have been working hard on double watches, performing relentless sail changes in a bid to keep pace.

Crewed by ‘people like you’ the Clipper Race offers the challenge of a lifetime to circumnavigate the world for people from all walks of life. The fleet is expected to arrive in Den Helder in the Netherlands between 11-13 July and will set off on its final race back to Southampton on 19 July, finishing in the Solent on Sunday 22 July.


Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)


Position Team DTF DTL

1 Gold Coast Australia 542NM 0NM

2 Visit Finland 547NM 5NM

3 Singapore 550NM 8NM

4 De Lage Landen 552NM 10NM

5 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 554NM 12NM

6 Welcome to Yorkshire 563NM 21NM

7 Qingdao 565NM 23NM

8 New York 572NM 30NM

9 Geraldton Western Australia 580NM 38NM

10 Derry-Londonderry 581NM 39NM

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 14 – DAY 3 – by Richard Hewson

It has been a challenging 24 hours for Gold Coast Australia as we battle not only the elements but also the other yachts in the fleet fighting back to regain the lead, and now continue to fight to maintain our lead.

Yesterday we had a fantastic tussle with Singapore, and at one point we were only boat lengths away from them. It was a brilliant opportunity to take some photos and exchange a few waves before we managed to sail beneath them and make some more ground.

Conditions worsened overnight with wind up to 30 knots and a very choppy sea state making helming difficult and rendering over half the crew to bed with seasickness. At one stage last night we only had two people from one watch remaining on deck, while others were seasick and another two people below helping the sick people and pumping the bilges.

The resulting short-handed crew means that everybody has to dig deep and put in 210 per cent effort, as we are required to wake up the other watch for reefing, tacking and sail changes. As we are sailing along the coast this has resulted in the crew getting very little sleep, but while we tack only a few miles from the coast to avoid the tide, everybody must pay complete attention to sailing and navigation as to make a mistake could be very costly indeed.

The wind and sea have since calmed a little, and we are now seeing a few more heads on deck. Still weak from the sickness at least it seems everybody is on the road to recovery. Hopefully the crew will be fighting fit before we reach the ultimate challenge of the race when we sail through Pentland Firth and round Dunscaby Light tonight.

Visit Finland
RACE 14 – DAY 3 – by Olly Osborne


The racing is still incredibly close as we enter our second full day of Race 14. The weather has been fairly unforgiving, and it has been a gruelling 24 hours as we beat upwind once again towards the Western Isles.

Passing the island of St Kilda last evening was a good milestone in our journey though, and we could see sheer cliffs and jagged rocks silhouetted against the sky. The weather is changing now though and this morning as the fleet bunches up to round the top of the Isle of Lewis, the race is on to lengthen sail and keep the boats powered up in the weakening breeze.

We are still almost neck and neck with the other boats, and we have just passed Singapore on opposite tacks, as we battle to reach the waypoint first. The fleet should begin to enter the Pentland Firth tonight and we are hoping to be one of the first boats to do so. But with its strong tides getting the timing right will be key to ensure our passage into the North Sea.

Singapore
RACE 14 – DAY 3 – by Ben Bowley


We've had a rather busy 24 hours aboard the ‘Big Red Bus’. Thrashing our way up the Scottish coast into freezing cold rain, drizzle and yet more rain is about as unpleasant as it sounds! It has certainly reminded us of how much nicer it was going downwind for the latter part of Race 13. We've had quite a bout of seasickness and minor incidents; particularly over the last 12 hours.

Yesterday saw us in a tight duel upwind with Gold Coast Australia. Sailing within miles of St. Kilda, an imposing piece of jagged rock masquerading as an island, was quite an experience. The shifty wind blowing over the leeward side made helming quite a challenge. This, combined with a confused sea state gave us several hours of entertainment whilst Gold Coast Australia gradually worked their way up under our leeward hip. From here skipper Richard Hewson was able to take the helm and nip beneath us in a wonderful display of helming prowess. Shortly after this we decided to start reducing sail as the tide had turned and the chop was getting yet steeper.

The rest of the night is but a blur of sail changes, reefs and tacks.With reduced crew some of the guys had to pull almost double shifts to keep us in the right gear and ensure there were sufficient crew on deck to perform efficient tacks. The team did a great job and this morning finds us having only lost out to Visit Finland, not bad at all considering we nearly lost the Yankee 2 over the side and had to heave too for ten minutes!

There have been some winners and losers on the beat between the Isle of Lewis and the banks south of the Flannan islands; tidal eddies being the main benefactor/culprit. As the front five teams in the fleet approach the Butt of Lewis we are compressing together for the next leg of our sprint round Scotland. This race could be anyone's at this rate.

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#660 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 11:04 AM



#661 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 06:53 PM

Tidal power determines the leaders of the pack - 10 July 2012

Day 4 in Race 14 to Den Helder, the Netherlands has seen the fleet of ten ocean racing yachts competing in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race take on the tactical challenge of timing the notorious tidal gates of the North Sea, in an attempt to win a coveted podium position.

Gold Coast Australia continues to lead the pack whilst in the last 24 hours Singapore has successfully challenged Visit Finland for second place. With just two miles separating the yachts, the race continues to heat up.

Singapore skipper, Ben Bowley described the power of the tides and the importance of timing them correctly, “We were being swept along at ten knots whereas Visit Finland was being pinned back by the tide and making no more than four knots over the ground. This allowed us to slip on the inside of them, cutting the north Shore of Stroma Island by around half a mile.”

With just 19 miles currently separating first place Gold Coast Australia and fifth place De Lage Landen, the race is still anyone’s for the taking, “With less than 400 miles to go until we reach Den Helder, this race is going to be decided fairly quickly. There is still everything left to play for, as there are only a few miles separating all ten yachts,” explained Stuart Jackson, skipper of the Dutch entry, De Lage Landen.

During the fleet’s stay in Den Helder, Recruitment Manager David Cusworth will be holding free hour long presentations for those interested in taking part in the future races. Click here to find out more about the Clipper Race Roadshow.

http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/the-race/den-helder-stopover/


Latest boat positions
Position Team DTF DTL

1 Gold Coast Australia 315 NM 0 NM

2 Singapore 321 NM 7 NM

3 Visit Finland 322 NM 7 NM

4 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 331 NM 17 NM

5 De Lage Landen 334 NM 19 NM

6 Welcome to Yorkshire 343 NM 28 NM

7 Qingdao 354 NM 40 NM

8 Derry-Londonderry 365 NM 50 NM

9 New York 370 NM 55 NM

10 Geraldton Western Australia 378 NM 63 NM

Gold Coast Australia
DAY 4 – RACE 14 – by Richard Hewson


Gold Coast Australia has sailed incredibly well over the past 24 hours through some beautiful but navigationally challenging waters from the north west coast of Scotland, across the top through the turbulent Pentland Firth into the North Sea and down the east coast past the oil rigs and their numerous support craft.

Yesterday began with the wind moderating as we tacked our way up the shores of the Isle of Lewis. We had gained some miles on the other yachts overnight and we were trying to avoid the tide by staying close to shore.

The yachts sailing further offshore gained a good wind shift, and for a while it looked like half the fleet were going to sail over the top of us.

Gold Coast Australia was forced to tack offshore into the stronger tide to get into the same wind shift, and once we managed this we were able to lay the Butt of Lewis in first place, gaining some miles as the other yachts got knocked at the last minute and had to tack around the Butt.

From the Butt of Lewis we made some good miles to Cape Wrath and across the north coast of Scotland further extending our lead and found ourselves approaching Pentland Firth two hours after the slack water as the tide began to ebb. Gold Coast Australia reached towards the island of Stroma trying to stay in the eddy until the last minute, when we altered course to sail around the north of the island. As soon as we were out of the eddy we were faced with sevenknots of tide against us, and making good only one knot to the east over ground.

Once clear of the overallswe hoisted our medium weight spinnaker, increasing our speed through the water to eleven knots and our speed over ground (SOG) to three knots to the east. We gradually pulled our way clear, and our speed over ground slowly increased to seven knots over the next few hours as we watched with baited breathe to see what conditions Singapore and Visit Finland would face.

Gold Coast Australia gradually pulled clear of the strongest tide as we sailed into the north sea and towards Den Helder and discovered the next obstacle and navigational challenge of dodging oil rigs and their support vessels.

Visit Finland
RACE 14 – DAY 4 – by Olly Osborne


The last 24 hours have been full of tactical decisions and sail changes, as we rounded the most northerly point of our circumnavigation last night at 58 degrees north. Rounding the top of the Western Isles yesterday was a welcome land mark, as it meant that we could begin to bear off the breeze and reduce the angle of heel. Soon after that we sighted Cape Wrath, we found ourselves in a close fight with Singapore , to see who would round first.

Tacking offshore we manage to get in front of the Singapore, but as we approached the very tidal Pentland Firth, we could only watch as she found a favourable tidal eddy and shot past us again. So it has been a very exiting race so far, and now we face the familiar waters of the North Sea again. With our spinnaker set we are making good miles, and the sprint is on to Den Helder

Singapore
RACE 14 –DAY 4 – by Ben Bowley


We’ve had yet another very busy 24 hours here on Singapore. Yesterday saw us carry on from the previous night's increase of sail to the point we were fetching nicely with the Yankee 1 and full mainsail. Once we rounded Cape Wrath we were able to crack sheets a little more and charge down toward the Pentland Firth, looking closely at arrival times in relation to the tide. Planning a passage between the islands of Stroma and Swona was easier said than done. Due to our excellent progress throughout the day, we had arrived whilst the tide was still pumping hard to the west.

At this point, we were neck and neck with Visit Finland and it became apparent that although we both planned to pass just north of Stroma, our execution of the plan was slightly different. Visit Finland stayed initially higher on the wind where as we stayed deeper and slower in an effort to get into the eddy on the west side of Stroma. Suddenly we found the eddy and although we were only less than a mile south of Visit Finland our speeds over the ground could not have been more different.

We were being swept along at no less than ten knots whereas Visit Finland was being pinned back by the tide and making no more than four knots over the ground. This allowed us to slip on the insideof them, cutting the north shore of Stroma Island by around half a mile. As we rounded the tip of the island we sailed through a convergence of the main tidal flow and the eddy swirling around the down tide western side of the island. The seas were boiling and at one point we sailed through a section of angry looking whirl pools. With clear skies and good visibility the raw natural majesty of this ancient part of Britain, with her jagged dark granite cliffs and rich green cloak of grass, was hard to deny.

Once out of the eddy we too soon parked in a strong head tide giving us the chance to hoist our medium kite and plan our exit strategy. The strategy was a simple one; find a nice balanced between speed, course, and kite stability.

With the last of the tide sweeping north west toward Scarpa Flow quite a cross sea built up making optimum trim with our broad shouldered medium trick to find. Heading to the foredeck to check over all the straining lines, I noticed a fist sized whole in the kite, just in from the ‘Mabel's’ starboard luff tape.

The exhausted off-watch crew members were called up on deck, and within minutes a perfect switch between medium and heavy weight kite was executed. Once patched up and ready to re-hoist, we decided to give ‘Mabel’ a rest for a few ours and let ‘Sticky Vicky’ (our heavy weight kite) take the weight for a few hours. This decision was based on one main factor:

Rolling cross seas, darkness and the twitchiness of the broad shouldered ‘Mabel’ have, in the past conspired to give us the mother of all wraps.

Dawn sees us changing back to the medium weight kite as the breeze eases away and Visit Finland catches up. We now face the tricky task of finding a reasonable band of breeze to keep us moving through the oil and gas fields of the North Sea.

Plenty to keep us busy for the next few days!

