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#101 SimonN

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 09:16 PM

Another afternoon of DNA sailing in predominately 10-16 knots of a puffy offshore northerly following a cold front on Lake Pontchartrain. Notable moments included a "liftoff". I was sailing downwind in about 12-13 knots of breeze with the boatspeed in the 14-16 knot range. Sailed into a pressure band and the breeze built to 16-18 knots. With both daggerboards fully down and the boatspeed climbing past 17 knots, things got sketchy as the boat started to sail on her foils (I was probably sailing a touch hotter than normal). I eased the mainsheet and dropped her back down. I'd guess at around 15 knots, you need to have some board pulled up (I've been sailing with the boards setup with around 1.5 degrees of AOA).

I don't know anybody who sails downwind with both boards down, unless they don't have the chance to lift the windward board. It is slow. In the same way, with only 1 board down, I have never seen anybody pull a bit of leeward board up in that amount of wind. I would suggest that you need to be moving your body weight in order to maintain the correct attitude of the boat. The problem you get is that as the boat rises up, the AOA increases and you get more lift, which causes the AOA to increase which........you get the picture! This is why I now firmly believe that the exact setting of the AOA isn't important, because you can make bigger changes with body movement and therefore static settings mean little.

It might also be helpful if you were to say where your slider is positioned, rather than talk AOA (or maybe both). Over here, everybody discusse it in this way - is the slider as far back as it goes (about 1/3rd of guys) or about 10mm forward of that (most common) to middle (a few). I don't know anybody further forward than that. Now, it is posisble that there are differences between DNA's but nobody I know takes that into account!

#102 AClass USA 230

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 10:35 PM


Another afternoon of DNA sailing in predominately 10-16 knots of a puffy offshore northerly following a cold front on Lake Pontchartrain. Notable moments included a "liftoff". I was sailing downwind in about 12-13 knots of breeze with the boatspeed in the 14-16 knot range. Sailed into a pressure band and the breeze built to 16-18 knots. With both daggerboards fully down and the boatspeed climbing past 17 knots, things got sketchy as the boat started to sail on her foils (I was probably sailing a touch hotter than normal). I eased the mainsheet and dropped her back down. I'd guess at around 15 knots, you need to have some board pulled up (I've been sailing with the boards setup with around 1.5 degrees of AOA).

I don't know anybody who sails downwind with both boards down, unless they don't have the chance to lift the windward board. It is slow. In the same way, with only 1 board down, I have never seen anybody pull a bit of leeward board up in that amount of wind. I would suggest that you need to be moving your body weight in order to maintain the correct attitude of the boat. The problem you get is that as the boat rises up, the AOA increases and you get more lift, which causes the AOA to increase which........you get the picture! This is why I now firmly believe that the exact setting of the AOA isn't important, because you can make bigger changes with body movement and therefore static settings mean little.

It might also be helpful if you were to say where your slider is positioned, rather than talk AOA (or maybe both). Over here, everybody discusse it in this way - is the slider as far back as it goes (about 1/3rd of guys) or about 10mm forward of that (most common) to middle (a few). I don't know anybody further forward than that. Now, it is posisble that there are differences between DNA's but nobody I know takes that into account!


Regarding weather board up in hull flying conditions downwind, I certainly agree that makes sense but there are plenty of photos from the Australian Nationals showing several top sailors ripping downwind with both blades down. The reality may be in a race, it's good to do but I believe the difference may not be as much as you imply above. I have "calibrated" my daggerboard sliders and there is about 16 mm of adjustment from 0 AOA to 2 degrees AOA. For now, I'm pretty much in the middle of that range and I'll probably leave it there. I agree with you that weight positioning is the way to manage the proper pitch trim of the boat and that comes with time on the water and getting more familiar with the boat.

#103 SimonN

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 11:40 PM

there are plenty of photos from the Australian Nationals showing several top sailors ripping downwind with both blades down. The reality may be in a race, it's good to do but I believe the difference may not be as much as you imply above.

You need to be very careful relying on just photos. To start with, most of them are taken from a single position near the top mark. I can absolutely assure you that all the top guys will raise the board as soon as they can. Of course, you have to make sure that raising the board isn't done at the expense of speed, which is why it is often best to wait until the first gybe. As for whether it makes as much difference as I imply, I will let you find out yourself. Simply put, I used to have your view until I weent testing and with 2 boards down I cannot stay with Steve Brewin, Bundy or Jack Benson. With one up, it is a very different story.

#104 cbrown

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 12:50 AM

So you sail with the windward board up and switch during the jibe? What happens when you are on the wire? Are the boards left down?

Thanks

#105 SimonN

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:25 AM

So you sail with the windward board up and switch during the jibe? What happens when you are on the wire? Are the boards left down?

Thanks

I would absolutely recommend sailing with the windward one up and switching on the gybe. That also applies if trapezing downwind. If you look at the photos on the AUS class site, you will see that most are taken between the windward mark and the spreader. In fact, I think there are only a couple taken some way down the course. Note that Steve Brewin even found time to pull his windward on up for the reach to the spreader mark. I suspect he must have tacked on or close to the windward mark.

My gybe sequence, assuming I am sat in, goes like this. First, lean on the lifted windward board to push it and the hull down while at the same time, starting the turn. As i cross over, I get the extension back in the hand it was in before the gybe and facing the new windward hull, I simply grab the board handle and pull. As the board isn't loaded, it should come up OK. The problem is if you leave it too long and you get a bit of load on it. I believe that the ideal amount to lift is so that there is some board left hanging out to block the slot but as little as possible. You really don't want any windward board in the water as surface piercing foils add to drag. I think in conditions which are too full on to go wild, you can keep both boards down without the same losses, but I still try to raise the board if I can.

#106 AClass USA 230

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 04:08 AM


there are plenty of photos from the Australian Nationals showing several top sailors ripping downwind with both blades down. The reality may be in a race, it's good to do but I believe the difference may not be as much as you imply above.

You need to be very careful relying on just photos. To start with, most of them are taken from a single position near the top mark. I can absolutely assure you that all the top guys will raise the board as soon as they can. Of course, you have to make sure that raising the board isn't done at the expense of speed, which is why it is often best to wait until the first gybe. As for whether it makes as much difference as I imply, I will let you find out yourself. Simply put, I used to have your view until I weent testing and with 2 boards down I cannot stay with Steve Brewin, Bundy or Jack Benson. With one up, it is a very different story.


Certainly makes sense, will give it a go.

#107 furling

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 08:57 AM

curved foils can be hard to lift once you are on the wire as the top of the board curves in over the tramp, a good trick if you are hull up on the wire and your board has slid back down or you didn't get time to attend to it is just squat in and push it up from under the bottom

#108 tiger11

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 08:06 PM

curved foils can be hard to lift once you are on the wire as the top of the board curves in over the tramp, a good trick if you are hull up on the wire and your board has slid back down or you didn't get time to attend to it is just squat in and push it up from under the bottom


Like to see a video of you doing that mate ___________ you must be kidding !<_<

#109 sosoomii

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 01:29 AM

One of Britain's (and the world's) best sailors buys an A Class, and not a peep on Anarchy?! It's not even a DNA...

#110 TracyO

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 02:39 AM

I hope the report of his first impression after sailing the A is posted. If history or experience are any indication it will be a tale of addiction at first sail!

#111 Foghorn77

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 03:38 AM

One of Britain's (and the world's) best sailors buys an A Class, and not a peep on Anarchy?! It's not even a DNA...


I guess you could of "broke"the story if you didn't try to be so mysterious.

#112 sosoomii

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 07:17 AM

I take no credit for breaking the story. Here's a link to the first I read of Giles Scott (Finn champ) getting a Bimare.

Giles Scott gets an A

#113 eric e

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 09:52 AM

it reads as if it's his first? multi

and for training himself up for the ac45

presumably placing in the next world championships

isn't too high on his list of concerns at the moment

#114 WetnWild

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 10:32 AM

Steep learning curve. The number 2 Finn sailor in the world came 47th in the AUS A Class nationals in January.

#115 demon936

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 10:41 AM

Im sorry simon but i never see anyone lifting the windward board

curved foils can be hard to lift once you are on the wire as the top of the board curves in over the tramp, a good trick if you are hull up on the wire and your board has slid back down or you didn't get time to attend to it is just squat in and push it up from under the bottom



No f$&@?! Way

#116 TracyO

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 02:17 AM

Im sorry simon but i never see anyone lifting the windward board


curved foils can be hard to lift once you are on the wire as the top of the board curves in over the tramp, a good trick if you are hull up on the wire and your board has slid back down or you didn't get time to attend to it is just squat in and push it up from under the bottom



No f{:content:}amp;@?! Way


I'm glad someone else thought that was freaking nuts! Clearing weeds with your foot with straights boards was enough of an acrobatic feat. With curved boards, while wire running in a breeze, it would be short lived insanity!

#117 furling

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 05:21 AM

Sorry I did forget to mention that the curved foils on my scheurer are set to the outer edge of the hulls, and not in the centre of the hulls making them much easier to reach. Posted Image

#118 SimonN

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 05:48 AM

I was talking to Stevie Brewin on Saturday night about the issue of having the windward board up and he says he raises it from the wire as he rounds the windward mark so it is up going to the spreader mark. It's not as simple as it seems because you need to have it easy to lift but not so loose that it falls back down. Stevie changed boards recently and has struggled to get this right with the new boards.

