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Ajax's Pearson 30 Rehab Thread


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#1001 Robcooper0767

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 02:36 AM

Stickboy,

Should I try to round the bronze cap (or get it honed?)  it's not wide enough "head to tail".  Seems to make more sense to take some out of the cap than try to sand a stainless steel shaft?

it's about .010-.012 too small head to toe (2.342 instead of 2.354-2.355)

R



#1002 Ajax

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 12:27 PM

Rob-

 

You're saying that the cap is tapered (head to tail)?  First, just sand the shaft as Stickboy says. You'd be surprised at the burrs and imperfections a light sanding will remove. If that fails, then we'll look at modifying the bronze cap. Bronze is soft, and you don't want to weaken it by removing material or stretching it.



#1003 Ajax

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 12:40 PM

Well, I've endured my first screw-up involving drilling a hole into my boat. :angry:

 

I used the installation directions available from Raymarine and measured 20 times, and still installed the mounting socket incorrectly by nearly 5", which resulted in the tiller being almost on centerline when the tiller pilot was fully extended.

 

I filled the hole with epoxy, but now I'll have to sand it and put a dot of paint on it. Grrrrrrrr!

I managed to work out where the mounting socket should go to ensure equal travel of the tiller, and the proper distance from the tiller head, and I've at least got the tiller pilot at a 90 degree angle from the tiller.


I also had to flip the little rheostat inside for a port side installation, because the fluxgate compass would be driving backwards, because the unit is setup for a stbd side installation from the factory.

 

Hopefully I'll run the wiring this week and the installation will be complete.



#1004 stickboy

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 11:56 PM

Aww, bummer. I hate drilling holes in the boat, that would bum me out wicked. Personally I'd consider bedding a panhead or countersunk bolt in the hole, it will catch your eye less.

I'm surprised you have to do something physical in this day and age to set it to port but I'm sure that's what the instructions say.



#1005 stickboy

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 12:14 AM

Rob, I'm with Ajax, I'm unclear what you mean head-to-toe. Is it tapered? Not deep enough? Is it out of round? Too small in diameter? If it's diameter maybe you can try throwing the cap in the oven for a while and chilling the rudder shaft (I've had success with canned air upside down but I'm low budget shadetree). If it's too shallow, how so? Do the holes in the rudder shaft not line up?  

 

Sometimes you just need a bigger hammer.



#1006 Ajax

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 12:31 PM

Well, this thing isn't even an ST1000, it's an old Raymarine Autohelm 1000...the early version.

 

I tested it yesterday under engine power and it drives the boat well enough, but the autotack function does not appear to be working. Bummer. Well, I only paid $150 for it.

 

I hope the newer ST series of tiller pilots are a drop-in replacement.

 

Aww, bummer. I hate drilling holes in the boat, that would bum me out wicked. Personally I'd consider bedding a panhead or countersunk bolt in the hole, it will catch your eye less.

I'm surprised you have to do something physical in this day and age to set it to port but I'm sure that's what the instructions say.



#1007 Alex W

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 07:36 PM

You can get extensions for the ST series ones that give you a lot of flexibility over where that hole is located.



#1008 toddster

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 09:39 PM

Actually, mine came with a ca. 5 or 6 inch rod extension that I don't need.  I think it's in the chart table somewhere.  I removed the extension and the ST2000 dropped perfectly into the hole/tiller pin previously installed for the PO's autohelm.  Of course, the electrical socket was different.  

 

I've found the auto-tack feature to be great... when it works.  Half of the time, Otto tacks correctly, then over-corrects and puts us into irons.  (Especially if we're tacking, say, directly in front of a beach full of people.)   I suspect that the problem is probably the current in the Columbia, but not really convinced yet.  i.e. Otto "learns" the amount of tiller movement needed to stay on course in the port tack, then when we swing around to starboard tack, the current is on the other side and the responses are all wrong.  So now I usually hit the autotack keys, then hit "+10" a couple of times right after.  Then I fine tune things after I get the sheets squared away.  



#1009 Ajax

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 04:44 PM

Well, it looks like Otto has a faulty synapse in his brain or something.

 

As an electronics dude, I made sure that all of my wire connections are clean and tight. I used the Dri-Plug parts that forum members graciously contributed. I restrained the wires every 18" with wire clamps, and Otto is on his own DC switch. The Dri-Plug where Otto plugs in, is hidden in a cockpit coaming due to an excellent suggestion from Stickboy.

 

I tested Otto in place at the dock. I then motored around my cove, and he functioned perfectly.

Yesterday, I went sailing and he performed correctly while I raised sails, and gave a huge sigh of relief for the convenience.

Later in the sail, he began to dump to "Standby" from "Auto" mode for no reason. Then, he would simply shut off and re-activate for no reason, as though there was a loose power wire. I noticed that if I kept plugging him in, the power light would flicker and die.

 

I ran a multi-meter over the entire boat wire run for the auto pilot, and it's perfect. No loose conections, 12v available at all legs. I took Otto home, and connected him to my 50cc scooter battery (12v), and he behaved the same screwy way. The power light would flicker and die, and he would power on intermittantly and briefly. Otto totally mutinied against me on the transit home, and I had to wrestle with the boat and sails alone, and docking was an adventure.

 

I took the body apart and verified that the primary power wires were clean and secure. I took the male part of the Dri-Plug apart, and it was all clean and tight. I was using alligator clips with the scooter battery. It seemed that if I scraped the Dri-Plug prongs with the alligator clips, Otto would power up. After scraping them a bit, he seemed to power up reliably.

 

I am hoping that the problem was simply oxidation on the contacts after a long period of disuse. If I can't get it working reliably, I guess I'll be shopping for an ST2000.

 

I will say this:

The AH1000 easily had the grunt to sail my boat close-hauled in 28 knots of breeze yesterday. Admittedly, I was using my 90% jib and a full main. The trick is obviously to help the unit out by balancing your sails.

 

Pray for Otto's speedy recovery.



#1010 Innocent Bystander

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 05:03 PM

Well, it looks like Otto has a faulty synapse in his brain or something.
 
As an electronics dude, I made sure that all of my wire connections are clean and tight. I used the Dri-Plug parts that forum members graciously contributed. I restrained the wires every 18" with wire clamps, and Otto is on his own DC switch. The Dri-Plug where Otto plugs in, is hidden in a cockpit coaming due to an excellent suggestion from Stickboy.
 
I tested Otto in place at the dock. I then motored around my cove, and he functioned perfectly.
Yesterday, I went sailing and he performed correctly while I raised sails, and gave a huge sigh of relief for the convenience.
Later in the sail, he began to dump to "Standby" from "Auto" mode for no reason. Then, he would simply shut off and re-activate for no reason, as though there was a loose power wire. I noticed that if I kept plugging him in, the power light would flicker and die.
 
I ran a multi-meter over the entire boat wire run for the auto pilot, and it's perfect. No loose conections, 12v available at all legs. I took Otto home, and connected him to my 50cc scooter battery (12v), and he behaved the same screwy way. The power light would flicker and die, and he would power on intermittantly and briefly. Otto totally mutinied against me on the transit home, and I had to wrestle with the boat and sails alone, and docking was an adventure.
 