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#662 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 07:23 PM

RACE 14: DERRY-LONDONDERRY - DEN HELDER DAY 5
Wind hole puzzle for Clipper Race fleet


The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race fleet has been hit by light winds, as the ten teams fight for position in the important last 24 hours of Race 14 to Den Helder.

“Sailing frustration is when you wake up to the sound of flapping sails and the boat is too calm to believe that we are in open seas and miles offshore,” says De Lage Landen skipper, Stuart Jackson. Pulling out all the stops, the Dutch entry is keen to arrive into home port in prime position.

Meanwhile, overnight there has been a tight battle between Gold Coast Australia, Singapore and Visit Finland. Singapore took the lead during the night, seeing its competitors becalmed around them.

“Sailing clean round Gold Coast Australia and Visit Finland last night while they languished in a windless hole was the highlight in the past 24 hours and enabled us to shift into first. There but for the grace of the wind gods go any of us so we are careful not to be too jubilant just yet,” says Singapore skipper, Ben Bowley.

Singapore is currently one mile ahead of Gold Coast Australia while Visit Finland is only two miles off the frontrunner. The back of the fleet is juggling for the best position too as Derry-Londonderry, Qingdao and Geraldton Western Australia have all moved up the leader board.

The Clipper Race fleet is expected to arrive into Willemsoord Marina in Den Helder tomorrow morning with the yachts arriving all throughout the day. Keep an eye on the website for latest arrival times.

A festival will be held in Den Helder over the weekend which includes an international food market, street theatre, music and more. The Clipper Race Roadshow will also be there, with presentations for anyone interested in taking up the adventure of a life time on a brand new fleet of yachts.


Latest boat positions (0900 UTC)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Singapore 186NM 0NM

2 Gold Coast Australia 187NM 1NM

3 Visit Finland 188NM 2NM

4 Qingdao 201NM 15NM

5 Derry-Londonderry 201NM 15NM

6 Welcome to Yorkshire 202NM 16NM

7 De Lage Landen 206NM 21NM

8 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 210NM 25NM

9 Geraldton Western Australia 226NM 40NM

10 New York 228NM 42NM



Singapore
RACE 14 – DAY 5 – by Ben Bowley


We've had a brilliant 24 hours aboard the ‘Big Red Bus’. Sailing clean round Gold Coast Australia and Visit Finland last night while they languished in a windless hole was the highlight and what has enabled us to shift into first. There but for the grace of the wind gods go any of us so we are careful not to be too jubilant just yet.

Yesterday was spent gybing and switching kites. Gybing to ensure maximum Velocity Made Good (VMG) was maintained and switching kites due to finding various little holes in our spinnakers throughout the day. Watch leader and rig monkey James Thomas (Jammy Dodger/Nipper) was sent aloft with large amounts of tape and a file to find the offending part of rigging. A split pin for at the top of the inner forestay had started to poke through the tape and was clearly the problem. Once sorted our lightweight kite ‘Josie’ was re-hoisted and the rest of the day spent swapping gybes with Visit Finland trying to avoid the large amount of shipping plying back and forth from the continent and the plethora of oil and gas rigs out here.

With less than 200 miles to the finish and some decent wind forecast to carry us in we are carefully planning our finishing strategy; with a dose of luck and plenty of focus, there is a chance for us to possibly attain a hallowed yellow pennant to go with

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 14 – DAY 5 – by Richard Hewson


Gold Coast Australia had a fantastic run down the Scottish coast yesterday extending our lead on Singapore and Visit Finland to over seven miles as we screeched along with the medium weight spinnaker up.

In the late afternoon the wind changed slightly and Visit Finland took advantage of a small wind shift and band of pressure to the west by gybing. Not wanting to lose our cover, Gold Coast Australia gybed as well, followed by Singapore. A few hours later, when the wind returned to its previous state, all three yachts gybed back and Visit Finland had made two miles on us decreasing our lead to only five miles.

In the early evening we had once again extended our lead on the others to seven miles, and the wind began to drop. Our attention focused on a big black cloud that seemed to be moving over the approximate position of Singapore and Visit Finland. Expecting them to either get a lot of wind or become becalmed under the cloud we watched them closely. Perhaps we were too focused on the other boats, but another cloud developed over us, and suddenly we were becalmed!

Some quick crew work saw the spinnaker dropped and the Yankee 1 and later windseeker hoisted as we made the best of the situation and tired our best to sail through the wind hole. Visit Finland quickly caught up, and half an hour later they were drifting in the same wind hole one mile to our north. Singapore noticing the two boats not moving was able to sail west and around the wind hole, and then continued to the south, not only taking the lead, but extending it by tens of miles.

Visit Finland was the first to escape the wind hole. Though they were less than a mile away at the time, they got the wind and left us drifting without wind, only to watch their stern light slowly disappear into the blackness of the night. It became apparent that there was not point trying to push through the wind hole to the south, so we turned around and sailed to the north, and finally into a light breeze.

Since midnight we have been sailing the race course as if it were a minefield that is mined with squalls. We pick our path trying to spot the squalls early using the radar and do our best to avoid them. Constant course alterations, changing of trim and scanning of the horizon is required to keep us sailing with any wind. The crew on Gold Coast Australia is certainly working hard for this race, and with only miles separating the fleet it will be a fight to the finish.

Visit Finland
RACE 14 – DAY 5 – by Olly Osborne


We are well on our way down the North Sea now, and it is good to be back in home waters. Today we have enjoyed using our spinnakers again having not hoisted one since race start day in Nova Scotia, Halifax several weeks ago. With the wind becoming more variable throughout the afternoon we have been working hard to keep the boat moving at a good pace, and have made some good gains on the boats ahead.

However, luck has turned against us, and we are now stuck in a wind hole almost within a stone’s throw of Gold Coast Australia which has suffered the same fate. Frustratingly the boats nearby seem to be going well, which would mean that this windless patch is quite small, but for the meantime we can only watch the hard earned miles slipping away from us.

As the weather becomes more and more variable through the region it looks like there could still be a big re-shuffle across the leader board as each boat makes the best of the localised conditions. The wind is due to fill in from the west during the course of the day, but until then it looks like the podium places for this race are still very much up for grabs.

Qingdao
RACE 14 – DAY 5 – by Ian Conchie


We’ve had a great days sailing under spinnaker in company with Geraldton Western Australia. Having another boat around to match race against helped push the crew on to constantly strive to get the maximum out of the boat. This morning as the wind built we switched from light weight kite to medium weight kite and then this morning back to the lightweight. Unfortunately, we were joined by Derry-Londonderry who made good use of the wind to catch us up.

Now looking at the radar we can see Welcome to Yorkshire and De Lage Landen as well as Derry-Londonderry as we all park up it the predicted wind hole, it will be interesting to see the next position reports to see if the boats that went further west do any better.

We have now caught up some of the other boats, and we are stuck in the strange situation of four boats all with the same sails and same point of sail all going in different directions!

At the moment it looks like this wind hole will last most of the day before the wind fills in again in the mean time we have plenty of traffic to watch out for and oil rigs to avoid. I am trying not to look at our ETA as until the wind fills in, it is bad news!

First arrivals expected tomorrow morning - 11 July 2012

Race 14 has proved to be one of the most tightly contested of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race. With places on the leader board still continuing to change in the last few hours of the 800-miles sprint to Den Helder on the northern coast of the Netherlands.

The first yacht is expected to cross the Race 14 finish line at 10am (local time, GMT+2) tomorrow morning (Thursday), with arrival into Willemsoord Marina approximately an hour and a half later at 11.30am. The rest of the fleet are set to arrive over the following eight to twelve hours.

The leader board is constantly changing at the moment, with yachts dodging wind holes and trying to be the first to catch strengthening winds. The top half of the leader board is within a handful of miles of each other. Follow their progress on the Race Viewer on the web site, where the latest estimated times of arrival will also be posted.

A traditional Dutch welcome will await the crew of the ten yacht entries arriving all throughout tomorrow

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#663 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 07:27 PM

Den Helder
There's a great line up for the Race Village in Willemsoord Marina, Den Helder, which is the first ever Clipper Round the World Yacht Race stopover in The Netherlands.

A rolling programme of entertainment willrun from 13 - 19 July with public events and entertainment concentrated over the weekend, Saturday 14 July (1200-2000) and Sunday 15 July (1200-1800). And entry to the race village is free!

Hosted by yacht sponsor De Lage Landen, a global provider of asset-based financial products, and in cooperation with Willemsoord marina and Den Helder City Marketing,there's a great variety of acts, entertainers, events and games- something to appeal to everyone.

The Clipper Race fleet is set to arrive between 11-12 July in Willemsoord Marina. During the week stopover, the marina will be transformed into a festival with an international food market, street theatre and music.

De Lage Landen will also welcome around 500 members of staff to the marina to leverage its partnership for world-wide employee and customerengagement.

The Race Village will go green, as De LageLanden’s official charity WWF promotes sustainability, with a huge sustainable dance floor, which will be used for competitions during several events.

You will also have an opportunity to visit the Clipper Race yachts, as well as take the time to see some Den Helder exhibition highlights including the ‘LichtAan Zee’ art workshop and the Naval Museum in the historic docks.

There will be lots of different eateries in the Race Village in addition to the many local cafes, bars and restaurants in the surrounding areas.

The fleet will slip lines on Thursday 19 July at 1000hrs and leave at 1230hrs for the final 260 miles to Southampton in the south of England.

We’ll also be at the Navy Days on 6 – 8 July. Visit the Clipper Race team at the Den Helder Navy Days event and find out more about the race and what it takes to circumnavigate the world.

We’re delighted to bring one of the world’s biggest yacht races to the Netherlands and hope you can join us.

Celebrate the first ever Clipper Round the World Yacht Race stopover in The Netherlands at Willemsoord marina, Den Helder.

PROGRAMME

Clipper Race Roadshow
12 July, daily, 1000 -1800

Packed with a big screen and games. Come and find out more about the race and what it takes to circumnavigate the world.

For those really serious about taking on the challenge, join one of the crew recruitment presentations:
12 -18 July, 1500 - 1600,
14-15 July, 1100 - 1200 and 1600 - 1700

To register your attendance email Recruitment Manager David Cusworth: dcusworth@clipper-ventures.com

CLIPPER RACE HIGHLIGHTS

Fleet arrives
Expected from 11-13 July

Welcome the fleet as it races into Den Helder, Willemsoord Marina.

*Keep an eye out for expected arrival times here www.clipperroundtheworld.com/raceviewer.

Prize giving
Saturday, 14 July, 1500

Cheer on the Race 14 winning crew members as they are presented with the penultimate yellow pennant.

All hands on deck
14 - 15 July, 1100 – 1600

Open boat tours allow you to get on board the world’s largest matched ocean racing fleet to find out what life is like on a Clipper 68.

Race 15 start
19 July at 1230

Wave the crew off as the fleet departs for the final part of the race to Southampton, England for a spectacular race finish.

EVENTS

International cultural and culinary market
Saturday 14 July, 1200 - 2000
Sunday 15 July, 1200 - 1800

Taste the world that the Clipper Race fleet has visited, with demonstrations and workshops from all continents.

Street theatre festival
Saturday 14 July, 12 – 2000
Sunday 15 July, 12 - 1800

Theatre acts across Willemsoord - with water as a unifying theme. With special acts such as the Driving Diva and a maritime show.

AtempoCirc
Saturday, 14 July, 2000

A spectacular performance with circus acts, acrobatics, dance and live music.

Light at Sea
Sunday, 15 July, 12, 1800

A big cultural event by eight cultural institutions of Den Helder with poetry, art, theatre, music and dance.

Kids special
Sunday, 15 July, 1200 -1800

Children’s Parade Underwater World and Garden Bells, for toddlers (2-4 years).All kinds of activities and fun with a leading role for bubbles.