#119 Nobody knows I am here

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 07:05 AM

Im sorry simon but i never see anyone lifting the windward board


curved foils can be hard to lift once you are on the wire as the top of the board curves in over the tramp, a good trick if you are hull up on the wire and your board has slid back down or you didn't get time to attend to it is just squat in and push it up from under the bottom



No f{:content:}amp;@?! Way

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#120 HollaStern

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 07:52 AM

^ That is amazing, You A-cat guys are crazy.
I want in. . .

#121 SC65

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 12:19 PM

From the photos, it looks like Mike's boat is painted black mat rather than polished glossy?
Anyone knows more about the reasoning behind? It looks cool [and 'hot'] but I was under the impression that all theories of rougher skins etc. failed when applied to boats and the most smooth surface is still the one with the least friction?

https://picasaweb.go...179352337171762

Any word on how his (Drummond) J-boards were?



#122 NZL255

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 07:13 PM

Mike's boat is painted with Durapox and is made by Resene Paints here in New Zealand. Most of the past and present Americas Cup and Volvo yachts are painted in it. The theory behind it - it is easy to touch up places that have been damaged (key it up with sandpaper, apply paint, wet n dry sandpaper, buff if required) the products drys virtually over night, less time in the shed and more time out on the water, the finish is very smooth. You can also add gloss to the final coat to make it shiny, but it does add weight. Their primary colours are white, gray and black but they can tinter to any colour at your request. I will post up Resene's link.

Mike has just bought a Extreme 40 and is spending his spare time blasting around the harbour.

#123 NZL255

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 07:21 PM

http://www.resene.co...lder/index.html

#124 AClass USA 230

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 11:45 PM

This past weekend the Ronstan A-Class Midwinters were sailed out of Davis Island Yacht Club with 28 boats registered to race and 24 actually making it to the starting line. In the fleet were four DNA's. Ben Moon and Bruce Mahoney were sailing their DNA's in their second event after last month's Islamorada Coconut Grove Sails Classic/Interglactic and myself and Chris Brown were racing our new DNA's for the first time. All four of us were using the Glaser Den Ben sail design which Ben did so well with at last summers WC in Aarhus. Ben and Bruce were sailing with new Fiberfoam masts and Chris and I were using the latest Hall masts. Both of these masts appear to be very similar when tested using the Landenberger bend test. Ben Hall made some changes after the WC and we are confident he is on par bend wise with the latest Saarberg and Fiberfoam masts.

Ben Moon had a freak accident disaster on the day before racing. He had come in from sailing and the breeze was a gusty 15-18 knots. As he was trying to get his boat staged to his beach dolly, a gust caught it and tipped it over to the beach which was on a rise. Ben's new mast broke when it hit the sand and he was forced to switch back to his rig that he used last year which was a Fiberfoam Medium and a Glaser Lars1. Good news is the break was relatively clean on the mast and it can be repaired fairly easily.

Racing for Day 1 was cancelled. The breeze hovered at 19-23 knots all day and the onshore wind against a lee shore sea wall in shallow water created conditions that were not safe for racing. On Day 2, we got in five races in conditions that followed a cold front. The wind was a gusty 8-14 knots with 30-40 degree oscillations. You had to sail with your head very out of the boat. At the end of the day, Ben and Bruce had won all five races with Ben leading Bruce by 2 points. I trailed in a relatively distant 3rd. I was a slight bit off Ben's and Bruce's pace upwind and downwind but in general was pretty happy with the performance of the boat and the rig given this was the first time I had sailed it around other A-Cats. Even though I was in third overall, I was only one point ahead of a 3 way tie for fourth between Jeff Linton, Woody Cope, and Tracy Oliver so it was going to be a fun battle on the last day of racing.

For the third and final day of racing, the breeze was from the NE at 15-20 knots with a short chop. Ben won the first race and Bruce won the 2nd race with Ben winning the overall by 2 points over Bruce. I had a pretty good day with two thirds and felt like I was much more competitive against Ben and Bruce staying in much better contact with them in each race as I got a better feel for the boat and rig. Woody Cope finished with two 4th's for the day to take 4th overall and Jeff Linton finished 5th overall. Tracy Oliver had an unfortunate capsize before the first race that broke his mast. Chris Brown finished both races but on the way in to the beach, the rivets on his spreader bracket failed and his new mast broke above the diamonds, bummer! He did finish 7th overall and he was very pleased with the performance of his new DNA.

So obviously I feel like the boat is living up to its reputation. I did carry a Speed Puck on the boat for all of the races and after downloading the GPS tracks for each race, what is interesting to me is that I don't believe the DNA (and the new rig) is any faster upwind than I was last year with my ASG3 modified with the Fiberfoam Medium and Lars1. Downwind, what I see is the boat has a very forgiving "groove" that makes it easier to sail fast with good depth for very good VMG. While the boatspeed looks very close between the two boats, the jibing angles with the DNA seem to be consistently better than with the ASG3. Is this the rig or the boat? Certainly it is probably a combination so it could be interesting to put the new rig on the ASG3 and see how it goes which I hope to do very soon. The DNA and other boats with similar volume distribution feel easier to get downwind in chop in heavy air.

One last note. Ben Moon was quite quick on the DNA with a standard Fiberfoam Medium and Lars1, quick enough to win the event. Both Ben and Bruce are excellent sailors and you would think the newer rig on Bruce's boat would have had an edge. In races 1 and 2, the breeze was up a bit and the water was pretty flat so I don't think Ben was at any disadvantage. In races 3, 4, and 5, there were more holes and Ben felt that Bruce had the better speed downwind. On the last day, the flatter Lars1 might have been a bit better upwind and downwind. Upwind, I was pleased that I was able to flatten the Den Ben to the point where I felt I was very close to Ben and Bruce upwind. Downwind I felt like I was very close to Bruce in speed and angle but Ben always seemed a bit quicker so the flatter, less powerful Lars1 might have been a bit better downhill in the big breeze and chop.

Fun stuff, stay tuned for more feedback.

#125 sailingkid

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 04:21 AM

Steep learning curve. The number 2 Finn sailor in the world came 47th in the AUS A Class nationals in January.

Is that overall? Or just in one race because I thought I came 48th or so (can't find the results) Who was it?

#126 A-man

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 04:36 AM

This past weekend the Ronstan A-Class Midwinters were sailed out of Davis Island Yacht Club with 28 boats registered to race and 24 actually making it to the starting line. In the fleet were four DNA's. Ben Moon and Bruce Mahoney were sailing their DNA's in their second event after last month's Islamorada Coconut Grove Sails Classic/Interglactic and myself and Chris Brown were racing our new DNA's for the first time. All four of us were using the Glaser Den Ben sail design which Ben did so well with at last summers WC in Aarhus. Ben and Bruce were sailing with new Fiberfoam masts and Chris and I were using the latest Hall masts. Both of these masts appear to be very similar when tested using the Landenberger bend test. Ben Hall made some changes after the WC and we are confident he is on par bend wise with the latest Saarberg and Fiberfoam masts.

Ben Moon had a freak accident disaster on the day before racing. He had come in from sailing and the breeze was a gusty 15-18 knots. As he was trying to get his boat staged to his beach dolly, a gust caught it and tipped it over to the beach which was on a rise. Ben's new mast broke when it hit the sand and he was forced to switch back to his rig that he used last year which was a Fiberfoam Medium and a Glaser Lars1. Good news is the break was relatively clean on the mast and it can be repaired fairly easily.

Racing for Day 1 was cancelled. The breeze hovered at 19-23 knots all day and the onshore wind against a lee shore sea wall in shallow water created conditions that were not safe for racing. On Day 2, we got in five races in conditions that followed a cold front. The wind was a gusty 8-14 knots with 30-40 degree oscillations. You had to sail with your head very out of the boat. At the end of the day, Ben and Bruce had won all five races with Ben leading Bruce by 2 points. I trailed in a relatively distant 3rd. I was a slight bit off Ben's and Bruce's pace upwind and downwind but in general was pretty happy with the performance of the boat and the rig given this was the first time I had sailed it around other A-Cats. Even though I was in third overall, I was only one point ahead of a 3 way tie for fourth between Jeff Linton, Woody Cope, and Tracy Oliver so it was going to be a fun battle on the last day of racing.

For the third and final day of racing, the breeze was from the NE at 15-20 knots with a short chop. Ben won the first race and Bruce won the 2nd race with Ben winning the overall by 2 points over Bruce. I had a pretty good day with two thirds and felt like I was much more competitive against Ben and Bruce staying in much better contact with them in each race as I got a better feel for the boat and rig. Woody Cope finished with two 4th's for the day to take 4th overall and Jeff Linton finished 5th overall. Tracy Oliver had an unfortunate capsize before the first race that broke his mast. Chris Brown finished both races but on the way in to the beach, the rivets on his spreader bracket failed and his new mast broke above the diamonds, bummer! He did finish 7th overall and he was very pleased with the performance of his new DNA.

So obviously I feel like the boat is living up to its reputation. I did carry a Speed Puck on the boat for all of the races and after downloading the GPS tracks for each race, what is interesting to me is that I don't believe the DNA (and the new rig) is any faster upwind than I was last year with my ASG3 modified with the Fiberfoam Medium and Lars1. Downwind, what I see is the boat has a very forgiving "groove" that makes it easier to sail fast with good depth for very good VMG. While the boatspeed looks very close between the two boats, the jibing angles with the DNA seem to be consistently better than with the ASG3. Is this the rig or the boat? Certainly it is probably a combination so it could be interesting to put the new rig on the ASG3 and see how it goes which I hope to do very soon. The DNA and other boats with similar volume distribution feel easier to get downwind in chop in heavy air.