I took the body apart and verified that the primary power wires were clean and secure. I took the male part of the Dri-Plug apart, and it was all clean and tight. I was using alligator clips with the scooter battery. It seemed that if I scraped the Dri-Plug prongs with the alligator clips, Otto would power up. After scraping them a bit, he seemed to power up reliably.
 
I am hoping that the problem was simply oxidation on the contacts after a long period of disuse. If I can't get it working reliably, I guess I'll be shopping for an ST2000.
 
I will say this:
The AH1000 easily had the grunt to sail my boat close-hauled in 28 knots of breeze yesterday. Admittedly, I was using my 90% jib and a full main. The trick is obviously to help the unit out by balancing your sails.
 
Pray for Otto's speedy recovery.


Ajax

I'd say there is a good chance you solved it. My first cruising boat had an auto helm 4000 and the plug had a tendency to create that sort of intermittent problem.

God luck.

#1011 Slim

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 05:21 PM

Ajax, I think those plugs are the achilles heal of that pilot - here's a post with some answers in it, check it out.

 

http://forums.sailin...16#entry1124894



#1012 Robcooper0767

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 05:21 PM

Ajax, I'm jealous you are already sailing.....DUDE, I don't even have a Rudder!!!!!! :)

 

Here' the answer to the bronze rudder cap.  My explanation was obviously confusing.....No, it is not supposed to be tapered, and it's just a tiny bit out of round.  No issues with depth, etc.  Guess that during manufacture, the cap was not "perfectly" rounded (but then, neither is my rudder shaft I'm sure).

So answer is, not tapered, just a bit of bronze material left that keeps it from being perfectly round at 2.354 diameter.  I called Rudy and left message, but need to try him again to see what he suggests.

 

Also for Rudder Install:  Advice please

Stickboy, you mentioned you've done this before on P30.  what is correct way to install?

Is it the following?

Before installing (with epoxy, I understand you want to do a dry run to find out if you need 1 or 2 washers to take up the up and down slop.  After determining correct number of washers/spacers, is this the correct order?


1.  Bottom bushing put all the way to bottom of rudder shaft at top of rudder (before getting rudder "near the boat")

2.  Put epoxy on bottom rudder bushing/rudder tube at the boat

3.  Insert Rudder shaft into rudder tube

4.  Elevate rudder

5.  install top bushing (with epoxy) and washer/spacer(s) (1 or 2 to take up "space")

6.  Install bronze rudder cap and bolt.

7.  stand back..........

 

Clean Epoxy residue?

Question:  How do you ensure that you don't get residual epoxy "everywhere" or in places that would basically freeze up the movement.  I ask this because I'm concerned about being "sloppy" and having epoxy get where I don't want it.

You might avoid alot of epoxy mess by installing the bushings with epoxy and cleaning residual mess, BUT,

 

****.  If you install (epoxy) bottom bushng in the rudder tube, then try to slip rudder shaft all the way through the rudder tube, I can see alot of pressure and manipulation (and time!) trying to "thread the needle".  Also, think that it would be just harder to do, or screw up something else, since this is supposed to be a tight fit anyway.

 

So, what's the right way?


Got my PCV kit from Indigo!!!

 

 

Rob



#1013 Kaptainkriz

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 05:42 PM

When my AH800 did the same thing I cut all the connectors off and used a locking 12v lighter plug instead. All was good after that.

Ajax, I think those plugs are the achilles heal of that pilot - here's a post with some answers in it, check it out.
 
http://forums.sailin...16#entry1124894



#1014 Ajax

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 05:50 PM

Excellent link, thanks.

 

It happens under power and under sail, problem was replicated in the garage, so I guess it is the connector.  If the problem persists, I'll trim it and splice in a different connector.

 

Ajax, I think those plugs are the achilles heal of that pilot - here's a post with some answers in it, check it out.

 

http://forums.sailin...16#entry1124894



#1015 hard aground

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 06:29 PM

When my AH800 did the same thing I cut all the connectors off and used a locking 12v lighter plug instead. All was good after that.
 

Ajax, I think those plugs are the achilles heal of that pilot - here's a post with some answers in it, check it out.
 
http://forums.sailin...16#entry1124894

And the extra nice thing about using a 12v lighter plug is when you aren't using your pilot there's a charge point handy, or plug in a 12v cooler in the cockpit.



#1016 Ishmael

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 07:37 PM

Before installing (with epoxy, I understand you want to do a dry run to find out if you need 1 or 2 washers to take up the up and down slop.  After determining correct number of washers/spacers, is this the correct order?


1.  Bottom bushing put all the way to bottom of rudder shaft at top of rudder (before getting rudder "near the boat")

2.  Put epoxy on bottom rudder bushing/rudder tube at the boat

3.  Insert Rudder shaft into rudder tube

4.  Elevate rudder

5.  install top bushing (with epoxy) and washer/spacer(s) (1 or 2 to take up "space")

6.  Install bronze rudder cap and bolt.

7.  stand back..........

 

Clean Epoxy residue?

Question:  How do you ensure that you don't get residual epoxy "everywhere" or in places that would basically freeze up the movement.  I ask this because I'm concerned about being "sloppy" and having epoxy get where I don't want it.

You might avoid alot of epoxy mess by installing the bushings with epoxy and cleaning residual mess, BUT,

 

****.  If you install (epoxy) bottom bushng in the rudder tube, then try to slip rudder shaft all the way through the rudder tube, I can see alot of pressure and manipulation (and time!) trying to "thread the needle".  Also, think that it would be just harder to do, or screw up something else, since this is supposed to be a tight fit anyway.

 

So, what's the right way?


Got my PCV kit from Indigo!!!

 

 

Rob

If you mask off the areas you want to bond to, then spray Pam all over everything else, you should be able to clean off any stray epoxy. I would also do a temporary fit of the rudder with Pam cooking spray on the shaft (that sounded just wrong) while the epoxy kicks, then remove it and clean up any spillage before final assembly.



#1017 Robcooper0767

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 02:57 AM

Spoke to Rudy today.  He recommends 180 grit (Stick said 800) big difference, and even a belt sander (don't think so) on the shaft.  You were right Ajax, he said keep the bronze cap intact.  Rudy said shaft should be 2.350, mines about 2.354 and 2.356 in some places (have some work to do).

His point was you can have up to .04 gap (max) and have a good, snug fit.  Above .04, you start to get slop.

He also said bushings should spin freely (like when spinning a top) and freely move 1/2 way around the shaft before they stop.  I can't even get them on the shaft - this should solve the issue of concern over trying to jam it home during install, the threading the needle problem.  If I get all to spin freely, the rudder should move in fairly easily.

 

Ish, I also like the idea of PAM (yes, it did sound dirty! but I think I'll mention it to the Admiral!!!).  Is it OK to put leave the PAM on the shaft if I can't access it to clean it off?  I will have a hard time (or impossible) to clean the PAM off since once I set the bushings (and they dry) and install the rudder since there is very little free space inside the rudder tube around the shaft.  It is acceptable to leave the PAM on or really bad idea?   what's the harm?

 

Rudy also suggested an interesting install.  Get a 2" PCV pipe, 3+ feet long and use to set the bushings in place when epoxying, and let epoxy dry for 1 full day.  Then, install rudder by just slipping it in after epoxy is dry.  The keeps the bushings true, and since the rudder will move freely after sanding, should be acceptable.