Music and more
Musical entertainment all week. Highlight includes the Ultimate Dance Challenge ‘Dance4TheOceans’, for the World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

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#664 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 07:33 PM

Singapore claims victory in Race 14 - 12 July 2012

Singapore, sponsored by Keppel Corporation, has clinched its first win of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race, arriving into Den Helder in the Netherlands today in jubilant spirits. They crossed the finish line at 0724 GMT (0924 local) and were followed in just over half an hour by Visit Finland and Gold Coast Australia respectively.

The fiercely fought 800 miles race from Derry-Londonderry in Northern Ireland is the penultimate stage of the 40,000 miles race. While the Singapore team celebrated its first victory, their performance spoilt Gold Coast Australia’s hopes of matching the Clipper Race record of six consecutive wins.

The Singapore team is now in serious contention for an overall podium position for third place in the eighth edition of the Clipper Race, but is up against stiff competition from De Lage Landen. The two yachts are neck and neck on points, so the final sprint to the race finish back in the UK on 22 July will clinch which team is on the podium.

Race 14 had a tough start with rough seas around the Scottish coast before wind holes opened up and a becalmed sea state turned this into a huge tactical game. Winds freshened over the last 24 hours resulting in the fleet finishing within approximately six hours of each other.

Upon arrival into Willemsoord Marina Singapore skipper, Ben Bowley said, “It feels absolutely fantastic, we’ve been waiting for this for a long time; everyone’s been awake for the last 36 hours or so it’s been a hard race and very challenging.

“It was neck and neck all the way through, right down to the wire. The atmosphere when we crossed the finish line was electric I’ve never seen the crew get so excited before. We had an honest jubilation; there were tears and laughter.”

Just 17 minutes behind Singapore was Visit Finland, currently in a strong position to also secure second place on the overall Clipper 11-12 Race podium. Skipper Olly Osborne explained, “The race was pretty full on, with many different parts really. The crew worked very hard and I’m always surprised by how much energy they can muster, they did really well and they worked to their best and I’m so glad they got a result to show for it.”

Gold Coast Australia skipper Richard Hewson reflected on his team’s third place, “It’s been an incredibly busy race from start to finish; it was just full on. We had a pretty bad start so we were playing catch up from day one. Singapore took the lead and Visit Finland was up there too, so we were battling it out with them pretty much all the way.

“We worked so hard in that race if we had come last I’d still be proud of my team because they just worked so hard. It was just the roll of the dice so to speak, it could have been any team that won the race but Singapore really deserves it.”

The teams were welcomed to Den Helder in traditional Dutch style with a ‘jenever’ drink, herring and Dutch clogs; a colourful festival awaits them over the weekend.

The Clipper Race fleet will leave Den Helder in the Netherlands next Thursday (19 July), arriving in Southampton on Sunday 22 July after 51 weeks of ocean racing, visiting 15 ports of call on six continents. This will complete the world’s longest ocean race, seeing around 500 people from all walks of life celebrating their remarkable achievement after nearly twelve months at sea.




Position Team DTF DTL


1 Singapore Finished Finished 0724 UTC 12 July 2012

2 Visit Finland Finished Finished 0741 UTC 12 July 2012

3 Gold Coast Australia Finished Finished 0758 UTC 12 July 2012

4 New York 27NM 27NM

5 Qingdao 42NM 42NM

6 De Lage Landen 45NM 45NM

7 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 49NM 49NM

8 Welcome to Yorkshire 49NM 49NM

9 Geraldton Western Australia 71NM 71NM

10 Derry-Londonderry 79NM 79NM

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 14 – DAY 6 – by Richard Hewson


It has been a painfully frustrating 24 hours for Gold Coast Australia playing catch-up on Singapore and Visit Finland as we race towards the finish in Den Helder. At the time of writing we are having a fantastic sail with the heavy weight spinnaker flying in 25-30 knots of wind, surfing down waves as we weave our way through the oil rigs at 12 knots and observe the first sunrise we have seen since the start of the race.

The day started becalmed in a wind hole and watching Singapore and Visit Finland disappear over the horizon. Once out of the hole we utilised every resource to navigate our way through the squalls and calm patches, gaining the occasional glimpse of Visit Finland on AIS (Automatic Identification System), always just out of our reach and constantly pulling away.

Late afternoon as we entered Dogger Bank, the wind finally began to swing to the west and increase in strength so we changed from the light weight to the mediumweight spinnaker, caught sight of Visit Finland again and finally began to make up ground. The team have been working very hard and everybody is exhausted from the constant sail changes and mid-watch wake-ups as we hoist and lower spinnakers and Yankees. Added to this the dreaded ‘Channels’ - a condition suffered by seafarers on their way home after a big trip where you cannot sleep due to the excitement of things to come on land. A few crew even skipped from watches throughout the day as their level of fatigue was noticed to be too high to concentrate on the task at hand. A few extra hours of sleep and the crew are all chomping at the bit to get to Den Helder as soon as possible and even at this very late stage of the race (at the time of writing), there is still a chance we can catch one of the leading boats.

Powernaps are the source of my sleep as skipper, as a proper six hours sleep is not an option when there are squalls, wind holes, sail changes, oil rigs, shipping and Traffic Separation Schemes to deal with. As instructed the crew are told to wake me up for any of the above reasons in my daily and standing orders. It is amazing how refreshed one can feel after not sleeping for a day and then getting a couple of hours sleep in to boost the sleep bank.

At the time of writing we have just crossed through all three of the Traffic Separation Schemes (TSS) outside Den Helder and weaved our way through a number of oil rigs and shipping traffic. We were making some fantastic ground on the leading boats throughout the night but lost miles gained when a fleet of Seismic Research Vessels cut us off. We were forced to sail around the four mile exclusion zone that the vessels had in place to get around their towed acoustic arrays, this put an extra four miles between us and the lead boats, and now we are pushing hard to make it all back up.

All in all it has been a fantastically competitive and challenging race. The team has worked incredibly hard. Tactically we sailed the race very well, and if it were not for the wind hole that we were stuck in for hours as the other yachts sailed past, we would have had a fantastic chance of being the first yacht into Den Helder. This is yacht racing, some things you just cannot predict. Congratulations should be given to Singapore skipper Ben Bowley and his crew for sailing a fantastic race.

Singapore
RACE 14 – DAY 6 – by Ben Bowley

Today's report will have to be short for three reasons: Firstly, we are currently dodging ships and rigs less than 15 miles from the finish.

Secondly, we are pushing very hard indeed to ensure that the 2.5 mile lead we have over Visit Finland presently does not shrink to the stage we drop back into second. And thirdly, I have not slept since yesterday morning resulting in me drinking so much coffee over the last two hours that my fingers are a bit jittery!

So here I sit with a heavy layer of sleepiness rimming my eyes but a huge fountain of suppressed excitement is in all our stomachs; being held firm by the tension of the situation. If we can make this stick then we shall finally attain the elusive yellow pennant that we have been hunting all year. It's been a very busy 24 hours of playing shifts and tide but with any luck it will have all been worth it.

New York
RACE 14 – DAY 6 – by Gareth Glover


There is 60 miles to race to the finish for us and there is still a lot to do before we get there. We have crossed our first TSS (Traffic Separation Scheme) of this race, as we gybe down the coast towards Den Helder, navigating round oil rigs, tanks and banks.

Luckily for us we have not seen the light winds the other yachts have had and have been moving along towards Den Helder at good speed and pulling back a few places. I must say thanks to Sir Robin Knox-Johnston; as we left Derry-Londonderry he advised us to stay close to the coast. It may just work for us and we will have to wait and see where we finish.


Qingdao
RACE 14 – DAY 6 – by Ian Conchie


Well another day of spinnaker flying and trying to keep the boat moving in the right sort of direction. We decided to head east early knowing that the boats to our west would do well, but we hope that getting east will pay dividends today so we will have to wait and see.

This morning finds us negotiating the first of the shipping lanes so it could prove to be a busy day dodging shipping and oil and gas platforms! Hopefully if the wind holds we should cross the finish this afternoon!

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#665 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 10:09 AM

Extremely competitive end in race to Den Helder - 12 July 2012

With Singapore, Visit Finland and Gold Coast Australia securing the much converted podium places in the race from Derry-Londonderry to Den Helder, the fight for the remaining positions has been a tight fought affair.

Just over half an hour separated the first three teams and they were soon joined by New York, skippered by Gareth Glover. “Just before we left Derry-Londonderry to start Race 14 Sir Robin Knox-Johnston said to me, “Gareth, stay inshore, it’s not worth going offshore.” Coming over the top of the British Isles I saw the rest of the fleet going offshore into a wind hole, and I said to the crew, we're in tenth, let’s do something different, so we gybed doing 12-13 knots at times with the medium weight kite up flying down the inside where everyone else was languishing down. We managed to catch up around 50-60 miles to finish in fourth, so it was a good move - it could have gone either way."

The American entry crossed the finish line at 1136 GMT narrowly missing out on the final podium place.

“I didn’t realise it was that close between us and Gold Coast Australia and we probably could have chased them down a little more, but there were lots of oil rigs for us to gybe round! It was a pretty close race though and I haven’t seen the overall race results yet so it will be interesting to see the difference in finish times, but well done to Singapore for coming first."

Qingdao were the next team to finish, crossing the line at 1306 GMT, a result which will see them inch further away from Edinburgh Inspiring Capital in the overall leader board. Australian entry, Geraldton Western Australia won the battle for sixth place as they stole a march over home port boat De Lage Landen, Welcome to Yorkshire and Edinburgh Inspiring Capital. Just 23 minutes separated Geraldton Western Australia in sixth and Edinburgh Inspiring Capital in ninth.

Derry-Londonderry crossed the Race 14 finish line at 1423 GMT, finishing in tenth place.

Meanwhile upon arriving, skipper of De Lage Landen, the home port yacht, Stuart Jackson explained his reaction to the welcome into Den Helder.

"The welcome into Den Helder has been amazing. Getting into Willemsoord Marina there were supporters everywhere and we’ve had a great time so far.

"It was such a close race finish here with six boats ending within a few miles of each other. The last few hours were fairly tense. We set off the race from Derry-Londonderry in a good position, being in fourth the whole time, but then we decided to make a slightly different weather decision along with Edinburgh Inspiring Capital where we stayed out slightly to the North Sea, which turned out being the wrong thing to do. It was very exciting towards the finish line, with us all being neck on neck it made some great racing.

"Our seventh place means that we’ve now been knocked off the podium spot by a few points, so we are going to do everything we can to get back up there and everyone is absolutely raring to go for it, to push ourselves in the last race ahead. It’s obviously a bit of a disappointing feeling right now, but it’s not an issue – as we know we’ll fight back hard into Southampton."

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#666 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 05:58 PM



#667 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 06:05 PM

Amazing welcome in Den Helder - 13 July 2012

After a busy day of arrivals yesterday, the Willemsoord Marina in Den Helder is a hive of activity as crews taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race tend to their deep cleans and general maintenance on the ten ocean racing yachts.

Among the crew racing into Den Helder was Honour Schram de Jong, who was born in the Dutch city.

“It was so exciting to arrive back into Den Helder, as it’s been a few years since I was here last time. “Coming out of the locks and seeing all the supporters standing there, along with my parents, was amazing. My parents were quite emotional seeing me - my dad used to be in the Dutch navy when we lived in Den Helder, so seeing them alongside the dock was extra special,” reflects Honour, a crew member on the Dutch entry, De Lage Landen.

“I think it will be a fantastic week here where I’ll go around and see some of the old familiar places from my childhood.” Anyone interested in taking on the challenge of racing around the world can find out more about signing up during recruitment presentations by David Cusworth in Den Helder. Click here to find more.

