Jump to content


best freeze dried food?


  • Please log in to reply
73 replies to this topic

#1 Estar

Estar

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,470 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 12:13 AM

Who here with experience with various freeze dried food can tell me what tastes best and what sucks? Brands and flavors, and of course some influence of costs?

#2 30Man

30Man

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,193 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 12:55 AM

Go find a backpacker forum and ask them. They eat the stuff regularly.

#3 WHL

WHL

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,690 posts
  • Location:49-19.8N, 123-09.7W
  • Interests:Offshore, Star, Farr 30, R Boat racing, and gunkholing in classic daysailers

Posted 07 March 2012 - 02:48 AM

I've used this brand and a number of different meals.. All good so far. Keep some in the earthquake kit.
Mountain House

You can also get the brand at REI

#4 Kyliem

Kyliem

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 04:15 AM

Best ever is Fuizion freeze dried food - proper food with real flavours and no sickening additives - no comparison !

#5 Alysum

Alysum

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 280 posts
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 07 March 2012 - 04:39 AM

I'd be looking for something flatulence-free, does any such thing exist? Posted Image

#6 Terrorvision

Terrorvision

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,843 posts
  • Interests:Taking 'the' out of Psychotherapist

Posted 07 March 2012 - 05:12 AM

If you start with the knowledge that there is no such thing as 'Nice freeze-dried food' you will save yourself a lot of disappointment when trying them.

Puma uses Fuizion and there is certainly a lot of talk of it in sailing circles. Never tried it though.

Pot Noodles with an egg cracked into them before you add the boiling water.......... good even on dry land!

#7 Port Tack Approach

Port Tack Approach

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 733 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 01:47 PM

I have done a few of the Mountain House freeze dried. The noodle meals (i.e. beef stroganoff and spaghetti & meatballs) weren't too bad. Stay away from the Mexican rice and beans. If you are needing freeze dried food chances are you aren't prepared for the repercussions of the Mexican rice and beans

For some reason, while you can go to the grocery store and buy a box of powdered mashed potatoes and they can be quite good, I haven't found any of Mountain House's mashed potatoes to be edible!

#8 Rail Meat

Rail Meat

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,170 posts
  • Location:Mystic, CT
  • Interests:My ride: An OCD designed Class 40

Posted 07 March 2012 - 03:03 PM

I have heard the same comments about Fruizion, but unfortunately I don't think that we can get it in the US. If some one knows differently, I would love the hear about it.

I methodically worked my way through the universe of freeze dried commonly available here in the US, going out and buying a pile of freeze dried from Campmor and then taste testing.

  • Backpacker's Pantry - Big seller, pretty good selection of recipies. Taste is bland and really requires you to punch it up with seasoning. I always end up reaching for a hot sauce bottle with this brand.
  • Mountain House - wide selection of recipies, reasonably good taste, texture leaves a bit to be desired. They use MSG, and they tend to over salt their meals.
  • Alpine Aire - Reasonably good. Recipies seemed to be a bit more interesting, texture was pretty good, taste was pretty good. They also rely on a bit too much salt.
  • Richmoor - Hated this stuff. Limited choices, bland taste, poor texture.
  • Natural High - Made by Richmoor as their higher end brand. Selling point is that they don't use additives. Some people swear by this brand, but I am not a fan. textrure and taste not what I wanted it to be. Ended up throwing out a bunch of it.

As it turns out, my favorite is actually Enertia Trail Foods. This product was offered in EMS several years back, but now is only available via the web as far as I know. They are now at least partially owned by Coleman (yes, the camp stoves and cooler bin outfit) and make a similar product available under both the Enertia and Coleman brand names.

Reasons why I like it.

  • Reconstitutes well - Too many of the different brands seem to come up with recipies that use ingredients that don't reconstitute at the same rate. So 10 minutes later and you have a bad combination of mush and crunchy. The biggest problem is when they try to actually use meat in the recipie since it takes forever to soften up. Enertia does not use meat... they use TVP for protien, and chicken fat for flavor and calories. They also use a combination of freeze dried and dyhydrated for different ingredients and as a result after 8 to 10 minutes you have a package of food that all is at the target texture.
  • Pretty good taste - Terrorvision is right, a freeze dried meal is never going to reach culinary heights. But the Enertia stuff is pretty good taste. They spice it well, and include salt and pepper in their packs. I never feel the need to add hot sauce like I do with other brands. Also, dehydrated food does not give the same aftertaste that freeze dried does, so Enertia's use of dehydrated components is a plus.
  • Good variety - Lots of different choices so you don't get bored of the same thing after eating it for two straight weeks.
  • Very good packaging - For starters, they make single serving packages. It can be difficult to find single serving packages in many of the other brands. The packages themselves are sturdy and stand up well when rested on their bottom. They are a decent mil plastic, giving you some comfort that when you are holding a hot bag of food it won't collapse in your hand and spill food all over the place. And they incorporate a measuring scale in the side of the bag to help you get the right amount of water measured out to boil without having to carry an extra measuring cup.

One of the things I do is bring dried sausages as well as beef jerky / turkey jerky to get protien, and then buy freeze dried that does not try to pretend to be a meat meal. None of these guys do meat very well.

#9 stinky

stinky

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 400 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 03:23 PM

Try Mountain Houses freeze dried peas. They taste like food.