Problem is, to get the right vertical tightness, would need to dry install the rudder, with bushings to see how many washers I need to bolt on cap.  then remove, epoxy bushings, wait 1 day to dry, then do final install of rudder.  This means lifting the boat 2 different times with the boat lift, since the marina owner doesn't want me to dig a hole to allow for 2' rudder shaft.  He is concerned about creating a soft spot in the ground (that could be a cause of problem if a jackstand is placed there and sinks under the weight of a boat in off season.....can't blame him, wouldn't want to have a boat crash off the jackstands either.

 

This "let the bushings dry first" is contrary to Dan Pfeiffer writeup that says dry test it, then put the bushings and the rudder in at the same time and mount everything up (cap included so everything dries "in line").  You must take the weight off the rudder with a jack so all dries well in this process.  Rudy says he's heard that when you do it this way, and if bushings are a little off when they dry, that it has caused the rudder to bind.

 

"So much data, so little experience".  Alot of info out there....just don't want to screw it up



#1018 steele

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 04:56 AM

Ajax, I guy on my dock uses motorcycle/snowmobile 12v sockets in his cockpit, claims they are more rubust and have a waterproof cap, might be worth a look.



#1019 Ajax

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 02:25 PM

Well, Otto is officially psychotic.

 

It's definitely not a loose power connection. Somewhere on one of the boards, is a failing capacitor or something.

 

When you apply power to the unit, it will remain on for a period of time, then it simply dies. If you repeatedly apply power to it, the power light barely flickers and dies. If you let the unit sit unpowered for about 10 minutes, it will power up again, and work for a period of time before it dies. I have ohmed out all of the power connections and they are rock solid, so that's not the problem.

 

It was a low-buck risk, so I bought it. I'll have to come up with another solution.



#1020 Slick470

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 03:57 PM

Ajax, if you have opened up the unit. Take a look at the board for any obvious bad connections, but also check the capacitors on the power board to see if any of the tops have swelled or cracked. If so, you definitly have a bad cap. It sounds like a cap is trying to charge but not holding it consistently so you get funky power.

 

This is really common on computer monitor power boards, Dell PC's and several TV manufacturers from the past 7-8 years or so. Somebody shipped a lot of bad capacitors in that timeframe. I've fixed about 30 or so monitors in my office by swapping out the caps, pretty easy soldering job and a ton cheaper than buying new monitors.



#1021 Ajax

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 04:33 PM

You're absolutely right, but identifying the faulty component is the problem. I have looked at the circuit boards. They are both clean, with no signs of corrosion, and none of the capacitors look swollen or damaged in anyway.

 

I mean, there aren't that many of them. I guess I could buy some, replace them and pray.



#1022 Kaptainkriz

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 10:19 PM

Wash it in alcohol anyway and see if it helps... Check for loose solder joint. I had one of mine open on the board at the motor transistors and it kind f behaved like that.

#1023 mrgnstrn

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 01:15 PM

actually....this sounds crazy but isn't.....

 

put it in the dishwasher with NO SOAP.

 

make sure you do the "heated dry" part.

 

the pure water will wash out any salt, and without the soap it won't corrode any connections.

 

then dry dry dry with heat.

 

maybe throw it in the oven on 200F for a half hour or so when you are done washing to make sure it's dry.

 

-M



#1024 Ajax

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 01:33 PM

I'm on a well, and my water isn't that pure. It contains many minerals, and I have to use a water softener plant to reduce the minerals. They aren't completely eliminated. I'm certain that mineral traces would persist between circuits that would just cause more damage.

 

I have done what you are suggesting with de-mineralized water from the reactor chemistry guys when I served on submarines. I washed down the guts of some VHF radios and got them working again. I could probably buy a gallon of distilled or de-mineralized water from the grocery store if I wanted to try it.



#1025 Alex W

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 01:51 PM

Cold solder joints is a good guess.  I've fixed numerous high current electronics by finding solder breaks and then reflowing them.  

 

Look first at the largest traces and flex the components slightly to see if there are hairline cracks under the solder pad.  What can happen is that as a component (normally a power transistor of some sort) heats up that it pushes on one of it's pins more than the others and that will pop a little bit out of the board.  Then the component cools down and makes contact again.



#1026 mrgnstrn

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 01:34 PM

I'm on a well, and my water isn't that pure. It contains many minerals, and I have to use a water softener plant to reduce the minerals. They aren't completely eliminated. I'm certain that mineral traces would persist between circuits that would just cause more damage.

 

I have done what you are suggesting with de-mineralized water from the reactor chemistry guys when I served on submarines. I washed down the guts of some VHF radios and got them working again. I could probably buy a gallon of distilled or de-mineralized water from the grocery store if I wanted to try it.

 

or you could visit and i can give you a gallon or two of water from our RO unit.



#1027 Ajax

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 11:56 AM

Yesterday, a friend and I were able to replace all of my lower shrouds and turnbuckles with shiny, new Sta-lok gear.

 

All of the lower shroud bottom swage fittings had very fine, hair-line fractures and the turnbuckle threads were all galled and unadjustable.

 

The upper shrouds, forestay and backstay bottom swage fittings definitely look better, but the turnbuckles are still ugly, so all of this is on the replacement list as well. I anticipate scraping together enough pennies to get them replaced in a month or two.

 

Irie Mon has a very interesting split-backstay arrangement with a block-and-tackle backstay adjuster that I really think I would like to emulate. I'm pretty sure that this will require two external chainplates on the stern. I'll need to crawl into the lazarette to assess the structural strength of transom corners to see if it can support this arrangement.

 

Merit 25 has started a rigging business. He has created for me, a "wham-o-dyne" halyard (not to be confused with Super-wham-o-dyne) which will be a spare jib halyard, once I cut an exit hole in the mast.

 

I'm also rigging up a jib downhaul to help me manage things when I'm single-handing.

 

In spite of my greatly reduced financial firepower, I am managing to keep her in fighting trim, which I feel pretty good about.

I'll try to post some photos this week of the latest improvements.



#1028 A_guy_in_the_Chesapeake

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 12:44 PM

Yesterday, a friend and I were able to replace all of my lower shrouds and turnbuckles with shiny, new Sta-lok gear.

 

All of the lower shroud bottom swage fittings had very fine, hair-line fractures and the turnbuckle threads were all galled and unadjustable.

 

The upper shrouds, forestay and backstay bottom swage fittings definitely look better, but the turnbuckles are still ugly, so all of this is on the replacement list as well. I anticipate scraping together enough pennies to get them replaced in a month or two.

 

Irie Mon has a very interesting split-backstay arrangement with a block-and-tackle backstay adjuster that I really think I would like to emulate. I'm pretty sure that this will require two external chainplates on the stern. I'll need to crawl into the lazarette to assess the structural strength of transom corners to see if it can support this arrangement.

 

Merit 25 has started a rigging business. He has created for me, a "wham-o-dyne" halyard (not to be confused with Super-wham-o-dyne) which will be a spare jib halyard, once I cut an exit hole in the mast.

 

I'm also rigging up a jib downhaul to help me manage things when I'm single-handing.

 

In spite of my greatly reduced financial firepower, I am managing to keep her in fighting trim, which I feel pretty good about.