The Clipper Race fleet will leave Den Helder in the Netherlands next Thursday (19 July) arriving in Southampton on Sunday 22 July after 51 weeks of ocean racing, visiting 15 ports of call on six continents. This will complete the world’s longest ocean race, seeing around 500 people from all walks of life celebrating their remarkable achievement after nearly twelve months at sea.

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#668 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 06:07 PM

http://www.facebook.com/lists/2242714380478#!/photo.php?v=415668478485922

#669 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 07:07 PM

Interested in taking on the challenge of a lifetime? - 14 July 2012

The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race is a unique event, offering people from all walks of life the chance to take on some of the most extreme conditions on the planet, achieving something incredible.

Places for the next edition of the 40,000-mile adventure are filling fast with the Clipper 13-14 Race promising to be the biggest so far with the introduction of a new twelve strong fleet of Clipper 70s.

The Clipper Race is open to anyone over 18-years-old with over 200 occupations and 40 nationalities being represented during Clipper 11-12 Race. Anyone interested in taking part in the challenge of a lifetime can find out more by attending a recruitment presentation.

Held by Recruitment Manager, David Cusworth, the presentations offer the opportunity to find out more and ask any questions to do with the race.

David, a round the world crew member himself during the Clipper Race in 2002, will be in Den Helder during the fleet’s stay in the Dutch city as well as Race Finish in Southampton.

Clipper Race Roadshow (Den Helder, Holland 12-18 July):

Come and find out more about the race and what it takes to circumnavigate the world. The Clipper Race Roadshow is open from 15-18 July from 1000-1800.

To find out more email Recruitment Manager David Cusworth: dcusworth@clipper-ventures.com

Clipper 11-12 Race Finish (Southampton, UK 21-22 July):

21 July – 1000-1200: Clipper Race Presentation, Ocean Village

22 July - Clipper 11-12 Race Finish. Celebrate the finale of the Clipper Race’s eighth circumnavigation and the final race of the Clipper 68 fleet. Find out more here.

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#670 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 07:09 PM

Singapore celebrates victory at Race 14 Prize Giving - 15 July 2012

Yesterday’s Race 14 Prize Giving was one to remember as the crew members of Singapore celebrated their first victory of the Clipper 11-12 Race as well as skipper, Ben Bowley’s birthday.

A performance from DJ Quintino kicked off the event which saw the sponsor of Dutch entry De Lage Landen, donate to its official boat charity WWF.

De Lage Landen donated €100,000 to the WWF after they set the public crowds -which included 500 company members - a dance challenge. A sustainable energy dance floor was installed in the Race Village which created energy from any movement made on it and the challenge was to generate an energy target. If reached, the company pledged to donate the €100,000 raised by their employees around the globe.

The Mayor of Den Helder, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston and De Lage Landen CEO Ronald Slaats were present as Singapore received its first yellow pennant.

Upon accepting it from Race Director, Jonathan Bailey, Singapore skipper, Ben Bowley was grateful for his crew members’ effort.

“It’s my birthday today, but it’s not about me it’s about my crew - this win is for them. They have all worked extremely hard for a long time and after a few setbacks we’ve finally got a win under our belts.”

“I’d like to thank all my crew, our sponsor, Keppel Corporation and everyone at Marina at Keppel Bay.”

All throughout the weekend the Race Village at Willemsoord Marina was a hive of activity with an international food festival, children’s entertainment, music, street theatre as well as some traditional Dutch stalls. The Clipper Race roadshow was also well visited with hundreds of people interested in hearing more about the Clipper 13-14 Race.

The Clipper Race fleet will leave Den Helder in the Netherlands next Thursday (19 July) arriving in Southampton on Sunday 22 July after 51 weeks of ocean racing, visiting 15 ports of call on six continents. This will complete the world’s longest ocean race, seeing around 500 people from all walks of life celebrating their remarkable achievement after nearly twelve months at sea.

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#671 MSA

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 07:38 AM

Does this "race" ever end?

#672 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 08:45 AM

Does this "race" ever end?

In 6 days - 11 months & 3 weeks - all boats not broken :)
Its the party that takes up the time!

#673 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 06:54 PM

Yachting legend’s torch bridges Olympic host cities - 16 July 2012

Sir Robin Knox-Johnston (73), the first person to sail solo non-stop around the world in 1968-9, says he is honoured to carry the Olympic Torch in Greenwich on 21 July. His Clipper Round the World Yacht Race, which arrives back in the UK the following day, includes an entry from Qingdao - the host of sailing events at the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games.

“It’s a great honour to be selected as a torch bearer for the London 2012 Olympic Games,” said Sir Robin. “As a trustee during the re-build of The Cutty Sark it is a fitting location to carry the flame. It’s particularly poignant for me to be carrying the Olympic Flame the same weekend as my Clipper Round the World Yacht Race fleet returns home to the UK after 40,000 miles at sea.

“One of the yachts represents Qingdao in China which hosted the sailing events of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. Members of their Olympic Sailing Committee will be joining us at the race finish in Southampton.”

The Qingdao yacht will also be carrying a present from the City of Qingdao, a scroll with an illustration of Qingdao harbour which will be presented by their delegation at the race finish on Sunday 22 July.

The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race was established by Sir Robin in 1996 to create the opportunity for people from all walks of life to experience ocean racing and,ultimately, a circumnavigation. At 40,000 miles it has become the world’s longest ocean race.

Sir Robin Knox-Johnston is the Executive Chairman and founder of Clipper Race organiser Clipper Ventures Plc. He has been involved in sailing all his life and was named RYA/YJA Yachtsman of the Year an unprecedented three times.

In 2007 he completed his second solo circumnavigation when he competed in the VELUX 5 OCEANS race. He participated in the 2010 Sydney-Hobart race at the age of 71.

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#674 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 06:15 PM

Reflections from Sir Robin - 17 July 2012

The Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race is close to reaching its conclusion. After nearly 40,000 miles of ocean racing over nearly twelve months, the world’s longest yacht race will soon be heading for Race Finish in Southampton.

The eighth edition of the Clipper Race will reach its finale on Sunday 22 July when the ten-strong fleet crosses the Race 15 finish line and arrives in Southampton’s Ocean Village.

Clipper Race Chairman and Founder, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, reflects on the crew members’ journey and previews the race ahead.

“All these crew members have achieved something special with their lives. They have ventured out across the oceans of the world facing nature in the raw, whether it be the stifling heat and calms of the Doldrums or the ferocious storms of the North Pacific and Southern Oceans.”

“Although, as we come to the finish of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race, the winner, Gold Coast Australia, has already sealed its place, and Visit Finland looks safe in second place barring anything untoward on the last race, only one point separates Singapore and De Lage Landen.

“This will be the battle to watch on the last race of some 260 miles from Den Helder to Southampton. After almost 40,000 miles of constant racing, these two boats know they have to pull out every bit of skill and expertise they have learned during their odyssey to try and win that coveted third podium place overall,” continues Sir Robin.

Sir Robin, who became the first person to sail solo around the world non-stop in 1968-69 on his ‘Suhaili’ yacht has been chosen as an Olympic torchbearer as part of the London 2012 relay. Sir Robin will carry the torch in Greenwich at 0730 on Saturday 21 July before heading back south to welcome the fleet at the finish line in ‘Suhaili’ the following day.

Nearly twelve months after leaving the maritime city of Southampton, on the south coast of England the Clipper Race fleet will return to a heroes’ welcome with a weekend full of free entertainment

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#675 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 07:16 PM

Nominations for Henri Lloyd Clipper Race Seamanship Award announced - 18 July 2012

The nominations for the Henri Lloyd Clipper Race Seamanship Award have been announced and voting is now open. You can vote for your favourite nomination by liking the individual story on Henri Lloyd’s Facebook page. The closing date for voting is close of play on Friday 20 July and the winner will be announced at Race Finish in Southampton on Sunday.

Out of the hundreds of nominations the following five have been choosen as the final. They have been nominated by a mix of fellow crew, skippers, race followers as well as friends and family.

Greg Puttock, Visit Finland crew member
Despite limited sailing experience before the race, Greg has repeatedly demonstrated the courage, leadership and humour in the face of adversity that I believe make him an outstanding candidate for this award. This nomination has the full support of myself and, most importantly, was put forward by the crew of Visit Finland.

He has been a key crew member on Visit Finland and through his passion, willingness to learn and his commitment to the Clipper Race ethos and values, he quickly became a watch leader, a position he has held the entire race with the crew’s support. For someone so young, he has continued to exceed expectations and has been my trusted right-hand man whose opinions the crew value. He has volunteered for multiple back-to-back watches in the toughest of conditions and has clearly demonstrated his willingness to put other people’s welfare first. Particular credit is due for the personal responsibility he has taken in making sure the boat stayed seaworthy and safe during stopovers and in tough race conditions. Immersing himself in all jobs on the boat with equal diligence and enthusiasm, he has led by example.

He has always taken his own personal time to coach and support new members of the crew and round the worlders alike with patience and understanding. All this has been achieved despite a painful damaged meniscus to his right knee sustained off Taiwan, a condition that will require surgery upon his return and at times debilitating seasickness. He has continued to lead, without complaint.

Qingdao crew
This crew has pulled together as a team at all times: When bad weather (not carelessness) has led to injuries no one has cared about race position. Indeed, they take pride in delivering their fellow crew members to safety. The feeling of joy they have expressed when injured crew have returned to the boat is better than gaining a podium position (we think!).

On arriving in their homeport in tenth place, no one would know that this was last! The crew ensured that the local Qingdao crew were treated as heroes, at the forefront of China’s march forward.

Everyone has shared their skills: their helming techniques, sail repairs, culinary expertise and more. Some share singing or poetry.

The watch leaders have taken their turn but have also stepped aside so as to encourage (and support) others that want the responsibility. They all look after each other.

As we stand at the start of Race 15, they are the only team who have not received any penalty points for damage to equipment. That too seems a major and amazing achievement. So it’s not the winning that counts but the conservation of equipment.

Finally, skipper Ian, should be a teacher. He has taught the crew the skills to sail around the world. He has encouraged respect for each other and the beautiful boat Qingdao. He is keeping our treasures safe. His crew and their families love him. That famous teacher quote, “… could do better,” does NOT apply here.

This is a team that doesn’t realise how wonderful they are and that’s another reason for giving them every award out there: a kiss from a relieved and welcoming loved one on 22 July, a well-earned slug of champagne or maybe the Henri Lloyd Clipper Seamanship Award?

Geraldton Western Australia crew
“Will she survive the next 24 hours until we can make another rescue attempt?". This is what the US Coastguard asked Juan over the VHF radio. A hesitation...a LONG hesitation… (echoing the Coastguard's previous question he'd already asked me if I was stable, and I had replied to the affirmative). I was lying very still on the floor by the nav station, an oxygen mask over my face, my head on a beanbag in the skipper's cabin, my soaked and battered body padded carefully by my crew mates with saloon cushions, sleeping bags, and hot water bottles.

At my urging my Henri Lloyd foulies had been cut from me and Callum was monitoring my vital signs with the equipment dropped down to us by the USAF plane. After 'the wave' the deck was a scene of devastation. The boat was out of control with no steering, in the most extreme Pacific conditions. The only sail up, the mainsail, had burst its third reefing line.

After lifting Elf and myself up like puppies by the 'scruff' of our lifejackets and depositing us in the relative safety of the cockpit, Juan led the crew to install the emergency tiller. Then he, Callum, Elf, Fluffy, Ian, Mark, Roxy and Rusty fought for the next five hours to get the mainsail down and lashed to the boom. FIVE HOURS. Juan's answer to the question was: "I really hope so." But without the prompt and decisive action of Juan and all my crew mates on Geraldton Western Australia, none of us would have survived. Obviously I really hope the judges will award Juan and the crew the prize!