#10 Test

Test

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,253 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 04:00 PM

Two summers ago, I hiked the southern half of the Appalachian Trail - 1000 miles in 67 days. I'll second the Mountain house, my favorites were spaghetti and primevera -- just add hot water and you can eat right out of the package, Foil chicken packages and Noor sides also made good meals. Some folks made their own insulated bags to make freeze dried foods which didn't have their own packets. Emergen-C is a good water additive for drinking, and I liked carnation instant breakfast with my coffee to keep up the protein input. Nido, made by Nestle, is the best whole powdered milk (you can find it in most Hispanic food stores). Also take a vitamin once a day to make up for any missing goodies.

If you want to really save weight, remove all boxes, and repackage everything (except the freeze dried stuff) into ziplocks of larger portions.

#11 kite

kite

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,206 posts
  • Interests:water

Posted 07 March 2012 - 04:16 PM

http://hawkvittles.com

http://www.packitgourmet.com

http://shop.maryjanesfarm.org

#12 Left Hook

Left Hook

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,318 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 07:10 PM

+3 on Mountain House.

When I hiked the CT and NY portions of the Appalachian Trail I tried every brand that was offered at EMS and REI. Mountain House was by far the best tasting. IIRC it have all the conveniences that Rail Meat likes in Enertia but the taste was more than edible.

#13 Jonathan Green

Jonathan Green

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 258 posts
  • Location:New England
  • Interests:US East coast single & double handed distance racing

Posted 07 March 2012 - 07:19 PM

I use a combination of Mt. House and Backpacker's Pantry - some better than others. Of the ones I've tried, you can see my ratings here.

#14 rule69

rule69

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,674 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 07:29 PM

Not sure where the OP is at the moment. If in NZ we had good luck with Back Country Food in Invercargill. They were willing to make up meals to our order and had a good selection of off the shelf stuff. Good quality, functional food, nice folks to do business with.

Packets of Saimin noodles are also a must, IMHO. Give them a bit of a pounding (good therapy) and eat as chips (season to taste) or add hot water (fish if you're fishing and lucky) etc...

#15 JL92S

JL92S

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 562 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 07:57 PM

Pot noodle or get a microwave, microwave meals on the fastnet were fantastic, a chilli meatball sub at the rock was just what we needed

#16 Estar

Estar

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,470 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 07:57 PM

Not sure where the OP is at the moment.


Hauled out in connecticut.

Thanks all. Sounds like Mountain House is the general purpose winner. I like RM's suggestion of " dried sausages as well as beef jerky / turkey jerky" - when in NZ we got bags of freeze dried meat particles (beef and lamb) that was good and very useful.

What about if the need was to buy in bulk - like a year's worth? Are there bulk/wholesale places, for mountain house or the sausages/jerky or anything else good?

#17 pogen

pogen

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,856 posts
  • Location:SF Bay

Posted 07 March 2012 - 08:07 PM

Not sure if this is really on topic, but here is a recipe for tortellini en brodo that is dead easy and very good when you are cold and hungry. Only one easy-clean pot used.

Tortellini, measure out portions. "Better than Bullion" low sodium (important!) beef base. Tomato paste in tube. None of this stuff needs refrigeration.

Boil water in pot, use much less than they say as you will not be dumping out the water and you want it starchy for body. Maybe 0.5 liter/serving. Add tortellini, beef base (about 1 T per 2 servings), and a couple of T. of the tomato paste. Cook 11 min. Add other spices if you've got them and want them. Spoon into bowl(s).


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#18 Estar

Estar

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,470 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 11:07 PM

Not sure if this is really on topic, but here is a recipe for tortellini en brodo that is dead easy and very good when you are cold and hungry. Only one easy-clean pot used.


hmmm . . . That's actual cooking :)

But terrific - any other favorite 'easy one pot meals' that don't require refrigeration?

#19 pogen

pogen

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,856 posts
  • Location:SF Bay

Posted 07 March 2012 - 11:22 PM


hmmm . . . That's actual cooking :)


Just barely. Only a couple minutes more work than a pot of ramen and way better.

But yeah, bring on the recipes, I don't have seawater plumbing in my galley and hate washing up.

And I'm tired of reading offshore menus like this that make me feel inadequate for not being able to have a full time chef and scullery maid on the crew. I mean, really, I don't make stuff that complicated at home 90% of the time!

In the book "A Voyage for Madmen" there's a great bit about Robin Knox-Johnson's provisioning, well worth digging up and reviewing.

#20 pogen

pogen

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,856 posts
  • Location:SF Bay

Posted 07 March 2012 - 11:27 PM

I just ordered some Landjaeger sausage from here

http://www.zubersmeats.com/landjaegers.html Posted Image

the local place to get these has been closed for a while, will give a report when they come.

Oh, I forgot you can add 1 T. of olive oil to the tortellini soup for a little more richness. Also no refrigeration needed.

#21 Rail Meat

Rail Meat

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,170 posts
  • Location:Mystic, CT
  • Interests:My ride: An OCD designed Class 40

Posted 08 March 2012 - 02:12 AM

While we are on the topic of olive oil.... if you are going to be eating freeze dried for an extended time bring a bottle of olive oil and add a table spoon to each bag. It will add flavor, add calories and let the whole mess slide out the other end a bit easier.

#22 Evo

Evo

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,961 posts
  • Location:a park by the sea

Posted 08 March 2012 - 04:47 AM

is this about dried food for the Bermuda race??

#23 gybe-ho!

gybe-ho!

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Curled up in the lee of Bum Island

Posted 08 March 2012 - 07:38 AM

While we are on the topic of olive oil.... if you are going to be eating freeze dried for an extended time bring a bottle of olive oil and add a table spoon to each bag. It will add flavor, add calories and let the whole mess slide out the other end a bit easier.