One last note. Ben Moon was quite quick on the DNA with a standard Fiberfoam Medium and Lars1, quick enough to win the event. Both Ben and Bruce are excellent sailors and you would think the newer rig on Bruce's boat would have had an edge. In races 1 and 2, the breeze was up a bit and the water was pretty flat so I don't think Ben was at any disadvantage. In races 3, 4, and 5, there were more holes and Ben felt that Bruce had the better speed downwind. On the last day, the flatter Lars1 might have been a bit better upwind and downwind. Upwind, I was pleased that I was able to flatten the Den Ben to the point where I felt I was very close to Ben and Bruce upwind. Downwind I felt like I was very close to Bruce in speed and angle but Ben always seemed a bit quicker so the flatter, less powerful Lars1 might have been a bit better downhill in the big breeze and chop.

Fun stuff, stay tuned for more feedback.


Bob, any take on the effectiveness of downwind trapping during the regatta? Were people making it work or not and in what conditions.

Bummer about those masts.

A-man

#127 TornadoSail2016

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 04:36 AM

This past weekend the Ronstan A-Class Midwinters were sailed out of Davis Island Yacht Club with 28 boats registered to race and 24 actually making it to the starting line. In the fleet were four DNA's. Ben Moon and Bruce Mahoney were sailing their DNA's in their second event after last month's Islamorada Coconut Grove Sails Classic/Interglactic and myself and Chris Brown were racing our new DNA's for the first time. All four of us were using the Glaser Den Ben sail design which Ben did so well with at last summers WC in Aarhus. Ben and Bruce were sailing with new Fiberfoam masts and Chris and I were using the latest Hall masts. Both of these masts appear to be very similar when tested using the Landenberger bend test. Ben Hall made some changes after the WC and we are confident he is on par bend wise with the latest Saarberg and Fiberfoam masts.

Ben Moon had a freak accident disaster on the day before racing. He had come in from sailing and the breeze was a gusty 15-18 knots. As he was trying to get his boat staged to his beach dolly, a gust caught it and tipped it over to the beach which was on a rise. Ben's new mast broke when it hit the sand and he was forced to switch back to his rig that he used last year which was a Fiberfoam Medium and a Glaser Lars1. Good news is the break was relatively clean on the mast and it can be repaired fairly easily.

Racing for Day 1 was cancelled. The breeze hovered at 19-23 knots all day and the onshore wind against a lee shore sea wall in shallow water created conditions that were not safe for racing. On Day 2, we got in five races in conditions that followed a cold front. The wind was a gusty 8-14 knots with 30-40 degree oscillations. You had to sail with your head very out of the boat. At the end of the day, Ben and Bruce had won all five races with Ben leading Bruce by 2 points. I trailed in a relatively distant 3rd. I was a slight bit off Ben's and Bruce's pace upwind and downwind but in general was pretty happy with the performance of the boat and the rig given this was the first time I had sailed it around other A-Cats. Even though I was in third overall, I was only one point ahead of a 3 way tie for fourth between Jeff Linton, Woody Cope, and Tracy Oliver so it was going to be a fun battle on the last day of racing.

For the third and final day of racing, the breeze was from the NE at 15-20 knots with a short chop. Ben won the first race and Bruce won the 2nd race with Ben winning the overall by 2 points over Bruce. I had a pretty good day with two thirds and felt like I was much more competitive against Ben and Bruce staying in much better contact with them in each race as I got a better feel for the boat and rig. Woody Cope finished with two 4th's for the day to take 4th overall and Jeff Linton finished 5th overall. Tracy Oliver had an unfortunate capsize before the first race that broke his mast. Chris Brown finished both races but on the way in to the beach, the rivets on his spreader bracket failed and his new mast broke above the diamonds, bummer! He did finish 7th overall and he was very pleased with the performance of his new DNA.

So obviously I feel like the boat is living up to its reputation. I did carry a Speed Puck on the boat for all of the races and after downloading the GPS tracks for each race, what is interesting to me is that I don't believe the DNA (and the new rig) is any faster upwind than I was last year with my ASG3 modified with the Fiberfoam Medium and Lars1. Downwind, what I see is the boat has a very forgiving "groove" that makes it easier to sail fast with good depth for very good VMG. While the boatspeed looks very close between the two boats, the jibing angles with the DNA seem to be consistently better than with the ASG3. Is this the rig or the boat? Certainly it is probably a combination so it could be interesting to put the new rig on the ASG3 and see how it goes which I hope to do very soon. The DNA and other boats with similar volume distribution feel easier to get downwind in chop in heavy air.

One last note. Ben Moon was quite quick on the DNA with a standard Fiberfoam Medium and Lars1, quick enough to win the event. Both Ben and Bruce are excellent sailors and you would think the newer rig on Bruce's boat would have had an edge. In races 1 and 2, the breeze was up a bit and the water was pretty flat so I don't think Ben was at any disadvantage. In races 3, 4, and 5, there were more holes and Ben felt that Bruce had the better speed downwind. On the last day, the flatter Lars1 might have been a bit better upwind and downwind. Upwind, I was pleased that I was able to flatten the Den Ben to the point where I felt I was very close to Ben and Bruce upwind. Downwind I felt like I was very close to Bruce in speed and angle but Ben always seemed a bit quicker so the flatter, less powerful Lars1 might have been a bit better downhill in the big breeze and chop.

Fun stuff, stay tuned for more feedback.


Bob,

How do you feel the comparison is between the new Hall mast and the current Fiberfoam and Saarberg masts and your thoughts concerning Jay and Pease's new Glaser DenBen sail compared to those you competed against at the Worlds in Aarhus? I hope that they prove to be as competitive and that you and all the others will do well at the Worlds in Islamorada this Fall. Hope you have fun testing these new combinations, love your new DNA and do great at the Worlds. Thanks, Tom

#128 WetnWild

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 06:15 AM


Steep learning curve. The number 2 Finn sailor in the world came 47th in the AUS A Class nationals in January.

Is that overall? Or just in one race because I thought I came 48th or so (can't find the results) Who was it?


There's a link on the AUS website but it's buried deep.................

Here it is - http://www.yachting....s2012/SGrp2.htm

#129 sailingkid

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 07:21 AM

Wow thats that guy that I had those epic battles over the pin with in a couple of races. No wonder he was good at that haha :lol:

#130 Bang Zoom

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:38 AM

usa 230, thanks for the report, sorry I missed the regatta.



#131 AClass USA 230

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 01:04 PM

Bob, any take on the effectiveness of downwind trapping during the regatta? Were people making it work or not and in what conditions.

Bummer about those masts.

A-man


I was on the KISS rule this weekend (keep it simple stupid) so I stayed on the tramp downwind even though I have done some trapezing downwind with the boat in my trial sessions before the event. I think on Saturday, there were too many holes downwind to do it even though Bruce did it for a short time in one race. On Sunday, the chop was bit too steep and short to try it.

BIG CORRECTION - Woody Cope won the 5th race on Saturday. Woody is sailing the new O.H. Rodgers A-Class design, the "O". The boat looks similar to the DNA but the max volume is a bit further aft. I think this design is pretty competitive to the DNA and will get better. O.H. already has plans for a tweak to the molds.

#132 AClass USA 230

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 01:08 PM

Bob,

How do you feel the comparison is between the new Hall mast and the current Fiberfoam and Saarberg masts and your thoughts concerning Jay and Pease's new Glaser DenBen sail compared to those you competed against at the Worlds in Aarhus? I hope that they prove to be as competitive and that you and all the others will do well at the Worlds in Islamorada this Fall. Hope you have fun testing these new combinations, love your new DNA and do great at the Worlds. Thanks, Tom


Based on numbers Ben Hall has provided to me on the latest Fiberfoams, the Hall mast is very similar fore and aft and I believe about 10 mm stiffer side to side doing the 20 kg weight test. Ben had some Landenberger mast bend test numbers for the new Fiberfoams and the new Halls have very similar profiles. The fit to the Den Ben looked good from my eye and the performance against Ben Moon and Bruce Mahoney seemed to verify that.

#133 SimonN

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 09:49 PM


Bob,

How do you feel the comparison is between the new Hall mast and the current Fiberfoam and Saarberg masts and your thoughts concerning Jay and Pease's new Glaser DenBen sail compared to those you competed against at the Worlds in Aarhus? I hope that they prove to be as competitive and that you and all the others will do well at the Worlds in Islamorada this Fall. Hope you have fun testing these new combinations, love your new DNA and do great at the Worlds. Thanks, Tom


Based on numbers Ben Hall has provided to me on the latest Fiberfoams, the Hall mast is very similar fore and aft and I believe about 10 mm stiffer side to side doing the 20 kg weight test. Ben had some Landenberger mast bend test numbers for the new Fiberfoams and the new Halls have very similar profiles. The fit to the Den Ben looked good from my eye and the performance against Ben Moon and Bruce Mahoney seemed to verify that.