I'll try to post some photos this week of the latest improvements.

 

Is there a reason that some reinforcing hard points (thinkin' like a coupla G10 blocks) couldn't be epoxied to the inside of the hull w/appropriate tabbing to provide the needed strength to hold through-bolts? 



#1029 Hike, Bitches!

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 02:51 AM

Ajax, nice.keep up the good work...good seeing you last weekend!

 

Rob..I didn't even know Dyson's had a website, but that hardware store is about 1 mile south of the turn off to Callaway to get to Piney Point Lighthouse. I had 1/16" thick by 1" by prolly a 50ft roll.



#1030 toddster

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 04:49 AM

I've just been messing around inside my transom (replacing the traveler and other fiascos). So, the hull back there s only about 3/8" thick, and the backstay is attached by sinking it into a 2"-thick x 4" wide build-up of fiberglass layers.  (All the chainplates on old ericsons are  sunk into the hull - guess they never thought they'd have to replace them.)  Anyway, seems like you just need to spread the load over a similarly wide area.

 

BTW:  In case you have trouble reaching things from the lazarette...  My boat has lots of inaccessible hardware hidden behind the liner (installed before the hull and deck were joined) and the access hatches to bow and stern spaces are made for... people with far narrower shoulders than I.  Anyhow, I've had to cut a lot of holes and install deck plates in the liner and soon in the deck.  I've gotten over cringing about it.  But it occurred to me that with a bit of planning, holes cut into the transom might make good locations for stereo speakers.  In case you were going to do that anyway, it saves a lot of dislocating your shoulder and still not reaching that bolt anyway.   



#1031 Ishmael

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 04:54 AM

I've just been messing around inside my transom (replacing the traveler and other fiascos). So, the hull back there s only about 3/8" thick, and the backstay is attached by sinking it into a 2"-thick x 4" wide build-up of fiberglass layers.  (All the chainplates on old ericsons are  sunk into the hull - guess they never thought they'd have to replace them.)  Anyway, seems like you just need to spread the load over a similarly wide area.

 

BTW:  In case you have trouble reaching things from the lazarette...  My boat has lots of inaccessible hardware hidden behind the liner (installed before the hull and deck were joined) and the access hatches to bow and stern spaces are made for... people with far narrower shoulders than I.  Anyhow, I've had to cut a lot of holes and install deck plates in the liner and soon in the deck.  I've gotten over cringing about it.  But it occurred to me that with a bit of planning, holes cut into the transom might make good locations for stereo speakers.  In case you were going to do that anyway, it saves a lot of dislocating your shoulder and still not reaching that bolt anyway.   

 

You could cut a bunch of holes and have quadrophenia.

 

Or quintophenia, or even sextophenia, if you can find enough willing participants.



#1032 mrgnstrn

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 03:22 PM

You probably don't need any reinforcing at all if you go to the corners.

 

the corners are naturally reinforced by the shape of the corner.  the hull side provides a lot of rigidity in the bending direction (it acts like part of an I-beam).

 

you need the reinforcing in the middle of the transom because there is no other support in the "vertical" direction (i.e., perpendicular to the face of the transom, in the direction of the load)

 

if I were doing this to install a backstay adjuster, i'd go fiber all the way around, and

1) install beefy padeyes on the deck in the corners,

2) as backing plates for the "deck" padeyes - matching padeyes on the underside of the deck.

3) thru-bolt a third beefy padeye on the inside transom under this,

4)lash the two together with some spectra, or a simple eye-to-eye turnbuckle.

 

Since your transom has an overhang this is easy to do.

 

(my reverse transom makes it hard to put an attachement on deck and tie it to the hull on the transom, I'd just put it on the corners of the outside transom.)

 

now you've provided an easy attachement point on the deck, and transfered the load to the hull. bingo.

 

-M



#1033 Robcooper0767

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 04:52 PM

HB:  THanks.  It's fallen lower on my list due to Rudder and Keel.  Almost there!

Question:

PCV kit installed and before I re-synch the carb, I figured I'd tune her up.
I've got about a 15-20 minute motoring from dock to sail (via channel), so I'm required to motor, versus sail in and out of dock.
The coil works but looks pretty "corroded", thinking of replacing it.  Moyer Marine:  $50.00
For the tune up:  Moyer has an Ignitor Elec Ignition (replaces points/condenser).  Bottom line ($-wise) is: Tune up parts with Electronic replacement inside distributor (if I have a Delco distributor - think I do) is about $60.00 more total for Plugs, Ignitor kit, Rotor, Cap.
Long ago - 30+ yrs, I put one of these, a Mallory kit, on my old 1972 Celica for the same effect.  It worked great, basically forever.
Opinions please:  Stick with the regular tuneup w/ Points, Plugs, Condenser, Distrib Cap.
Any horror stories about this kit?
  Product No. - IGLM_13_195 244mmi.jpg Ignitor electronic ignition kit - late model
 
 
Thanks
Rob


#1034 craigjoh

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 06:21 PM

Replacing the points on my 77 Toyota Corona (486K miles, my daily driver) with an ignitor was one of the best mods I've ever done to the car.  It has worked flawlessly for 10 years now, where I was having to dick with the points every 4-6 months.  I wouldn't think twice about doing this on a boat.



#1035 Robcooper0767

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 08:54 PM

I'm going with it......just have to check the distributor.....R



#1036 sculpin

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 01:58 AM

Ajax, two comments on the backstay project.  Firstly, keep in mind that the loads on the corners will be a lot less than the straight version, and as has been noted the corners are stronger than the middle of the transom.  Secondly, as a backing plate you can use a slab of hardwood - easy to shape, slap some epoxy on and glue it up.  G-10 is overkill on this and if you are worried about rot I'll have to ask why you think it would be getting wet up in there...



#1037 Ajax

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 03:25 AM

Sculp-

 

There is truth in what you say. However, my view has just been tainted by another racer with a P30-

 

He has a ratcheting, mechanical, backstay adjuster, so he just kept the single backstay. The simplicity was pretty enticing. He managed to avoid the hydraulic adjuster. Ugh...the choices!

 

Ajax, two comments on the backstay project.  Firstly, keep in mind that the loads on the corners will be a lot less than the straight version, and as has been noted the corners are stronger than the middle of the transom.  Secondly, as a backing plate you can use a slab of hardwood - easy to shape, slap some epoxy on and glue it up.  G-10 is overkill on this and if you are worried about rot I'll have to ask why you think it would be getting wet up in there...



#1038 mrgnstrn

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 02:28 PM

yeah...you don't need hydraulics. rope/wire/spectra is fine with purchase for your deal.

 

-M



#1039 Merit 25

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 02:45 PM

+1 and you can lead it farther forward if needed, also double end it with faster adjustments. 

 

yeah...you don't need hydraulics. rope/wire/spectra is fine with purchase for your deal.

 

-M



#1040 Bruce T. Shark

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:10 PM

Sculp-

 

There is truth in what you say. However, my view has just been tainted by another racer with a P30-

 

He has a ratcheting, mechanical, backstay adjuster, so he just kept the single backstay. The simplicity was pretty enticing. He managed to avoid the hydraulic adjuster. Ugh...the choices!