Shit yeah...I mean, er, um. Definite winning tip here, good on the way in, good on the way out!

Have always liked Mountain House, but since using Wayfayrer offshore, I'm a convert. Clicky

I'm unsure if they are available outside the UK, there is the downside of the bags are heavier than freezedried, but the actual eating experience is great. The self heating packs are fiddly and get scary hot, so don't let then cook on your nonskid tape in the cockpit. We used them, self heating and regular Wayfayrer, on all deliveries on the Soto40 last season and would use them again anytime. The choice of different meals is great too.

The Mountain House Freeze dried Granola with freeze dried blueberries is my favourite offshore breakfast.

#24 pogen

pogen

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,856 posts
  • Location:SF Bay

Posted 09 March 2012 - 06:11 PM

Have always liked Mountain House, but since using Wayfayrer offshore, I'm a convert. Clicky



OMG, they have freeze dried "Spotted Dick and Custard" and "Lancashire Hot Pot" how can you not love it!

Trust a guy whose avatar is a jar of Vegimite to put us on to that one. :P

Looks like only sold in the UK but a couple of places will ship.

#25 Jonathan Green

Jonathan Green

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 258 posts
  • Location:New England
  • Interests:US East coast single & double handed distance racing

Posted 10 March 2012 - 03:53 AM

The Mountain House Freeze dried Granola with freeze dried blueberries is my favourite offshore breakfast.


hell yeah.

#26 rmb

rmb

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 154 posts

Posted 11 March 2012 - 08:11 AM

real turmat from norway is what i ate around the world after trying lots of different ones. It is what the norweigan military eats, and that is where it is made. All the flavors are good.

#27 gybe-ho!

gybe-ho!

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Curled up in the lee of Bum Island

Posted 11 March 2012 - 10:44 AM



Have always liked Mountain House, but since using Wayfayrer offshore, I'm a convert. Clicky



OMG, they have freeze dried "Spotted Dick and Custard" and "Lancashire Hot Pot" how can you not love it!

Trust a guy whose avatar is a jar of Vegimite to put us on to that one. :P

Looks like only sold in the UK but a couple of places will ship.


Thanks for the endorsement Pogen, actually the stuff is not freeze dried, it's real food, cooked and then vacuum packed so you can eat it hot or cold, no need to add water. I'll admit it's heavier than the freeze dried, but the eating experience is great. Their breakfasts of beans and sausage, beans and bacon etc are really good too. Didn't get to try the desserts, but heard they are also very tasty.

Vegemite, never leave home without it!

#28 haligonian winterr

haligonian winterr

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 704 posts
  • Location:Halifax, NS
  • Interests:Going Fast.

Posted 11 March 2012 - 03:41 PM

real turmat from norway is what i ate around the world after trying lots of different ones. It is what the norweigan military eats, and that is where it is made. All the flavors are good.


Canadian Military uses vacuum packed wet meals (boil-in-bag), which is probably terrible for weight savings but could be made up in them donating a tonne of it.

I'll have to check for the brand but It's better than the American meals that's for sure.

HW

#29 Estar

Estar

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,470 posts

Posted 11 March 2012 - 05:26 PM

So, is there a US available equivalent to this Wayfayrer stuff?






Have always liked Mountain House, but since using Wayfayrer offshore, I'm a convert. Clicky



OMG, they have freeze dried "Spotted Dick and Custard" and "Lancashire Hot Pot" how can you not love it!

Trust a guy whose avatar is a jar of Vegimite to put us on to that one. :P

Looks like only sold in the UK but a couple of places will ship.


Thanks for the endorsement Pogen, actually the stuff is not freeze dried, it's real food, cooked and then vacuum packed so you can eat it hot or cold, no need to add water. I'll admit it's heavier than the freeze dried, but the eating experience is great. Their breakfasts of beans and sausage, beans and bacon etc are really good too. Didn't get to try the desserts, but heard they are also very tasty.

Vegemite, never leave home without it!



#30 billgow

billgow

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 130 posts
  • Location:Flagstaff, AZ

Posted 12 March 2012 - 04:58 AM

I got tired of eating store bought camp food. I figured I’d rather eat lizards and rodents. I started looking around in the grocery store and now I won’t even consider that over priced garbage. Look through your grocers packaged food sections. You’ll be amazed at all the real food you can take with you that’s almost as light but has much more flavor and caloric value. The trick is making sure it actually has some value. A lot of that stuff is trash. Take your time and read everything.

I smoke my own meats and make jerky. I started because I don’t like jerky crispy like fiberglass. I take lots of this and things like dried fruits and nuts. The guys who hike long distances will tell you, the last thing they want in their packs is cooking stuff. I try to never do anything more than heat water and pour it into the container the food came in. I only carry 1 titanium cup for cooking and anything else you can imagine a cup doing. Find one of those vacuum sealers and you’re really in business.

You can also stage your food so you eat those things most likely to spoil in the first couple days. This lets you take ripe fruits and vegetables along as well. On a boat, that would include meats too. Hell, on a boat, you should be catching fish anyway!

When you start talking about storing for years, I suggest you go make friends with a Mormon. They’ve been hording a year’s worth of food in their cellars ever since Bringham Young talked them into trudging out to Utah. They use lots of those #10 cans to store everything you can think of. Some of the survival sites have information on that too. Think things like pasta, beans, rice, flour, etc…

#31 Evo

Evo

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,961 posts
  • Location:a park by the sea

Posted 12 March 2012 - 05:21 AM

I got tired of eating store bought camp food. I figured I'd rather eat lizards and rodents. I started looking around in the grocery store and now I won't even consider that over priced garbage. Look through your grocers packaged food sections. You'll be amazed at all the real food you can take with you that's almost as light but has much more flavor and caloric value. The trick is making sure it actually has some value. A lot of that stuff is trash. Take your time and read everything.