Bob
I am a bit confused by your measurements. The standard bend tests I understand. It is what we do over here to compare masts. However, nobody here uses the "Landy" mast bend numbers to compare masts and I am not sure what one really learns from that test. I understand why Landy and other sailmakers use it. Generally it is used to calculate static bend on the mast which is comapred with a base figure so that the sailmaker can cut the luff curve accordingly. However, even that needs to be adjusted depending on the dinamic bend properties of the mast. 2 masts that show the same bend for a given diamond setting can behave very differently when a sail is up and you start applying sailing forces.

Or am I missing something?

BTW, I think the stiffer sideways can be good particularly if you weigh more than, say, 78kgs. Thanks for your reports. Interesting as usual.

#134 TornadoSail2016

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 02:13 AM

BTW, I think the stiffer sideways can be good particularly if you weigh more than, say, 78kgs. Thanks for your reports. Interesting as usual.

I thought that this was part of the new mast theory, that it would be stiffer side to side and softer fore and aft. Thanks, TTS

#135 Ludicrous Speed

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 04:48 AM

Is it just me, or is that alot of broken 5k masts for one weekend in Florida. ;-)

This past weekend the Ronstan A-Class Midwinters were sailed out of Davis Island Yacht Club with 28 boats registered to race and 24 actually making it to the starting line. In the fleet were four DNA's. Ben Moon and Bruce Mahoney were sailing their DNA's in their second event after last month's Islamorada Coconut Grove Sails Classic/Interglactic and myself and Chris Brown were racing our new DNA's for the first time. All four of us were using the Glaser Den Ben sail design which Ben did so well with at last summers WC in Aarhus. Ben and Bruce were sailing with new Fiberfoam masts and Chris and I were using the latest Hall masts. Both of these masts appear to be very similar when tested using the Landenberger bend test. Ben Hall made some changes after the WC and we are confident he is on par bend wise with the latest Saarberg and Fiberfoam masts.

Ben Moon had a freak accident disaster on the day before racing. He had come in from sailing and the breeze was a gusty 15-18 knots. As he was trying to get his boat staged to his beach dolly, a gust caught it and tipped it over to the beach which was on a rise. Ben's new mast broke when it hit the sand and he was forced to switch back to his rig that he used last year which was a Fiberfoam Medium and a Glaser Lars1. Good news is the break was relatively clean on the mast and it can be repaired fairly easily.

Racing for Day 1 was cancelled. The breeze hovered at 19-23 knots all day and the onshore wind against a lee shore sea wall in shallow water created conditions that were not safe for racing. On Day 2, we got in five races in conditions that followed a cold front. The wind was a gusty 8-14 knots with 30-40 degree oscillations. You had to sail with your head very out of the boat. At the end of the day, Ben and Bruce had won all five races with Ben leading Bruce by 2 points. I trailed in a relatively distant 3rd. I was a slight bit off Ben's and Bruce's pace upwind and downwind but in general was pretty happy with the performance of the boat and the rig given this was the first time I had sailed it around other A-Cats. Even though I was in third overall, I was only one point ahead of a 3 way tie for fourth between Jeff Linton, Woody Cope, and Tracy Oliver so it was going to be a fun battle on the last day of racing.

For the third and final day of racing, the breeze was from the NE at 15-20 knots with a short chop. Ben won the first race and Bruce won the 2nd race with Ben winning the overall by 2 points over Bruce. I had a pretty good day with two thirds and felt like I was much more competitive against Ben and Bruce staying in much better contact with them in each race as I got a better feel for the boat and rig. Woody Cope finished with two 4th's for the day to take 4th overall and Jeff Linton finished 5th overall. Tracy Oliver had an unfortunate capsize before the first race that broke his mast. Chris Brown finished both races but on the way in to the beach, the rivets on his spreader bracket failed and his new mast broke above the diamonds, bummer! He did finish 7th overall and he was very pleased with the performance of his new DNA.

So obviously I feel like the boat is living up to its reputation. I did carry a Speed Puck on the boat for all of the races and after downloading the GPS tracks for each race, what is interesting to me is that I don't believe the DNA (and the new rig) is any faster upwind than I was last year with my ASG3 modified with the Fiberfoam Medium and Lars1. Downwind, what I see is the boat has a very forgiving "groove" that makes it easier to sail fast with good depth for very good VMG. While the boatspeed looks very close between the two boats, the jibing angles with the DNA seem to be consistently better than with the ASG3. Is this the rig or the boat? Certainly it is probably a combination so it could be interesting to put the new rig on the ASG3 and see how it goes which I hope to do very soon. The DNA and other boats with similar volume distribution feel easier to get downwind in chop in heavy air.

One last note. Ben Moon was quite quick on the DNA with a standard Fiberfoam Medium and Lars1, quick enough to win the event. Both Ben and Bruce are excellent sailors and you would think the newer rig on Bruce's boat would have had an edge. In races 1 and 2, the breeze was up a bit and the water was pretty flat so I don't think Ben was at any disadvantage. In races 3, 4, and 5, there were more holes and Ben felt that Bruce had the better speed downwind. On the last day, the flatter Lars1 might have been a bit better upwind and downwind. Upwind, I was pleased that I was able to flatten the Den Ben to the point where I felt I was very close to Ben and Bruce upwind. Downwind I felt like I was very close to Bruce in speed and angle but Ben always seemed a bit quicker so the flatter, less powerful Lars1 might have been a bit better downhill in the big breeze and chop.

Fun stuff, stay tuned for more feedback.



#136 furling

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 05:27 AM

Short U Tube of some A Cats messing round...http://www.youtube.c...h?v=bC5zQeyD3zU some of me trying to do wheelies....enjoy and have a laugh.

#137 SimonN

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 07:00 AM


BTW, I think the stiffer sideways can be good particularly if you weigh more than, say, 78kgs. Thanks for your reports. Interesting as usual.

I thought that this was part of the new mast theory, that it would be stiffer side to side and softer fore and aft. Thanks, TTS

Sorry if I wasn't clear. You are correct that the new generation of masts are stiffer sideways and softer fore and aft. I was referiung to Bob's comment that the Hall; masts are stiffer sideways than the Fibrefoam and Saaberg masts. It is possible to go significantly stiffer than where we are at the moment, but you still need some side bend. One of the reasons why the masts have got stiffer is that they are being rigged slightly differently, with lower hounds. This allows the top to become more active but if you left the stiffness the same, it wouldn't stand up. It also makes rotation work better. For more power you let the rotation off and this makes the sail fuller. The problem used to be that with the mast soft sideways, as soon as you went for leech tension, the mast bent. Now, the extra stiffness allows for better leach tension when powered up.

One interesting development that doesn't seem to have been discussed is that some of the top people aren't reducing rotation as much as they used to. Bundy is very noticable in this regard and he cannot pull the rotator closer than about 3 inches from the centreline. Stevie Brewin used to pull in to about 1 inch from the centreline but now doesn't. I have to admit I just cannot make it work. Maybe it is because I am currently lighter than they are, but for me, as soon as I am properly depowering, I need the rotaion pulled as close to the centreline as I can. For me, that is always faster than eased.

#138 ita 16

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 08:18 AM

Is it just me, or is that alot of broken 5k masts for one weekend in Florida. ;-)


This past weekend the Ronstan A-Class Midwinters were sailed out of Davis Island Yacht Club with 28 boats registered to race and 24 actually making it to the starting line. In the fleet were four DNA's. Ben Moon and Bruce Mahoney were sailing their DNA's in their second event after last month's Islamorada Coconut Grove Sails Classic/Interglactic and myself and Chris Brown were racing our new DNA's for the first time. All four of us were using the Glaser Den Ben sail design which Ben did so well with at last summers WC in Aarhus. Ben and Bruce were sailing with new Fiberfoam masts and Chris and I were using the latest Hall masts. Both of these masts appear to be very similar when tested using the Landenberger bend test. Ben Hall made some changes after the WC and we are confident he is on par bend wise with the latest Saarberg and Fiberfoam masts.

Ben Moon had a freak accident disaster on the day before racing. He had come in from sailing and the breeze was a gusty 15-18 knots. As he was trying to get his boat staged to his beach dolly, a gust caught it and tipped it over to the beach which was on a rise. Ben's new mast broke when it hit the sand and he was forced to switch back to his rig that he used last year which was a Fiberfoam Medium and a Glaser Lars1. Good news is the break was relatively clean on the mast and it can be repaired fairly easily.

Racing for Day 1 was cancelled. The breeze hovered at 19-23 knots all day and the onshore wind against a lee shore sea wall in shallow water created conditions that were not safe for racing. On Day 2, we got in five races in conditions that followed a cold front. The wind was a gusty 8-14 knots with 30-40 degree oscillations. You had to sail with your head very out of the boat. At the end of the day, Ben and Bruce had won all five races with Ben leading Bruce by 2 points. I trailed in a relatively distant 3rd. I was a slight bit off Ben's and Bruce's pace upwind and downwind but in general was pretty happy with the performance of the boat and the rig given this was the first time I had sailed it around other A-Cats. Even though I was in third overall, I was only one point ahead of a 3 way tie for fourth between Jeff Linton, Woody Cope, and Tracy Oliver so it was going to be a fun battle on the last day of racing.