Gold Coast Australia crew
On 18 February 2012, Tim Burgess broke his leg during a headsail change on Gold Coast Australia. A helicopter evacuation attempt was unsuccessful and Gold Coast Australia diverted to Taiwan. Using great presence of mind, the skipper declined suggestions for the boat to come alongside, which would likely have resulted in delays for customs and immigration formalities, on the basis that his vessel was still racing.

Having forfeited its podium position as a result of this substantial deviation, the entire team opted to pull out all the stops in order to regain a podium slot in honour of Tim. They pulled through and succeeded, coming in third. I propose this is worthy of the award as a fine example of how the skipper and crew worked together to support Tim both in his moment of need and its repercussions, under the category “to recognise the lengths a crew member or team will go to help each other.”

It would have been so easy to accept the offers of help and hospitality from the Taiwanese, but no, having made sure Tim was delivered into safe hands they wanted to get the job done in his honour. Fine seamanship I say. Furthermore, let’s not forget an honourable mention also goes to De Lage Landen for its support during the emergency.

Stuart Jackson (skipper) and Guillaume Vermeersch (watch leader), De Lage Landen
Throughout the Pacific crossing, the two of them worked extremely hard to keep the De Lage Landen team safe and constantly reminded us of the rules of good seamanship, including good equipment handling. Bad seamanship was guaranteed to be met with the skipper’s anger or trigger the first mate’s surprised face.

The two of them have completely different personalities yet they have one thing in common: they’ve taught us how to keep our equipment in the best shape through the race and to think of safety first! I still remember the nights when half-awake we came on deck and started our assigned jobs, our minds somewhere else.

Stu or Gill would quickly bring us back to reality by reminding us how important focus, dedication and communication are in sailing and how little it takes for an accident to happen. With the memory of some life-threatening situations the De Lage Landen yacht faced still fresh in my mind, I feel I owe my life to Stu and Gill. I’m so grateful to have had such amazing teachers and I’m inspired by seamanship lessons they taught me during the challenge of my lifetime in Leg 6 of the Clipper Race.

http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/race-news?item=734 to vote!

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#676 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 09:15 PM

http://www.facebook....&type=1


Remember to make your vote count by 'like' at the end of the Qingdao story :)

We only have until Friday - TVM!

#677 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 06:33 AM

Race 15 starts today - 19 July 2012

“This last race is where all the crew will really go for it,” explains Race Director, Jonathan Bailey, ahead of today’s start to Race 15.

“Podium positions are still up for grabs and with a short 260-mile sprint across the North Sea back down the English Channel to the Solent, it is all to play for.”

Going into the final race of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race just one point separates current occupiers of third place, Singapore and De Lage Landen in fourth place.

Gold Coast Australia has secured overall victory but several positions are still to be decided as the ten-strong fleet head for home and the finish line in the Solent.

Fifth, sixth and seventh place are up for grabs with Welcome to Yorkshire, New York and Geraldton Western Australia vying for the best possible position, only ten points separates the three teams.

Derry-Londonderry and Qingdao are currently tied on 55 points with the Northern Irish entry only ahead on more podium finish during the eleven month challenge.

Barring penalty points or disqualification Visit Finland has secured second place while Edinburgh Inspiring Capital looks to have left it too late to move up from its tenth place although they are still aiming to try and experience a podium in the final race.

The Clipper 11-12 Race reaches its conclusion on 22 July with the fleet parading down Southampton water at 1215 and arriving in Ocean Village at 1330. Click here for more information.

“It could be a beautiful summer’s day providing dream sailing conditions, the winds might be painfully light, or the UK could be experiencing a dreadful summer with grey skies and gale force winds,” continues Jonathan.

“Whatever is on offer, the Isle of Wight will soon come in to view and the incredible adventure is almost over as the yachts cross their outward track, ‘tying the knot’ and completing an epic 40,000-mile circumnavigation.”

Race 15, the final race of Clipper 11-12, starts today at 1030 GMT (1230 local time) in Den Helder, the Netherlands.

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#678 gybe-ho!

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 11:09 AM

The Race Village is being put up today in Southampton.

#679 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 07:08 PM

Fight to the finish expected in Clipper Race as last sprint starts - 19 July 2012

The world’s longest ocean race is drawing to a close, as the final 260-mile sprint back to Southampton, UK started today. The Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race will finish in just three days, but with a tight overall leader board there is stiff competition for the final podium place.

After a great stopover in Den Helder, on the most northern coast of the Netherlands, the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race fleet today started Race 15 to Southampton at 11:00GMT. As the fleet contended with strong winds of 20-25 knots, De Lage Landen was first to cross the line in its home port, closely followed by Gold Coast Australia and Singapore.

After more than 40,000 miles at sea, the Clipper Race fleet of ten identical 68-foot racing yachts, crewed by non-professional sailors from all walks of life, will have a nail-biting fight to the end as the teams battle for final valuable points.

The fight is on for the final podium place with just one point separating Singapore currently in third overall and De Lage Landen which slipped into fourth on the leader board coming into the Netherlands. Gold Coast Australia is unbeatable in first place and Visit Finland is secure in second place. Further down the leader board it remains tight too, with several teams within a few points of each other aiming for the top half of the table.

Ahead of today’s departure, Singapore skipper Ben Bowley said, “We were ecstatic about taking our first place into Den Helder, which has really spurred the crew on to push themselves even harder for the final race to Southampton. The top of the leader board is so tight we’re by no means going to start being complacent now; we could easily lose our position if we don’t work hard to keep it. We’ll give it everything we have and I’m confident the crew will make me proud and deliver the result we are all desperate to achieve.”

Mixed weather conditions await the fleet in Race 15, from gale force winds to hardly any at all, as the teams race their way from the Netherlands through the North Sea and back down the English Channel to the Solent.

“The teams have to pull out every bit of skill and expertise they have learned during their odyssey to try to secure the best position overall,” said Clipper Race Founder and Chairman Sir Robin Knox-Johnston.

People from all walks of life, nationalities and ages can be part of the Clipper Race. Reflecting on ordinary people achieving something extraordinary, Sir Robin continued, “All these crew members have achieved something special with their lives. They have ventured out across the oceans of the world facing nature in the raw, whether it be the stifling heat and calms of the doldrums or the ferocious storms of the North Pacific and Southern Oceans. They should all be justifiably proud once on that stage in Southampton.”

The Clipper Race fleet will arrive in Southampton this Sunday 22 July to a huge celebration after 51 weeks of ocean racing, visiting 15 ports of call on six continents. This will complete the world’s longest ocean race, seeing around 500 people from all walks of life celebrating their remarkable achievement after nearly twelve months at sea.

Race 15 start order:

1. De Lage Landen
2. Gold Coast Australia
3. Singapore
4. New York
5. Qingdao
6. Edinburgh Inspiring Capital
7. Geraldton Western Australia
8. Derry-Londonderry
9. Visit Finland
10. Welcome to Yorkshire

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 15 - DEPARTURE REACTION - by Richard Hewson


Everyone’s very excited to start Race 15, it’s a very short coastal race with forecast strong winds to start with and light winds towards the end. Gold Coast Australia generally doesn’t go that well in light airs but the crew members have done a lot of work on the boat over the last few days like throwing out stuff that we don’t need so we hoped to have lightened the boat. The crew will try really hard like always and we’ll see if we can beat the boats that work better in light winds.

It would be unbelievable to get 15 podium wins out of 15 races. I’ve got a lot of family and friends that are going to be welcoming us in Southampton so it would be great to sail in first and finish the race on a good note but if we don’t, this race around the world has gone really well and I’m really proud of the crew. I’m really happy with the year that’s been and obviously we’ll try our hardest to win but it’s been a fantastic race.

Singapore
RACE 15 -DEPARTURE REACTION - by Ben Bowley


We know we can definitely beat De Lage Landen on the water as we’ve done so, many times before. We were ecstatic at our performance in Race 14, winning first place into Den Helder, which has really spurred the crew on to push themselves even harder for the final race to Southampton. The top of the leader board is so tight we’re by no means going to start being complacent now; we could easily lose our position if we don’t work hard to keep it. We’ll give it everything we have and I’m confident the crew will make me proud and deliver the result we are all desperate to achieve.

I’d like us to be the only team that managed to get past Gold Coast Australia on two occasions and I’ve got every confidence we can do it. It’s all about getting a decent start and to take charge of where the fleet is going. It could be a shortened version of the last race – with a beat to windward that will certainly mix up the fleet a little, a period of downwind sprinting and then the wind will probably switch off for a while in the final stages.

Visit Finland
RACE 15 - DEPARTURE REACTION - by Olly Osborne


It has been a fantastic adventure and nearly 12 months of pretty tough racing so far; it’s been a hell of a journey. The podium finish is everyone’s dream so it has definitely been a dream come true and we will be doing all we can to keep a tight grip on our current second place position on the overall leader board.

On board Visit Finland we have a slightly laid back style and we try and get everybody involved in all the jobs, whether it is working in the galley, driving at the wheel or going aloft in the heavy weather. All the crew members get stuck in and we will certainly be taking this attitude all the way to the finish in Southampton.

Qingdao
RACE 15 - DEPARTURE REACTION - by Ian Conchie


It’s been an interesting stop in Holland and everyone has made it really special, it’s been great to see the locals embrace our visit.

It’s going to be an interesting start inside the Harbour; some of the previous sailing we have done has proved that it can be quite an interesting place to sail. We won’t see the deep wide oceans that we’re used too but lots of sandbanks which will continue all the way home. It will certainly be interesting but everyone is looking forward to going back to Southampton.

The crew members are fired up; we had a couple of bad results in the last year which we didn’t deserve but that’s the luck of ocean racing so it was nice to take fifth place in Race 14. Neck and neck on points with Derry-Londonderry makes it all to play for in this next race and there is no animosity between the crew at all at the moment! It will be nice to steal another place before the end so we will try to maintain the focus and push through. For Race 15 when we go through the Channel there is going to be lots of tidal gates; so it’s really a matter of keeping up every bit of speed to try and grab each advantage you can to get you home in a good position. You never know there is still that elusive podium position that we have yet to achieve on Qingdao, so let’s wait and see!

It’s going to be amazing to sail back into Southampton; I started my professional sailing career and lived there for quite a few years. I’ve got lots of friends and family travelling from all over the country to come and see us in so that will be amazing and emotional as well.

The best part of this experience has been the crew – I’ve had really good crew the whole way round, making the hard decisions easy and the whole journey a pleasure. Even when we’ve had tough times we’ve always managed to get past it and have a laugh and a joke the crew members approach has always been right and they’ve made it great fun.


Latest boat positions (1200 UTC)
Position Team DTF DTL

1 Singapore 264NM 0NM

2 De Lage Landen 264NM 0NM

3 Geraldton Western Australia 265NM 1NM

4 Gold Coast Australia 265NM 1NM

5 Qingdao 265NM 1NM

6 Visit Finland 265NM 1NM

7 New York 265NM 1NM

8 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital 265NM 1NM

9 Derry-Londonderry 266NM 2NM

10 Welcome to Yorkshire 266NM 2NM

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#680 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 07:15 PM

The Race Village is being put up today in Southampton.

2 sleeps to go!

#681 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 06:20 PM

Fleet battle for final podium in world’s longest ocean race - 20 July 2012

With just three days until the world’s longest ocean race concludes in Southampton, the ten strong fleet of racing yachts taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race face a tightly packed finish, as the teams fight it out for the final podium position.

Over the last 24 hours it’s all change at the top of the leader board as the northern Irish entry, Derry-Londonderry has taken first place. Hot on its heels is Geraldton Western Australia and De Lage Landen respectively. Current first place in the overall race, Gold Coast Australia, shocked everyone by slipping into tenth place at one stage.