 

Ajax, two comments on the backstay project.  Firstly, keep in mind that the loads on the corners will be a lot less than the straight version, and as has been noted the corners are stronger than the middle of the transom.  Secondly, as a backing plate you can use a slab of hardwood - easy to shape, slap some epoxy on and glue it up.  G-10 is overkill on this and if you are worried about rot I'll have to ask why you think it would be getting wet up in there...

 

Ajax; Go with the bascading backstay arrangement.  I had a adjustable harken turnbuckle (looked like a periscope) to tighten the backstay up, the cascade is faster, easier and you keep the weight out of the back of the boat during mark roundings.



#1041 stickboy

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 02:51 PM

Sculp-
 
There is truth in what you say. However, my view has just been tainted by another racer with a P30-
 
He has a ratcheting, mechanical, backstay adjuster, so he just kept the single backstay. The simplicity was pretty enticing. He managed to avoid the hydraulic adjuster. Ugh...the choices!
 

Ajax, two comments on the backstay project.  Firstly, keep in mind that the loads on the corners will be a lot less than the straight version, and as has been noted the corners are stronger than the middle of the transom.  Secondly, as a backing plate you can use a slab of hardwood - easy to shape, slap some epoxy on and glue it up.  G-10 is overkill on this and if you are worried about rot I'll have to ask why you think it would be getting wet up in there...


Rita P has a Wichard ratchet. It's simple and works fine. Sure it's not as fast as cascading or hydraulic but way less expensive than hydraulic and less of a project than splitting the back stay. To me the biggest argument FOR the cascading split is that it makes getting aboard via the stern ladder more convenient. I'd hate to think I'm winning or losing races on the difference in the speed of adjustment of cascading vs ratcheting back stay.

#1042 Ishmael

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 03:27 PM

You don't necessarily have to split the backstay to put in a cascade. This is the back end of a local Bene 36.7, while the blocks are spaced to spread the load and keep clean leads it's essentially a single backstay with a cascade for tensioning.

 


Attached File  jaz.jpg   519.86KB   42 downloads



#1043 Ajax

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 11:02 PM

Wow, the ratcheting ones aren't cheap.



#1044 Hike, Bitches!

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 01:55 AM

Ajax, give me a shout & we can talk if I can help. I have a split backstay..I recall you do not. You are only adding a few inches of tension....get rid of the crap below the existing turnbuckle and you have options....maybe enough, and maybe not...you might need to replace the backstay wire...

 

 

Robocoop...if I have my numbers right, the 1146A from Pertronix is the right one. (do a search to confirm.) The only issue with going to electronic ignition is if you have a good (low voltage loss) ignition circuit, you can introduce too much voltage into the coil and burn it up, if it does not have sufficient internal resistance. I've had enough beers today I am not going to attempt the math...we have an extensive discussion at the Moyer Marine forum about it.. do some googling to find it. I run a Pertronix 3 ohm coil, with a 1.82ohm resistor in front of it to keep the voltage down on the coil with good success.

 

All that being said, I wholeheartedly endorse the electronic ignition and ditching the points...although I do keep a fresh set of points/condenser on their plate as a backup..never had to use it yet.



#1045 mrgnstrn

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 02:40 PM

Wow, the ratcheting ones aren't cheap.

 meh...who needs a ratchet?  now a nurse.... :)

 

-M



#1046 stickboy

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 01:29 AM

Wow, the ratcheting ones aren't cheap.

Holy smokes, I don't remember paying that.



#1047 Robcooper0767

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 02:35 AM

HB,

Thanks, got the Ignitor kit and Coil from MM.  Cap, rotor button and plugs too (from auto parts).  It's all goin' on within a week.

Cheers



#1048 Ajax

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 02:27 PM

I have had the great fortune to own a 99% dry, solid boat.

However, the cockpit locker lid did develop 2 cracks, which let the rainwater rot out the balsa core. The hatch delaminated, and became mostly hollow. This was a great primer for learning how to re-core fiberglass structures.

 

I used West Systems epoxy. The funky, aluminum roller is for rolling air bubbles out of wetted mat or cloth. There are fillers for thickening, and fairing:

 

am9sef.jpg

ofswtf.jpg

24gj8jl.jpg

 

First, I cut the skin off from the underside.

I used a pneumatic cutoff wheel. A Fein multimaster tool would probably also work well.

Note the rotted balsa: 

 

14t7exd.jpg

 

 

 



#1049 Ajax

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 02:38 PM

Next, I scraped the "skin" and the hatch clean of all rotted wood and let it air dry overnight.

Then, I cut a piece of chopped, strand-mat to size, and placed it into the hatch, and wet it thoroughly with epoxy.

I used the funky-finned roller to roll out any air bubbles:

 

2z68jdv.jpg

 

 

Next, I cut a piece of 1/4" maple plywood for core. The maple is very hard, had no voids or knots. I thoroughly wetted it with epoxy, taking special care to seal the edges and any open areas. I placed the new core, onto the still wet, chopped mat:

 

70uxw4.jpg

 

I wetted another piece of chopped strand mat, and placed it onto the new core.

Then, I wetted the underside of the old skin with epoxy, and placed it back into it's original position on the underside of the hatch, completing the assembly:

 

4jp3li.jpg

 

As you saw in the first photo, I placed a bunch of water-filled jugs onto the entire assembly to keep everything pressed tight while the epoxy cured. I filled the cut around the perimeter of the skin with epoxy filled with colloidal silica filler.

 

The hatch set like solid granite by the afternoon. I installed it on the boat, and jumped up and down on it. It didn't deflect at all. Cosmetically, it looks fine because I didn't disturb the visible skin on top.

 

Epoxy is the shizzle. :)



#1050 Diarmuid

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 03:38 PM

Looks good, Ajax.  If that's all the wet core you have to deal with, I envy you.  Just finished peeling off the inner skins of the Ballad sidedecks last night. Foam rather than balsa, so we can keep most of it; but it's still gonna be an ugly repair job.  Also epoxied a 6 x 27 x 3/4" slab of phenolic under the foredeck cleat area.  That's the LAST time leaks will cause a problem up there.;) 

 

Epoxy is, indeed, the shizzle.  A purist would say you should scarf (or scarph, for the true pedant) and tape (tahyp) the seam, to tie the repair to the existing laminate.  I reckon epoxy is so good structurally, your fix is fine.  One thing to consider: what caused the wet core in the first place? Leaks around hinge or latch fasteners? A chip in the gelcoat? Cuz if that isn't addressed, your new plywood core may soon look like the old balsa one.

 

We're scratch-building cockpit hatches this week.  I'm giddy with excitement.:)

 

 

 


 



#1051 Ajax

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 08:21 PM

I thought about taping the seam, but as you said- Epoxy is tough enough to do the job on this low-stress piece of cockpit furniture.

 

Yes, the gelcoat had two cracks that let the water in. I used a Dremel to grind back the edges a bit, and filled them with epoxy thickened with the other filler powder in the first photo. It's made for easy sanding.



#1052 Tucky

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 01:29 PM

Was the skeleton next to the West System jars to remind you to be careful?

 

Nice job.



#1053 Ajax

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 03:44 PM

Lol...the skeleton was actually a figurehead for a dinghy, during a a cruise.

 

 

Was the skeleton next to the West System jars to remind you to be careful?

 

Nice job.