I smoke my own meats and make jerky. I started because I don't like jerky crispy like fiberglass. I take lots of this and things like dried fruits and nuts. The guys who hike long distances will tell you, the last thing they want in their packs is cooking stuff. I try to never do anything more than heat water and pour it into the container the food came in. I only carry 1 titanium cup for cooking and anything else you can imagine a cup doing. Find one of those vacuum sealers and you're really in business.

You can also stage your food so you eat those things most likely to spoil in the first couple days. This lets you take ripe fruits and vegetables along as well. On a boat, that would include meats too. Hell, on a boat, you should be catching fish anyway!

When you start talking about storing for years, I suggest you go make friends with a Mormon. They've been hording a year's worth of food in their cellars ever since Bringham Young talked them into trudging out to Utah. They use lots of those #10 cans to store everything you can think of. Some of the survival sites have information on that too. Think things like pasta, beans, rice, flour, etc…


indeed

also making your own and cryovacing it works very well for any passage less than a week as long as you have the ice or eutectics. Great part is you can give a crew a menu and it doesn't take long to boil the amount of water needed

If this about the Bda race....there is no excuse for going to sea with crappy food. Dried or preserved stuff is emergency rations only....blech!

#32 pogen

pogen

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,856 posts
  • Location:SF Bay

Posted 12 March 2012 - 05:48 AM

Yes billgow, I think you are right. And I don't see a benefit of a 1 oz freeze dried that has to be rehydrated with 3 oz of fresh water vs. a 4 oz ready-to-eat.

My landjager sausages came in yesterday, they are quite tasty and fairly moist out of the package. Price works out as $1/sausage, shipping and tax included. They are "shelf stable" meaning that as long as they are hung in a dry area they will not spoil. They suggest hanging them for a week or two to dry them further to taste. So I have 9 pairs of them up in the spare bedroom. Fortunately the cats don't seem to be interested in them.

#33 Presuming Ed

Presuming Ed

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,037 posts
  • Location:London, UK

Posted 12 March 2012 - 11:40 AM

And I don't see a benefit of a 1 oz freeze dried that has to be rehydrated with 3 oz of fresh water vs. a 4 oz ready-to-eat.

Makes sense with a watermaker - with the big weight savings coming from not carrying all the drinking water.

#34 Estar

Estar

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,470 posts

Posted 12 March 2012 - 12:06 PM


You'll be amazed at all the real food you can take with you that's almost as light but has much more flavor and caloric value.

Any specific suggestions that you have tried and really like?


also making your own and cryovacing

We do quite a bit of pressure cooking (into glass jars) - terrific end result, but a lot of work and heavy.

If this about the Bda race

My own interest is NOT for the BDA race, but for a rather longer time away from stores.


Have always liked Mountain House, but since using Wayfayrer offshore, I'm a convert. Clicky

So, does anyone know if there is a US available equivalent for this stuff? The website does not tell me very much what's its about - Is it basically canned one-pot meals (in a pouch) or is there something 'special/better' about it ?




#35 billgow

billgow

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 130 posts
  • Location:Flagstaff, AZ

Posted 12 March 2012 - 12:54 PM

['Estar']

Any specific suggestions that you have tried and really like?

On a typical tramp, I don't take any of it. I may vacuum seal a little canned meat or take some quick noodles but if it's under a week, I can do fine with the dried fruits, nuts, jerky, powdered energy mixes, power bars, etc. The only reason to get into the cooking thing is more ceremonial. You really do not have to go through all the brain damage of a formal meat but for some reason people feel they have to. I pretty much just keep munching all day long and skip the formalities of the dining experience (don't mess with camp fires, tents, etc. much either)

If you live near an REI store, give them a call and ask them if they're still doing camp food demos. Years ago they did one every Saturday. That's when I pretty much decided it wasn't for me.

If you're still interested in this stuff, I'd read up on what the French ocean racers are doing. I remember reading stuff during the Banque Populaire V Jules Verne Trophy race about their choices of food and Thomas Coville mentioned it a lot during his solo effort as well. Thomas was sponsored by Sodebo which is a major food industry. Those guys look at food like almost a religious event. If anyone has an answer to choking down freeze dried food, it's the French.


#36 gybe-ho!

gybe-ho!

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Curled up in the lee of Bum Island

Posted 12 March 2012 - 03:09 PM

Estar,

Yeah the website seems to be crappy at describing the product. As you note, ready cooked meals in a pouch, can be eaten hot/cold. As they are 'real' food as opposed to freeze dried, they are not filled with sodium/seasonings and you won't encounter the issues of the corner of the bag not properly rehydrated that seems to happen when people are not used to preparing freeze dried. My opinion is purely based on trying/using this stuff at sea over the summer, their selection is very good and it is good to eat too.

I still don't mind freeze dried, as I said in my original post, Mountain House is my choice and would take that racing over the Wayfayrer due to the weight difference, assuming the race boat was running a watermaker.

As to the shipping/availability in the US, can\t help as I'm not there, but you could always ask at your local Outdoor Store for this or something similar.

#37 LeoV

LeoV

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,004 posts
  • Location:The Netherlands

Posted 12 March 2012 - 05:45 PM

As mentioned, look at trail hikers websites. I use it for mountainbiking. Lots of info there.