For the third and final day of racing, the breeze was from the NE at 15-20 knots with a short chop. Ben won the first race and Bruce won the 2nd race with Ben winning the overall by 2 points over Bruce. I had a pretty good day with two thirds and felt like I was much more competitive against Ben and Bruce staying in much better contact with them in each race as I got a better feel for the boat and rig. Woody Cope finished with two 4th's for the day to take 4th overall and Jeff Linton finished 5th overall. Tracy Oliver had an unfortunate capsize before the first race that broke his mast. Chris Brown finished both races but on the way in to the beach, the rivets on his spreader bracket failed and his new mast broke above the diamonds, bummer! He did finish 7th overall and he was very pleased with the performance of his new DNA.

So obviously I feel like the boat is living up to its reputation. I did carry a Speed Puck on the boat for all of the races and after downloading the GPS tracks for each race, what is interesting to me is that I don't believe the DNA (and the new rig) is any faster upwind than I was last year with my ASG3 modified with the Fiberfoam Medium and Lars1. Downwind, what I see is the boat has a very forgiving "groove" that makes it easier to sail fast with good depth for very good VMG. While the boatspeed looks very close between the two boats, the jibing angles with the DNA seem to be consistently better than with the ASG3. Is this the rig or the boat? Certainly it is probably a combination so it could be interesting to put the new rig on the ASG3 and see how it goes which I hope to do very soon. The DNA and other boats with similar volume distribution feel easier to get downwind in chop in heavy air.

One last note. Ben Moon was quite quick on the DNA with a standard Fiberfoam Medium and Lars1, quick enough to win the event. Both Ben and Bruce are excellent sailors and you would think the newer rig on Bruce's boat would have had an edge. In races 1 and 2, the breeze was up a bit and the water was pretty flat so I don't think Ben was at any disadvantage. In races 3, 4, and 5, there were more holes and Ben felt that Bruce had the better speed downwind. On the last day, the flatter Lars1 might have been a bit better upwind and downwind. Upwind, I was pleased that I was able to flatten the Den Ben to the point where I felt I was very close to Ben and Bruce upwind. Downwind I felt like I was very close to Bruce in speed and angle but Ben always seemed a bit quicker so the flatter, less powerful Lars1 might have been a bit better downhill in the big breeze and chop.

Fun stuff, stay tuned for more feedback.


What? There is much talk of data flex , nobody is talking about reliability, I believe this to be a very important topic.

#139 flojo

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 01:38 PM

Short U Tube of some A Cats messing round...http://www.youtube.c...h?v=bC5zQeyD3zU some of me trying to do wheelies....enjoy and have a laugh.

So you bought Brad's G6 (2011). Congrats!
What are your first impressions?

flojo

#140 furling

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 09:42 AM


Short U Tube of some A Cats messing round...http://www.youtube.c...h?v=bC5zQeyD3zU some of me trying to do wheelies....enjoy and have a laugh.

So you bought Brad's G6 (2011). Congrats!
What are your first impressions?

flojo


As for the boat itself, the build quality is first class, very well finished with no loose ends. Having the main track recessed into the hull is a big winner for hiking out, its pretty easy to push the nose under but dosent come to a sudden stop and pitch like my I17, i did bury it to the rear beam and it powered through and speared out easily, i thought i was gunna have a swim, plenty of room on the tramp and easy to get under the boom, it has mid sheet system which found its way around my foot during a windy jibe and the harder i tried to get over the other side the more my foot pulled the main in, so over i went, it was easy to right, the boards are on the outside of the hulls so i could get on the side of the hull easily and it came back up easily, i was able to keep racing. The steering is typically very light and i use brads 4wd drive areal as a tiller, it works great. The curved boards are my biggest issue, they provide an amazing amount of lift, i havent sailed with them up much as the trailing edge is knife sharp and im a little scared of running into it, they make the boat extremely flighty and will lift either hull easily as soon as it is unloaded, on a reach in the groove its scarey fast and light as a feather, just kissing the top of the water, even upwind the faster you go the lighter it gets, learning where to put your weight fore and aft is critical, the downhaul and rotation is placed well and easy to use, the outhaul is a bit sticky if you have main tension on, overall it points well, has plenty of volume, not a lot of rocker and accelerates fast if you pump the main going under a slower boat, i would have to say straight or canted boards would have been way easier for me to learn this class as the curved foils are a handfull for a learner but once mastered im hoping will get the results, i am 115kg and it carries me fine, it manouveres fast but seems a little slow on the tacks, that is probably me being cautious because when you tack the leeward hull unloads and it wants to lift, i still really like my Nacra I17 and are way more comfortable on it than the scheurer, but i am coming around and will persevere with these curved foils. and its light and easy on the back, i can see a lot more women joining the A class as they dont need a lot of muscle to sail them fast. Scheurer have built a very nice and competitive platform, im sure you will still see them in the top ten when in the right hands for many years to come
I dont see the need for a wide flat transom/stern like the DNA has, as the amount of lift provided from the curved foils means you have to come forward to keep the bows down anyhow and the hull volume seems better in the middle, but early days..


MM

#141 AClass USA 230

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 11:52 AM

Bob
I am a bit confused by your measurements. The standard bend tests I understand. It is what we do over here to compare masts. However, nobody here uses the "Landy" mast bend numbers to compare masts and I am not sure what one really learns from that test. I understand why Landy and other sailmakers use it. Generally it is used to calculate static bend on the mast which is comapred with a base figure so that the sailmaker can cut the luff curve accordingly. However, even that needs to be adjusted depending on the dinamic bend properties of the mast. 2 masts that show the same bend for a given diamond setting can behave very differently when a sail is up and you start applying sailing forces.

Or am I missing something?

BTW, I think the stiffer sideways can be good particularly if you weigh more than, say, 78kgs. Thanks for your reports. Interesting as usual.


Regarding fore and aft bend profiles, we had Landy bend test numbers for new Fiberfoam, older Fiiberfoam Medium, and the new Halls. All were based upon setting up with 55 mm spreader rake and two data sets based on a tension of 19 and 20 on the Loos Pro gauge respectively. We took the deflections at each measurement point and plotted them on a curve. While we found there were obviously some differences in actual bend deflections, the profile of the curves were very similar and consistent. Therefore if I want to duplicate the new Fiberfoam profile with the new Hall, I can probably get very close with an adjustment in spreader rake. The bottom line for me is how the sail sets up on the mast. If the shape looks even top to bottom, I get the flattening I need at max downhaul upwind, and I get the perception of increased power downwind, then my simple mind is happy. My next gauge is judging my boatspeed against good benchmarks like Ben Moon, Matt Struble, Lars Guck, and other fast sailors.

Works for me.

#142 SimonN

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 08:07 PM

All were based upon setting up with 55 mm spreader rake and two data sets based on a tension of 19 and 20 on the Loos Pro gauge respectively.

I think I now understand what you are doing. What is of real interest to me is the figures you give for the diamond tension. Is that what you are sailing with? If so, we need to be sure we are discussing the same Loos gauge, but I can tell you that the base figure that Brewin works off is 28!

#143 A-man

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 03:56 AM


All were based upon setting up with 55 mm spreader rake and two data sets based on a tension of 19 and 20 on the Loos Pro gauge respectively.

I think I now understand what you are doing. What is of real interest to me is the figures you give for the diamond tension. Is that what you are sailing with? If so, we need to be sure we are discussing the same Loos gauge, but I can tell you that the base figure that Brewin works off is 28!


Simon, if I'm not mistaken I believe Bob is talking about the new Loos Gauge and you are talking about he old "silver" Loos Guage. Makes these dialogues confusing for sure.

#144 A-man

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 04:03 AM


All were based upon setting up with 55 mm spreader rake and two data sets based on a tension of 19 and 20 on the Loos Pro gauge respectively.

I think I now understand what you are doing. What is of real interest to me is the figures you give for the diamond tension. Is that what you are sailing with? If so, we need to be sure we are discussing the same Loos gauge, but I can tell you that the base figure that Brewin works off is 28!

Simon,

Found the chart for the conversion. http://loosnaples.co...-tension-gauges
I'm still using the silver (old) gauge but hope to upgrade to the pro sometime. Scroll halfway down and you can work out the conversion. Landenberger has the conversion on his mast bend data handout also.

A-man

#145 SimonN

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 04:57 AM



All were based upon setting up with 55 mm spreader rake and two data sets based on a tension of 19 and 20 on the Loos Pro gauge respectively.

I think I now understand what you are doing. What is of real interest to me is the figures you give for the diamond tension. Is that what you are sailing with? If so, we need to be sure we are discussing the same Loos gauge, but I can tell you that the base figure that Brewin works off is 28!


Simon, if I'm not mistaken I believe Bob is talking about the new Loos Gauge and you are talking about he old "silver" Loos Guage. Makes these dialogues confusing for sure.

I am certain I talking about the new Loos gauge like this
Posted Image

#146 ACat

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 05:20 AM

Simon I believe is talking about diamond wire tension and Bob is talking about the tension on the wire running from the masthead lock to the end of the boom using the Landy method for measuring mast bend/luff round.

#147 SimonN

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 06:32 AM

Ahhhh. I have never done theLandy test so I guess I got confused. It would still be good to compare diamond tension and thinking about it, length of spreader as it will all make a difference.

#148 AUS

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 02:46 PM

My numbers are taken off the old gauge. When we use a new gauge we conver to what it would represent on the old gauge when comunicating numbers. I am sure it is different in each fleet?