While light winds continue to challenge the fleet’s progress, Olly Osborne, skipper of the Finnish entry Visit Finland describes the tactical race that lies ahead of the fleet, “It looks like this race is going to become a very tactical light airs challenge, and with such variable conditions and tidal gates ahead, we still have a chance to enter our home waters at the front of the pack.”

The Clipper Race fleet will arrive in Southampton this Sunday 22 July to a huge celebration after 51 weeks of ocean racing and completing the world’s longest ocean race. Over 500 people from all walks of life will be celebrating their remarkable achievement after nearly twelve months at sea.

Visit http://www.clipperro...inish-schedule/ for more information on the day’s events.

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 15 – DAY 2 –by Richard Hewson


After a magnificent start from Den Helder Gold Coast Australia lead the fleet out of the harbour and into the North Sea. The fleet soon split into two halves, three yachts including us going north, and the rest south.

By early evening the fleet had re-converged and Gold Coast Australia remained in the lead and was sailing well. As we neared the Traffic Separation Scheme (TSS) the wind began to drop off, and the yachts behind caught up and overtook us to the north.

What was to follow was a number of hours of what must look like synchronised sailing on the yacht tracker with yachts tacking north and south against the tide, trapped between poor winds and a Traffic Separation Scheme.

Finally Visit Finland caught up and overtook the fleet, bringing with them the wind and we were off and racing again.

Edinburgh Inspiring Capital
RACE 15 -DAY 2 – By Piers Dudin


Another great send off after another superb stopover, thank you Den Helder for looking after us so well. It was made all the more exciting for the thumping front system sweeping the Race Village during the boat songs and race start. Still we got out of Holland in good shape; it was a little bouncy but all good.

The wind predictions have once again come true, on the whole. One shift didn't go in our favour at a crucial time and we entered the Traffic Separation System (TSS) when the race rules asked us not to, so we'll be expecting a hefty point deduction for that infringement. We made no gain from the small detour off the beaten track and promptly tacked straight back out again. We were hoping for a shift to lift us and our kite, being sailed upwind, away from said Traffic Separation System but it was not to be which was a shame.

The pack is still tightly bunched after a night of windless 'just-sail-in-any-direction-you-can' strategies, with many occasions of boats passing each other in totally opposite directions, a few 100 metres apart.

It's great to be racing so tightly again. The course is pretty prescribed, so not many chances to head off on flyers, which we are happy about.

We'll see what spanners the Dover Straits can throw in the works. Bring it on!

Derry- Londonderry
RACE 15 – DAY 2 – by Mark Light


Firstly from myself and the crew on board Derry-Londonderry we’d like to say a huge thank you to everybody concerned for making Den Helder such a memorable stopover.

And so here we are Race 15, the final race of this whole amazing journey, the culmination of almost a year’s sailing. The the homecoming back to Southampton and the end of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race.

This has been an amazing race, an adventure, raced by some extraordinary people. It has had everything - tremendous highs and the lowest of lows.

There simply is no easy way to sail around the world and anybody who has taken part will understand just how tough this whole experience can be - if it was easy, with no real challenges then it simply would not exist - nobody would be interested.

Right now just a couple of hundred miles stand between the Clipper Race fleet and a jubilant homecoming into our port of departure, 51 weeks ago. The race start in Den Helder was very lively due to upwind conditions and the wind gusting up to 30 knots true. Our pre-race preparations were not helped when our second reef line exploded during the parade of sail but we got it fixed just in time for race start.

We crossed the start line quite late in eighth position, flying our Yankee 3, staysail and 3 reefs in our mainsail but made very good progress and after six hours we had forced ourselves up into fourth place. We endured strong upwind conditions for the first five hours and then the wind began to veer and decrease necessitating a series of sail evolutions all the way through almost our entire sail wardrobe. We now find ourselves crawling along under full main and lightweight spinnaker doing five knots over ground whilst dodging high volumes of commercial shipping associated with this area of sea!

Yet another set of challenges to keep us on our toes right until the end...

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#682 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:29 PM

Competitive push for podium in final 24 hours of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race - 21 July 2012

As the fleet of ten 68-foot ocean racing yachts taking part in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race starts its final full day of racing in the series, the teams are playing every last card up their sleeves in a battle for the final podium position.

It has been a very tight 24 hours racing in light winds as the teams make their way closer to the Solent for Race Finish in Southampton. In a bid to eke out extra miles on their rivals, long watch systems and constant sail changes have been on the agenda, pulling out all the stops in slick teamwork.

This has made for another dynamic yo-yo effect on the leader board and Singapore is currently leading the pack once again, closely being chased by Edinburgh Inspiring Capital and Gold Coast Australia.

Hoping to finish the race on a high and take away its first podium place of the race series is Edinburgh Inspiring Capital, currently in second place, skipper Piers Dudin reports, “It's all getting rather exciting and we’ve had another immense night’s racing with all sorts of cards being played. We busted some pretty nice moves on the front runners and are currently jostling with Singapore at the head of the fleet. The breeze held up nicely allowing for some great lightweight kite reaching. Earlier in the day both watches were throwing in kite gybes as if they were easier than tacks!

“With such a hectic and sleepless few days racing, it's hard for the round the world crew members to have much time to reminisce on their odyssey over the past year, as they are reminded by crew member Georg Schille's mantra of 'Focus, Commitment, Dedication!' I guess that their achievement will only sink in in the days and months to come."

As the yachts have entered the final phase of Race 15 the race course has become ‘elastic’ as the Clipper Race Office are timing the fleet’s finish ensuring they arrive for their spectacular Race Finish ceremony tomorrow. Due to this ‘elastic course’ the latest positions will continue to update but distance to finish and distance to leader positioning will not be available.

The Clipper Race fleet will arrive in Southampton tomorrow, Sunday 22 July to a huge celebration after 51 weeks of ocean racing and completing the world’s longest ocean race. Over 500 people from all walks of life will be celebrating their remarkable achievement after nearly twelve months at sea.

You can be part of welcoming the crew home and found out more about the Clipper 13-14 Race all day tomorrow. For more information about tomorrow’s Race Finish click here.

Latest boat positions (1200 GMT)

Position Team DTF DTL

1 Singapore

2 Edinburgh Inspiring Capital

3 Gold Coast Australia

4 De Lage Landen

5 Derry-Londonderry

6 Geraldton Western Australia

7 Welcome to Yorkshire

8 Qingdao

9 New York

10 Visit Finland

Singapore
RACE 15 – DAY 3 – by Ben Bowley


Another tough 24 hours aboard Singapore. Tiredness abounds as we have been working tirelessly to improve on our position. As I sat typing yesterday I believe we were somewhere near the bottom of the fleet. Today sees us leading the pack toward the Owers South Cardinal off Selsy Bill. What a feeling it is to be back in truly home waters. Headland flits by with increasing familiarity and the nautical playground of the Solent is almost within reach!

Having made excellent progress throughout the night we are watching our Speed Over Ground (SOG) and associated ETA move from positive to depressing once more. It is torture to be so close to home and not be able to pull in for shower and beer with friends and family! We shall just have to be patient for now and keep the focus on the right here, right now. That's all one can ever do whilst sailing any yacht on any ocean. Perhaps that is part of the appeal; life's little concerns and stresses about the short, medium and long term future melt away leaving one focused solely on what needs doing right now.

It seems that I am becoming somewhat philosophical and this is a sure sign that I need some sleep. Time for another hour's cat nap.

Edinburgh Inspiring Capital
RACE 15 – DAY 3 – by Piers Dudin


It's all getting rather exciting and we’ve had another immense night’s racing with all sorts of cards being played. We busted some pretty nice moves on the front runners and are currently jostling with Singapore at the head of the fleet. The breeze held up nicely allowing for some great lightweight kite reaching. Earlier in the day both watches were throwing in kite gybes as if they were easier than tacks!

Fortunately the sail changes have been very limited and more time is being spent changing the heavy to the lightweight spinnaker sheets. With such a hectic and sleepless few day’s racing, it's hard for the round the world crew members to have much time to reminisce on their odyssey over the past year, as they are reminded by crew member Georg Schille's mantra of 'Focus, Commitment, Dedication!' I guess that their achievement will only sink in in the days and months to come.

For the mean time we'd like to ask all our Race Viewer fans to keep shouting at the screen, don't been concerned about us going round in circles, it's just the final few laps of the race course! 24 hours to go! Go’ EICa!’ go ‘Purple Beastie!’

Gold Coast Australia
RACE 15 – DAY 3 – by Richard Hewson


It has been a rewarding, challenging and frustrating day for Gold Coast Australia in the final race of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race.

We started the day at the back of the fleet, once again becalmed in our own special wind hole which by now we are becoming very familiar with. By the afternoon we had made some places on the rest of the fleet, and a gybe towards the east to get into the slack tide under the White Cliffs of Dover bought us up into first place as we passed Dover and weaved our way between the ferries.

Soon after Dover, once again we were becalmed allowing the rest of the fleet to catch up, eventually we got the wind again and were racing one on one with Geraldton Western Australia until another wind hole at Dungeness Head left us becalmed again. Unfortunately Geraldton Western Australia managed to scrape their way into some more breeze, leaving us bobbing around only to watch them disappear over the horizon and see the rest of the fleet catch up.

For the afternoon we utilised the tide to make our way east, and then as the tide changed so did the wind so we gybed inshore to make the most of the wind along the shoreline off Hastings.

It has been a very tiring and hectic day, and my crew are performing incredibly well despite their lack of sleep and copious sail changes and course adjustments. I have managed to survive the last few days with a few cat naps, but for a skipper coastal racing basically means no sleep as the proximity of yachts and ships in the shipping lanes, combined with the numerous dangers, reefs and shorelines along the coast means that opportunities for sleep are few and far between.

Despite the lack of sleep this race is very challenging and it is very enjoyable to have the entire fleet in visual range.This race could be anybody's, and almost every yacht in the fleet has taken the lead at some point or another over the last two days.

Qingdao
RACE 15 – DAY 3 – by Ian Conchie


Well the wind lottery continues! While we lost a lot of ground yesterday we managed to get some back this morning. We have watching the constant change in the leader board and hopefully before the race ends we can make some changes ourselves!

This morning we were greeted by the sun and the view of Brighton! It feels strangely good to know that we are close to home but odd as our great adventure is coming to a close. And to finish our voyage in such light airs after tackling some really heavy weather almost feels like an anti-climax. It is also strange that we have 24 hours of racing left to go when we are so close to home and the thought of being sat with our loved ones this afternoon celebrating with a drink is very tempting.

We also celebrated our last birthday on board with crew member James Rogers turning 30! This means that all of our round the world crew have now celebrated their birthdays on this trip, a unique set of birthdays not likely to be repeated!

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#683 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:30 PM

Sir Robin Knox-Johnston runs with the Olympic torch ahead of Race Finish - 21 July 2012

It’s a busy weekend for the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race, with the fleet arriving for Race Finish in Southampton’s Ocean Village tomorrow. In the meantime, Chairman and Founder Sir Robin Knox-Johnston was cheered on by huge crowds this morning, as he ran with the Olympic Torch in Greenwich.

Completing his run, Sir Robin said, “Running with the Olympic Torch was phenomenal. There were such huge crowds and it was a wonderful atmosphere. I’m so pleased to have been part of this.”

Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, the first person to sail solo non-stop around the world in 1968-69 on ‘Suhaili’ is currently sailing his old beloved boat around to Southampton, ready to welcome the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race fleet in the Solent in the early hours of tomorrow morning.

Tomorrow the fleet will form a parade of sail down the Solent before arriving into Ocean Village in Southampton at 1330 local time, where spectacular welcoming festivities await them.