One of my favourites: http://www.trailcook...-tuna-spaghetti

#38 Evo

Evo

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,961 posts
  • Location:a park by the sea

Posted 12 March 2012 - 07:34 PM

My own interest is NOT for the BDA race, but for a rather longer time away from stores.


is it a race though? what sort of storage is available? is there refrigeration and/or a freezer?

answers may vary by need. One thing may work because the options are limited enough to exclude others.

eg: Putting things in glass jars would be very time consuming, heavy and an addition to danger....not really a race option.

#39 Sarimanok

Sarimanok

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 27 posts

Posted 13 March 2012 - 01:45 AM

real turmat from norway is what i ate around the world after trying lots of different ones. It is what the norweigan military eats, and that is where it is made. All the flavors are good.


+1

The Cod and potato casserole is really quite good and I'm known to be diffcult

#40 Zonker

Zonker

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,143 posts
  • Location:Canada

Posted 13 March 2012 - 12:49 PM

Somewhere out there in internet land is a guy who compares all the MRE (meals, ready to eat) i.e. army rations of the various armies in the world. While the US has Skittles in theirs, the French have little tins of pate. Guess whose are more appetizing :). But you can buy MREs in various forms online (like 70 entrees for $200). Not nearly as light as freeze dried but interesting variety and much cheaper.

Back to other long life food suggestions:

- UK "Surprise" brand freeze dried peas. Used to get them in grocery stores in Canada. Excellent for adding to dishes to give them a bit of fresh veggie flavour.

- in Panama years ago we came across boil in the bag chicken tamales. About $0.50 a serving so we bought a case of 50. Even came wrapped in banana leaves inside the foil pouches! But after eating them for months for lunches the lesson became clear too much greasy tamale meals become dull after a while

- 2nd Laendjager sausages. Used to take them hiking all the time. Tasty and slice up into stews if you don't eat at lunch

- Check out the Mormons. You can find freeze dried foods in #10 cans which are much cheaper than buying individual packs. Not meals but freeze dried fruits and veggies and <shudder> powdered eggs. OK you can use the fake eggs for baking

- instant cheesy au grautin/scalloped potatoes. Add milk and butter and throw in the oven. Satisfying on a colder day at sea.

- instant mashed potatoes. For when it's too rough for scalloped ones.

I've also oven dried cooked ground beef. Cook very lean ground beef, and then oven dry like beef jerky. Keeps about 1 month in moderate climates. Add to pasta sauces etc. Not sure about hot climates but you're not a fan

I've also done oven dried beef jerky. Flank steak, cut very thin, marinade in teriyaki sauce, bake in low oven on cookie sheet, turning every hour or so. About 4-6 hours in the oven. Don't eat it all. Store in ziplock bags for a month or more

#41 Estar

Estar

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,470 posts

Posted 13 March 2012 - 02:00 PM


My own interest is NOT for the BDA race, but for a rather longer time away from stores.


is it a race though? what sort of storage is available? is there refrigeration and/or a freezer?

answers may vary by need. One thing may work because the options are limited enough to exclude others.

eg: Putting things in glass jars would be very time consuming, heavy and an addition to danger....not really a race option.


Evo, we do extended high latitude cruising.

There is decent stowage, but when you are talking about 4-6 months every space gets used up. There is no fridge, but the bilge is quite cold. We do the glass jar/pressure cooker thing, but I am looking for better/additional alternatives. Normally we are provisioning in third world ports and they just have what they have, but right now are in shopping mall/internet/fedex land and I thought to take advantage of whatever was best.

#42 MR.CLEAN

MR.CLEAN

    Anarchist

  • Reporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,498 posts
  • Location:Everywhere you want to be
  • Interests:.

Posted 13 March 2012 - 02:24 PM


If you're still interested in this stuff, I'd read up on what the French ocean racers are doing.


You already heard it from an adopted French ocean racer.

real turmat from norway is what i ate around the world after trying lots of different ones. It is what the norweigan military eats, and that is where it is made. All the flavors are good.



#43 MR.CLEAN

MR.CLEAN

    Anarchist

  • Reporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,498 posts
  • Location:Everywhere you want to be
  • Interests:.

Posted 13 March 2012 - 02:43 PM

Just sent an email to BP5 team, will have their choice shortly.

#44 seaker

seaker

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 114 posts
  • Location:Maine

Posted 13 March 2012 - 08:12 PM

FWIW, Matt Rutherford who is sailing in a 27 foot boat non stop around north and south America is sponsored by a company called Shelf Reliance. Looking at there web site their food comes in #10 cans. According to the thread on SA they provided all his food . http://www.shelfreliance.com/
http://www.solotheamericas.org/

#45 kokopelli

kokopelli

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 613 posts

Posted 14 March 2012 - 07:59 PM

I just found out that COSCO sells 10-pack variety packs of Mountain House freeze dried food. Flavors are Beef Strogenoff, Lasagna, Beef Stew and Chicken Teriyaki. All decent flavors.

Cost for 10-pack was $42 which seemed OK.

#46 Jonathan Green

Jonathan Green

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 258 posts
  • Location:New England
  • Interests:US East coast single & double handed distance racing

Posted 14 March 2012 - 08:49 PM

I just found out that COSCO sells 10-pack variety packs of Mountain House freeze dried food. Flavors are Beef Strogenoff, Lasagna, Beef Stew and Chicken Teriyaki. All decent flavors.

Cost for 10-pack was $42 which seemed OK.


Indeed, that price sounds great. I just bought a bunch Mountain House stuff from REI and paid $6-$6.50 per item.