#149 samc99us

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 06:55 PM

I'm shocked you guys are trying to accurately determine bend numbers on modern carbon masts and you're using a Loos Pro Gauge that's been pretty much the same for the past 20 years. Check it: http://www.shopsound...ucts&kw=haripro

#150 Foghorn77

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 11:46 PM

I'm shocked you guys are trying to accurately determine bend numbers on modern carbon masts and you're using a Loos Pro Gauge that's been pretty much the same for the past 20 years. Check it: http://www.shopsound...ucts&kw=haripro


Sam did you buy an A cat yet, or have you been spending all your money on digital gauges?

#151 AClass USA 230

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 05:45 PM

Simon I believe is talking about diamond wire tension and Bob is talking about the tension on the wire running from the masthead lock to the end of the boom using the Landy method for measuring mast bend/luff round.


And you would be correct. Sailing, my diamond tension numbers range from 31 to 35 (light air to heavy air) using the silver Loos gauge. I have both the silver and the black Pro in my sailing tools kit.

#152 samc99us

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 01:33 PM


I'm shocked you guys are trying to accurately determine bend numbers on modern carbon masts and you're using a Loos Pro Gauge that's been pretty much the same for the past 20 years. Check it: http://www.shopsound...ucts&kw=haripro


Sam did you buy an A cat yet, or have you been spending all your money on digital gauges?


Nope, sorry, been spending all my money on stacks of these to hand out at regattas, specifically those with you in attendance: http://www.google.co...s:0&tx=54&ty=61

#153 Foghorn77

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 05:58 PM



I'm shocked you guys are trying to accurately determine bend numbers on modern carbon masts and you're using a Loos Pro Gauge that's been pretty much the same for the past 20 years. Check it: http://www.shopsound...ucts&kw=haripro


Sam did you buy an A cat yet, or have you been spending all your money on digital gauges?


Nope, sorry, been spending all my money on stacks of these to hand out at regattas, specifically those with you in attendance: http://www.google.co...s:0&tx=54&ty=61


I think maybe you should take your cups advice and post about what you have experience in, which at this point is very little. Telling someone like Ben Moon, Simon, or Bob Hodges what tools to use is pretty arrogant, considering your sailing resume',and the fact that you don't nor have ever raced or own an A cat, but that seems to be your standard M.O. online. I'll see if your still as bold next time I see you, somehow I strongly doubt it.

#154 samc99us

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 07:52 PM

I guess its a crime now to suggest considering a different tool? Loos gauges tend to change their readings over time. I'll bow out now and never respond to your online attacks again.

#155 Foghorn77

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 10:37 PM

I guess its a crime now to suggest considering a different tool? Loos gauges tend to change their readings over time. I'll bow out now and never respond to your online attacks again.


The readings on the harken will change depending on how hard you press the lever, so still a variable. Calling you out for some snarky, arrogant comment you make about some folks who possess more skill than you could ever dream of , isn't an attack. One of those probably isn't too far off in your future though, but thanks for "bowing out" anyway.

#156 SimonN

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 11:40 PM

I guess its a crime now to suggest considering a different tool? Loos gauges tend to change their readings over time. I'll bow out now and never respond to your online attacks again.

All guages have their issues and yes, I have tried them all. The Loos gauge has 2 issues, namely the spring and also the plastic "rollers" which develop a groove in them. You need to spin the plastic inserts every now and again, depending on how much you use it. The spring seems to be OK unless you damage it. To be sure I am getting a good reading, I try to compare the readings I am getting against other gauges occasionally (say once a year) and my Loos gauge is now 5 years old and I am pretty happy that I am still getting good results.

As for the harken, while it is a great bit of kit, it really isn't that usefull in a class where everybody talks about loos gauge tensions. In fact, if you look at the tuing sheets produced by most sailmakers, they tend to refer to Loos gauge settings. In big boats I can understand paying the money but for an A, it really isn't worth the investment. You can buy 4 Loos pro gauges to every 1 Harken in Oz although I am aware that in the USA, it is only 2.5 times more expensive. I would rather spend the extra money on something that will make a difference. :)

#157 Lost in Translation

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 12:30 AM

I have the harken and have found the lever makes little difference. I have also set up boats with Bastian, Micha's crew for the F18, and he said the harken is all they use due to its accuracy that the lever matters little. It is a nice gauge and I wish more used it, but Loos dominates.

I have played around a bit with comparing it to a single loos gauge and found quite a bit of variance on repeated readings which I would guess is attributable to the loos but I don't really know. Something to play with on a no wind day.

#158 sunmonkey

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 12:34 PM

It seems that some sailors lose sight of the fact that A's are such fun to just sail to enjoy their sweet performance. As a kid in 1975 I was allowed to sail an Australis one morning and then just had to build one myself, so I pushed shopping trolleys and packed groceries and shovelled earth until I had a plywood boat. Won a few, lost more, but still had a great time sailing rings around nearly everything else, and that boat would be so slow today ....

#159 AClass USA 230

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 04:40 PM

It seems that some sailors lose sight of the fact that A's are such fun to just sail to enjoy their sweet performance. As a kid in 1975 I was allowed to sail an Australis one morning and then just had to build one myself, so I pushed shopping trolleys and packed groceries and shovelled earth until I had a plywood boat. Won a few, lost more, but still had a great time sailing rings around nearly everything else, and that boat would be so slow today ....


+1000!

#160 crasher

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 12:47 PM


It seems that some sailors lose sight of the fact that A's are such fun to just sail to enjoy their sweet performance. As a kid in 1975 I was allowed to sail an Australis one morning and then just had to build one myself, so I pushed shopping trolleys and packed groceries and shovelled earth until I had a plywood boat. Won a few, lost more, but still had a great time sailing rings around nearly everything else, and that boat would be so slow today ....


+1000!


With all this talk about new $30k Dna's, how about a complete thread hijack with a low cost entry level 5k A? Carbon mast, boom, beams.

I took a set of 18ht hulls and beamed them up with a set of Forte carbon beams and added a fiberfoam mast and sail combo(2k used). I havent put her on the scales yet, but im guessing she's about 20 lbs over weight. This isnt going to be an issue since the guy sailing it is 275lbs. The ht hulls have a very similar stern profile as the newer dna and evo2 trend. The bottom side rocker is also pretty similar. The gel coat on the ht's is thick, so some serious sanding and the boat is mirror smooth, no scratches. The only thing that may be an issue in heavy air is that the beams are proabably 6 inches too far forward and the boom is going to be a bit long for a standard acat sail. Some creative inhaul, outhaul will solve this and since the boat will live at lake lanier, i dont expect it to see heavy air for the majority of the year.

If you see ht hulls, especially the pre worrell ones, i think they make a good starting point for an entry level acat. We will see how she feels one her maiden voyage later today, but im pretty happy with how this came out.


Pics later today.

#161 manicsh

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 02:34 AM

[quote name='AClass USA 230' timestamp='1326808870' post='3549254']
Seven new DNA A-Class platforms arrived via container to the Florida Keys a couple of weeks ago with three of the new boats staying for the Coconut Grove Invitational winter opening regatta. Ben Moon dominated the event on his new DNA but he was also sailing with the latest Fiberfoam mast and Glaser sail (the same rig he used for a top 10 finish at the WC in Aarhus this past summer).

US sailors now have a great opportunity to measure our development against what is now considered the benchmark platform in the world (similar to the arrival of the first Flyer wave piercer in 1999). There is now a great opportunity to measure the performance of the strongest US designs like the EVO HT, the Barracudas, the evolving EVO II, the next generation of the A3 (the A4?), and the new Rodgers A-Class design from Tampa Bay. There are also the modified designs that have shown good performance this year including updates of the Flyer II and Bimare XJ with curved blades and the updated ASG3's that performed very well in the spring and at the NAC this October.

Rig development will continue with Jay Glaser continuing to fine tune his latest A-Class design on both the Fiberfoam and Hall masts that US sailors are using. Bend tests on the latest Halls now have these tubes pretty spot on to the latest Fiberfoams. Personally I am in a good position to trial the DNA against the ASG3 (modified) and have the ability to swap rigs and sails between the boats. It should be fun and interesting to learn the differences in the boats in different conditions. Personally I anticipate a light to moderate air WC this October and I believe that will keep the door open for several designs (new and older) to be very competitive.

The new DNA's looked great. The build quality is excellent and the foils package looks very well done. The boats are very close to a plug and play package in the tradition of the AHPC and Gel Tek boats from Australia and the Bimare boats from Italy.

This thread can be used for updates on the racing and tuning and what we observe and learn. Should be a fun journey to the Worlds in the Florida Keys this year. Join in or stay tuned.


Bob, 4 DNA's just shipped for the US today, will be great to see you soon!

#162 AClass USA 230

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:24 PM

DNA is on the trailer ready for the trip back to Tampa for the Admiral's Cup this weekend. Got some good Velocitek Speed Puck GPS tracks from my first races with the DNA at last month's Ronstan Midwinters. The ASG4 is rigged at the club so went for a sail on Friday night in 12-14 knots of breeze. I did two four mile W/L runs to a club mark with many tacks and jibes in conditions that were comparable to the first two races on the first day of racing in Tampa at the Midwinters (in terms of wind strength). Here's are my observations

1. I was hitting slightly higher boatspeed top ends downwind with the ASG4 (16-17.9 knots) than I did with the DNA in Tampa (15-17 knots) but I was sailing slightly deeper angles with the DNA. I was using my standard Fiberfoam and Lars1 on the ASG4, not the new bendier F/A and stiffer sideways Hall mast and fuller Glaser Den Ben that is on the DNA. Wonder if I could have squeezed some better angles with the more powerful rig on the ASG4?
2. I think SimonN is right about raising the weather daggerboard downwind when flying a hull. I hit some of my best boatspeed and depth numbers on the ASG4 since I have been recording and downloading the tracks early last year keeping the weather board raised on the downwind legs. I also think it makes the boat feel a bit easier to steer downwind (not as "tracky" a bit looser).
3. The ASG$ still does not have as nice of a helm feel as the DNA. I may go back to my stock rudders with aspect ratios more similar to the DNA rudders. I've been using relatively high aspect blades on the ASG4 and I am beginning to believe they don't have as good a feel on the boat.