#1054 BayGal

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 07:59 PM

Looks like a job well done. 



#1055 Ajax

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:36 AM

I'm still at it...

 

A wonderful gift of a nice spinnaker, and a replacement compass. It's a Plastimo mini-contest. The old Aqua-Signal "Saturn" had a bubble, and was a sealed unit that you can't refill.

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#1056 Ajax

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:40 AM

Oh, Boomer helped me install the compass. That was a fun afternoon of fabrication.

 

I upgraded to some overkill, 3/4" anchor rode and installed "scope flags" in it.

I found a double-exit block for the spare jib halyard I'll be installing.

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#1057 Ajax

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:43 AM

LED's throughout the cabin, and for nav lights.

Some brass from Weems and Plath's "scratch 'n dent" sale at the boat show.

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#1058 Ajax

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:47 AM

A name for the old girl, at last.

 

Lemme tell you about this project. Boat show sale or not, I paid WAY too much for a vinyl sticker, and it did NOT release from the backing sheet the way it should have. It was nearly an hour long fight to get the backing sheet off without fucking it up.

 

Ridiculous.

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#1059 Ajax

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:53 AM

Made the dinghy street-legal.  Rowing is ok, but I at least wanted the option to legally use propulsion on it. I scored a 30lb. thrust, electric trolling motor that moves it quite nicely for dirt-cheap.2j6225v.jpg

 

It's an excellent taxi for getting to the various towns on the Chesapeake's Eastern Shore. I drop the house battery into the dinghy. I'm just not interested in yet another gasoline engine to maintain, especially with ethanol fuel problems.



#1060 stickboy

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 03:20 AM

What's your halyard situation? When I lead my halyards internally I ended up with 2 jib hals and the spin on the truck, the main hal and an extra sheave aft that I never used. That double exit plate might be nice for a topping lift if you want that internal.



#1061 memopad

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:09 PM

Looking good ajax, I like the vinyl name.  The double jib halyard is a good idea, not sure I'd ever need two but more is better right?  I'm bringing my mast in to a heated building this winter for some work.  Repainting, new sheaves, etc etc.  Good time to do some upgrades.

 

I STILL need to put a name on my boat, and remove the old one... only been 3 years no problem right?  Oh and now thanks to gate's thread I want to paint my boat stars and stripes blue as well.



#1062 Ajax

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:53 PM

What's your halyard situation? When I lead my halyards internally I ended up with 2 jib hals and the spin on the truck, the main hal and an extra sheave aft that I never used. That double exit plate might be nice for a topping lift if you want that internal.

 

Dude, that's brilliant. I'll need another double-exit or cut another single exit, but I'd love to have the topping lift at the mast so that I can release it as soon as the main is raised instead of all the running to and fro.

 

Great suggestion!



#1063 Ajax

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:56 PM

Memo,

 

Glad to see I wasn't the only guy dragging his feet on the name issue.

I envy your heated workshop. I'd love to run a masthead VHF antenna (even though hard core racers eschew weight aloft) ;)

 

With hank-on jibs, a spare halyard is key to a smooth, quick jib change and it's also essential to have a backup when I go coastal sailing.

Looking good ajax, I like the vinyl name.  The double jib halyard is a good idea, not sure I'd ever need two but more is better right?  I'm bringing my mast in to a heated building this winter for some work.  Repainting, new sheaves, etc etc.  Good time to do some upgrades.

 

I STILL need to put a name on my boat, and remove the old one... only been 3 years no problem right?  Oh and now thanks to gate's thread I want to paint my boat stars and stripes blue as well.



#1064 Py26129

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 02:18 PM

Made the dinghy street-legal.  Rowing is ok, but I at least wanted the option to legally use propulsion on it. I scored a 30lb. thrust, electric trolling motor that moves it quite nicely for dirt-cheap.2j6225v.jpg

 

It's an excellent taxi for getting to the various towns on the Chesapeake's Eastern Shore. I drop the house battery into the dinghy. I'm just not interested in yet another gasoline engine to maintain, especially with ethanol fuel problems.

 

Love the dinghy.  We have one just like it.  We got it from a friend  who picked it up at a auction for free because it had been given up as dead.  I built a fairly crude plywood floor for it and it has been serving us well for a few years now.   We run a little 3 hp merc on it and it moves along nicely.  The Avons seem to be much tougher that Zodiacs of the same vintage.  Our old zodiac needed to be reglued almost every season and eventually it decided that the flood was not worth hanging on to.



#1065 Elegua

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 02:40 PM

Really beginning to come together nicely. I like the bling. 



#1066 BayGal

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 02:52 PM

Looking good on name a boat without a name is a bit naked so great!



#1067 Ishmael

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 03:34 PM

One small note...for future reference, epoxy and most chopped strand mat are not a great combination. CSM is usually held together with a styrene-soluble binder, and since there is no styrene in epoxy, the binder does not dissolve into solution. It stays as part of the layup and the CSM does not wet out properly, resulting in a much weaker laminate than you would normally get with epoxy. In a low-load application like this, there is probably no great harm, but for greater strength, either regular glass cloth or fabmat (NEMPC, Knytex) would be better (or wet out the CSM using polyester resin, using epoxy for the rest of the assembly).

All that being said, I have used epoxy with heavy mat as a surfacing layer and it does fine, but I wouldn't use it as part of a structural laminate.



#1068 Ajax

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 04:22 PM

Ah thanks for the tip, Ish.



#1069 Hike, Bitches!

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 02:35 AM

I upgraded to some overkill, 3/4" anchor rode and installed "scope flags" in it.

 

Oversized anchor rode is NEVER overkill. The breaking strength to weight ratio is well worth the extra 5 lbs.



#1070 Ishmael

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:32 AM

3/4".

 

 

 

I use a length of 3/8" 3-strand to give me some stretch as a snubber on chain and I have no worries of it breaking in anything up to 45 knots.

 

 

 

3/4"

 

 

 

Ajax, you must anchor in some serious shit, because I have never thought of going anywhere over 1/2" to hold my boat in place and it displaces at least twice what yours does.

 

 

 

 

3/4"

 

 

 

 

 

Shakes head, walks away.



#1071 Ajax

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 12:19 PM

Ish-

 

The rode was a gift from a dockmate who didn't want it anymore. I paid $3.50 for a thimble to splice into the end, so it was free.

 

My current ground tackle is 30 feet of 3/8th chain and 150-ish feet of 1/2" 3-strand rode, with a Danforth S920 (14lb.) anchor.  I suppose the combined rode is ok, but the anchor is not adequate for all weather and bottom conditions for a 9,000lb boat.

 

In accordance with Estar's anchoring presentation, I'm setting about building ground tackle that is "adequate to hurricane force winds", yet "not too much work for normal days".  I have a huge rode locker below decks which will easily accomodate 200' of 3/4" rode plus the existing chain. Handling 3/4" rode will actually be easier on my hands when retrieving the anchor because I don't use a windlass.  I'm going to buy a 25lb. Manson Supreme to put on the end of this rode.  That'll be my "forever" ground tackle.

 

I'll keep the original tackle and swap them out for racing, but when I'm not racing, this is what I want.