#47 billgow

billgow

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 130 posts
  • Location:Flagstaff, AZ

Posted 14 March 2012 - 08:57 PM

[Estar]
There is decent stowage, but when you are talking about 4-6 months every space gets used up. There is no fridge, but the bilge is quite cold. We do the glass jar/pressure cooker thing, but I am looking for better/additional alternatives. Normally we are provisioning in third world ports and they just have what they have, but right now are in shopping mall/internet/fedex land and I thought to take advantage of whatever was best.


Maybe we're on the wrong track. If you have the space and make your own water, would it make sense to just buy store bought food in bulk and repackage it into smaller containers? I'm thinking along the lines of staples like wheat, flour, white rice, sugar, spices, beans, rolled oats, pasta, potato flakes, dehydrated or freeze dried fruit & vegies, non-fat powdered milk, etc. and packaged foods like peanut butter, jams, powdered soups, cereals, candy, power bars, powdered fruit juices, etc. These things are all easy to find at your local grocery store. Anything powdered is a candidate. The dehydrated and freeze dried meats I've run into aren't worth the money. They just don't taste enough like the real thing to bother. The only thing that works for me is smoking and jerking at home. I've kept jerked meats in seal-a-meal bags in my pack for months with no problems. If you use mylar bags and vacuum seal, they should easily last you several months. Dried foods sealed up this way should last years. Food in mylar bags can be jammed into just about every nook and cranny in the boat. There are a multitude of ways to seal them but I'd think seriously about a sealer that also vacuums the air out.

LEARN TO FISH! I don't mean pulling a cedar plug and crossing your fingers. Find someone who understands how to catch fish and Shanghai hm/her. There's fish out there, learn how to get them in the pot. It might make better sense to alter course so you're cruising over structure than taking the rhumb line. It might take a little longer but you'll arrive in port a little fatter. Sailors are notorious for not taking fishing seriously. Get some basic gear that you can count on and keep it up so it works. If you get a good fish on the line, don't risk loosing it, heave to and get that thing in the boat.

Be sure to try these foods before you shove off. It would suck to be 1000 miles from your nearest port and find out you either hate this stuff or can't make it into anything that resembles food. I have enough bad luck in my life, I don't need you sticking needles in a voodoo doll in my likeness... ;)


#48 bbr

bbr

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 125 posts

Posted 15 March 2012 - 12:00 AM

I'd be looking for something flatulence-free, does any such thing exist? Posted Image


The secret to making freeze-dried food *almost* flatulence-free is to soak it a long time... If the directions say to soak it for an hour then you should soak it for 3-4 hours before heating it up... The flatulence comes from the "food" not being totally hydrated properly and going off in your gut...

Also bring lots of Tabasco and garlic to spice it up with...

#49 Ultraman

Ultraman

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 402 posts
  • Location:Vancouver

Posted 15 March 2012 - 04:31 PM

I just found out that COSCO sells 10-pack variety packs of Mountain House freeze dried food. Flavors are Beef Strogenoff, Lasagna, Beef Stew and Chicken Teriyaki. All decent flavors.

Cost for 10-pack was $42 which seemed OK.

Costco.com has this mother load of Mountain House freeze dried food on their site for $400. Could keep one man fed (and farting away) for a month!

Breakfast Entrees
16 pouches of Granola with Blueberries (8.0 oz. Each Prepared)
12 pouches of Scrambled Eggs with Bacon (8.0 oz Each Prepared)

Lunch Entrees
4 pouches of Rice & Chicken (16 oz. Each Prepared)
4 pouches of Beef Stroganoff (16 oz. Each Prepared)
4 pouches of Pasta Primavera (16 oz. Each Prepared)
4 pouches of Beef Stew (16 oz. Each Prepared)
4 pouches of Chili Mac with Beef (16 oz. Each Prepared)
8 pouches of Spaghetti with Meat (16 oz. Each Prepared)

Dinner Entrees
4 pouches of Noodles & Chicken (20 oz. Each Prepared)
4 pouches of Chicken Stew (20 oz. Each Prepared)
4 pouches of Sweet & Sour Pork with Rice (20 oz. Each Prepared)
4 pouches of Mexican Chicken with Rice (20 oz. Each Prepared)
4 pouches of Lasagna with Meat (20 oz. Each Prepared)
4 pouches of Turkey Tetrazzini (20 oz. Each Prepared)
4 pouches of Mac & Cheese (20 oz. Each Prepared)
12 pouches of Green Peas (8 oz. Each Prepared)
16 pouches of Corn (8 oz. Each Prepared)

#50 Ultraman

Ultraman

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 402 posts
  • Location:Vancouver

Posted 15 March 2012 - 04:36 PM

Costco.com even appears to have the Reid Stowe Special available for $5800 that could keep him going for 2 years! No Parmesan Cheese though...