The DNA is teaching me a few things about how to sail the ASG4 better. After the Admiral's Cup, I've lined up another good sailor to come out so we can sail both boats.

#163 Wandering Geo

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 08:57 AM

U230,
Nathan Outeridge has been training using his DNA fitted with GPS (not sure what sort).
He was saying after the NSW states that the best he has recorded is in the 19's.
Said he gets a bit scared at that point and sticks two hulls in the water.
May have bettered it on the way home (his) to Wangi from Mannering Park after the titles.
Southerly buster (25kn+) ripped through at the end of the last race.
Now sold his DNA and is concentrating on the 49er until the Olympics.
Be interesting to see if he gets a new one at the end of the year.

#164 AClass USA 230

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 05:02 PM

U230,
Nathan Outeridge has been training using his DNA fitted with GPS (not sure what sort).
He was saying after the NSW states that the best he has recorded is in the 19's.
Said he gets a bit scared at that point and sticks two hulls in the water.
May have bettered it on the way home (his) to Wangi from Mannering Park after the titles.
Southerly buster (25kn+) ripped through at the end of the last race.
Now sold his DNA and is concentrating on the 49er until the Olympics.
Be interesting to see if he gets a new one at the end of the year.


When I first got into the class, Jeremy Laundergan and Pete Melvin told me that they thought the highest speed you could get out of an A-Cat was around 19 knots. You just run into a wall to go any faster unless you added more horsepower for moderate conditions (or perhaps like a sailboard reduce the sail area when it is really windy). I'd agree with Nathan that at around 19 knots, the boat will be getting twitchy for sure with the current sailplan. I'm not sure I believe the claims of +20 knots that DNA has claimed unless it happened in absolutely flat water conditions. In the real world, you are typically sailing in chop and waves in any strong wind condition and that certainly limits what you can get out of the boat. A-Cats are superb light to medium air performers for sure and since most of us sail predominately in light to medium conditions, we should feel fortunate the design excels so well in that range.

#165 TornadoSail2016

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 05:05 PM

. The ASG4 is rigged at the club so went for a sail on Friday night in 12-14 knots of breeze. The DNA is teaching me a few things about how to sail the ASG4 better. After the Admiral's Cup, I've lined up another good sailor to come out so we can sail both boats.

Bob,

Last I looked your boat was an ASG3. What have you done to it to make it an ASG4? Also, has Lars launched a new A4 yet? I have not had the time to make it to his place yet. Spending days off getting in the last ski runs of the season. Will switch to boating in 2 weeks.

Thanks,
Tom

#166 Bang Zoom

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 05:15 PM

3. The ASG$ still does not have as nice of a helm feel as the DNA. I may go back to my stock rudders with aspect ratios more similar to the DNA rudders. I've been using relatively high aspect blades on the ASG4 and I am beginning to believe they don't have as good a feel on the boat.

Did you try raking the ASG4 blades back a bit?

#167 Bang Zoom

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 05:20 PM


U230,
Nathan Outeridge has been training using his DNA fitted with GPS (not sure what sort).
He was saying after the NSW states that the best he has recorded is in the 19's.
Said he gets a bit scared at that point and sticks two hulls in the water.
May have bettered it on the way home (his) to Wangi from Mannering Park after the titles.
Southerly buster (25kn+) ripped through at the end of the last race.
Now sold his DNA and is concentrating on the 49er until the Olympics.
Be interesting to see if he gets a new one at the end of the year.


When I first got into the class, Jeremy Laundergan and Pete Melvin told me that they thought the highest speed you could get out of an A-Cat was around 19 knots. You just run into a wall to go any faster unless you added more horsepower for moderate conditions (or perhaps like a sailboard reduce the sail area when it is really windy). I'd agree with Nathan that at around 19 knots, the boat will be getting twitchy for sure with the current sailplan. I'm not sure I believe the claims of +20 knots that DNA has claimed unless it happened in absolutely flat water conditions. In the real world, you are typically sailing in chop and waves in any strong wind condition and that certainly limits what you can get out of the boat. A-Cats are superb light to medium air performers for sure and since most of us sail predominately in light to medium conditions, we should feel fortunate the design excels so well in that range.


Steve C will tell you its a wetted surface area problem and yes the limit is around 18.5 for an A-cat not surported by C foils. I recorded a peak of 22 on my XJ but it was very transient.

#168 AClass USA 230

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 09:40 PM


. The ASG4 is rigged at the club so went for a sail on Friday night in 12-14 knots of breeze. The DNA is teaching me a few things about how to sail the ASG4 better. After the Admiral's Cup, I've lined up another good sailor to come out so we can sail both boats.

Bob,

Last I looked your boat was an ASG3. What have you done to it to make it an ASG4? Also, has Lars launched a new A4 yet? I have not had the time to make it to his place yet. Spending days off getting in the last ski runs of the season. Will switch to boating in 2 weeks.

Thanks,
Tom


Ben Moon and I took our ASG3's and moved the front beam forward 200 mm and the daggerboard trunks aft 100 mm. We replaced the stock curved daggerboards (they were too short in span) with the same hi-modulus pre-preg carbon foils Ben Hall is producing for the EVO II and the Barracuda's. With the beam relocation we were also able to go back to what I would call a standard foot length sail and I feel that was also a positive change. The ASG3 required a shorter foot sail due to the distance between the beams. The improvement in balance and performance was very significant. The boats became extremely competitive against the best boats in the US (A3, EVOHT, Barracudas, etc.). As I stated above I'm in a unique position to gauge the boat's performance against the DNA which is now considered the benchmark for performance. I believe the ASG4 with the standard Glaser Lars1 and a standard Fiberfoam Medium is equal to the DNA (witht the new generation mast and Glaser Den Ben sail) upwind in all conditions. Downwind, I believe the extra volume in the aft sections of the DNA and the more powerful mast/sail combo give that boat a better feel and is more forgiving to reach the best combination of speed forward and depth. It will be interesting to put the new rig on the ASG4 and the old rig on the DNA and see the difference (stay tuned). I'm not sure you can take advantage of trapezing downwind on the ASG4 like you can on the DNA and other boats. But I don't think that makes it non-competitive. There is also the option to go one step further with the ASG4 and graft a fuller volume aft section similar to what is being done for the A3's to convert them to A4's. It would not be that expensive to do.

I think Lars is close to finishing two A4's in his shop. I heard today he had a knee injury (from skiing?) so might be healing for awhile.

#169 AClass USA 230

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 09:42 PM

3. The ASG$ still does not have as nice of a helm feel as the DNA. I may go back to my stock rudders with aspect ratios more similar to the DNA rudders. I've been using relatively high aspect blades on the ASG4 and I am beginning to believe they don't have as good a feel on the boat.

Did you try raking the ASG4 blades back a bit?


I did try changing the rake and it only seemed to load up the helm. It's not that the higher aspect blades don't work, they are just twitchier and you really do not have the same down speed control with them. They are sexy to look at!

#170 Bang Zoom

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 01:19 AM


3. The ASG$ still does not have as nice of a helm feel as the DNA. I may go back to my stock rudders with aspect ratios more similar to the DNA rudders. I've been using relatively high aspect blades on the ASG4 and I am beginning to believe they don't have as good a feel on the boat.

Did you try raking the ASG4 blades back a bit?


I did try changing the rake and it only seemed to load up the helm. It's not that the higher aspect blades don't work, they are just twitchier and you really do not have the same down speed control with them. They are sexy to look at!



Maybe a longer tiller would calm them down? They do look like the low drag setup but I'm guessing they bend a bit under load making things a bit unpredictable. I went more moderate with my new blades.

#171 AClass USA 230

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 02:36 PM



3. The ASG$ still does not have as nice of a helm feel as the DNA. I may go back to my stock rudders with aspect ratios more similar to the DNA rudders. I've been using relatively high aspect blades on the ASG4 and I am beginning to believe they don't have as good a feel on the boat.

Did you try raking the ASG4 blades back a bit?


I did try changing the rake and it only seemed to load up the helm. It's not that the higher aspect blades don't work, they are just twitchier and you really do not have the same down speed control with them. They are sexy to look at!



Maybe a longer tiller would calm them down? They do look like the low drag setup but I'm guessing they bend a bit under load making things a bit unpredictable. I went more moderate with my new blades.


With skinny high aspect blades, you have to be very careful to not get flow separation through too much angle of attack (i.e. you can't move the tiller as much). Easy to control while you are practicing, in the heat of a race you might find you jam the tiller and the boat stops because the flow has broken loose from the blades.

#172 TornadoSail2016

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 08:22 PM

There is also the option to go one step further with the ASG4 and graft a fuller volume aft section similar to what is being done for the A3's to convert them to A4's. It would not be that expensive to do.