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#684 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:32 PM

RACE 15 - DAY 2 - by James Rogers (Qingdao)

In one way, today has been a typical 'Clipper Race' day: Sunshine and Showers, Good speed and No speed, Fun and Frustrations, Laughs and Lamentations, plus we have gybed a million times trying to avoid TSS and shallow water as light winds make 'best course and speed' mutually exclusive and seem to be at the back of the fleet! In another way, it has been completely unique: not only did we spy England for the first time in 350 days but it was also my 30th birthday.

As ever the Q-family has made an amazing effort to make the day special, which it forever will be, and I received some great cards and messages from people on other boats and ashore too which was brilliant. Cath and Lynn nailed the mothering today with Bacon, Fried Bread and Beans; Chicken Fricassee and Mash; and then Thai Curry with Cake to finish... A present for us all! But today was a day when I missed those I love more than ever, we seem so near, but the separation has never seemed wider.

Thinking about writing this blog has been an extraordinary experience in itself! So many memories, emotions and experiences relived, so many rediscovered: I spent some time going through old blogs, photos and video clips and laughed and cried throughout.

As there is too much to say in detail here is a list of the things I will treasure: race start day - only in hindsight do I truly appreciate it's magnitude; that first team photo on the wall in Madeira; our crew dinner at Mama Africa; sailing into Rio de Janeiro - the completion of our first ocean crossing and one of the most stunning natural coastlines in the world; the welcomes in Geraldton Western Australia and Derry-Londonderry - heartfelt and humbling, the stand out moments for many of us; the stopovers in Cape Town, San Francisco and New York made this city boy miss London but I did have some fun!; our first storm was exhilarating - Airborne and Tom F's lifejackets on the bow; our first squall hysterical - you've seen the video; kloofing in South Africa; surfing in Gold Coast; getting to the top of the mast in any ocean and any conditions - a treat for me even if others could not agree; riding on the end of the spinnaker pole at night; the Southern Ocean and Pacific seascapes; being privileged enough to be capturing our adventure as the media crewmember; the bravery of Lynn and Jimbo getting back on board and the boost it gave us in Qingdao; Sam H's humour and friendship; Tel's tales; Lloydie and my mother watches; Cath and my chats under the stars and making sure neither missed a special moment or sight; helming at sunset; dancing on deck; big hugs from TJ, young Ben and Pete Phillips whenever we got into port; sharing and singing with Lizzie Haigh; getting into mischief with Bambi; school visits in Qingdao; Mikey-Dave's fresh fish; Pop's and Joan's beautiful ways with words; Winnie-the-Pooh with Della; sailing under the Golden Gate Bridge with that superb team of people; learning from George, William, Ming, Brett, Holly and Vicky, our Chinese crewmates; poetry and practical jokes with Beanz; crazy ideas with Bill; Sean dodging waves in the Pacific and never wetting one Tab; brilliance and madness with Dimitri; Skip being silly or serious at the perfect moments; Claire and Jo-Jo's laughs; my watch on Leg 7 - a great bunch to lead; the support of friends and family - both my own and our extended Q-family; being reunited with former crew mates - Viv (seemingly everywhere!), everyone in Qingdao, Airborne (both his poster in Qingdao and himself in New York), Johnny and Joan in Den Helder, Martin in Northern Ireland; ticking off final items on 'Things to do before I'm 30' list; and falling in love.

Wow, I did not know that list would get so long... and I think I have only scratched the surface. Perhaps I'll have to write a book to get it all in!

But it is clear that this journey has been everything I needed and way more than I expected. I can only hope that the lows have made me stronger and the highs have made me happier.

Thanks for reading all year.

See you in Southampton!

James Rogers
Come on Qingdao!

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#685 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:40 PM

RACE 15 - DAY 2 - by Sherlyn Chen (Singapore)

All sorts of emotions are running high on board the Big Red Bus at the moment - from excitement for the final race of this year-long odyssey, to melancholy that it's coming to an end, or even sheer relief that we will soon be able to return to some semblance of normalcy; talk to ten different people and you will probably get ten different answers of how they're feeling.

Personally, I'm filled with a whole gamut of emotions. Part of me wants to get it over and done with, because it's difficult not to be jaded after almost twelve months of this, and yet another part of me doesn't quite want it to end. The race start yesterday was quite emotional therefore, because on the one hand in three days' time this will all be over, and I will be able to set foot on dry land for good and see my family, but simultaneously, in three days' time this will all be over, and I will more likely than not never again experience the delirious freedom of sailing under the starry night sky with nothing else on my mind.

Every evolution we've performed has had a certain sense of finality to it, so I made sure to relish the experiences while I could. Struggling to move the Yankee 2 to the foredeck, putting in a herculean effort to budge it a foot forward, only to have it washed two feet down the deck by the next wave; hanking it on while perching precariously on the pulpit and being jolted up and down; unhanking the Yankee 3 as it came down and taking an inordinate sense of pride in doing it quickly (6 minutes 45 seconds for the Yankee 3 to Yankee 2 change, which is pretty good); being woken up 45 minutes into our off watch to change to the Yankee 1 and then going back to bed for 15 minutes before the next watch - all these memories will be treasured by me.

Because we got off to such a bumpy start, some people fell victim to seasickness, and while they were in their bunks recovering the rest of us got through a sizeable part of our sail wardrobe as the wind abated - from the Yankee 3 to the Yankee 2 to the Yankee 1 and then the dreaded wind seeker, and now the lightweight spinnaker. It looks as if the elastic course that the Race Committee planned may not come into action; we'd be lucky to get to Southampton on time with the current speeds we're doing.

Anyway, the views during this race have been interesting. Just this watch I've had to go up the mast yet again to sort out the tangled spinnaker halyards - possibly for the last time ever - and the vista of the countless windmills around was pretty spectacular. We're weaving through a wind farm with our spinnaker up, although it has to be said that the turbines are unlikely to be harnessing much energy at the moment, given that we've got fewer than ten knots of true wind. And the amount of shipping has been incredible, keeping skipper Ben and first mate Will P busy watching the AIS and talking to ship's captains if necessary.

Not long to go now!

Sherlyn Chen

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#686 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:41 PM

RACE 15 - DAY 1 - by Kyle Gardner (Welcome to Yorkshire)

The pink lady's race start must be the worst seen amongst the fleet in Clipper Race history. To add to our pain we were no doubt photographed at race start sailing the wrong way over the start line as everyone else timed their starts to perfection leaving us 3-4 miles behind everyone else.

A delayed race start and miss-communication on board are to blame.

However, as I write my final Blog ever on my Clipper Round the World Yacht Race adventure, we have over taken Visit Finland who are now in last place and are hot on the heels of New York in eight just four boat lengths in front... MEGA There are mixed feelings onboard the pink lady as we finally approach Southampton; our home port. Lots are keen to get home to our creature comforts, whilst being mindful that we may never have such an extreme and emotion filled adventure ever again.

I am looking forward to being on dry land for more than just a week knowing I do not have to go back to sea on a 68ft racing yacht and its lack of luxuries.

However the friends I have made are DEFINETLY friends for life and will be sorely missed. As will Clipper life with its up and downs... it's such a roller coaster of emotions but when you’re on top of the world it really is hard to beat (or describe to someone who has never experienced it).

All in all, my Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race has been the experience of a lifetime. This phrase is used lightly throughout clipper but really is the best way of describing my MEGA experience.

Finally I cannot wait to see my friends, MATES and family at race finish and am so excited to be leading the fleet in the parade of sail as the ENGLISH entry into our home port.

Kyle Gardner - MEGA WATCH

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#687 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:43 PM

RACE 15 - DAY 1 - by Jonathan Pickering (Singapore)

The end is nigh...as we approach the end of the penultimate race our thoughts turn more and more to life after the Clipper Race ("LAC"), particularly for the worlders.

We worked out today that by Race Finish we'll have been on the boat for 250 or so days, which is a long time to spend with people whom we didn't really know, if we'd ever even met them, before Race Start: and longer still when we've lived with them 24/7, in what can best be described as cramped conditions. It's also a long time to spend away from family and friends - and so part of LAC will comprise renewing relationships with friends and family, and working out how to deal with the ones we've made while on board.

For most, those on board relationships are inevitably a mixture of new close friends and people we'd probably not want to see again, with the whole range in between: and it will be interesting to see how long they last.

What else will we take away into LAC? We've all learnt a lot about sailing: I expect I shall sail again but don't expect to race and certainly won't be doing any ocean racing again. Which is not to say that I haven't enjoyed this race: it's been an awesome experience, and I've even started liking the racing aspects which frankly I hadn't been that interested in at the start. Having been out to the end of the pole today to spike the spinnaker (in the course of a flurry of spinnaker evolutions), I think I've now been in every position on the boat for at least one evolution: and done some things a lot more than others. I seem to have become a specialist helm, and have worked out that I'll probably have driven for about 8,000 miles of the 50,000 or so we'll have sailed.

We've learnt a lot about ourselves too, and I hope I shall be able to take some (all?) of those learnings into LAC. I fear I won't be wholly successful (I do still like being warm and dry, for example, even though I've learnt I can tolerate cold and wet - as a friend of Willy's said after the Pacific crossing "Ah, so you've done suffering then").

And then of course there are the memories of the things we've done and seen. The exhilaration, and fear, of the Southern Ocean and Pacific storms, with over 50 knots of wind, huge waves, thrilling speeds and crashing water; the frustration of being stuck in wind holes and trying to get the boat moving (and the satisfaction when you do); the utter blackness when there's 100 per cent% cloud cover and no moon; heat; cold; wet; occasional misery; exaltation; gratitude to, and frustration with, crew members; natural wonders, such as the whales, dolphins, albatross, the stars and moon, moon bows, sunrises and sunsets; and the satisfaction at the end of each race of having given more than our all to get the result, and of seeing the destination rising over the horizon as we approached it.

I feel I have few unhappy memories - perhaps I have conveniently erased them - and many happy ones, which is a great outcome.

And of course I shall be able to say that (barring the totally unexpected and perhaps not even then, as we have now crossed every degree of longitude) I have achieved my ambition, which was to sail around the world - and that is a great feeling.

Jono's last blog

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#688 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 07:17 PM

Triumphant end to Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race - 22 July 2012

It was a spectacular scene today as thousands of people turned out to watch the end of the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race in Southampton, UK. Gold Coast Australia secured overall victory, as the non-professional crew on board all ten ocean racing yachts marked the end of a 40,000-mile challenge of a lifetime.

After 51 weeks of ocean racing Gold Coast Australia today took first place in the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race. Visit Finland finished in second, while a battle towards the end saw Singapore, sponsored by Keppel Corporation, pip Dutch entry De Lage Landen to the post for the third and final podium position by finishing 20 seconds earlier.

The fleet crossed the final finish line of Race 15 this morning where Founder and Chairman Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, the first person to sails solo non-stop around the world, led a parade of sail in Southampton Water to welcome back the fleet of ten identical 68-foot racing yachts.

Tasmanian skipper Richard Hewson and his crew proudly stood on the bow of Gold Coast Australia as thousands of people applauded the victorious Australian team.

“It has been an amazing adventure. From the start we’ve had plans to dominate the race and we’ve definitely done that. It was very competitive and we’ve racing against some fantastic tough competition all the way. We’ve achieved so much more than we set out to achieve and had so many wins and podiums, but to stand here on the stage as winners is unbelievable. I’ve had an amazing crew that’s made this happen,” said Gold Coast Australia skipper Richard Hewson, before accepting the winning trophy on stage in front of thousands of people.

All day tens of thousands of people lined the dockside of Ocean Village marina in Southampton to welcome home the crews after a gruelling year long challenge that has seen them take on the world’s largest and most formidable oceans, endured violent storms and frustrating calms, extreme heat and bone-numbing cold while racing ferociously to win.