7 Cases/42 Cans of Granola with Blueberries and Milk (20 Servings per Can/840 Total Servings)
3 Cases/18 Cans of Scrambled Eggs with Bacon (16 Servings per Can/288 Total Servings)
6 Cases/36 Cans of Breakfast Skillet (10 Servings per Can/360 Total Servings
3 Cases/18 Cans of Bananas, Sliced (20 Servings per Can/360 Total Servings)
2 Cases/12 Cans of Strawberries, Sliced (16 Servings per Can/192 Total Servings)
3 Cases/18 Cans of Apple, Dices (33 Servings per Can/594 Total Servings)
2 Cases/12 Cans of Apple, Dices with Cinnamon (33 Servings per Can/396 Total Servings)
4 Cases/24 Cans of Garden Green Peas (23 Servings per Can/552 Total Servings)
4 Cases/24 Cans of Green Beans (20 Servings per Can/480 Total Servings)
4 Cases/24 Cans of Golden Sweet Corn (22 Servings per Can/528 Total Servings)
5 Cases/30 Cans of Spaghetti with Meat Sauce (10 Servings per Can/300 Total Servings)
4 Cases/24 Cans of Chili Mac with Beef (10 Servings per Can/240 Total Servings)
6 Cases/36 Cans of Chicken a la King (11 Servings per Can/396 Total Servings)
5 Cases/30 Cans of Chicken Teriyaki with Rice (10 Servings per Can/300 Total Servings)
5 Cases/30 Cans of Macaroni and Cheese (9 Servings per Can/270 Total Servings)

#51 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 18 March 2012 - 09:34 PM

I'm now getting direct marketing for FD food via PM by a newbie - is anyone else getting that?

#52 billgow

billgow

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 130 posts
  • Location:Flagstaff, AZ

Posted 18 March 2012 - 10:20 PM

I'm now getting direct marketing for FD food via PM by a newbie - is anyone else getting that?


Yup. me too.

Did you give him the traditional welcome? :rolleyes:

#53 Left Hook

Left Hook

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,318 posts

Posted 19 March 2012 - 02:13 AM

I politely told him to FOAD. Gotta give them credit though, most spammers wouldn't think to send PMs.

#54 Ozee Adventure

Ozee Adventure

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,541 posts

Posted 19 March 2012 - 06:54 AM


I'm now getting direct marketing for FD food via PM by a newbie - is anyone else getting that?


Yup. me too.

Did you give him the traditional welcome? :rolleyes:

I don't usually do that to other women!

#55 Estar

Estar

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,470 posts

Posted 19 March 2012 - 08:33 PM

Thanks everyone. I just ordered a whole range of stuff in small sizes to taste test - looks like I will be eating camping food for the next month!

#56 gybe-ho!

gybe-ho!

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Curled up in the lee of Bum Island

Posted 20 March 2012 - 08:15 AM

I politely told him to FOAD. Gotta give them credit though, most spammers wouldn't think to send PMs.


Him's a her, BTW.

#57 Left Hook

Left Hook

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,318 posts

Posted 20 March 2012 - 03:39 PM


I politely told him to FOAD. Gotta give them credit though, most spammers wouldn't think to send PMs.


Him's a her, BTW.


Thanks. Are they selling anything worthwhile?

#58 gybe-ho!

gybe-ho!

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Curled up in the lee of Bum Island

Posted 20 March 2012 - 04:33 PM



I politely told him to FOAD. Gotta give them credit though, most spammers wouldn't think to send PMs.


Him's a her, BTW.


Thanks. Are they selling anything worthwhile?


I have no idea, I'm not in North America so didn't bother to have a look at the site.

#59 pogen

pogen

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,856 posts
  • Location:SF Bay

Posted 20 March 2012 - 04:38 PM


I politely told him to FOAD. Gotta give them credit though, most spammers wouldn't think to send PMs.


Him's a her, BTW.



Christ I can't even get that much action.

#60 essentialfoodstorage02

essentialfoodstorage02

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Location:Provo City, Utah, United States
  • Interests:eating, reading books and so on..

Posted 16 May 2012 - 03:43 AM

I love to eat healthy stuff especially fresh fruits and vegetables!:lol:

But, for being practical, I balanced it with dried foods! don't know what to choose, they all looks tasty! :rolleyes:

Maybe, my problem would be if I have enough money!:P

#61 Panoramix

Panoramix

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Rennes, Brittany, France

Posted 16 May 2012 - 10:25 AM

['Estar']

If you're still interested in this stuff, I'd read up on what the French ocean racers are doing. I remember reading stuff during the Banque Populaire V Jules Verne Trophy race about their choices of food and Thomas Coville mentioned it a lot during his solo effort as well. Thomas was sponsored by Sodebo which is a major food industry. Those guys look at food like almost a religious event. If anyone has an answer to choking down freeze dried food, it's the French.


I seem to remember that some French crew hid a big ham in the mast as their non-French skipper tried to force them to eat inappropriate food on weight saving grounds. When the skipper was asleep they would slice it and share it bit by bit.

I can't remember who it was though, I think it was in the 90's.

Edit: I think it was onboard club med during the race but I am not sure.

#62 gybe-ho!

gybe-ho!

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Curled up in the lee of Bum Island

Posted 16 May 2012 - 03:18 PM


['Estar']

If you're still interested in this stuff, I'd read up on what the French ocean racers are doing. I remember reading stuff during the Banque Populaire V Jules Verne Trophy race about their choices of food and Thomas Coville mentioned it a lot during his solo effort as well. Thomas was sponsored by Sodebo which is a major food industry. Those guys look at food like almost a religious event. If anyone has an answer to choking down freeze dried food, it's the French.


I seem to remember that some French crew hid a big ham in the mast as their non-French skipper tried to force them to eat inappropriate food on weight saving grounds. When the skipper was asleep they would slice it and share it bit by bit.

I can't remember who it was though, I think it was in the 90's.

Edit: I think it was onboard club med during the race but I am not sure.


Yeah, shore crew hid one in the rear beam I think, memory's a bit fuzzy, but definitely Club Med.

#63 Presuming Ed

Presuming Ed

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,037 posts
  • Location:London, UK

Posted 16 May 2012 - 07:55 PM

Up the mast, IIRC.