I think Lars is close to finishing two A4's in his shop. I heard today he had a knee injury (from skiing?) so might be healing for awhile.

Thanks for the indepth look at your changes. i will wait to hear how the new rig goes. I hope that Lars did not do too much damage to the knee. I know we have had spring skiing conditions over the last two weeks and I almost tore my knee skiing in that shit.

#173 AClass USA 230

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 12:50 PM

Here's the top ten finishers at the Hall Spars Admirals Cup and their platform-mast-sail choices. "NG" indicates a new generation mast or sail (i.e. the newer masts that have more fore/aft deflection and are stiffer sideways and the fuller, more powerful sails designed to fit those masts):


1. Bruce Mahoney DNA, NG Fiberfoam, NG Glaser (Den Ben)
2. Bob Hodges DNA, NG Hall, NG Glaser (Den Ben)
3. Ian Lindahl Lindahl LR2, Fiberfoam, 2010 North
4. Ben Hall Barracuda V3 (very similar to DNA), NG Hall, NG Landenberger/Glaser (Ben used two sails in this event which was allowed)
5. Woody Cope Rogers "O", NG Hall, NG Glaser (Den Ben)
6. Jeff Linton Bim XJ (modified with Hall/Cogan curved daggerboards), NG Fiberfoam, NG Glaser (Den Ben)
7. Bob Webbon Marstrom Mk V, NG Hall, NG Landenberger
8. Brett Moss Flyer II (modified with Marstrom curved daggerboards), Fiberfoam, 2010 Landenberger
9. Jonathan Farrar A2 (modified with Hall/Cogan curved daggerboards), Hall, Glaser (Lars1)
10. Tracy Oliver Barracuda V1, NG Hall, NG Glaser (Den Ben)

Bruce Mahoney (in addition to his skills as an excellent sailor) probably had the best upwind speed of any sailor at the regatta. This verifies the upwind performance that Ben Moon had with an identical rig at the 2011 WC where Ben rounded the first weather mark in the top ten in nearly every race. As second place finisher at this event, I am trying to obviously match that performance with a different mast that is very similar in static bend testing. At the last event we sailed (the Ronstan Midwinters), I sailed with more spreader rake and seemed more competitive to Bruce's upwind speed. For this event I sailed the first two days with less spreader rake (5 mm less). I changed back on the last day and felt the upwind performance for me was better in the last two races. I also need to sort out the right amount of diamond tension for the spreader rake setting. The new generation sails with more luff curve and/or seam shaping seem more critical in getting this combination right. I'm not sure there is any advantage over a NG rig/sail upwind versus a recent "conventional" rig (example Fiberfoam Medium with Lars1 or 2010 generation Landenberger) if you get the spreader/diamond setup optimized for the mast and sail.

Offwind, I think the new generation rigs and sails had a slight advantage in the 6-13 knot races (Races 1, 2, 3, 7, and 8). In races 4, 5, and 6 all sailed in 14-18 knots with very short and steep chop, I'm not sure the extra power available downwind was any advantage. Ian Lindahl, Brett Moss, and Jonathan Farrar showed good speed with conventional masts and sails (especially Brett and Jonathan who were sailing modified older designs). It will be interesting to see if these sailors upgrade their rigs as the season progresses (I know Farrar is). The North sail Lindahl used is a bit of an unknown for me. It seems to perform very well for Ian.

Platform wise, I think the DNA is showing itself to be a very balanced design that performs well in all conditions. Bob Webbon (who sailed his Marstrom in this event but has a new DNA platform waiting to get on the water in Houston) was delighted with the boat's light air performance against the Marstrom which is a good benchmark performer in light air. I was not surprised that it did OK in light air as it's bottom profile is very similar to the Barracuda sailed by Ben Hall who got great results in light air races last year (the current North American champion). The Lindahl LR2 looks to be a very competitive design (and it seems to follow the design trend of the DNA and Barracuda)and it will be very interesting to see how its performance could change as Ian sorts out his rig and sail choices. Back to Bob Webbon, he felt like he had to work harder upwind in the windier races with larger chop on the Marstrom Mk V but in the last race on Saturday (Race 6) that had the most wind and worst chop condition, he was blazing on the final downwind passing me and taking a big chunk out of Bruce Mahoney's lead (Ben Hall was also pretty fast on that downwind leg). Jeff Linton had a strong event and showed excellent speed on the Bim XJ modified with Hall/Cogan curved boards. He struggled in the breezier races (races 4, 5, and 6) but he felt he still had to sort out his rig and sail tuning for those conditions. It will be interesting to see how he progresses with the boat at the next event in Houston which (for the time of year) is expected to have some breeze. Jeff is a former ROLEX Yachtsman of the Year and his resume includes an Etchells 22 World Championship and a Lightning World Championship. If anyone can optimize a boat, it's Jeff. There is also the OH Rodgers "O". Woody Cope sailed a very consistent series getting all top ten finishes. The boat is very similar to the DNA in concept with subtle differences. I would expect OH to do a tweak of the volume distribution and profile sections on this design before the WC in October.

Brett Moss and Jonathan Farrar also seem to have some cards to play. I'm not sure what Brett's plans are with his Flyer II as he is still sailing with a conventional rig and getting decent results with it. It will be interesting to watch his rig choices if he keeps the platform and I am sure he is considering his options for further modifications to the boat (perhaps similar to what has been done with the aft sections of some Flyer I's). Jonathan Farrar also has the option to graft the new aft sections on his A2 that have been developed for the A3 to upgrade it to the A4. The A4 looks very competitive as proven recently by Pete Melvin dominating the New Zealand A-Class Championship on his A4. Lars Guck is currently finishing two new A4's in Rhode Island and Jim Godbey is currently converting his 2011 A3 to an A4.

Finally there were a couple of other platforms and rigs that also seemed to do well in specific races. Bob Curry had a 4 and 6 on the last day with his recently upgraded EVOHT (addition of Hall/Cogan curved blades). Bob was changing sails every day and seemed to hit the right combination on the last day with a 2 year old Skip Elliot sail that is very similar to a 2010 Landenberger. Ron Roth literally finished his ASG3 to ASG4 upgrade a week before the event (same changes that Ben Moon and I to our ASG3's last year) and told me he had the best speed and performance ever with the boat. Regarding the ASG4, I believe I would have been competitive with the one I still own at this event as it has already proven itself against the Barracuda V3 and LR2 in racing last year with a conventional rig (Fiberfoam Medium and Glaser Lars1).

To summarize, I believe there are still a lot of choices for US A-Class sailors including economical choices on recent and older boats that have the potential to be upgraded with rig and sail updates. Given that the WC will probably have a diverse range of conditions that is expected to be mostly in the light to medium wind range, that should keep the door open for a diverse range of equipment to be competitive at that event. That is good for the class and for sailors who want to get into the class.

Next up is the US Nationals next month in Houston. Stay tuned.

#174 LCD

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 01:31 PM

Ian Lindahl is sailing an LR4, significantly different from the LR2.

#175 Lost in Translation

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 02:07 PM

Great write up! I believe Ian's boat is an LR4. I agree that it looked really nice and is a big departure from the narrower LR2's and LR3's. Ian also debuted their new curved boards and they are true to form for the LR series with very narrow chord lengths.


Some older boats were still going OK too including a Flyer 1 with straight boards and '02 mast in 11th but not as fast the new stuff. ;)



#176 AClass USA 230

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 03:02 PM

Great write up! I believe Ian's boat is an LR4. I agree that it looked really nice and is a big departure from the narrower LR2's and LR3's. Ian also debuted their new curved boards and they are true to form for the LR series with very narrow chord lengths.


Some older boats were still going OK too including a Flyer 1 with straight boards and '02 mast in 11th but not as fast the new stuff. ;)


Apologies to Ian and John on getting the series number incorrect. It was the LR4. When I saw the narrower chord daggerboards, I wondered if there would be some negatives but Ian's performance did not indicate that at all. Going into the last day, Bruce owned the event and there were at least 6 sailors in close contention for 2nd through 5th overall.

Bailey, I think this was your best finish in an A-Class event to date and it will be scary when you get your new DNA. Watch out folks, the CLK is coming!

#177 TornadoSail2016

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 03:13 PM

To summarize, I believe there are still a lot of choices for US A-Class sailors including economical choices on recent and older boats that have the potential to be upgraded with rig and sail updates. Given that the WC will probably have a diverse range of conditions that is expected to be mostly in the light to medium wind range, that should keep the door open for a diverse range of equipment to be competitive at that event. That is good for the class and for sailors who want to get into the class.

Next up is the US Nationals next month in Houston. Stay tuned.

Bob,

Great report and you have shared wonderful information about the masts, sails, platforms and foils. It loks like you are getting a great workup leading to the WC this fall. I hope you find that fine-tuning before the nationals. I read the short report from the NZ Nationals and saw that Pete had easily won that regatta. I did not know that it was on the new A4. Good Luck in Houston.

TTS

#178 Lost in Translation

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 03:13 PM

haha. Thanks. I hope I don't go backwards with all the new gear!

The class is really vibrant, and I just wanted to encourage folks to get into it with whatever boat they can muster. It's a lot of fun and there is great racing to be had throughout the fleet no matter what the gear. I think we had 35 boats at this last three day regatta and I hope to see more on the water at future events this summer.




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