 

If a hurricane comes up the wrong side of the Bay, the tidal surge could easily lift my boat 10 feet over my docks and deposit it on shore. I'd rather anchor the boat in my cove with this new tackle, and ease out the rode as the surge comes in.

As we observed with Hurricane Sandy, hauling out is not a guarantee of survival.



#1072 floating dutchman

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 12:44 PM

Ajax, on the LED lights, I've done the same on my own boat,  saves a ton of cash!  You can basicly double your battery capacity without the cost of an extra battery, or the charging issues.

On the anchor warp,  Yea, I know, I anchor in different places to you.

What I do is have 20 ft of chain on the anchor all the time, I have another 45 ft of chain that lives in a school bag with the ends marked, It comes out of the bilges if I plan an over night.

Keeps the weight out of the anchor well.

Yea, sure your 30 ft of chain and good warp will hold your boat well, but I've found with anchoring here that more chain makes it easer to anchor in close quarters with other boats,  and has the great by-product of making sleeping better.

 

FD



#1073 mrgnstrn

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 05:40 PM

Ish-

 

The rode was a gift from a dockmate who didn't want it anymore. I paid $3.50 for a thimble to splice into the end, so it was free.

 

My current ground tackle is 30 feet of 3/8th chain and 150-ish feet of 1/2" 3-strand rode, with a Danforth S920 (14lb.) anchor.  I suppose the combined rode is ok, but the anchor is not adequate for all weather and bottom conditions for a 9,000lb boat.

 

In accordance with Estar's anchoring presentation, I'm setting about building ground tackle that is "adequate to hurricane force winds", yet "not too much work for normal days".  I have a huge rode locker below decks which will easily accomodate 200' of 3/4" rode plus the existing chain. Handling 3/4" rode will actually be easier on my hands when retrieving the anchor because I don't use a windlass.  I'm going to buy a 25lb. Manson Supreme to put on the end of this rode.  That'll be my "forever" ground tackle.

 

I'll keep the original tackle and swap them out for racing, but when I'm not racing, this is what I want.

 

If a hurricane comes up the wrong side of the Bay, the tidal surge could easily lift my boat 10 feet over my docks and deposit it on shore. I'd rather anchor the boat in my cove with this new tackle, and ease out the rode as the surge comes in.

As we observed with Hurricane Sandy, hauling out is not a guarantee of survival.

 

Ajax, just a comment on your last paragraph.

 

While I recognize that you are fitting this boat out for "life" which may include being in the Carribean or other places in unfortunate times of the year....being hauled is by far the best place to be for the Chesapeake and frankly for many areas of the world.

 

BOAT US has done a fair bit of study into hurricane preps. based on their study, all of their insurance customers get a discount for hauling if there is a named storm coming their way. something like 50% of all haul out costs will be reimbursed by them. said another way "my insurance company will pay me back half my cost to haul out instead of stay in the water."

 

I lived thru 2 major storms with my boats. Isabel and Sandy.

 

For Isabel, my marina (the current one) had heavy damage over a small portion of their waterfront, and basically no damage along the majority of their waterfront. specifically Docs A, B &C were totally destroyed. but those boats that were sunk or damaged were damaged by the surge (and aftereffects there to), not specifically by the wind or the waves.  the surge either picked them up and dropped them on land, on a piling, or half-on-half-off a dock. then they sunk. or the surge rose and their dock lines had insufficient slack and they rolled and filled and sunk.

Keep in mind, this was before the rock seawalls existed.

 

For Sandy, we had the sea walls, and there were few waves, some surge, but being on land was again the best proposition.

 

 

For your cove, it seems very very protected..I'd just have lots of slack in the dock lines. I would not anchor out in your river, where it is much more exposed, even with your massive anchor rode. or better yet, haul out.

 

YMMV. M



#1074 Diarmuid

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 09:35 PM

I upgraded to some overkill, 3/4" anchor rode and installed "scope flags" in it.

 

Oversized anchor rode is NEVER overkill. The breaking strength to weight ratio is well worth the extra 5 lbs.

Generally good advice, tho there can be windlass compatibility issues if you have a windlass.  But the one real consideration with oversized mixed rode: 3/4" is much stronger than 1/2" with minimal weight penalty, but it also stretches far less at, say, 1200# dynamic loading.  In other words, it acts more like chain than nylon rope, dissipating far less kinetic energy.  Just be aware that upsizing your rode will place higher, potentially much higher, loads on your anchor & your deck hardware.   There's not much benefit to a rode that withstands a hurricane ... but rips out your foredeck cleats. :( Having max rode out, as you would in a storm, obviates the problem somewhat.



#1075 Ajax

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 09:40 PM

Dia-

 

No windlass here, and no intention of installing one on a 30 foot boat.

I hear what you're saying about the less stretch of the heavier rode and I did consider that. I will observe what happens when the new rode is put to use.

 

I might even sew tell-tales into the line to observe how much it stretches. We had them sewn into the docklines of submarines to let us know if they were overloading.



#1076 Ajax

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 09:41 PM

Dia-

 

No windlass here, and no intention of installing one on a 30 foot boat.

I hear what you're saying about the less stretch of the heavier rode and I did consider that. I will observe what happens when the new rode is put to use.

 

I might even sew tell-tales into the line to observe how much it stretches. We had them sewn into the docklines of submarines to let us know if they were overloading.



#1077 Diarmuid

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 10:39 PM

Cool idea about the submarines. :) Rope size was a topic for discussion in climbing circles. 11-12mm ropes could withstand lots of abuse and last for years, and their lab test performance sure made them look desirable.  But in high Fall Factor events (long lead falls or when not much rope was out) they would snap you in half.  Would almost certainly yank your gear out, and maybe the belay itself. Skinny ropes give a soft catch and help marginal protection keep you alive, at the expense of lower ultimate strength and shorter rope life.  Most of us ended up cragging on 9-10.2mm dynamic ropes as the best compromise -- best elastic energy dissipation, but good for 2-3 seasons. We used double 8mm in the mountains, where routes wander and protection can be atrocious. When you are 70' above a #2 RP, you want the softest catch possible. Falling on those things was like bungy jumping. Fat cords were for toproping, where elasticity doesn't matter.

 

ETA: hey, you still collecting 22mm winch handles?



#1078 Ajax

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 12:44 AM

Yeah I scored one handle at Bacon Sails a month ago.

#1079 Diarmuid

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 01:05 AM

Yeah I scored one handle at Bacon Sails a month ago.

If you want another, we won't be needing ours.  Square drive, fits the old Lewmar pattern, heavy metal bastard.  PM me an addy & it's yours.:)



#1080 The Advocate

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:09 PM

Looking great Ajax!



#1081 Ajax

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 01:35 PM

Thanks Advocate. I hope all is well in the land of Vegemite.

 

Ray-Ray has the deck and the conn!

 

I hadn't even seen my boat in two weeks. Considering that it's a 5 minute walk from my front door, this is simply inexcusable.

Temperatures were in the mid 50F's and the breeze was 10-15 kts from the south, so I thought it was time to take Ray-Ray for a test drive.

 

I performed the dockside pre-commisioning adjustments. The compass readout definitely seems off, and he is over active in maintaining course, so I still need to make some adjustments.  I haven't done the "drive in circles" calibration yet. I need to find a crab pot or something that I can make safe, consistent circles around, to calibrate the unit.