Yup, here we go:

http://www.latitude3...an22/Jan22.html

http://books.google....m" mast&f=false

#64 gybe-ho!

gybe-ho!

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Curled up in the lee of Bum Island

Posted 17 May 2012 - 06:44 AM

Up the mast, IIRC.

Yup, here we go:

http://www.latitude3...an22/Jan22.html

http://books.google....m" mast&f=false


Well found Ed, apologies Panoramix, my bad...memory's worse than I thought!

#65 Panoramix

Panoramix

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Rennes, Brittany, France

Posted 18 May 2012 - 09:22 PM

Here we go a special topic from Groupama on food:

Offshore food

... apologies Panoramix, my bad...memory's worse than I thought!


There was no offence taken, so no need to apologise!

#66 Te Kooti

Te Kooti

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,436 posts

Posted 19 May 2012 - 04:35 AM


['Estar']

If you're still interested in this stuff, I'd read up on what the French ocean racers are doing. I remember reading stuff during the Banque Populaire V Jules Verne Trophy race about their choices of food and Thomas Coville mentioned it a lot during his solo effort as well. Thomas was sponsored by Sodebo which is a major food industry. Those guys look at food like almost a religious event. If anyone has an answer to choking down freeze dried food, it's the French.


I seem to remember that some French crew hid a big ham in the mast as their non-French skipper tried to force them to eat inappropriate food on weight saving grounds. When the skipper was asleep they would slice it and share it bit by bit.

I can't remember who it was though, I think it was in the 90's.

Edit: I think it was onboard club med during the race but I am not sure.


You mean Dalton's boat - Club Med?

Ham in the mast?

More likely a taniwha.

#67 onimod

onimod

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 993 posts
  • Location:Sydney
  • Interests:Cannot be left blank

Posted 24 May 2012 - 11:59 AM

from Groupama 4:

This evening we have Chilli Con Carne aboard Groupama 4; one of the new dishes bought in the United States. That's not to say that the others were bad, but in this game, variety is our ally. So we left Alicante with the basics and we've renewed the larder several times over during our stopovers with some different dishes. This was particularly true in New Zealand, then most recently in Miami. However, that doesn't take away from the fact that we've been eating freeze-dried food for some seven months, and to tell the truth, we're sick of it. Whatever the dish, there's always a distinctive little aftertaste and that alone erases any notion of enjoyment. Earlier on I heard this rather telling Freudian slip!
"It's good this dish, there's no taste!"

#68 Balder

Balder

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 524 posts
  • Location:Hong Kong (from Bellingham, WA)
  • Interests:Sailing, and currently trying to configure my career to sail more, may be able to pull it off.

Posted 16 June 2012 - 01:56 AM



I'm now getting direct marketing for FD food via PM by a newbie - is anyone else getting that?


Yup. me too.

Did you give him the traditional welcome? :rolleyes:

I don't usually do that to other women!


The sex, or lack thereof, of the newbie or the Anarchist is irrelevant to the delivery of the traditional greeting.

Stand yourself corrected!

#69 K38BOB

K38BOB

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,535 posts
  • Location:Bay Area

Posted 16 June 2012 - 03:15 AM

Up the mast, IIRC.

Yup, here we go:

http://www.latitude3...an22/Jan22.html

http://books.google...... mast&f=false


Stan Honey talked about what it was like to be navigator on a Kiwi boat vs G3...cuisine definitely was one of the differentiators.

#70 essentialfoodstorage02

essentialfoodstorage02

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Location:Provo City, Utah, United States
  • Interests:eating, reading books and so on..

Posted 11 August 2012 - 08:40 AM

Hi buddy, I have a lot of experiences i n freeze dried good. Well some of them taste good but some are not especially those foods stored in the can. Though it is easy to carry especially if you want to go in hiking I can't assure you that the taste will be the same. As well those goods that you only need to add hot or cold water and then you can eat.
But I can assure you that the nutrition is still there because it undergo from different examinations. Hope it will help you.

#71 atwinda

atwinda

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 499 posts

Posted 11 August 2012 - 08:36 PM

Hi buddy, I have a lot of experiences i n freeze dried good. Well some of them taste good but some are not especially those foods stored in the can. Though it is easy to carry especially if you want to go in hiking I can't assure you that the taste will be the same. As well those goods that you only need to add hot or cold water and then you can eat.
But I can assure you that the nutrition is still there because it undergo from different examinations. Hope it will help you.


Holy lack of punctuation batman!

#72 DickDastardly

DickDastardly

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,640 posts
  • Location:Syderney

Posted 16 August 2012 - 10:50 AM

I hear you can feed a whole crew on about 1.5 tons of rice. Don't need freeze dried at all...

#73 ntyaagi

ntyaagi

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 14 September 2012 - 10:23 AM

Southern Franchise Company LLC (Abu Dhabi, U.A.E) - restaurant


Samosa Garden - RESTAURANT , is an Indian restaurant in Abu Zaby, United Arab Emirates

Our Indian food is liked by all and have good reviews.

Please don't forget to review and compare us at anindian.com

About Indian food and restarurants,

http://www.anindian.com/local/southern-franchise-company-llc-abu-dhabi-uae/

#74 Jonathan Green

Jonathan Green

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 258 posts
  • Location:New England
  • Interests:US East coast single & double handed distance racing

Posted 19 September 2012 - 02:03 PM

I use a combination of Mt. House and Backpacker's Pantry - some better than others. Of the ones I've tried, you can see my ratings here.


Updated my list with the new stuff I tried this year.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users