While Gold Coast Australia led most of the race securing a podium place in all 15 races, its nine competitors remained close throughout. Visit Finland skippered by Olly Osborne kept in a firm second. Further down the leader board it remained very close between a number of the boats.

More photos
http://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/index.php/follow/photo-galleries/

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#689 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 07:18 PM

What a fantastic 11 months - I'll have to find something else to do @ 5am every day now!

We won the HL award I'm hearing so thanks to all that voted :)

#690 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 07:26 PM



#691 Leka

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 01:55 AM

What a fantastic 11 months - I'll have to find something else to do @ 5am every day now!

We won the HL award I'm hearing so thanks to all that voted :)


Well done on the HL Award.

Good effort by GC to be on the podium in every race.
Bet he is pissed off at not winning 6 straight.
Still a good effort.

The next go round will be interesting with the new boats, they look like they might be a bit of fun downwind in a blow.

#692 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 07:40 AM

yeah & I hear the applications that have mentioned Anarchy as "where did you hear about us" are in the double figures so someone else will be starting a thread in about a years time!

#693 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 08:12 PM

40,000-mile adventures reaches its conclusion - 23 July 2012

After completing 40,000 miles of ocean racing, the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race fleet arrived home yesterday to a heroes’ welcome in Southampton.

Vicky Song, Qingdao
“It has enriched my life. When you are not on water you have a regular life and go to work, but my life on board has really brought life into perspective. I am proud and happy to have developed my sailing skills and make so many friends, as well as teaching people about Chinese culture around the world.”

Jane Hitchins, Geraldton Western Australia
“Getting back on board feels like closure. Having had the Southern Ocean thrown at me twice and the Pacific Ocean thrown at me once it was great to be well enough to be able to complete the journey after a great recovery.

“When the US Coast Guard took me off the yacht after the wave hit us, I didn’t have a chance to complete my experience. Now standing here I feel like the Clipper Race journey is truly full circle and I’m very pleased to have been part of this, be part of the team and finish it here on stage together despite all that has happened.”

Jim Cole, New York
This experience has been absolutely fantastic. I have loved every minute of this journey and other than a little broken finger 700 miles off the shore of Ireland it has been an incredible experience, especially for someone of 72 years of age!”

Justine Laymond, Edinburgh Inspiring Capital
“I’m just amazed to be home, it’s certainly been a challenge that I have overcome battling through my own personal challenges with my health, seasickness and exhaustion. I’m glad I’m home and I can actually flush a toilet or have to balance myself at an angle!

“There were a couple of moments on my journey where I thought it was game over but I was determined and powered myself through and it’s fantastic. I just can’t believe I’m home and I’ve done it! I’m so happy,”

George Allen, Welcome to Yorkshire
“It is so emotional, what a reception we have received it is absolutely unbelievable. Looking back on it now I can’t believe I’ve done it, I’ve conquered some mighty oceans and it was out of this world.

“The Clipper Race was a challenge, I’ve completed it and I’m really pleased and proud of myself for that.”

Richard Hewson, Gold Coast Australia
“It has been an amazing adventure. From the start we’ve had plans to dominate the race and we’ve definitely done that. We’ve been racing against some fantastic teams and very tough competition all the way.

“We’ve achieved so much more than we set out to achieve, had so many wins and podiums, but to stand on the stage as overall winners is unbelievable. The fantastic crew of Gold Coast Australia, amazing support from our sponsor and followers have all been part of making this happen,”

John Harkin, Derry-Londonderry
“It’s been a long journey and I’ll be glad to get back to my family and grandchildren who I haven’t seen for quite a while. It’s been tough and there were lots of times I thought I couldn’t complete it. Now that I stand here at the end, I’m delighted to have achieved what I have achieved. I have always wanted to sail round the world and the Clipper Race gave me the opportunity to do it.”

Ben Bowley, Singapore
"To see how they have developed and grown, not just as sailors over the course of the race makes my heart swell to the point of bursting. We have shared so much together that the thought of not being with my crew in the immediate future is a little distressing; yet, I take comfort in the fact that what we have achieved together in a year is more than many people could hope to accomplish in a lifetime. Today is the day we realise that with enough effort, the right team attitude and a sense of humour, anything is achievable. There's always a chance that tomorrow could be the greatest day of your life, dare to dream, they may just come true!

Stuart Jackson, De Lage Landen
"Well what an amazing climax to an amazing race!

"Seconds separated the podium positions at race finish and we gave it all we had. What a privilege and an honour to race with such a fantastic crew throughout the year. It has been humbling to think back to what we have experienced since we left these shores 12 months ago and what have we all been through in that time.

"I am so proud of what we have achieved and every crew member that has raced with De Lage Landen should feel thoroughly proud of themselves.

Olly Osborne, Visit Finland
We couldn't have asked for a better day to enter our home waters, and not long after sunrise we re-crossed our outward track and completed our circumnavigation of the world. It was an emotional moment for the round the world crew, and until then the realisation that we had completed such an epic journey had not sunk in.

The final race for us was a struggle, with sail damage, wind holes, and even a visit from the customs and excise to contend with! But this morning the feeling on board turned from frustration to elation as we finally finished the race and secured our second place overall.

It has been an incredible journey and having sailed so many miles and visited so many amazing places it will take some time before the scale of the adventure sinks in. But as the festivities begin this afternoon and we are re-united with our friends and family it will certainly be an achievement to be proud of.

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#694 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 07:45 AM



#695 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 07:19 PM

Qingdao wins Henri Lloyd Clipper Race Seamanship Award - 24 July 2012

The skipper and crew of Chinese entry, Qingdao, have been awarded the Henri Lloyd Clipper Race Seamanship Award after the team completed the Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race without a single penalty point.

Skipper Ian Conchie and his crew raced 40,000 miles around the world without reaching an amount of damage to equipment or sails to warrant the team being penalised with a penalty point.

The crew members of the Chinese entry received the award on Sunday as the Clipper 11-12 Race finished in Southampton after nearly a year at sea.

“I’m so proud of my crew after receiving this award,” explains, Ian Conchie.

“They’ve worked so hard for so long to look after the boat, their fellow crew members and more importantly learnt how to race safely while completing a circumnavigation.”

Hundreds of nominations were received for the award with five standout nominations being selected by Henri Lloyd, which moved forward to the public voting on Henri Lloyd’s Facebook page.

“We are very proud of our long standing partnership with the Clipper Round the World Race and delighted to be able to show our support to the race crews through the Henri Lloyd Clipper Race Seamanship Award,” reveals Paul Strzrelecki, Joint Managing Director of Henri Lloyd.

The award was presented to the crew on stage at Race Finish by Paul and Clipper Race Chairman and Founder, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston.

“To race around the world without losing any points due to sail or equipment damage is a great achievement. They have stayed safe and looked after the yacht well and the crew of Qingdao are worthy winners for this award,” comments Sir Robin.

The crew of Qingdao raced around the world, facing some of the most extreme conditions on the planet including the Southern and Pacific Ocean.

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#696 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 11:45 PM

Reflections
http://sherlynsails.tumblr.com/post/28087255565/reflections
I’m engulfed by a maelstrom of emotions at the moment. There is joy and pride at completing the circumnavigation that I set out to do a year ago, but overwhelmingly, dismay that it is over. I did not expect these feelings because towards the end of the race I, along with most of the other round-the-worlders, was starting to get a bit jaded and weary of it all, so I was expecting just to be relieved when it finally ended.

Moving off the boat and into a hotel room though, I was suddenly swamped with these feelings, and so allowed myself a little cry. Fewer than 12 hours on dry land, and I was already wishing that I were back out at sea.

It’s been such an incredible experience, this past year. There were uncountable high and low points, and I probably felt every emotion I have ever known in all degrees of intensity. Triumph, disappointment, wonderment, boredom, fear, relief, anticipation, apprehension, exhilaration, frustration… the list goes on and on.

There is a certain emptiness and lack of purpose now, which is very strange, because it’s not as if I have been cut adrift and have no plans for the immediate future. In a week or so, I will be flying home to Singapore for a couple of weeks, and then I’ll be off to Philadelphia to start at college. That’s a whole new adventure, but whilst I’m still grieving over the fact that this chapter of my life is over, it’s difficult to muster much enthusiasm for the next.

I’ve grown a lot over the past year, not just as a sailor but also as a person. I’ve changed, hopefully for the better, and gained some new perspectives of the world. A close friend wrote to me before I left for the UK last April that the lines which circumscribed my world contained so much, and indeed I have witnessed paradoxically both how big and how small the world is.

The shared experience ties all the crew together, no matter how diverse their backgrounds, and as much as I have written about my Clipper experience, I actually find it difficult to communicate to people who haven’t done the race the essence of it all. Or perhaps I myself am unsure what the essence of Clipper is - whether it’s the sailing, or the competition, or the inter-crew relationships, or our individual ambitions and motivations. So much is ineffable.

In terms of sailing, it’s been a very complete experience, as I’ve made sure to spend lots of time in all the possible positions on the boat, be it on the bow or the foredeck, in the snake pit or on the coffee grinder, out on the spinnaker pole or up the rig, and of course on the helm. I reckon that I’ve helmed about 8000 miles of the approximate 60,000 we have sailed, being on watch half the time and helming about a third of that or under. That’s a long, long way. In terms of maintaining the boat rather than sailing it, I’ve done lots of rigging work and am very proud of my whipping and splicing skills, repaired sails and replaced hanks, ventured into the bosun’s department and serviced winches, and very briefly helped out with the victualling (although not necessarily for my boat!). The only department of the boat that I’ve not gotten too involved with is the engineering department, as I never serviced the heads or replaced fuel filters; the closest I got to that was the daily generator check and the rare engine check and topping up of oil. All in all, I think I’ve learnt 90% of what there is to know about the boat, and I’m satisfied with that.

I joined the race in part because I wanted to develop my leadership skills, and that is one thing that I feel I have achieved. Under the leadership of Ben, Will, Luke and Jonathan during the first six legs, I learnt a lot about different leadership styles. On the last two legs where I had the privilege of leading Rotary, I’ve learnt that age is not a hindrance at all. Both times I was the youngest person on my watch, and on Leg 7 the next youngest person was more than twice my age, and yet that was never an issue. I had such a keen, supportive watch both times, and they were all willing to give their best, especially on the last leg where we really pushed ourselves harder.

On the media front, I wrote 40,000 words, took about 8000 photos, recorded hundreds of gigabytes of footage, and made forty videos. Some of these I was quite proud of, especially since it was a real headache sifting through hours of footage just to compile a two-minute video, in less than ideal conditions on the boat. I hope that I’ve done a satisfactory job of recording the Clipper journey for all the crew, and regret that I didn’t make any videos after Panama, especially since we did so well this last leg and the homecoming would have been an amazing thing to record. Unfortunately, the media clashed with watch-leading, because obviously any time spent down below doing media was time not spent on deck racing the boat. Hey ho.

#697 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 09:04 AM



#698 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 08:24 AM

http://www.youtube.c...player_embedded

#699 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 07:06 PM

ttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQJhlO9xyNs&feature=plcp

#700 sailingmaster

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 08:21 AM

I was always wondering who is going to pay 43K british pounds to go sailing around the world in dubious company with not professional sailors?
I've read their advertisement and looked the video how they sail, I would not want to sail with such people. I saw in video how helmsman one of the boat was freaking out and shit allover his crew because they were in panic after huge wave hit their boat and spinnaker boom felt down, they didn't know what to do, so he went himself of the bow fixed it himself and started to scream on this people. I could understand his anger but honestly as a pro sailor since 7 years old I wouldn't go with such people. By the way, I feel like this company should pay me for racing in this race. :)
By the way, for 43K of british pounds you get pretty nice 32-36 foot boat and enjoy sailing yourself for years.




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