 

Ray-Ray is not tied to any wind instruments or chart plotter. The auto-tack function tacks through a wider angle than necessary, but that's ok.  I'm not sure how often I'm going to use that feature. The 2000 model is powerful and FAST. Turns and course corrections are very snappy compared to the old AH models I've owned in the past.

 

At last, I had a steady hand on the tiller so that I could raise sails safely. I also practiced reefing with the tiller pilot, which was an almost pleasant affair.

 

I'm looking forward to some spinnaker work eventually.

 

 

Attached Files

  • Attached File  Ray.jpg   50.02KB   11 downloads


#1082 Innocent Bystander

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 02:02 PM

Thanks Advocate. I hope all is well in the land of Vegemite.

 

Ray-Ray has the deck and the conn!

 

I hadn't even seen my boat in two weeks. Considering that it's a 5 minute walk from my front door, this is simply inexcusable.

Temperatures were in the mid 50F's and the breeze was 10-15 kts from the south, so I thought it was time to take Ray-Ray for a test drive.

 

I performed the dockside pre-commisioning adjustments. The compass readout definitely seems off, and he is over active in maintaining course, so I still need to make some adjustments.  I haven't done the "drive in circles" calibration yet. I need to find a crab pot or something that I can make safe, consistent circles around, to calibrate the unit.

 

Ray-Ray is not tied to any wind instruments or chart plotter. The auto-tack function tacks through a wider angle than necessary, but that's ok.  I'm not sure how often I'm going to use that feature. The 2000 model is powerful and FAST. Turns and course corrections are very snappy compared to the old AH models I've owned in the past.

 

At last, I had a steady hand on the tiller so that I could raise sails safely. I also practiced reefing with the tiller pilot, which was an almost pleasant affair.

 

I'm looking forward to some spinnaker work eventually.

Ajax,

 

Circling to calibrate the fluxgate doesn't need to be a perfect circle.  Just at a basically steady speed and turn rate.  Senstitvity can be dialed down with some of the basic adjustments.  Good idea to get a feel for them as you may need to adjust for conditions.  The more aggressive the AP is, the more power it consumes.  Finding a balance between AP gain and the boat's natural tendency can minimize rudder input while maintaining a good course on average.  The Autotack on the below decks models can be adjusted for the amount of turn.  Not sure about teh TPs.  



#1083 Ajax

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 02:25 PM

It doesn't appear that I can adjust the amount of turn on the TP's. You're right about the rest of it.



#1084 Diarmuid

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 03:37 PM

Ajax: IIRC, the ST models have a 'gain' setting that you can tweak to limit speed & amplitude of course corrections.  Also, the TP will settle down after half an hour or so: when you first turn it on, it's really hyperactive and tends to oversteer the boat.  But it learns as it goes, comparing its steering to the boat's course over time, and (usually) it will make fewer & smaller motions as the day advances. TPs are a bit twitchy tho, and the noise can get to you.  Wouldn't care to sail w/out one. :)

 

http://www.flickr.co...N06/6175671100/


 



#1085 toddster

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 05:30 PM

Have fun.  I have this love-hate thing going with the ST2000.  One problem I discovered this summer was that the cockpit plug loosens up and the internal pins can come loose.  If you look into the plug, there is a screw-in ring that holds the whole thing together with friction. ( It needs a pin wrench or a pair of curved needle-nose pliers or something) to tighten it up.

 

I also just installed the wireless remote from Madman Electronics (he shills on SA sometimes) pretty cool - can adjust course from the foredeck or just steer with my hands in my pockets.    If you don't have yours hooked up to a wind instrument though, that might be a better investment.  



#1086 Ajax

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 05:47 PM

Dia-  How did you like the Simrad? I waffled back and forth on which one to buy.

 

Todd- I've been advised to buy a remote, and I will. I hope the thing stays together, but at least I have decent access.



#1087 Diarmuid

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 09:38 PM

Simrad is okay.  That's the TP-10, which can't be synched to any electronics, but it is plenty strong for a 1400# boat.;) AFAIKT, there's nothing much to choose between the Simrads and the Raymarines.  Either will do the job, right up until they break & you find out the company doesn't service that model anymore.

 

Steers a much better course than I do, esp under spinnaker. The Simrad came w/out a cord cap, so we added a twist-lock 12V plug to it. Which works great, but like all the others, the rubber plugs on the sockets all pop open due to thermal cycling, & then the damned contacts rust. To store the TP, I screwed a section of 3 or 4" schedule 20 PVC inside the lazarette.  The unit holsters right in down to the fat end, which flexes the pipe & creates a nice pressure fit, keeps it from bouncing out in chop.

 

30' is kind of an awkward size for arranging autopilots.  Do you go with one of the fancier core-pak, below-deck rams, or do you accept the lesser performance & durability of a tillerpilot? It's a fifteen hundred dollar question. We haven't figured it out yet.



#1088 stickboy

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 04:22 AM

I can't remember the doing circles part but I know I never bothered to calibrate the compass so that it was correct, I never cared what the display read, I just got the boat going in the direction I wanted and hit go. If you tie it into GPS or something you need it right but otherwise it doesn't matter.

#1089 Ajax

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 05:19 PM

I experienced an issue on another boat this weekend, that showed how important a manual bilge pump is.

Shoes has no manual bilge pump at all, save a 5 gallon bucket.

 

I have corrected this deficiency by ordering this pump and will install it ASAP:

Attached Files



#1090 Tucky

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 05:41 PM

Smart move- I once tried to flush about 10,000 gallons of water out of my family's Hinckley Pilot using the head pump (the water was above the bowl) when she tried to sink on her mooring one beautiful day. Went out and got a powerful proper pump like yours right after the experience.



#1091 mrgnstrn

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 05:50 PM

I experienced an issue on another boat this weekend, that showed how important a manual bilge pump is.

Shoes has no manual bilge pump at all, save a 5 gallon bucket.

 

I have corrected this deficiency by ordering this pump and will install it ASAP:

 

 

oooh..do tell!

clearly, don't name names.

 

and it wasn't my boat...was it?

-M



#1092 Ajax

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 06:23 PM

LOL...I'm not naming and shaming. It was a minor issue, easily dealt with but it did illuminate a flaw on my boat that should be immediately corrected.

 

Hm... BtS did seem to be riding a bit low, last I looked...



#1093 memopad

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 08:24 PM

I have a manual pump in a cockpit locker with a Y-valve going to the engine bilge and keel bilge. The handle of the y-selector falls out, can't figure out how to secure it in place lol. I've never tried using the pump as my bilge is about an inch deep and have never had enough water in there to cover the suction hose. No electric pump either.



#1094 mrgnstrn

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 09:12 PM

LOL...I'm not naming and shaming. It was a minor issue, easily dealt with but it did illuminate a flaw on my boat that should be immediately corrected.

 

Hm... BtS did seem to be riding a bit low, last I looked...

hmmm, she was dry as a bone yesterday when I visited.

 

I'll look again. maybe we have a weight distribution problem.

 

-M



#1095 Ajax

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 01:44 AM

The rhum might be missing. Did you check to see if it was still there?



#1096 The Advocate

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 10:46 PM

They do say the best bilge pump is a terified person with a bucket Ajax!

 

All is good here mate, cheers.